Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted: Section I: law enforcement officers killed

Section I: law enforcement officers killed

Section I–Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed

Methodology

Section I contains statistics on felonious and accidental deaths of duly sworn local, state, and federal law enforcement officers meeting the following criteria: they are working in an official capacity, they have full arrest powers, they wear a badge (ordinarily), they carry a firearm (ordinarily), and they are paid from governmental funds set aside specifically for payment of sworn law enforcement representatives.

The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program collects data on officers’ deaths from several sources. First, local and state law enforcement agencies participating in the UCR Program notify the national Program of duty-related deaths. Contributors submit preliminary data about any officer killed in the line of duty within their jurisdictions. In addition, FBI field divisions and legal attache offices report such incidents occurring in the United States and its territories, as well as those incidents in which a United States law enforcement officer dies while assigned to duties in another country. Finally, the Bureau of Justice Assistance, administrator of the Public Safety Officers’ Benefits Program, maintains contact throughout the year, supplying the national UCR Program with information regarding officers whose survivors have received benefits. This threefold reporting procedure ensures the validity and completeness of the data.

When the national Program receives notification of a line-of-duty death, the staff sends inquiries through FBI field divisions to the victim officer’s employing agency to obtain additional details concerning the circumstances surrounding the incident. Additionally, the national staff furnish the agency with information concerning two federal programs that provide benefits to survivors of federal and nonfederal law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty. The national Program staff also obtain pertinent criminal history data from the FBI’s Interstate Identification Index concerning individuals identified in connection with felonious killings.

The number of officers killed on September 11, 2001, are not included in this publication. Because of the unique nature of the data from this singular event, including these extreme values in rate or trend data would skew data measurements in the UCR Program’s analysis.

Overview

During 2002, a total of 56 law enforcement officers were feloniously killed in 26 states and the United States Territory of Puerto Rico. City police departments employed 27 of the fallen officers; county police and sheriff’s offices employed 19 officers; state agencies employed 4 of the victims; and federal agencies employed 2. Puerto Rico employed 4 of the victim officers, all of whom were city law enforcement officers. (See Table 27.) Fifty-three separate incidents, one of which occurred in 1993, a second which occurred in 1999, and a third which occurred in 2000, claimed the lives of the 56 officers in 2002. Forty-seven of these incidents were cleared by arrests or by exceptional means.

The 56 officers slain in 2002 were 14 fewer than the 70 fatalities in 2001. Five- and 10-year comparisons show that the number of officers killed in 2002 were 5 fewer than the 61 officers murdered in 1998 and 14 fewer than the 70 officers feloniously slain in 1993. (Based on Table 1.)

Victims

The average age of the 56 law enforcement officers feloniously killed in 2002 was 37. One officer was under the age of 25, and 11 were 25 to 30 years of age. Twenty-eight victim officers were 31 to 40 years old, and 16 were over 40 years in age. (See Table 5.) Forty-eight of the slain officers were male, and 8 were female. Fifty-one officers were white, 4 were black, and 1 was Asian/Pacific Islander. (See Table 6.)

On average, officers feloniously killed in 2002 had 10 years of service. Twelve officers had 1 to 4 years of service, 20 officers had 5 to 10 years of experience, and 23 officers had served over 10 years in law enforcement. Law enforcement experience was not Reported for 1 victim. (See Table 7.)

Circumstances Surrounding Deaths

The data collected on the circumstances surrounding officers’ deaths in 2002 revealed that 15 were slain in ambush situations, 10 were killed during traffic pursuits or stops, and 10 were killed during arrest situations. A further breakdown of the arrest situations showed that 4 officers were killed by robbery suspects, 3 were involved in drug-related matters, and 3 officers were attempting other arrests. Nine law enforcement officers were slain while answering disturbance calls, 5 of which involved family quarrels and 4 of which involved bar fights, person with firearm, etc. Eight officers were investigating suspicious persons or circumstances at the time of their deaths, and 4 officers were slain by mentally deranged assailants. (See Table 20.)

From 1993 through 2002, 32.2 percent of the officers feloniously killed were involved in arrest situations (burglary or robbery investigations, drug-related matters, etc.), 16.5 percent were investigating suspicious persons or circumstances, and 15.4 percent were responding to disturbance calls. Additionally, 15.3 percent of the fallen officers were involved in traffic pursuits or stops, and 15.1 percent were killed in ambush situations. Data also showed that 3.1 percent of the victim officers were slain while handling, transporting, or maintaining custody of prisoners, and 2.4 percent of the officers were killed by mentally deranged assailants. (Based on Table 18.)

Types of Assignment

In 2002, 38 of the 56 slain officers were assigned to vehicle patrol. Of these, 32 officers were assigned to one-officer vehicles and 6 were assigned to two-officer vehicles. At the time of the incidents, 1 officer was alone and on foot patrol. Twelve victim officers were assigned to other duties (undercover, special assignments, etc.), and of these, 2 were alone and unassisted. Five officers were off duty but acting in an official capacity when killed. (See Table 22.)

In the 10-year period, 1993 through 2002, most of the victim officers, 63.5 percent, were assigned to vehicle patrol at the time of the felonious incidents that led to their deaths. Data also showed that 20.9 percent of the fallen officers were performing other duties (special assignments, detective work, undercover assignments, etc.) when slain. During the decade, 13.2 percent of the total victim officers were acting in an official capacity though off duty at the time of their fatal incidents. Data collected regarding the officers’ assignments also revealed that during the 10-year period, 46.8 percent of the 404 vehicle patrol officers were alone and unassisted when they were killed, 8 of the 15 (53.3 percent) foot patrol officers were alone and unassisted, and 27.8 percent of the 133 victim officers who were performing other types of assignments were alone and unassisted. (Based on Table 24.)

Weapons

Weapons data reported to the national Program in 2002 showed that firearms were used in 51 of the 56 officer murders. Handguns were used in 38 of the killings, and 11 of these were committed using 9 mm handguns. Rifles were used in 10 officer slayings, and shotguns were used in 3 of the murders. In addition to those victims killed by firearms, 4 officers were intentionally struck by vehicles, and 1 officer was stabbed to death with a knife. (See Tables 26, 27, and 32.)

From 1993 through 2002, 636 officers were killed in the line of duty. Of that number, 591 officers were killed with firearms, and 443 of those victims were killed with handguns. In addition, 9 officers were killed with bombs, 8 officers with knives or other cutting instruments, 3 with personal weapons (hands, fists, feet, etc.), and 25 officers were murdered with other weapons (vehicles, blunt objects, etc.). During that same 10-year period, 46 of the officers killed with firearms were slain with their own weapons. (See Tables 14 and 26.) Furthermore, during that 10-year period, 136 of the 636 officers feloniously killed fired their service weapons during the incident. In addition, assailants stole the service weapons from 97 of the victim officers. (See Tables 12 and 13.)

Among the 51 officers who were killed by firearms in 2002, 25 victim officers were within 5 feet and 9 were within 6 to 10 feet of their attackers. Eight officers were within 11 to 20 feet of their assailants, 3 officers were within 21 to 50 feet, and 4 victims were over 50 feet from their attackers. The distance between victim and attacker was not provided for 2 officers. (See Table 33.)

Body Armor

In 2002, 34 of the 51 officers killed in the line of duty by a firearm were wearing body armor at the time of their deaths. Twenty-one of the officers who were wearing body armor died as a result of head wounds, 11 died from wounds to the upper torso, and 2 received fatal wounds below the waist. (See Table 35.) Of the 11 victims with upper torso injuries, 3 died as a result of bullets entering through the armhole or shoulder area of the vest, 3 died when bullets entered above the vest, and 3 were struck below the protective vest. One officer died from a bullet that entered between the side panels of the vest, and 1 officer died as a result of a .30-30 caliber bullet penetrating the body armor. (See Tables 36 and 37.)

Places

Regionally, 25 of the 56 felonious deaths reported to the national Program in 2002 occurred in the South. Twelve line-of-duty deaths occurred in the Midwest, 9 in the West, and 5 in the Northeast. Five victim officers were killed in the U.S. Territory of Puerto Rico.

For the 10-year period between 1993 and 2002, the South experienced 278 officer deaths; the West, 130 officer slayings; the Midwest, 116 murders; and the Northeast, 63 slain officers. Forty-nine officers were slain in the U.S. Territories during this 10-year period. (See Table 1.)

Times

In 2002, the greatest number of officers, 9, were killed in incidents that occurred between 8:01 p.m. and 10 p.m. Eight officers were killed in incidents that occurred between the hours of 4:01 p.m. and 6 p.m. One officer was killed between the hours 4:01 a.m. and 6 a.m., the time in which the fewest number of officers were killed.

During the past decade, the majority, 14.5 percent, of officers feloniously killed in the line of duty were attacked between 8:01 p.m. and 10 p.m. The fewest, 3.8 percent, were feloniously assaulted between 6:01 a.m. and 8 a.m. (Based on Table 2.)

A breakdown of 2002 data by day of the week showed that more officers, 11 of the 56 officers feloniously killed, received fatal injuries on Monday than on any other day of the week. The fewest number of officers, 6, were fatally attacked on Wednesday. During the 10-year span 1993 through 2002, the majority of officers, 110, were attacked on Friday. For the same 10-year period, Sunday was the least likely day for a felonious attack (69 fatal attacks). (See Table 3.)

A review of the 2002 data by month revealed that August was the month in which the greatest number of officers, 9, were killed, followed by January and November in which 8 officers were feloniously killed in each month. The fewest number of officers, 1, were feloniously killed in June. In the 10-year period, 1993 through 2002, more officers, 63, were killed in August than in any other month. The fewest number of officers, 42, were feloniously killed in June. (See Table 4.)

Alleged Assailants

The 56 officers who were killed in 2002 lost their lives in 53 separate incidents. Sixty-one assailants were identified in connection with those incidents. Of the 61 identified suspects, 45 were arrested, 8 were justifiably killed by persons other than the victim officer, and 4 of the assailants committed suicide. Three assailants were justifiably killed by the victim officer, and 1 assailant remains at large at the time of publication. Seven offenders remain unidentified.

Of the 61 identified suspects, 59 were male and 2 were female. Regarding the race of the assailants, 37 were white and 24 were black. The average age of the assailants was 32 years. Two of the assailants were under 18 years of age, 24 were 18 to 24 years of age, 10 were 25 to 30 years of age, 12 were 31 to 40 years of age, and 13 were over the age of 40. (See Tables 38 and 39.)

For 2002, a review of the criminal histories of the 61 known assailants revealed that 48 had prior criminal arrests, 36 had been convicted on a prior criminal charge, and 18 of the suspects had been previously arrested for a violent crime. Two assailants had prior arrests for murder. Thirty-one of the suspects had received parole or probation for prior criminal charges, 28 had prior arrests for drug law violations, 19 had been arrested for weapons violations, and 10 assailants had prior arrests for assaulting an officer or resisting arrest. (See Table 42.)

Table 1

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Region, Geographic Division, and State, 1993-2002

