Forte gets applets – Forte Software’s Forte Applications Environment 3.0 development environment – Product Announcement

Forte gets applets – Forte Software’s Forte Applications Environment 3.0 development environment – Product Announcement – Brief Article

Susan Mael

Forte Software’s on a roll. The Oakland, Calif.-based firm grew its revenue more than 200% in 1995, and raised $35 million in its March 1996 IPO. Now the company has announced significant upgrades to its high-end development environment to target the hot Internet market. Release 3 of the Forte Application Environment is scheduled for beta this quarter and general availability in Q2/97.

The new version adds Forte Applets, small blocks of Forte code that can be downloaded from a server to perform tasks such as automatically updating client versions of applications. The applets can also be run from Internet browsers and can support new object definitions and requests such as changing phone numbers to include extensions.

Key to the new release, says Ed Horst, Forte’s senior director of product marketing, is its ability to integrate with Java and other Corba 2.0-compliant products as part of Forte’s strategy for delivering high-end Internet applications. This allows Forte services to be called from a Java applet, giving the applet access to business services. The development environment will also support Visigenic’s VisiBroker for Java for IIOP and Forte Server interoperability, and allow ActiveX controls to be embedded in applications for access to ActiveX component libraries.

In addition to the Java and ActiveX integration, Forte is extending its support for legacy integration through an agreement with Conextions Inc. of North Andover, Mass., to provide the Forte Developer’s Toolkit for Enterprise Access Server. Conextions’ Enterprise Access Server gives systems administrators a single point for network management and supports multiple, concurrent links to IBM mainframe, AS/400, ASCII and Tandem hosts. The toolkit allows developers to access the legacy data as if it were native Forte objects without additional coding.

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