Area Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 636 70 80 74 61 71

NORTHEAST 63 9 12 8 10 8

New England 14 1 6 1 0 3

Connecticut 1 0 0 0 0 0

Maine 0 0 0 0 0 0

Massachusetts 8 1 4 1 0 0

New Hampshire 4 0 1 0 0 3

Rhode Island 1 0 1 0 0 0

Vermont 0 0 0 0 0 0

Middle Atlantic 49 8 6 7 10 5

New Jersey 11 1 2 3 0 2

New York 22 3 3 2 6 3

Pennsylvania 16 4 1 2 4 0

MIDWEST 116 11 16 8 15 11

East North Central 85 8 11 5 10 9

Illinois 19 1 1 2 2 1

Indiana 16 4 1 0 0 4

Michigan 17 1 3 1 1 0

Ohio 21 2 2 1 5 4

Wisconsin 12 0 4 1 2 0

West North Central 31 3 5 3 5 2

Iowa 0 0 0 0 0 0

Kansas 8 0 0 2 1 1

Minnesota 8 1 2 0 2 1

Missouri 11 0 3 0 1 0

Nebraska 2 1 0 1 0 0

North Dakota 2 1 0 0 1 0

South Dakota 0 0 0 0 0 0

SOUTH 278 31 24 32 24 32

South Atlantic 128 14 14 10 11 14

Delaware 0 0 0 0 0 0

District of Columbia 13 2 3 2 0 3

Florida 18 3 0 2 4 1

Georgia 27 1 3 2 3 2

Maryland 13 1 0 2 0 1

North Carolina 26 4 2 2 2 5

South Carolina 16 1 1 0 2 2

Virginia 12 1 5 0 0 0

West Virginia 3 1 0 0 0 0

East South Central 55 3 7 6 3 11

Alabama 13 1 3 2 1 2

Kentucky 8 1 0 0 0 1

Mississippi 18 1 3 1 0 5

Tennessee 16 0 1 3 2 3

West South Central 95 14 3 16 10 7

Arkansas 11 1 0 3 1 3

Louisiana 17 4 0 3 4 1

Oklahoma 13 1 0 8 1 0

Texas 54 8 3 2 4 3

WEST 130 11 19 23 6 15

Mountain 49 3 8 11 1 5

Arizona 17 1 1 5 1 1

Colorado 8 0 2 3 0 1

Idaho 5 0 1 0 0 1

Montana 1 0 1 0 0 0

Nevada 6 1 0 2 0 1

New Mexico 6 0 2 0 0 1

Utah 5 1 1 0 0 0

Wyoming 1 0 0 1 0 0

Pacific 81 8 11 12 5 10

Alaska 6 0 0 0 1 1

California 62 8 9 11 4 7

Hawaii 1 0 0 0 0 0

Oregon 3 0 0 0 0 1

Washington 9 0 2 1 0 1

U.S. TERRITORIES 49 8 9 3 6 5

American Samoa 0 0 0 0 0 0

Guam 0 0 0 0 0 0

Mariana Islands 1 0 0 1 0 0

Puerto Rico 48 8 9 2 6 5

U.S. Virgin Islands 0 0 0 0 0 0

Area 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 61 42 51 70 56

NORTHEAST 3 5 0 3 5

New England 0 2 0 0 1

Connecticut 0 1 0 0 0

Maine 0 0 0 0 0

Massachusetts 0 1 0 0 1

New Hampshire 0 0 0 0 0

Rhode Island 0 0 0 0 0

Vermont 0 0 0 0 0

Middle Atlantic 3 3 0 3 4

New Jersey 0 2 0 1 0

New York 3 0 0 0 2

Pennsylvania 0 1 0 2 2

MIDWEST 10 6 13 14 12

East North Central 8 4 8 12 10

Illinois 1 2 1 6 2

Indiana 2 1 2 2 0

Michigan 2 1 2 3 3

Ohio 1 0 2 1 3

Wisconsin 2 0 1 0 2

West North Central 2 2 5 2 2

Iowa 0 0 0 0 0

Kansas 1 1 1 1 0

Minnesota 0 0 1 0 1

Missouri 1 1 3 1 1

Nebraska 0 0 0 0 0

North Dakota 0 0 0 0 0

South Dakota 0 0 0 0 0

SOUTH 29 20 32 29 25

South Atlantic 16 10 15 13 11

Delaware 0 0 0 0 0

District of Columbia 2 0 0 1 0

Florida 5 0 1 1 1

Georgia 2 5 6 2 1

Maryland 0 0 3 3 3

North Carolina 2 3 2 4 0

South Carolina 1 1 2 1 5

Virginia 3 1 0 1 1

West Virginia 1 0 1 0 0

East South Central 7 3 3 6 6

Alabama 2 0 0 0 2

Kentucky 2 1 0 2 1

Mississippi 3 1 0 3 1

Tennessee 0 1 3 1 2

West South Central 6 7 14 10 8

Arkansas 1 0 1 0 1

Louisiana 0 0 3 0 2

Oklahoma 0 2 0 1 0

Texas 5 5 10 9 5

WEST 14 11 4 18 9

Mountain 4 4 1 9 3

Arizona 1 3 1 1 2

Colorado 1 0 0 1 0

Idaho 1 0 0 2 0

Montana 0 0 0 0 0

Nevada 1 0 0 1 0

New Mexico 0 1 0 2 0

Utah 0 0 0 2 1

Wyoming 0 0 0 0 0

Pacific 10 7 3 9 6

Alaska 1 1 0 2 0

California 7 4 2 6 4

Hawaii 0 1 0 0 0

Oregon 1 0 0 0 1

Washington 1 1 1 1 1

U.S. TERRITORIES 5 0 2 6 5

American Samoa 0 0 0 0 0

Guam 0 0 0 0 0

Mariana Islands 0 0 0 0 0

Puerto Rico 5 0 2 6 5

U.S. Virgin Islands 0 0 0 0 0

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 2

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Time of Day, 1993-2002

Time Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 636 70 80 74 61 71

A.M.

12:01 – 2 77 13 9 9 7 7

2:01 – 4 46 5 8 5 5 5

4:01 – 6 29 2 7 6 0 6

6:01 – 8 24 0 3 3 3 1

8:01 – 10 46 6 5 11 4 4

10:01 – Noon 39 3 8 2 3 3

P.M.

12:01 – 2 51 5 3 2 5 14

2:01 – 4 53 4 9 7 3 6

4:01 – 6 48 3 6 4 7 5

6:01 – 8 48 4 9 2 4 2

8:01 – 10 92 8 7 11 10 8

10:01 – Midnight 80 17 6 12 7 10

Time not reported 3 0 0 0 3 0

Time 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 61 42 51 70 56

A.M.

12:01 – 2 7 5 10 6 4

2:01 – 4 2 2 2 6 6

4:01 – 6 0 1 1 5 1

6:01 – 8 6 1 1 4 2

8:01 – 10 5 3 0 4 4

10:01 – Noon 5 4 4 5 2

P.M.

12:01 – 2 5 3 6 3 5

2:01 – 4 6 5 7 2 4

4:01 – 6 4 5 4 2 8

6:01 – 8 2 2 5 12 6

8:01 – 10 10 8 7 14 9

10:01 – Midnight 9 3 4 7 5

Time not reported 0 0 0 0 0

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 3

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Day of Week, 1993-2002

Day Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 636 70 80 74 61 71

Sunday 69 10 8 7 5 9

Monday 81 7 12 11 7 6

Tuesday 97 8 18 12 7 7

Wednesday 102 14 10 17 6 15

Thursday 94 13 7 10 12 11

Friday 110 10 18 9 12 13

Saturday 83 8 7 8 12 10

Day 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 61 42 51 70 56

Sunday 5 4 6 8 7

Monday 7 3 11 6 11

Tuesday 16 6 3 12 8

Wednesday 11 5 7 11 6

Thursday 7 7 9 10 8

Friday 10 9 7 14 8

Saturday 5 8 8 9 8

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 4

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Month, 1993-2002

Month Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 636 70 80 74 61 71

January 58 3 6 4 11 6

February 53 12 10 3 3 8

March 54 6 4 5 7 6

April 58 4 5 20 1 9

May 52 4 5 7 6 5

June 42 6 8 2 2 1

July 54 6 2 5 9 4

August 63 6 8 9 2 9

September 50 0 10 6 7 7

October 59 10 5 7 7 8

November 44 4 9 3 2 4

December 49 9 8 3 4 4

Month 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 61 42 51 70 56

January 9 4 4 3 8

February 1 3 3 7 3

March 3 6 6 7 4

April 4 5 3 3 4

May 9 3 2 6 5

June 7 3 6 6 1

July 7 3 5 8 5

August 6 1 4 9 9

September 4 1 4 7 4

October 2 9 6 3 2

November 5 1 2 6 8

December 4 3 6 5 3

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 5

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Profile of Victim Officers, Age Groups, 1993-2002

Victim officers Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 636 70 80 74 61 71

Age

Under 25 years 42 4 8 6 3 1

25 – 30 years 173 26 20 19 20 20

31 – 40 years 234 23 30 18 22 26

Over 40 years 183 16 22 31 13 24

Age not reported 4 1 0 0 3 0

Average years of age 36 34 36 38 35 37

Victim officers 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 61 42 51 70 56

Age

Under 25 years 7 1 5 6 1

25 – 30 years 18 10 12 17 11

31 – 40 years 17 23 19 28 28

Over 40 years 19 8 15 19 16

Age not reported 0 0 0 0 0

Average years of age 35 36 37 37 37

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 6

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Profile of Victim Officers, Race and Sex, 1993-2002

Victim officers Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 636 70 80 74 61 71

Race

White 536 60 67 62 47 57

Black 84 10 12 9 9 11

Asian/Pacific Islander 9 0 1 2 2 2

American Indian/Alaskan 5 0 0 1 1 1

Native

Race not reported 2 0 0 0 2 0

Sex

Male 605 66 77 73 59 71

Female 31 4 3 1 2 0

Victim officers 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 61 42 51 70 56

Race

White 53 37 40 62 51

Black 7 3 11 8 4

Asian/Pacific Islander 1 0 0 0 1

American Indian/Alaskan 0 2 0 0 0

Native

Race not reported 0 0 0 0 0

Sex

Male 55 39 50 67 48

Female 6 3 1 3 8

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 7

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Profile of Victim Officers, Years of Services, 1993-2002

Victim officers Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 636 70 80 74 61 71

Years of service

Less than 1 year 32 2 8 9 2 4

1 – 4 years 168 24 16 15 23 11

5 – 10 years 198 17 26 20 18 34

Over 10 years 226 24 29 30 14 20

Years of service not 12 3 1 0 4 2

reported

Average years of service 10 9 9 11 10

Victim officers 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 61 42 51 70 56

Years of service

Less than 1 year 2 1 3 1 0

1 – 4 years 20 11 17 19 12

5 – 10 years 16 16 11 20 20

Over 10 years 22 14 20 30 23

Years of service not 1 0 0 0 1

reported

Average years of service 10 9 9 11 10

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of

September 11, 2001, are not included in this table.

Table 8

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Profile of Victim Officers, 5–and 10-Year Averages, 1983-2002

5-year averages 10-year averages

1993- 1998- 1993- 1983-

Victim officers 2002 1997 2002 2002 1992

Average

Age (years) 37 36 36 36 36

Service (years) 10 9 10 10 9

Height 5’10” 5’11” 5’11” 5’11” 5’11”

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 9

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Number Wearing Uniform, Body Armor, and Holster, 1993-2002

Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 636 70 80 74 61 71

Number wearing uniform 463 56 48 49 44 51

Wearing body armor

In uniform 308 38 33 30 28 25

Not in uniform 33 1 3 4 4 4

Wearing holster

In uniform 445 51 46 46 44 49

Not in uniform 86 4 12 9 9 12

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 61 42 51 70 56

Number wearing uniform 48 31 41 48 47

Wearing body armor

In uniform 34 24 30 31 35

Not in uniform 1 3 1 10 2

Wearing holster

In uniform 48 29 39 48 45

Not in uniform 9 8 3 15 5

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 10

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed

Type of Holster by Model of Holster, 2002

Type

Holster Total Crossdraw Sidedraw

Total 50 1 45

Model

Strapover 3 0 3

Thumb release 43 1 38

Flaptop 0 0 0

Other 4 0 4

Model not reported 0 0 0

Type

Not

Holster Shoulder Other Reported

Total 0 3 1

Model

Strapover 0 0 0

Thumb release 0 3 1

Flaptop 0 0 0

Other 0 0 0

Model not reported 0 0 0

Table 11

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Type of Holster by Model of Holster, 1993-2002

Type

Holster Total Crossdraw Sidedraw

Total 531 3 512

Model

Strapover 54 1 50

Thumb release 418 2 406

Flaptop 3 0 2

Other 21 0 21

Model not reported 35 0 33

Type

Not

Holster Shoulder Other Reported

Total 4 11 1

Model

Strapover 2 1 0

Thumb release 2 7 1

Flaptop 0 1 0

Other 0 0 0

Model not reported 0 2 0

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 12

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Use of Weapon during Incident, 1993-2002

Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 636 70 80 74 61 71

Fired own weapon 136 13 20 13 13 22

Attempted to use own weapon 103 13 12 12 11 6

Did not use or attempt to 346 44 48 49 26 38

use own weapon

Not reported 51 0 0 0 11 5

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 61 42 51 70 56

Fired own weapon 10 8 13 12 12

Attempted to use own weapon 11 8 4 16 10

Did not use or attempt to 31 20 28 37 25

use own weapon

Not reported 9 6 6 5 9

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 13

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Weapon Stolen by Assailant, 1993-2002

Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 636 70 80 74 61 71

Weapon taken from scene 97 8 13 17 9 12

of incident

Slain with own weapon 32 4 4 5 3 4

Slain with other weapon 65 4 9 12 6 8

Weapon not taken from 539 62 67 57 52 59

scene of incident

Slain with own weapon 14 1 2 1 1 2

Slain with other weapon 525 61 65 56 51 57

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 61 42 51 70 56

Weapon taken from scene 11 6 5 8 8

of incident

Slain with own weapon 2 4 1 2 3

Slain with other weapon 9 2 4 6 5

Weapon not taken from 50 36 46 62 48

scene of incident

Slain with own weapon 4 1 0 1 1

Slain with other weapon 46 35 46 61 47

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 14

Law Enforcement Offices Feloniously Killed by Firearms

Number Slain With Own Weapon By Type of Fireman and Size of Ammunition,

1993-2002

Firearm

Ammunition Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 46 5 6 6 4 6

Handgun 45 5 6 6 4 5

.22 Caliber 2 0 0 0 1 1

.25 Caliber 1 0 0 1 0 0

.357 Magnum 5 1 1 2 0 0

.38 Caliber 5 0 2 1 0 1

.40 Caliber 11 1 0 1 0 0

.44 Magnum 1 0 0 1 0 0

.45 Caliber 5 2 0 0 0 0

9 Millimeter 14 1 3 0 3 3

10 Millimeter 1 0 0 0 0 0

Rifle 1 0 0 0 0 1

7.62×39 Millimeter 1 0 0 0 0 1

Shotgun 0 0 0 0 0 0

Firearm

Ammunition 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 6 5 1 3 4

Handgun 6 5 1 3 4

.22 Caliber 0 0 0 0 0

.25 Caliber 0 0 0 0 0

.357 Magnum 1 0 0 0 0

.38 Caliber 0 1 0 0 0

.40 Caliber 1 1 1 3 3

.44 Magnum 0 0 0 0 0

.45 Caliber 2 0 0 0 1

9 Millimeter 2 2 0 0 0

10 Millimeter 0 1 0 0 0

Rifle 0 0 0 0 0

7.62×39 Millimeter 0 0 0 0 0

Shotgun 0 0 0 0 0

Table 15

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed

Population Group of Victim Officer’s Agency by Type of Assignment, 2002

1-Officer vehicle

2-Officer

Population group Total vehicle Alone Assisted

Total 56 6 17 15

Group I (cities 250,000 6 1 1 1

and over)

Group II (cities

100,000 – 249,999) 6 2 1 2

Group III (cities

50,000 – 99,999) 3 0 2 0

Group IV (cities

25,000 – 99,999) 1 0 0 1

Group V (cities

10,000 – 24,999) 6 0 3 1

Group VI (cities under 5 2 1 2

10,000)

Suburban counties 11 0 6 4

Rural counties 8 0 2 3

State agencies 4 1 1 0

Federal agencies 2 0 0 1

U.S. Territories 4 0 0 0

Foot patrol Other (1)

Population group Alone Assisted Alone Assisted

Total 1 0 2 10

Group I (cities 250,000 0 0 0 2

and over)

Group II (cities

100,000 – 249,999) 0 0 0 0

Group III (cities

50,000 – 99,999) 0 0 0 0

Group IV (cities

25,000 – 99,999) 0 0 0 0

Group V (cities

10,000 – 24,999) 0 0 0 2

Group VI (cities under 0 0 0 0

10,000)

Suburban counties 0 0 0 1

Rural counties 0 0 1 2

State agencies 0 0 0 2

Federal agencies 1 0 0 0

U.S. Territories 0 0 1 1

Population group Off duty

Total 5

Group I (cities 250,000 1

and over)

Group II (cities

100,000 – 249,999) 1

Group III (cities

50,000 – 99,999) 1

Group IV (cities

25,000 – 99,999) 0

Group V (cities

10,000 – 24,999) 0

Group VI (cities under 0

10,000)

Suburban counties 0

Rural counties 0

State agencies 0

Federal agencies 0

U.S. Territories 2

(1) Includes detectives, officers on special assignments, undercover

officers on other types of assignments that are not listed.

Table 16

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed

Type of Assignment by Time of Day, 2002

1-Officer vehicle

2-Officer

Time Total vehicle Alone Assisted

Total 56 6 17 15

A.M.

12:01 – 2 4 0 1 2

2:01 – 4 6 2 1 0

4:01 – 6 1 0 0 0

6:01 – 8 2 0 1 1

8:01 – 10 4 0 2 0

10:01 – Noon 2 0 1 1

P.M.

12:01 – 2 5 0 1 2

2:01 – 4 4 1 1 1

4:01 – 6 8 2 2 4

6:01 – 8 6 0 1 1

8:01 – 10 9 0 4 3

10:01 – Midnight 5 1 2 0

Time not reported 0 0 0 0

Foot patrol Other (1)

Time Alone Assisted Alone Assisted Off duty

Total 1 0 2 10 5

A.M.

12:01 – 2 0 0 0 0 1

2:01 – 4 0 0 0 2 1

4:01 – 6 0 0 0 1 0

6:01 – 8 0 0 0 0 0

8:01 – 10 0 0 1 1 0

10:01 – Noon 0 0 0 0 0

P.M.

12:01 – 2 0 0 0 2 0

2:01 – 4 0 0 0 1 0

4:01 – 6 0 0 0 0 0

6:01 – 8 1 0 1 2 0

8:01 – 10 0 0 0 0 2

10:01 – Midnight 0 0 0 1 1

Time not reported 0 0 0 0 0

(1) Includes detectives, officers on special assignments, undercover

officers, and officers on other types of assignments that are not

listed.

Table 17

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Type of Assignment by Time of Day, 1993-2002

1-Officer vehicle

2-Officer

Time Total vehicle Alone Assisted

Total 636 84 189 131

A.M.

12:01 -2 77 12 25 18

2:01 – 4 46 5 15 6

4:01 – 6 29 1 16 3

6:01 – 8 24 6 7 4

8:01 – 10 46 3 12 9

10:01 – Noon 39 2 16 10

P.M.

12:01 – 2 51 6 14 12

2:01 – 4 53 3 10 14

4:01 – 6 48 5 16 16

6:01 – 8 48 7 11 12

8:01 – 10 92 17 26 17

10:01 – Midnight 80 15 20 10

Time not reported 3 2 1 0

Foot patrol Other (2)

Time Alone Assisted Alone Assisted

Total 8 7 37 96

A.M.

12:01 -2 0 2 3 6

2:01 – 4 0 0 2 6

4:01 – 6 0 0 2 6

6:01 – 8 0 0 2 2

8:01 – 10 0 0 10 10

10:01 – Noon 2 0 2 6

P.M.

12:01 – 2 1 1 5 11

2:01 – 4 1 0 4 12

4:01 – 6 0 0 1 6

6:01 – 8 2 0 2 10

8:01 – 10 2 2 3 7

10:01 – Midnight 0 2 1 14

Time not reported 0 0 0 0

Time Off duty

Total 84

A.M.

12:01 -2 11

2:01 – 4 12

4:01 – 6 1

6:01 – 8 3

8:01 – 10 2

10:01 – Noon 1

P.M.

12:01 – 2 1

2:01 – 4 9

4:01 – 6 4

6:01 – 8 4

8:01 – 10 18

10:01 – Midnight 18

Time not reported 0

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

(2) Includes detectives, officers on special assignments, undercover

officers, and officers on other types of assignments that are not

listed.

Table 18

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Circumstance at Scene of Incident, 1993-2002

Circumstance Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 636 70 80 74 61 71

Disturbance calls 98 10 8 8 4 14

Bar fights, person 41 5 4 2 1 3

with firearm, etc.

Family quarrels 57 5 4 6 3 11

Arrest situations 205 28 34 21 26 22

Burglaries in progress/ 23 1 4 4 3 5

pursuing burglary suspects

Robberies in progress/ 73 9 18 7 12 11

pursuing robbery suspects

Drug-related matters 38 3 4 4 3 1

Attempting other arrests 71 15 8 6 8 5

Civil disorders (mass 0 0 0 0 0 0

disobedience, riot, etc.)

Handling, transporting, 20 1 1 4 0 4

custody of prisoners

Investigating suspicious 105 15 15 17 13 10

persons/circumstances

Ambush situations 96 5 8 14 6 12

Entrapment/premeditation 34 3 1 6 2 5

Unprovoked attacks 62 2 7 8 4 7

Mentally deranged assailants 15 1 4 1 1 1

Traffic pursuits/stops 97 10 10 9 11 8

Circumstance 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 61 42 51 70 56

Disturbance calls 16 7 8 14 9

Bar fights, person 7 6 4 5 4

with firearm, etc.

Family quarrels 9 1 4 9 5

Arrest situations 16 12 12 24 10

Burglaries in progress/ 0 0 3 3 0

pursuing burglary suspects

Robberies in progress/ 3 4 1 4 4

pursuing robbery suspects

Drug-related matters 7 2 3 8 3

Attempting other arrests 6 6 5 9 3

Civil disorders (mass 0 0 0 0 0

disobedience, riot, etc.)

Handling, transporting, 4 2 2 2 0

custody of prisoners

Investigating suspicious 6 7 6 8 8

persons/circumstances

Ambush situations 10 6 10 10 15

Entrapment/premeditation 4 4 2 3 4

Unprovoked attacks 6 2 8 7 11

Mentally deranged assailants 0 0 0 3 4

Traffic pursuits/stops 9 8 13 9 10

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11,

2001, are not included in this table.

Table 19

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed in Traffic Pursuits/Stops

Activity at Scene of Incident, 1993-2002

Activity Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 97 10 10 9 11 8

Contacted radio dispatcher

prior to attack 73 5 8 7 11 7

Activity of victim

Approaching offender(s) 29 4 4 4 2 3

Returning to police unit 2 0 0 0 1 0

Interviewing offender(s)

in police unit 3 1 1 0 0 0

Interviewing offender(s)

at offender’s vehicle 8 1 2 2 1 0

Searching offender(s) 1 0 0 0 0 0

Searching offender’s 1 0 0 0 1 0

vehicle

Making arrest/handcuffing 12 2 0 0 2 3

Engaging in foot pursuit 6 0 1 0 1 1

Engaging in vehicle 2 1 0 0 0 0

pursuit

Other 31 1 2 3 2 1

Activity not reported 2 0 0 0 1 0

Activity 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 9 8 13 9 10

Contacted radio dispatcher

prior to attack 8 6 9 6 6

Activity of victim

Approaching offender(s) 2 2 3 3 2

Returning to police unit 0 0 0 0 1

Interviewing offender(s)

in police unit 0 0 0 0 1

Interviewing offender(s)

at offender’s vehicle 0 0 2 0 0

Searching offender(s) 0 0 0 0 1

Searching offender’s 0 0 0 0 0

vehicle

Making arrest/handcuffing 0 3 1 1 0

Engaging in foot pursuit 0 0 1 0 2

Engaging in vehicle 0 0 0 1 0

pursuit

Other 7 3 5 4 3

Activity not reported 0 0 1 0 0

Table 20

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed

Circumstance at Scene of Incident by Region, 2002

Circumstance Total Northeast Midwest

Total 56 5 12

Disturbance calls 9 0 3

Bar fights, person

with firearm, etc. 4 0 1

Family quarrels 5 0 2

Arrest situations 10 0 3

Burglaries in progress/

pursuing burglary suspects 0 0 0

Robberies in progress/

pursuing robbery suspects 4 0 0

Drug-related matters 3 0 0

Attempting other arrests 3 0 3

Civil disorders (mass

disobedience, riot, etc.) 0 0 0

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 0 0 0

Investigating suspicious

persons/circumstances 8 3 1

Ambush situations 15 1 2

Entrapment/premeditation 4 0 0

Unprovoked attacks 11 1 2

Mentally deranged assailants 4 0 0

Traffic pursuits/stops 10 1 3

U.S.

Circumstance South West Territories

Total 25 9 5

Disturbance calls 3 3 0

Bar fights, person

with firearm, etc. 1 2 0

Family quarrels 2 1 0

Arrest situations 6 0 1

Burglaries in progress/

pursuing burglary suspects 0 0 0

Robberies in progress/

pursuing robbery suspects 3 0 1

Drug-related matters 3 0 0

Attempting other arrests 0 0 0

Civil disorders (mass

disobedience, riot, etc.) 0 0 0

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 0 0 0

Investigating suspicious

persons/circumstances 2 1 1

Ambush situations 6 3 3

Entrapment/premeditation 3 0 1

Unprovoked attacks 3 3 2

Mentally deranged assailants 4 0 0

Traffic pursuits/stops 4 2 0

Table 21

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Circumstance at Scene of Incident by Region, 1993-2002

Circumstance Total Northeast Midwest

Total 636 63 116

Disturbance calls 98 4 19

Bar fights, person

with firearm, etc. 41 3 9

Family quarrels 57 1 10

Arrest situations 205 26 35

Burglaries in progress/

pursuing burglary suspects 23 3 5

Robberies in progress/

pursuing robbery suspects 73 13 10

Drug-related matters 38 3 5

Attempting other arrests 71 7 15

Civil disorders (mass

disobedience, riot, etc.) 0 0 0

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 20 1 3

Investigating suspicious

persons/circumstances 105 15 25

Ambush situations 96 8 13

Entrapment/premeditation 34 2 4

Unprovoked attacks 62 6 9

Mentally deranged assailants 15 2 1

Traffic pursuits/stops 97 7 20

U.S.

Circumstance South West Territories

Total 278 130 49

Disturbance calls 45 27 3

Bar fights, person

with firearm, etc. 18 9 2

Family quarrels 27 18 1

Arrest situations 82 38 24

Burglaries in progress/

pursuing burglary suspects 9 4 2

Robberies in progress/

pursuing robbery suspects 21 12 17

Drug-related matters 20 8 2

Attempting other arrests 32 14 3

Civil disorders (mass

disobedience, riot, etc.) 0 0 0

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 11 4 1

Investigating suspicious

persons/circumstances 38 22 5

Ambush situations 52 11 12

Entrapment/premeditation 21 4 3

Unprovoked attacks 31 7 9

Mentally deranged assailants 8 3 1

Traffic pursuits/stops 42 25 3

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 22

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed

Circumstance at Scene of Incident by Type of Assignment, 2002

1-Officer vehicle

2-Officer

Circumstance Total vehicle Alone Assisted

Total 56 6 17 15

Disturbance calls 9 2 1 5

Bar fights, person

with firearm, etc. 4 0 1 3

Family quarrels 5 2 0 2

Arrest situations 10 1 1 1

Burglaries in progress/

pursuing burglary suspects 0 0 0 0

Robberies in progress/

pursuing robbery suspects 4 1 0 1

Drug-related matters 3 0 0 0

Attempting other arrests 3 0 1 0

Civil disorders (mass

disobedience, riot, etc.) 0 0 0 0

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 0 0 0 0

Investigating suspicious

persons/circumstances 8 0 4 2

Ambush situations 15 2 3 3

Entrapment/premeditation 4 0 0 0

Unprovoked attacks 11 2 3 3

Mentally deranged assailants 4 0 1 3

Traffic pursuits/stops 10 1 7 1

Foot patrol

Circumstance Alone Assisted

Total 1 0

Disturbance calls 0 0

Bar fights, person

with firearm, etc. 0 0

Family quarrels 0 0

Arrest situations 0 0

Burglaries in progress/

pursuing burglary suspects 0 0

Robberies in progress/

pursuing robbery suspects 0 0

Drug-related matters 0 0

Attempting other arrests 0 0

Civil disorders (mass

disobedience, riot, etc.) 0 0

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 0 0

Investigating suspicious

persons/circumstances 0 0

Ambush situations 1 0

Entrapment/premeditation 0 0

Unprovoked attacks 1 0

Mentally deranged assailants 0 0

Traffic pursuits/stops 0 0

Other (1)

Circumstance Alone Assisted Off duty

Total 2 10 5

Disturbance calls 0 1 0

Bar fights, person

with firearm, etc. 0 0 0

Family quarrels 0 1 0

Arrest situations 0 5 2

Burglaries in progress/

pursuing burglary suspects 0 0 0

Robberies in progress/

pursuing robbery suspects 0 0 2

Drug-related matters 0 3 0

Attempting other arrests 0 2 0

Civil disorders (mass

disobedience, riot, etc.) 0 0 0

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 0 0 0

Investigating suspicious

persons/circumstances 0 2 0

Ambush situations 2 1 3

Entrapment/premeditation 1 1 2

Unprovoked attacks 1 0 1

Mentally deranged assailants 0 0 0

Traffic pursuits/stops 0 1 0

(1) Includes detectives, officers on special assignments, undercover

officers, and officers on other types of assignments that are not

listed.

Table 23

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed in Traffic Pursuits/Stops

Activity at Scene of Incident by Type of Assignment, 2002

2-Officer 1-Officer vehicle

Activity Total vehicle Alone Assisted

Total 10 1 7 1

Contacted radio dispatcher

prior to attack 6 1 4 1

Activity of victim

Approaching offender(s) 2 0 1 0

Returning to police unit 1 0 1 0

Interviewing offender(s)

in police unit 1 0 1 0

Interviewing offender(s)

at offender’s vehicle 0 0 0 0

Searching offender(s) 1 0 1 0

Searching offender’s vehicle 0 0 0 0

Making arrest/handcuffing 0 0 0 0

Engaging in foot pursuit 2 0 2 0

Engaging in vehicle pursuit 0 0 0 0

Other 3 1 1 1

Activity not reported 0 0 0 0

Foot Patrol Other (1)

Activity Alone Assisted Alone Assisted

Total 0 0 0 1

Contacted radio dispatcher

prior to attack 0 0 0 0

Activity of victim

Approaching offender(s) 0 0 0 1

Returning to police unit 0 0 0 0

Interviewing offender(s)

in police unit 0 0 0 0

Interviewing offender(s)

at offender’s vehicle 0 0 0 0

Searching offender(s) 0 0 0 0

Searching offender’s vehicle 0 0 0 0

Making arrest/handcuffing 0 0 0 0

Engaging in foot pursuit 0 0 0 0

Engaging in vehicle pursuit 0 0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 0

Activity not reported 0 0 0 0

Activity Off duty

Total 0

Contacted radio dispatcher

prior to attack 0

Activity of victim

Approaching offender(s) 0

Returning to police unit 0

Interviewing offender(s)

in police unit 0

Interviewing offender(s)

at offender’s vehicle 0

Searching offender(s) 0

Searching offender’s vehicle 0

Making arrest/handcuffing 0

Engaging in foot pursuit 0

Engaging in vehicle pursuit 0

Other 0

Activity not reported 0

(1) Includes detectives, officers on special assignments,

undercover officers, and officers on other types of

assignments that are not listed.

Table 24

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Circumstances at Scene of Incident by Type of Assignment, 1993-2002

1-Officer vehicle

2-Officer

Circumstance Total vehicle Alone Assisted

Total 636 84 189 131

Disturbance calls 98 17 28 34

Bar fights, person 41 7 7 19

with firearm, etc.

Family quarrels 57 10 21 15

Arrest situations 205 24 33 42

Burglaries in progress/ 23 3 9 5

pursuing burglary suspects

Robberies in progress/ 73 9 11 16

pursuing robbery suspects

Drug-related matters 38 4 2 1

Attempting other arrests 71 8 11 20

Civil disorders (mass 0 0 0 0

disobedience, riot, etc.)

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 20 2 9 1

Investigating suspicious 105 16 41 12

persons/circumstances

Ambush situations 96 11 22 12

Entrapment/premeditation 34 3 10 4

Unprovoked attacks 62 8 12 8

Mentally deranged assailants 15 0 2 8

Traffic pursuits/stops 97 14 54 22

Foot Patrol Other (2)

Circumstance Alone Assisted Alone Assisted

Total 8 7 37 96

Disturbance calls 1 0 3 6

Bar fights, person 0 0 1 2

with firearm, etc.

Family quarrels 1 0 2 4

Arrest situations 1 6 6 55

Burglaries in progress/ 0 0 1 2

pursuing burglary suspects

Robberies in progress/ 0 2 1 5

pursuing robbery suspects

Drug-related matters 0 2 4 24

Attempting other arrests 1 2 0 24

Civil disorders (mass 0 0 0 0

disobedience, riot, etc.)

Handling, transporting, 0 0 4 4

custody of prisoners

Investigating suspicious 3 1 4 12

persons/circumstances

Ambush situations 3 0 17 11

Entrapment/premeditation 1 0 4 2

Unprovoked attacks 2 0 13 9

Mentally deranged assailants 0 0 0 5

Traffic pursuits/stops 0 0 3 3

Circumstance Off duty

Total 84

Disturbance calls 9

Bar fights, person 5

with firearm, etc.

Family quarrels 4

Arrest situations 38

Burglaries in progress/ 3

pursuing burglary suspects

Robberies in progress/ 29

pursuing robbery suspects

Drug-related matters 1

Attempting other arrests 5

Civil disorders (mass 0

disobedience, riot, etc.)

Handling, transporting, 0

custody of prisoners

Investigating suspicious 16

persons/circumstances

Ambush situations 20

Entrapment/premeditation 10

Unprovoked attacks 10

Mentally deranged assailants 0

Traffic pursuits/stops 1

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

(2) Includes detectives, officers on special assignments, undercover

officers, and officers on other types of assignments that are not

listed.

Table 25

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed in Traffic Pursuits/Stops

Activity at Scene of Incident by Type of Assignment, 1993-2002

1-Officer

2-Officer Vehichle

Activity Total vehicle Alone Assisted

Total 97 14 54 22

Contacted radio dispatcher 73 10 40 19

prior to attack

Activity of victim

Approaching offender(s) 29 6 15 5

Returning to police unit 2 0 2 0

Interviewing offender(s) 3 0 3 0

in police unit

Interviewing offender(s) 8 1 7 0

at offender’s vehicle

Searching offender(s) 1 0 1 0

Searching offender’s vehicle 1 0 1 0

Making arrest/handcuffing 12 2 6 3

Engaging in foot pursuit 6 0 4 1

Engaging in vehicle pursuit 2 0 0 2

Other 31 5 13 11

Activity not reported 2 0 2 0

Foot patrol Other (1)

Activity Alone Assisted Alone Assisted

Total 0 0 3 3

Contacted radio dispatcher 0 0 3 1

prior to attack

Activity of victim

Approaching offender(s) 0 0 0 2

Returning to police unit 0 0 0 0

Interviewing offender(s) 0 0 0 0

in police unit

Interviewing offender(s) 0 0 0 0

at offender’s vehicle

Searching offender(s) 0 0 0 0

Searching offender’s vehicle 0 0 0 0

Making arrest/handcuffing 0 0 1 0

Engaging in foot pursuit 0 0 1 0

Engaging in vehicle pursuit 0 0 0 0

Other 0 0 1 1

Activity not reported 0 0 0 0

Activity Off duty

Total 1

Contacted radio dispatcher 0

prior to attack

Activity of victim

Approaching offender(s) 1

Returning to police unit 0

Interviewing offender(s) 0

in police unit

Interviewing offender(s)

at offender’s vehicle 0

Searching offender(s) 0

Searching offender’s vehicle 0

Making arrest/handcuffing 0

Engaging in foot pursuit 0

Engaging in vehicle pursuit 0

Other 0

Activity not reported 0

(1) Includes detectives, officers on special assignments,

undercover officers, and officers on other types of

assignment that are not listed.

Table 26

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Type of Weapon, 1993-2002

Weapon Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 636 70 80 74 61 71

Firearms 591 67 79 62 57 68

Handgun 443 51 67 43 50 50

Rifle 112 13 8 14 6 12

Shotgun 36 3 4 5 1 6

Knife or cutting 8 0 0 2 1 2

instrument

Bomb 9 0 0 8 0 0

Personal weapons 3 0 0 0 1 1

Other 25 3 1 2 2 0

Weapon 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 61 42 51 70 56

Firearms 58 41 47 61 51

Handgun 40 25 33 46 38

Rifle 17 11 10 11 10

Shotgun 1 5 4 4 3

Knife or cutting 1 0 1 0 1

instrument

Bomb 1 0 0 0 0

Personal weapons 0 0 0 1 0

Other 1 1 3 8 4

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of

September 11, 2001, are not included in this table.

Table 27

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed

State and Agency by Type of Weapon, 2002

State

Agency Total Handgun Rifle

Total 56 38 10

ALABAMA 2 2 0

Birmingham 1 1 0

Department of Conservation and 1 1 0

Natural Resources, Tanner

ARIZONA 2 1 1

National Park Service, Ajo 1 0 1

Pinal County 1 1 0

ARKANSAS 1 1 0

Little Rock 1 1 0

CALIFORNIA 4 3 1

Fresno County 1 0 1

Los Angeles County 2 2 0

Red Bluff 1 1 0

FLORIDA 1 1 0

Tallahassee 1 1 0

GEORGIA 1 1 0

Carroll County 1 1 0

ILLINOIS 2 1 0

Chicago 1 1 0

Stark County 1 0 0

KENTUCKY 1 0 1

Pulaski County 1 0 1

LOUISIANA 2 2 0

Marion 1 1 0

New Orleans 1 1 0

MARYLAND 3 3 0

Baltimore 1 1 0

Prince George’s County 2 2 0

MASSACHUSETTS 1 1 0

Westminster 1 1 0

MICHIGAN 3 1 0

Detroit 2 1 0

Hazel Park 1 0 0

MINNESOTA 1 1 0

Minneapolis 1 1 0

MISSISSIPPI 1 0 0

Moss Point 1 0 0

MISSOURI 1 1 0

Dent County 1 1 0

NEW YORK 2 1 1

Broome County 1 1 0

State Police, Schroon Lake 1 0 1

OHIO 3 2 1

Dayton 1 0 1

Massillon 1 1 0

Muskingum County 1 1 0

OREGON 1 0 1

Douglas County 1 0 1

PENNSYLVANIA 2 2 0

State Police, Ebensburg 1 1 0

Upper Darby Township 1 1 0

SOUTH CAROLINA 5 3 2

Beaufort County 2 0 2

Charleston 1 1 0

Highway Patrol, 1 1 0

North Charleston

Myrtle Beach 1 1 0

TENNESSEE 2 2 0

Chattanooga 1 1 0

Shelby County 1 1 0

TEXAS 5 2 1

Department of Public 1 1 0

Safety, Andrews

Beaumont 1 0 0

Ferris 1 0 0

Limestone County 1 0 1

White Settlement 1 1 0

UTAH 1 1 0

West Jordan 1 1 0

VIRGINIA 1 1 0

Pittsylvania County 1 1 0

WASHINGTON 1 1 0

King County 1 1 0

WISCONSIN 2 0 0

Hobart/Lawrence 2 0 0

U.S. TERRITORIES 5 4 1

Puerto Rico

Guayama 1 1 0

Puerto Nuevo 1 1 0

San Juan 1 0 1

Toa Baja 1 1 0

Department of Veterans Affairs, 1 1 0

San Juan

State

Agency Shotgun Other (Detail)

Total 3 5

ALABAMA 0 0

Birmingham 0 0

Department of Conservation and 0 0

Natural Resources, Tanner

ARIZONA 0 0

National Park Service, Ajo 0 0

Pinal County 0 0

ARKANSAS 0 0

Little Rock 0 0

CALIFORNIA 0 0

Fresno County 0 0

Los Angeles County 0 0

Red Bluff 0 0

FLORIDA 0 0

Tallahassee 0 0

GEORGIA 0 0

Carroll County 0 0

ILLINOIS 1 0

Chicago 0 0

Stark County 1 0

KENTUCKY 0 0

Pulaski County 0 0

LOUISIANA 0 0

Marion 0 0

New Orleans 0 0

MARYLAND 0 0

Baltimore 0 0

Prince George’s County 0 0

MASSACHUSETTS 0 0

Westminster 0 0

MICHIGAN 1 1

Detroit 0 1 (knife)

Hazel Park 1 0

MINNESOTA 0 0

Minneapolis 0 0

MISSISSIPPI 0 1

Moss Point 0 1 (vehicle)

MISSOURI 0 0

Dent County 0 0

NEW YORK 0 0

Broome County 0 0

State Police, Schroon Lake 0 0

OHIO 0 0

Dayton 0 0

Massillon 0 0

Muskingum County 0 0

OREGON 0 0

Douglas County 0 0

PENNSYLVANIA 0 0

State Police, Ebensburg 0 0

Upper Darby Township 0 0

SOUTH CAROLINA 0 0

Beaufort County 0 0

Charleston 0 0

Highway Patrol, 0 0

North Charleston

Myrtle Beach 0 0

TENNESSEE 0 0

Chattanooga 0 0

Shelby County 0 0

TEXAS 1 1

Department of Public 0 0

Safety, Andrews

Beaumont 0 1 (vehicle)

Ferris 1 0

Limestone County 0 0

White Settlement 0 0

UTAH 0 0

West Jordan 0 0

VIRGINIA 0 0

Pittsylvania County 0 0

WASHINGTON 0 0

King County 0 0

WISCONSIN 0 2

Hobart/Lawrence 0 2

U.S. TERRITORIES 0 0

Puerto Rico

Guayama 0 0

Puerto Nuevo 0 0

San Juan 0 0

Toa Baja 0 0

Department of Veterans Affairs, 0 0

San Juan

Table 28

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed

Region by Type of Weapon, 2002

Total

Region Total firearms Handgun

Total 56 51 38

Northeast 5 5 4

Midwest 12 9 6

South 25 23 18

West 9 9 6

U.S. Territories 5 5 4

Knife or

cutting

Region Rifle Shotgun instrument

Total 10 3 1

Northeast 1 0 0

Midwest 1 2 1

South 4 1 0

West 3 0 0

U.S. Territories 1 0 0

Personal

Region Bomb weapons Other

Total 0 0 4

Northeast 0 0 0

Midwest 0 0 2

South 0 0 2

West 0 0 0

U.S. Territories 0 0 0

Table 29

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Region by Type of Weapon, 1993-2002

Total

Region Total firearms Handgun

Total 636 591 443

Northeast 63 58 48

Midwest 116 106 80

South 278 255 187

West 130 124 85

U.S. Territories 49 48 43

Knife or

cutting

Region Rifle Shotgun instrument

Total 112 36 8

Northeast 7 3 2

Midwest 20 6 2

South 48 20 2

West 32 7 2

U.S. Territories 5 0 0

Personal

Region Bomb weapons Other

Total 9 3 25

Northeast 0 0 2

Midwest 0 0 8

South 9 1 11

West 0 2 2

U.S. Territories 0 0 1

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 30

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed

Circumstance at Scene of Incident by Type of Weapon, 2002

Total

Circumstance Total firearms Handgun

Total 56 51 38

Disturbance calls 9 8 4

Bar fights, person

with firearm, etc. 4 4 1

Family quarrels 5 4 3

Arrest situations 10 10 9

Burglaries in progress/

pursuing burglary suspects 0 0 0

Robberies in progress/

pursuing robbery suspects 4 4 4

Drug-related matters 3 3 3

Attempting other arrests 3 3 2

Civil disorders (mass

disobedience, riot, etc.) 0 0 0

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 0 0 0

Investigating suspicious

persons/circumstances 8 8 6

Ambush situations 15 13 8

Entrapment/premeditation 4 4 2

Unprovoked attacks 11 9 6

Mentally deranged assailants 4 4 4

Traffic pursuits/shops 10 8 7

Knife or

cutting

Circumstance Rifle Shotgun instrument

Total 10 3 1

Disturbance calls 2 2 0

Bar fights, person

with firearm, etc. 1 2 0

Family quarrels 1 0 0

Arrest situations 0 1 0

Burglaries in progress/

pursuing burglary suspects 0 0 0

Robberies in progress/

pursuing robbery suspects 0 0 0

Drug-related matters 0 0 0

Attempting other arrests 0 1 0

Civil disorders (mass

disobedience, riot, etc.) 0 0 0

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 0 0 0

Investigating suspicious

persons/circumstances 2 0 0

Ambush situations 5 0 0

Entrapment/premeditation 2 0 0

Unprovoked attacks 3 0 0

Mentally deranged assailants 0 0 0

Traffic pursuits/shops 1 0 1

Personal

Circumstance Bomb weapons Other

Total 0 0 4

Disturbance calls 0 0 1

Bar fights, person

with firearm, etc. 0 0 0

Family quarrels 0 0 1

Arrest situations 0 0 0

Burglaries in progress/

pursuing burglary suspects 0 0 0

Robberies in progress/

pursuing robbery suspects 0 0 0

Drug-related matters 0 0 0

Attempting other arrests 0 0 0

Civil disorders (mass

disobedience, riot, etc.) 0 0 0

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 0 0 0

Investigating suspicious

persons/circumstances 0 0 0

Ambush situations 0 0 2

Entrapment/premeditation 0 0 0

Unprovoked attacks 0 0 2

Mentally deranged assailants 0 0 0

Traffic pursuits/shops 0 0 1

Table 31

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed

Circumstance at Scene of Incident by Type of Weapon, 2002

Total

Circumstance Total firearms Handgun

Total 636 591 443

Disturbance calls 98 91 51

Bar fights, person

with firearm, etc. 41 40 20

Family quarrels 57 51 31

Arrest situations 205 201 161

Burglaries in progress/

pursuing burglary suspects 23 21 17

Robberies in progress/

pursuing robbery suspects 75 72 65

Drug-related matters 38 37 32

Attempting other arrests 71 71 47

Civil disorders (mass

disobedience, riot, etc.) 0 0 0

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 20 19 19

Investigating suspicious

persons/circumstances 105 98 85

Ambush situations 96 85 55

Entrapment/premeditation 34 31 15

Unprovoked attacks 62 54 40

Mentally deranged assailants 15 14 9

Traffic pursuits/shops 97 83 63

Knife or

cutting

Circumstance Rifle Shotgun instrument

Total 112 36 8

Disturbance calls 23 17 2

Bar fights, person

with firearm, etc. 10 10 0

Family quarrels 13 7 2

Arrest situations 30 10 0

Burglaries in progress/

pursuing burglary suspects 3 1 0

Robberies in progress/

pursuing robbery suspects 5 2 0

Drug-related matters 5 0 0

Attempting other arrests 17 7 0

Civil disorders (mass

disobedience, riot, etc.) 0 0 0

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 0 0 1

Investigating suspicious

persons/circumstances 10 3 2

Ambush situations 26 4 1

Entrapment/premeditation 14 2 1

Unprovoked attacks 12 2 0

Mentally deranged assailants 3 2 1

Traffic pursuits/shops 20 0 1

Personal

Circumstance Bomb weapons Other

Total 9 3 25

Disturbance calls 0 0 5

Bar fights, person

with firearm, etc. 0 0 1

Family quarrels 0 0 4

Arrest situations 0 1 3

Burglaries in progress/

pursuing burglary suspects 0 1 1

Robberies in progress/

pursuing robbery suspects 0 0 1

Drug-related matters 0 0 1

Attempting other arrests 0 0 0

Civil disorders (mass

disobedience, riot, etc.) 0 0 0

Handling, transporting,

custody of prisoners 0 0 0

Investigating suspicious

persons/circumstances 1 1 3

Ambush situations 8 0 2

Entrapment/premeditation 2 0 0

Unprovoked attacks 6 0 2

Mentally deranged assailants 0 0 0

Traffic pursuits/shops 0 1 12

(1) The 72 deaths resulted from the events of September 11, 2002,

are not included in this table.

Table 32

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed by Firearms

Number Slain by Type of Firearm and Size Ammunition, 1993-2002

Firearm

Ammunition Total 1993 1994 1995

Total 591 67 79 62

Handgun 443 51 67 43

.22 Caliber 28 3 5 1

.25 Caliber 18 1 2 3

.32 Caliber 9 0 0 1

.32-20 Caliber 1 0 0 0

.357 Magnum 30 5 1 3

.38 Caliber 65 11 12 6

.380 Caliber 43 9 6 6

.40 Caliber 34 3 2 3

.41 Magnum 1 0 0 0

.44 Magnum 11 0 3 3

.45 Caliber 36 3 2 4

.455 Caliber 1 0 1 0

.50 Caliber 1 0 0 0

.7.62×25 Millimeter 1 0 0 0

.9 Millimeter 136 11 27 12

.9×18 Millimeter 1 0 0 0

10 Millimeter 2 1 0 0

Size not reported 25 4 6 1

Rifle 112 13 8 14

.22 Caliber 5 2 1 0

.223 Caliber 24 3 2 1

.243 Caliber 1 1 0 0

.25-06 Caliber 2 0 0 0

.25-20 Caliber 1 1 0 0

.270 Caliber 2 0 0 0

.30 Caliber 13 1 1 0

.30-06 Caliber 3 0 1 0

.30-30 Caliber 8 1 0 1

.308 Caliber 5 2 2 1

.44 Magnum 1 0 0 0

300 Magnum 1 1 0 0

7.62×39 Millimeter 41 0 1 10

7.62x54R Millimeter 2 0 0 1

Size not reported 3 1 0 0

Shotgun 36 3 4 5

.410 Gauge 1 0 1 0

12 Gauge 29 3 3 4

16 Gauge 1 0 0 0

20 Gauge 3 0 0 0

Size not reported 2 0 0 1

Firearm

Ammunition 1996 1997 1998 1999

Total 57 68 58 41

Handgun 50 50 40 25

.22 Caliber 4 3 4 1

.25 Caliber 3 2 3 1

.32 Caliber 1 4 1 0

.32-20 Caliber 0 0 0 0

.357 Magnum 5 3 3 2

.38 Caliber 6 11 6 4

.380 Caliber 6 3 1 0

.40 Caliber 2 4 1 2

.41 Magnum 0 0 0 0

.44 Magnum 1 0 1 0

.45 Caliber 3 4 5 1

.455 Caliber 0 0 0 0

.50 Caliber 0 0 0 0

7.62×25 Millimeter 0 0 0 0

9 Millimeter 11 13 14 12

9×18 Millimeter 1 0 0 0

10 Millimeter 0 0 0 1

Size not reported 7 3 1 1

Rifle 6 12 17 11

.22 Caliber 0 1 0 0

.223 Caliber 2 3 8 1

.243 Caliber 0 0 0 0

.25-06 Caliber 0 0 0 0

.25-20 Caliber 0 0 0 0

.270 Caliber 0 0 0 1

.30 Caliber 1 3 1 0

.30-06 Caliber 1 0 0 0

.30-30 Caliber 2 0 0 0

.308 Caliber 0 0 0 0

.44 Magnum 0 0 0 0

300 Magnum 0 0 0 0

7.62×39 Millimeter 0 5 6 9

7.62x54R Millimeter 0 0 1 0

Size not reported 0 0 1 0

Shotgun 1 6 1 5

..410 Gauge 0 0 0 0

.12 Gauge 0 4 1 5

.16 Gauge 0 1 0 0

.20 Gauge 1 1 0 0

Size not reported 0 0 0 0

Firearm

Ammunition 2000 2001 2002

Total 47 61 51

Handgun 33 46 38

.22 Caliber 4 1 2

.25 Caliber 1 1 1

.32 Caliber 0 1 1

.32-20 Caliber 1 0 0

.357 Magnum 1 4 3

.38 Caliber 4 2 3

.380 Caliber 3 5 4

.40 Caliber 5 5 7

.41 Magnum 0 0 1

.44 Magnum 1 2 0

.45 Caliber 4 6 4

.455 Caliber 0 0 0

.50 Caliber 0 1 0

7.62×25 Millimete 0 0 1

9 Millimeter 8 17 11

9×18 Millimeter 0 0 0

10 Millimeter 0 0 0

Size not reported 1 1 0

Rifle 10 11 10

.22 Caliber 0 1 0

.223 Caliber 3 1 0

.243 Caliber 0 0 0

.25-06 Caliber 0 0 2

.25-20 Caliber 0 0 0

.270 Caliber 1 0 0

.30 Caliber 2 2 2

.30-06 Caliber 0 1 0

.30-30 Caliber 3 0 1

.308 Caliber 0 0 0

.44 Magnum 0 0 1

300 Magnum 0 0 0

7.62×39 Millimeter 1 6 3

7.62x54R Millimeter 0 0 0

Size not reported 0 0 1

Shotgun 4 4 3

.410 Gauge 0 0 0

12 Gauge 3 4 2

16 Gauge 0 0 0

20 Gauge 1 0 0

Size not reported 0 0 1

Table 33

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed by Firearms

Distance Between Victim Officer and Offender, 1993-2002

Distance Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

in feet

Total 591 67 79 62 57 68

0 – 5 296 33 44 28 31 36

6 – 10 124 14 21 16 14 11

11 – 20 64 7 7 6 6 9

21 – 50 50 6 4 7 3 7

Over 50 47 7 3 5 3 5

Distance not 10 0 0 0 0 0

reported

Distance

in feet 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 58 41 47 61 51

0 – 5 26 19 25 29 25

6 – 10 7 9 6 17 9

11 – 20 8 4 4 5 8

21 – 50 8 3 4 5 3

Over 50 7 5 5 3 4

Distance not 2 1 3 2 2

Reported

Table 34

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed by Firearms

Number Slain While Wearing Body Armor by Type of Firearm and Size of

Ammunition, 1993-2002

Firearm

Ammunition Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 324 37 35 32 31 27

Handgun 232 27 27 21 29 20

.22 Caliber 9 1 2 0 1 1

.25 Caliber 11 0 1 2 2 1

.32 Caliber 6 0 0 1 1 2

.357 Magnum 19 3 0 1 3 0

.38 Caliber 28 6 3 4 3 4

.380 Caliber 24 6 4 2 4 2

.40 Caliber 24 3 2 2 1 2

.41 Magnum 1 0 0 0 0 0

.44 Magnum 7 0 2 1 1 0

.45 Caliber 24 2 0 3 3 3

.455 Caliber 1 0 1 0 0 0

.50 Caliber 1 0 0 0 0 0

7.62×25 Millimeter 1 0 0 0 0 0

9 Millimeter 65 6 10 5 5 5

9×18 Millimeter 1 0 0 0 1 0

Size not reported 10 0 2 0 4 0

Rifle 72 9 7 9 2 5

.22 Caliber 1 0 1 0 0 0

.223 Caliber 17 3 2 0 0 1

.25-06 Caliber 1 0 0 0 0 0

.25-20 Caliber 1 1 0 0 0 0

.30 Caliber 9 1 1 0 0 2

.30-06 Caliber 2 0 1 0 1 0

.30-30 Caliber 5 1 0 1 1 0

.308 Caliber 2 1 1 0 0 0

.44 Magnum 1 0 0 0 0 0

300 Magnum 1 1 0 0 0 0

7.62×39 Millimeter 30 0 1 8 0 2

7.62x54R Millimeter 1 0 0 0 0 0

Size not reported 1 1 0 0 0 0

Shotgun 20 1 1 2 0 2

12 Gauge 17 1 1 2 0 1

20 Gauge 2 0 0 0 0 1

Size not reported 1 0 0 0 0 0

Firearm

Ammunition 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 34 27 29 38 34

Handgun 20 17 19 29 23

.22 Caliber 0 1 2 1 0

.25 Caliber 2 1 1 1 0

.32 Caliber 1 0 0 1 0

.357 Magnum 3 2 1 3 3

.38 Caliber 2 3 1 0 2

.380 Caliber 1 0 1 1 3

.40 Caliber 0 1 5 2 6

.41 Magnum 0 0 0 0 1

.44 Magnum 0 0 1 2 0

.45 Caliber 3 1 2 4 3

.455 Caliber 0 0 0 0 0

.50 Caliber 0 0 0 1 0

7.62×25 Millimeter 0 0 0 0 1

9 Millimeter 7 7 4 12 4

9×18 Millimeter 0 0 0 0 0

Size not reported 1 1 1 1 0

Rifle 13 7 6 6 8

.22 Caliber 0 0 0 0 0

.223 Caliber 6 1 3 1 0

.25-06 Caliber 0 0 0 0 1

.25-20 Caliber 0 0 0 0 0

.30 Caliber 1 0 1 1 2

.30-06 Caliber 0 0 0 0 0

.30-30 Caliber 0 0 1 0 1

.308 Caliber 0 0 0 0 0

.44 Magnum 0 0 0 0 1

300 Magnum 0 0 0 0 0

7.62×39 Millimeter 5 6 1 4 3

7.62x54R Millimeter 1 0 0 0 0

Size not reported 0 0 0 0 0

Shotgun 1 3 4 3 3

12 Gauge 1 3 3 3 2

20 Gauge 0 0 1 0 0

Size not reported 0 0 0 0 1

Table 35

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed by Firearms

Location of Fatal Firearm Wounds and Use of Body Armor, 1993-2002

Location Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 591 67 79 62 57 68

Front head 213 28 22 18 15 22

Rear head 80 6 12 10 12 9

Front upper torso 230 20 36 23 23 30

Rear upper torso 38 5 4 5 3 6

Front below waist 21 6 4 5 2 1

Rear below waist 9 2 1 1 2 0

Wearing body armor 324 37 35 32 31 27

Front head 138 18 13 12 12 7

Rear head 51 4 9 8 7 3

Front upper torso 102 9 9 9 11 13

Rear upper torso 18 2 2 1 1 3

Front below waist 9 2 2 1 0 1

Rear below waist 6 2 0 1 0 0

Location 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 58 41 47 61 51

Front head 17 18 22 30 21

Rear head 11 6 2 4 8

Front upper torso 23 13 21 23 18

Rear upper torso 3 4 2 4 2

Front below waist 2 0 0 0 1

Rear below waist 2 0 0 0 1

Wearing body armor 34 27 29 38 34

Front head 10 11 17 22 16

Rear head 6 5 2 2 5

Front upper torso 12 8 8 13 10

Rear upper torso 2 3 2 1 1

Front below waist 2 0 0 0 1

Rear below waist 2 0 0 0 1

Table 36

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed by Firearms

Point of Entry for Torso Wounds and Use of Body Armor, 1993-2002

Point of entry Total 1993 1994 1995

Total 120 11 11 10

Entered between side 19 3 4 2

panels of vest

Entered through armhole 34 2 2 3

or shoulder area of vest

Entered above vest

(front or back of neck, 38 2 4 2

collarbone area)

Entered below vest

(abdominal or lower 11 1 0 1

back area)

Penetrated vest 18 3 1 2

Point of entry 1996 1997 1998 1999

Total 12 16 14 11

Entered between side 4 2 1 0

panels of vest

Entered through armhole 2 2 1 6

or shoulder area of vest

Entered above vest

(front or back of neck, 4 9 6 2

collarbone area)

Entered below vest

(abdominal or lower 1 0 3 0

back area)

Penetrated vest 1 3 3 3

Point of entry 2000 2001 2002

Total 10 14 11

Entered between side 1 1 1

panels of vest

Entered through armhole 5 8 3

or shoulder area of vest

Entered above vest

(front or back of neck, 3 3 3

collarbone area)

Entered below vest

(abdominal or lower 1 1 3

back area)

Penetrated vest 0 1 1

Table 37

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed by Firearms

Type of Firearm and Size of Ammunition that Penetrated

Body Armor, 1993-2002

Firearm

Ammunition Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 18 3 1 2 1 3

Handgun 0 0 0 0 0 0

Rifle

.223 Caliber 4 2 1 0 0 1

.30 Caliber 2 0 0 0 0 1

.30-30 Caliber 3 1 0 0 1 0

7.62×39 Millimeter 9 0 0 2 0 1

Shotgun 0 0 0 0 0 0

Firearm

Ammunition 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 3 3 0 1 1

Handgun 0 0 0 0 0

Rifle

.223 Caliber 0 0 0 0 0

.30 Caliber 1 0 0 0 0

.30-30 Caliber 0 0 0 0 1

7.62×39 Millimeter 2 3 0 1 0

Shotgun 0 0 0 0 0

Table 38

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Profile of Known Assailants, Age Groups, 1993-2002

Known assailants Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 785 93 114 93 85 76

Age

Under 18 years 83 16 18 17 7 3

18 – 24 years 290 32 38 31 37 25

25 – 30 years 150 12 24 14 23 19

31 – 40 years 117 9 15 17 6 17

Over 40 years 109 13 13 11 10 12

Age not reported 36 11 6 3 2 0

Average years of age 28 28 27 27 27 30

Known assailants 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 77 49 64 73 61

Age

Under 18 years 11 3 4 2 2

18 – 24 years 27 24 20 32 24

25 – 30 years 17 10 11 10 10

31 – 40 years 10 10 8 13 12

Over 40 years 11 2 14 10 13

Age not reported 1 0 7 6 0

Average years of age 27 27 32 29 32

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11,

2001, are not included in this table.

Table 39

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Profile of Known Assailants, Race and Sex, 1993-2002

Known assailants Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 785 93 114 93 85 76

Race

White 417 37 60 50 34 38

Black 307 46 46 38 39 31

Asian/Pacific Islander 15 0 2 2 3 4

American Indian/Alaskan 14 0 1 2 2 3

Native

Race not reported 32 10 5 1 7 0

Sex

Male 750 84 105 85 84 76

Female 22 1 5 7 1 0

Sex not reported 13 8 4 1 0 0

Known assailants 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 77 49 64 73 61

Race

White 45 27 44 45 37

Black 24 19 16 24 24

Asian/Pacific Islander 2 0 0 2 0

American Indian/Alaskan 3 2 0 1 0

Native

Race not reported 3 1 4 1 0

Sex

Male 76 47 62 72 59

Female 1 2 2 1 2

Sex not reported 0 0 0 0 0

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11,

2001, are not included in this table.

Table 40

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Profile of Known Assailants, 5- and 10-Year Averages, 1983-2002

5-year averages 10-year averages

1993- 1998- 1993- 1983-

Known assailants 2002 1997 2002 2002 1992

Average

Age (years) 32 27 29 28 29

Height 5’10” 5’9″ 5’10” 5’9″ 5’9″

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table.

Table 41

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Profile of Known Assailants, Status at Time of Incident, 1993-2002

Known assailants Total 1993 1994 1995

Total 785 93 114 93

On parole or probation 158 12 19 17

Known to agency as

User of controlled substance 108 5 14 16

Dealer of controlled substance 118 15 21 10

Possessor of controlled substance 41 7 2 10

Under influence of controlled

substance 62 1 9 11

Intoxicated/under influence of

alcohol 81 12 7 10

Known to agency as having prior

mental disorders 49 2 5 9

Relationship between victim and

assailant

Through law enforcement 121 8 16 20

Through non-law enforcement 15 2 0 3

No known relationship 628 72 94 67

Relationship not reported 21 11 4 3

Known assailants 1996 1997 1998 1999

Total 85 76 77 49

On parole or probation 27 19 9 14

Known to agency as

User of controlled substance 11 21 9 3

Dealer of controlled substance 11 12 10 11

Possessor of controlled substance 3 9 4 0

Under influence of controlled

substance 6 5 7 2

Intoxicated/under influence of

alcohol 9 7 10 6

Known to agency as having prior

mental disorders 4 9 5 2

Relationship between victim and

assailant

Through law enforcement 6 24 8 6

Through non-law enforcement 1 0 3 4

No known relationship 78 52 63 39

Relationship not reported 0 0 3 0

Known assailants 2000 2001 2002

Total 64 73 61

On parole or probation 13 13 15

Known to agency as

User of controlled substance 9 10 10

Dealer of controlled substance 8 11 9

Possessor of controlled substance 1 1 4

Under influence of controlled

substance 5 6 10

Intoxicated/under influence of

alcohol 7 9 4

Known to agency as having prior

mental disorders 3 8 2

Relationship between victim and

assailant

Through law enforcement 10 12 11

Through non-law enforcement 1 0 1

No known relationship 53 61 49

Relationship not reported 0 0 0

Table 42

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed (1)

Profile of Known Assailants, Criminal History, 1993-2002

Known assailants Total 1993 1994 1995

Total 785 93 114 93

Prior criminal arrest 528 55 62 62

Convicted on prior

criminal charge 373 31 41 38

Received juvenile conviction

on prior criminal charge 67 6 6 4

Received parole or probation

on prior criminal charge 287 25 35 31

Prior arrest for

Crime of violence 245 19 45 43

Murder 22 3 4 1

Drug law violation 252 24 26 34

Assaulting an officer or

resisting arrest 146 15 25 20

Weapons violation 240 26 40 28

Known assailants 1996 1997 1998 1999

Total 85 76 77 49

Prior criminal arrest 48 59 54 41

Convicted on prior

criminal charge 42 55 34 30

Received juvenile conviction

on prior criminal charge 6 5 12 6

Received parole or probation

on prior criminal charge 31 35 23 22

Prior arrest for

Crime of violence 28 24 18 11

Murder 1 1 5 1

Drug law violation 22 34 27 21

Assaulting an officer or

resisting arrest 11 13 7 19

Weapons violation 26 27 17 19

Known assailants 2000 2001 2002

Total 64 73 61

Prior criminal arrest 51 48 48

Convicted on prior

criminal charge 29 37 36

Received juvenile conviction

on prior criminal charge 1 12 9

Received parole or probation

on prior criminal charge 25 29 31

Prior arrest for

Crime of violence 20 19 18

Murder 3 1 2

Drug law violation 13 23 28

Assaulting an officer or

resisting arrest 9 17 10

Weapons violation 19 19 19

(1) The 72 deaths that resulted from the events of September 11, 2001,

are not included in this table

Table 43

Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed

Disposition of Known Assailants, 1991-2000

1991- 1996- 1991-

Disposition 1995 2000 2000

Total 493 351 844

Fugitives 8 1 9

Arrested and charged 397 268 665

Guilty of murder 291 173 464

Received death sentence 63 38 101

Received life imprisonment 156 104 260

Received prison terms (ranging from

1.5 years to 396 years) 72 31 103

Guilty of lesser offense related to murder 34 24 58

Guilty of crime other than murder 22 13 35

Acquitted/dismissed/nolle prossed 33 12 45

Indeterminate charge and sentence 2 2 4

Committed to psychiatric institution 8 6 14

Case pending/disposition unknown 2 35 37

Died in custody prior to sentencing 5 3 8

Deceased 88 82 170

Justifiably killed 51 50 101

by victim officer 15 8 23

by person(s) other than victim officer 36 42 78

Committed suicide 33 29 62

Murdered while at large 1 0 1

Died under other circumstances 3 3 6

Summaries of Felonious Incidents

ALABAMA

A 35-year-old conservation enforcement officer with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources was fatally wounded during a drug investigation about 7:15 p.m. on March 8 in Winfield. The 16-year veteran of law enforcement was working on a local drug task force that was attempting to execute a search warrant at the residence of a suspected drug dealer. Once at the home, officers knocked on the front door and announced their intent to execute the warrant. With no reply from inside, the officers tried to forcibly enter the residence. After numerous unsuccessful attempts, officers finally knocked down the door. When the conservation officer entered the residence, the suspect fired one shot from a .380-caliber semiautomatic handgun that struck the officer below the waist, just beneath his body armor. The victim officer yelled to the other officers that he had been shot, and the officers took cover outside the residence. The victim officer was able to pull himself back onto the porch where fellow officers were able to retrieve him and take him from the scene by police vehicle to a local hospital. The alleged shooter retreated to the back of the house. Law enforcement officers convinced the 42-year-old man to surrender a short time later. The man, who was a known drug user and dealer, had prior arrests on charges of First-Degree Rape and Lewd Molestation. He was arrested and charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance/Distribution of a Controlled Substance and Attempted Murder. On March 25, the conservation enforcement officer died of his injuries and the Attempted Murder charge against the offender was changed to Capital Murder.

A veteran police officer, aged 31, with the Birmingham Police Department was slain in a robbery attempt of a fast-food restaurant at 8:40 p.m. on November 18. The officer, who was off duty and in plain clothes at the time, had entered the establishment, placed an order, and sat at a table. Just after an acquaintance of the officer entered the business and sat at the officer’s table, a man entered the restaurant brandishing a .25-caliber automatic handgun. He ordered patrons and employees to the floor. The officer’s friend was apparently too slow to follow the robber’s orders, and the robber shot the individual. Calling himself to duty, the officer, with nearly 10 years of law enforcement experience, drew his 9 mm semi-automatic handgun and engaged the robber in a gunfight in which several shots were exchanged. The suspect tried to leave the business through a back door, but it was locked. The individual then retraced his steps and ran out the front door of the business with the officer in pursuit. After a short footchase, the officer collapsed at the corner of the restaurant. The victim officer, who had been shot five times in the right shoulder, the right hand, the right thigh, and fatally in the chest, was pronounced dead at the scene. The assailant remains at large at time of publication.

ARIZONA

On August 9, at 1:30 p.m., a 28-year-old park ranger with the National Park Service was killed in an ambush in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument in Pima County, Arizona, while assisting in the pursuit of Mexican nationals who had stolen a vehicle in Puerto Penasco, Mexico. The ranger, who had nearly 5 years of law enforcement experience, was one of several Mexican and American officers attempting to apprehend the suspects. After car-jacking the vehicle from an American who was vacationing in Puerto Penasco, the suspects drove to the border town of Sonoyta, Mexico, where municipal police confronted them. After an exchange of gunfire, two of the suspects fled in the stolen vehicle to an area near the port of entry at Lukeville, Arizona, followed by Mexican authorities. The suspects turned east along the Mexican border road for approximately 3 miles then drove north into the United States through an opening in the barbed wire fence that marks the international boundary. One Mexican police vehicle followed the suspects a short distance across the border. After another exchange of gunfire, the Mexican police returned to Mexico as the suspects continued north into the national park. At approximately 1 p.m., Mexican authorities notified the American port director that two armed men in a stolen silver sports utility vehicle had crossed into the United States. The port director notified both the U.S. Border Patrol and the National Park Service. A Border Patrol helicopter working in the area located the suspects and directed responding units to the site. The suspects tried to evade the pursuing Border Patrol units, but their vehicle eventually became stuck in a ravine. The two Mexican citizens fled from the vehicle in separate directions. One man ran northwest and was eventually captured with assistance from the Border Patrol helicopter. The second man ran south-west into a heavily vegetated area. The helicopter pilot eventually found this suspect hiding under a tree and directed officers on the ground to that location. The park ranger approached with his weapon drawn within approximately 50 feet of the tree. However, without warning, the suspect fired three shots from a 7.62×39 mm semiautomatic rifle. One round struck the victim officer’s radio on his left hip, and the bullet entered his abdomen under his body armor. The suspect then ran southeast across open desert to within 50 yards of the border where at least 30 Mexican officers from numerous agencies opened fire on him. The 28-year-old assailant and the victim ranger both died from their wounds.

A 59-year-old sergeant with the Pinal County Sheriff’s Department died on August 24 as a result of line-of-duty injuries sustained in Apache Junction on December 11, 1993. Just after 4 p.m. on the day of the incident, the officer, then a corporal with more than 6 years’ law enforcement experience, and other officers responded to a domestic/disturbance call at a residence. As the officers entered the structure, a man inside exchanged gunfire with them. During the exchange, the man reportedly shot the corporal, who was wearing body armor, in the front of the head with a .38-caliber revolver; another officer and the shooter were also injured. The 31-year-old male, who was known to law enforcement as a drug user and was under the influence of a controlled substance at the time, was taken into custody and charged with Attempted Murder and multiple counts of Aggravated Assault. The victim corporal required 24-hour care; he was promoted to sergeant and, subsequently, medically retired from the Pinal County Sheriff’s Office on June 4, 1994. The department also granted the other injured officer a medical retirement. On August 24, 2002, the victim officer succumbed to cardiopulmonary complications stemming from the initial gunshot wound.

ARKANSAS

A patrol officer with the Little Rock Police Department was fatally shot at 1:30 p.m. on February 1 at an apartment complex office while handling a mentally deranged individual who was acting suspiciously and making bizarre statements. The 34-year-old officer, with nearly 12 years of law enforcement experience, and a backup officer talked with the man for more than 10 minutes before attempting to escort him from the office. A struggle ensued during which the man began to assault the victim officer. The backup officer used a wrestling hold in an attempt to separate the two, but the man obtained the victim officer’s firearm, a .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun, and fired a first shot into the left side of the officer’s head. The backup officer grabbed the barrel of the weapon and held it tightly as the man fired a second round, which struck the victim officer in the left arm. The backup officer fired one round from his weapon into the side of the suspect and, after clearing a malfunction, fired two more rounds into the suspect’s back. Both the victim officer and the suspect were transported to a nearby hospital. The 28-year-old male was pronounced dead on arrival. The victim officer remained in critical condition until the next morning when he died.

CALIFORNIA

A 33-year-old deputy generalist with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department was shot and killed during a traffic stop near Irwindale at 10:40 a.m. on April 29. The 7-year veteran to law enforcement, who initiated the stop for unknown reasons, entered the vehicle’s license plate number into his Mobile Digital Terminal. According to witnesses, the man, known to law enforcement as a drug dealer, exited his vehicle and began walking towards the patrol unit. The deputy exited his vehicle, stood behind his opened car door, and ordered the individual to stop. The suspect stopped near the back of his own vehicle. The deputy approached the suspect from behind and was patting him down when the suspect grabbed a 9 mm semi-automatic handgun from his waistband with his right hand, spun around, and fired a shot at the deputy. The deputy fell to the ground and the suspect fired four more shots at him before fleeing in his vehicle. The victim officer suffered two fatal injuries, a chest wound from a bullet that went through his left arm before entering through the armhole of his protective vest and a wound to the front of his head. The suspect, a male in his mid-twenties, who has an extensive criminal history including various drug and weapons charges, remains at large at time of publication.

A 47-year-old deputy with the Fresno County Sheriff’s Department was shot and killed during a traffic stop about 11:45 p.m. on May 19. The deputy, who had nearly 3 years of law enforcement experience, had stopped a vehicle in Clovis. The driver of the vehicle was suspected of being involved in the shooting of a commercial street sweeper earlier that day. Before exiting the marked patrol car, the deputy, who was wearing body armor, provided dispatchers with the vehicle’s license plate number and location as well as a description of the vehicle and its occupant. As the deputy approached the car, the driver allegedly shot him once in the mouth area at close range with a .30-caliber lever-action rifle. The deputy died at the scene, and the suspected shooter fled in the deputy’s police car, which had a rifle inside. On May 25, the suspect, who had a history of mental instability, was found near Auberry in a camper on a rural residential lot. He exited the camper holding a rifle and pointed it at SWAT personnel, who then shot and killed the 21-year-old suspect. The officer’s weapon was recovered.

A 31-year-old police officer with the Red Bluff Police Department was gunned down at 1:30 a.m. on November 19 in an ambush as he was fueling his marked police vehicle at a gasoline station. The officer, who had nearly 4 years of law enforcement experience, was wearing body armor when he was shot three times with a .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun. He was shot twice in the back, but the rounds penetrated the vest because the ammunition was more powerful than the body armor’s capabilities. In addition, the victim officer was shot fatally once, execution-style, in the back of the head. There were no witnesses to the killing. The victim officer’s weapon was found approximately 10 feet from his body. It is unclear if the officer drew his weapon, if the suspect removed the officer’s weapon, or if the weapon ejected from the victim officer’s holster as he fell to the ground. On November 25, a 23-year-old male confessed over the telephone to his parents about the killing and told them he was at a hotel in Concord, New Hampshire. The suspect’s parents contacted law enforcement personnel with that information, and a felony warrant was issued in the early morning hours of November 26 for the suspect’s arrest. When authorities went to the hotel to arrest the suspect, he had barricaded himself in the hotel room. He demanded media access, which was provided and his confession was taped. Hostage negotiators then convinced him to surrender, and he was arrested around 9 a.m. that day and charged with Murder of a Peace Officer Engaged in Duties.

On November 30 at 10:30 a.m., a 42-year-old deputy sheriff with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department was fatally wounded after responding to a disturbance call in Artesia. The nearly 19-year veteran to law enforcement was among patrol units and an air unit that responded to numerous calls of two street gang members in the area of a rival street gang. Gunshots were also reported being fired. Members of the air unit spotted the two suspects; one suspect hid in a backyard and the other forced his way into a nearby residence. The deputies learned that inside the house there were two women who were afraid to leave. Fearing a hostage situation, they went to the residence and ordered the suspect to come out, but he refused. With the house surrounded by law enforcement personnel, a group of deputies attempted to kick in the front door. The suspect fired four shots from a .380-caliber semiautomatic pistol. One shot entered through the armhole of the victim officer’s protective vest and struck him in the chest. The victim officer attempted to draw his weapon as another deputy fired one round from his shotgun through the front door. The round struck the suspect in the right side and back. The 21-year-old suspect, who was on probation and under the influence of a controlled substance at the time of the incident, then shot himself in the head and died at the scene. The victim officer was transported to a local hospital where he died the same day. Officials later discovered that the occupants of the home had managed to escape before the deputies arrived.

FLORIDA

On November 13, a sergeant, aged 47, with the Tallahassee Police Department was shot and killed at 8 p.m. while responding to a robbery in progress. Reportedly, after kicking in the back door of a residence, a man held two females at gunpoint in the living room while he searched for drugs. Eventually, the man put the females in the bathroom and continued to loot their home, placing jewelry and compact discs into a pillowcase that he took to his vehicle; he then returned to remove a computer. While in the bathroom, one of the females called 911 on a cellular telephone, and officers with the Tallahassee Police Department were dispatched to the residence. Upon arriving, the sergeant, who had nearly 14 years’ law enforcement experience, parked one block away and walked toward the residence, which was located at the end of a dead end road with no lighting. After observing an idling vehicle at the end of the driveway, the veteran sergeant radioed dispatch with the vehicle’s license plate number. A second officer arrived at the scene and went to the rear of the residence; the sergeant moved toward the side of the residence where the front door was located. When the sergeant approached the door with his weapon drawn, a man emerged with a .357-caliber revolver and shot the sergeant fatally in the back of his head from a distance of 5 feet or less, as well as in the stomach below his body armor, the back, below his waist in the back, and his arms and hands. A third officer entering the area then saw the individual get into his vehicle and flee the scene through a field. Within minutes, officers located the vehicle and a pursuit ensued. They hit the assailant’s vehicle with the police car, and both vehicles slid from the roadway. Officers then apprehended the man, who confessed to the robbery and to firing the handgun at the scene of the crime. The 32-year-old suspect, who had an extensive criminal history and had been released from prison 4 12 months earlier, was arrested and charged with Homicide of a Law Enforcement Officer, Robbery with a Firearm, Burglary of a Dwelling, Possession of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon, Fleeing Police, and Kidnapping.

GEORGIA

A 42-year-old lieutenant with the Carroll County Sheriff’s Office was killed at 9:30 p.m. on September 3 while investigating a suspicious person. The lieutenant responded to a 911 call from a person who had reportedly witnessed a man setting fire to a residence in Carrollton. The witness also reported seeing the suspect fleeing with a can of gasoline from the burning dwelling, which was later discovered to be the suspect’s residence. The witness followed the man’s vehicle and continued to update the 911 center with information that was passed on to all patrol units. The veteran officer, with over 20 years of law enforcement experience, was the first officer to intercept the suspect’s vehicle. As the lieutenant attempted to pull over the suspect, a high-speed chase ensued. The alleged arsonist, who was reportedly distraught over his impending divorce, eventually stopped his vehicle and fled on foot, and the officer ran after him. The man entered a nearby residence where he allegedly fired 12 close-range rounds from a 9 mm semiautomatic handgun, killing the 85-year-old owner. The suspect immediately exited the residence, firing additional rounds at the pursuing officer. One of the rounds fatally struck the victim officer in his chest. The suspect ran back into the house and then out again as he fired at officers who were arriving at the scene. The 31-year-old male, who had previous charges against him for Aggravated Assault with a Motor Vehicle, Fleeing and Attempting to Elude Officer for Felony, and Failure to Appear, was shot by the officers and died shortly after being transported to a local hospital. The victim officer died at the scene.

ILLINOIS

A veteran police officer with the Chicago Police Department died March 19 of in-juries sustained the previous day while trying to serve a bench warrant. Shortly after 10 p.m. on March 18, the 47-year-old officer, with more than 20 years of experience in law enforcement, and his partner arrived at a residence to serve a bench warrant requiring the officers to bring the individual to court and authorizing forced entry into the residence, if necessary. Identifying themselves as police officers, the officers knocked on the door several times, but the occupant refused to open the door. A neighbor of the occupant also tried in vain to get the individual to open the door. Subsequently, the officer obtained a sledge-hammer, again identified himself as a police officer, and asked that the occupant open the door. When the occupant still refused to open the door, the officer hit it with the sledgehammer. His partner heard a gunshot and saw the victim officer fall across the door’s threshold. The victim officer had been shot in the front of the head at close range with a .22-caliber semiautomatic handgun. The victim officer’s partner and the neighbor took cover while the suspect continued shooting. The partner called for help, and additional officers responded to the scene. While under fire, officers removed the victim officer from the scene and shot the 77-year-old suspect in return fire. More than 40 shots were fired during the incident. The victim officer and the suspect were taken to different hospitals. The suspect died at 11:30 p.m. on March 18, and the officer succumbed to his wounds shortly after midnight on March 19.

About 8 p.m. on March 22 in Toulon, a deputy sheriff with the Stark County Sheriff’s Office was shot and killed while attempting to serve an arrest warrant to a man who had been arrested for assault by the department in the past and had been verbally, but not physically, abusive to officers. The 23-year-old deputy with 2 years of law enforcement experience knocked on the man’s door. Allegedly, the man came to the door and shot at the deputy, who was wearing body armor, from about 2 feet away with a sawed-off 12-gauge pump-action shotgun. The round hit the deputy’s badge, ricocheted up, and struck the officer in the neck, killing him instantly. Apparently, the man then took the deputy’s firearm and stole his police car. He drove approximately two blocks and rammed into a vehicle. Assumedly, he exited the police car, entered another residence, and killed a man and woman inside. The suspect returned to the police car and left the scene. About a block away, a responding officer rammed his patrol vehicle into the police car driven by the suspect. The man then engaged in a gunfight with what eventually included three police officers. One of the officers shot the suspect in the head. The man was taken into custody and transported to a hospital for treatment. The 60-year-old man, who had prior arrests for Assault, Aggravated Assault, and Disorderly Conduct, was charged with 12 counts of First-Degree Murder, four counts of Criminal Damage to Government Supported Property, three counts each of Aggravated Discharge of a Firearm and Attempted First-Degree Murder, two counts of Criminal Damage to Property, and one count each of Armed Robbery, Disarming a Peace Officer, Aggravated Vehicular Hijacking, Unlawful Use of Weapons, Home Invasion, and Aggravated Assault.

KENTUCKY

The 48-year-old sheriff of the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Office was shot and killed in an ambush at 7:15 p.m. on April 13. The officer, with 28 years’ experience in law enforcement, was leaving a benefit dinner in the city of Somerset. The officer, in uniform and wearing body armor, was unlocking the door to his police car when a single shot from a .25-06-caliber bolt-action rifle apparently fired from a wooded area more than 250 feet away fatally struck him in the side of the head. The assailant was seen leaving the area on a motorcycle. Police apprehended and arrested a 30-year-old suspect, who was a known narcotics user, a short time later in a rural area of the county. He was charged with Murder of a Police Officer. Two days later, a 34-year-old male and a 54-year-old male were also arrested and charged with Complicity to Commit Murder of a Police Officer.

LOUISIANA

A 25-year-old officer with the Marion Police Department was shot and killed following a felony traffic pursuit at 9:15 a.m. on March 5. The officer, who had 1 year of law enforcement experience, was responding to a call from a teller at the drive-through window of an area bank. Three males, aged 16, 22, and 23, in a pickup truck had attempted to cash a forged check at the bank. As the officer approached the bank, the 16-year-old driver sped away, and the officer followed. After a chase that lasted several minutes and approached speeds of 100 miles per hour, the driver lost control of the truck, which was later determined to have been stolen, and crashed into a ditch. The trio exited the truck through the passenger-side door. The officer stopped, exited his vehicle, and chased the driver, who was the last to exit the vehicle, into a wooded area. As the officer neared the 16-year-old, the teenager apparently turned and fired shots at close range from a 9 mm semiautomatic hand-gun. The first shot hit the officer in the chest and he dropped to his knees; a second and fatal shot hit him in his forehead. The driver was arrested and charged with First-Degree Murder and Aggravated Flight from Officer. The 22-year-old and 23-year-old men, both with previous arrests and convictions, were each charged with Voluntary Manslaughter.

Just before 3:30 a.m. on August 4, a police officer with the New Orleans Police Department was shot and killed while investigating a robbery in progress at a neighborhood bar. The 35-year-old officer had more than 4 years’ experience in law enforcement and was acting as Field Training Officer to his partner, a recent graduate of the police academy, when the call of a robbery in progress was dispatched. Responding to the dispatched call, the officers sat in their marked car across the intersection from the bar and observed that no activity was occurring outside the establishment. As the officers approached the bar in their cruiser, the robbers inside saw the police arrive and began a frantic search for an alternate exit. At some point, one of the suspects ordered the bartender to release the lock on the front door, and the suspect exited just as the officers drove past the door. Reportedly, he immediately fired 6 rounds from a .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun toward the passenger door of the police car as the victim officer attempted to exit the vehicle. Although the officer was wearing body armor, one of the bullets struck him fatally in the front of the head. The four men reported to be involved in the robbery–two aged 20, one aged 31, and one aged 35-were all arrested and charged with First-Degree Murder and 16 counts of Armed Robbery.

MARYLAND

Two deputy sheriffs with the Prince George’s County Sheriff’s Office were shot and killed on August 29 just after 9:30 in the evening while attempting to serve a Court Order Emergency Psychiatric Evaluation Order. The two deputies arrived at the home of the parents of the individual who had been ordered to be evaluated and the father directed them to the basement. The individual was with an associate when the deputies attempted to take him into custody. The man bolted from the basement and ran to an upstairs bedroom with the deputies in pursuit. The 53-year-old veteran Deputy Sheriff Sergeant, with 13 years of police experience, attempted to negotiate with him while the accompanying officer, with a little more than a year on the job, and the subject’s parents ob-served the conversation. After the man’s parents left the immediate scene, he became uncooperative. He apparently pulled a 9 mm semiautomatic pistol from behind the closet door by which he was partially concealed, and shot the sergeant in the throat and fatally in the chest. As the suspect fired his second shot, the 30-year-old Deputy Sheriff First Class, who was wearing a protective vest, stepped back and drew her weapon. Before the deputy could fire, the 23-year-old suspect shot six rounds at her, one of which mortally wounded her in the side of the head. The alleged shooter then stood over the sergeant and shot him 4 more times. The suspect and his 19-year-old male associate then fled the scene, and the suspect’s father called 911. The suspect, who was on probation at the time of the shooting, was arrested on August 31 and charged with Murder First Degree. His associate was arrested the same day and charged with Murder First Degree, Accessory After Fact.

An off-duty detective with the Baltimore Police Department was fatally wounded in an ambush just before 2 a.m. on November 23. The 37-year-old detective along with four acquaintances had just left an establishment where he was working security. As the veteran detective with 12 years of law enforcement experience approached his car, two men walked across the parking lot, produced handguns, and shot multiple rounds at the detective from less than 5 feet away. The detective, who was attempting to draw his weapon, was hit in the arms and hands, back, stomach, and fatally in the chest, and fell to the ground with his gun next to him. One of the detective’s acquaintances, who also worked at the establishment, picked up the gun and chased the two men on foot. The detective’s acquaintances got into a car, called 911, and then proceeded to chase the suspects’ vehicle. After a short car chase, the suspects stopped the vehicle, exited, and fled on foot. The detective’s acquaintances also stopped, exited their vehicle, and exchanged gunfire with the suspects as they chased them on foot. When police officers arrived at the scene of the foot-chase, they canvassed the area. A woman told the officers she saw someone go into a nearby building. The investigating officers heard a noise coming from inside the building and ordered the person to come out. The man complied, and officers took the 21-year-old male into custody. The officers located a 9 mm semiautomatic handgun in the building. A responding officer found the victim detective’s body and called a medical unit. The victim detective was transported to a local hospital and died less than an hour after the incident. Later that morning the two suspects, a 34-year-old male and a 22-year-old male, were arrested at the home of one of their friends. In interviews with investigators, the suspects revealed that they conspired to kill the detective because they believed the detective was responsible for arresting one of the men’s brothers. Through further investigation, authorities determined that the 9 mm pistol used in the murder of the detective was among items that had been stolen during a burglary of the home of a police officer earlier that month. A revolver was also recovered during the investigation, but laboratory technicians were unable to verify that it was used in this incident. The 21-year-old and 22-year-old suspects, both with prior drug possession arrests, were each charged with First-Degree Murder, Handgun on Person, Handgun Violation-Use/Felonious-Violent Crime, Conspiracy to Commit Murder-First Degree, and Illegal Possession of a Firearm. The 34-year-old, who is a known drug dealer on probation, was charged with First-Degree Murder and Handgun Violations.

MASSACHUSETTS

A 34-year-old patrol officer with the Westminster Police Department died on November 30 as a result of line-of-duty injuries sustained on May 10, 1999. Around 12:15 a.m. on the night of the incident, an officer on patrol duty stopped a car on the highway and, at the same time, observed a male walking along side of the road. Just then, an assisting patrol officer, who had nearly 12 years’ law enforcement experience, arrived at the scene; the two officers identified the pedestrian and attempted to investigate this suspicious person. How-ever, the man ran into the woods, so the officers ran after him. From a distance of 11-20 feet, the suspect allegedly fired at the assisting officer six times with a .357-caliber revolver, striking him in the face, the hand, and the leg. The victim officer returned fire and hit the suspect once. Responding emergency personnel administered medical aid to the victim officer and transported him to a medical center in Worcester where he was treated for his wounds. The 26-year-old suspect, who was on probation and had a previous criminal history, was taken into custody and charged with Assault with Intent to Murder, Assault and Battery with a Dangerous Weapon, and Larceny of a Firearm. As a result of the injuries he sustained to his head, the victim officer remained unconscious for 3 12 years until his death on November 30, 2002. Following the officer’s death, a grand jury charged his assailant with Murder.

MICHIGAN

Just after 9:30 p.m. on February 12, an officer with the Detroit Police Department was fatally stabbed after initiating a traffic stop. The 35-year-old police officer with 6 years of law enforcement experience parked his patrol car behind the suspect’s vehicle after the suspect had turned into the driveway of a local residence. The officer exited his patrol car and approached the driver. As he was attempting to question the driver, the driver fled on foot with the officer in pursuit. When the officer caught up with the man, a struggle ensued. The man allegedly stabbed the veteran officer, who was wearing body armor, in the back, arms/hands, and fatally in the neck. During the altercation the victim officer fired a shot inflicting a wound to the suspect’s stomach. The suspect fled in the officer’s patrol car and drove to a nearby hospital where he was treated and taken into police custody. Responding officers found the victim officer on the porch where the altercation occurred; he was taken to a local hospital where he died in the emergency room. The 22-year-old male was charged with First-Degree Murder and Murder First Degree Felony.

A 26-year-old patrol officer with the Hazel Park Police Department was shot and killed about 9:15 p.m. on July 28 while answering a disturbance call concerning an unleashed dog. As the officer, with 2 years of law enforcement experience, approached the residence, she encountered a man armed with a pump shotgun and immediately radioed for assistance. When responding officers arrived, they found the victim officer lying in the yard with a fatal wound to the throat, well above her protective armor. The officer was pronounced dead at 9:47 p.m. The 42-year-old suspect, who was under the influence of alcohol, was also lying in the yard with a gunshot wound to the abdomen from a single shot fired by the officer. The suspect was arrested and charged with Murder of Police Officer, Premeditated Murder, and Felony Firearm.

A Detroit police officer with 5 years of law enforcement experience was fatally shot in the head at 2:40 a.m. on August 11 while investigating suspicious persons. The plain clothed officer was investigating individuals who were allegedly gambling in front of a residence. He was wearing body armor and was bent over trying to handcuff an individual for illegally carrying a pistol when another person shot the officer at close range in the back of the head with a 9 mm semiautomatic handgun. The 31-year-old officer was taken to a local hospital where he died at 12:30 p.m. that day. The alleged shooter turned himself in to police the same day and was charged with Second-Degree Murder and Felony Firearms. The 27-year-old male had been arrested previously on charges of Felony Homicide-Man-slaughter-Involuntary and Felony Weapons Felony Firearms.

MINNESOTA

A 35-year-old officer with the Minne-apolis Police Department was shot and killed on August 1 while responding to a domestic disturbance call. The incident began shortly before 6 p.m. when police received a complaint that a woman was threatening a relative with a gun. Officers who responded to the residence learned that the suspect had fled the scene in her aunt’s vehicle. Investigators broadcast the vehicle’s description and the suspect’s address to officers on the street. The victim officer, a 7-year veteran, and a back-up officer went to the address and found a female sitting in the driver’s seat of the vehicle in question. The two officers searched the woman but found no weapon. The woman then asked permission to use a public rest-room in her apartment building. The officers accompanied the suspect into the bathroom. While in the bathroom stall, the suspect apparently retrieved a small .38-caliber revolver from between her buttocks and emerged from the stall firing the gun. One round hit the victim officer in the front lower torso, below her protective vest. The wounded officer was able to fire three shots, all of which hit the 60-year-old shooter, killing her. The police officer was transported to an area hospital, but she died on the operating table.

MISSISSIPPI

A 42-year-old patrol officer with the Moss Point Police Department died about 11:45 p.m. on October 17 when the vehicle of a fleeing subject struck his patrol car. The patrol officer, who had over 21 years’ law enforcement experience, had answered a radio request for assistance from an officer in pursuit of a suspect traveling the wrong way on a divided highway. After establishing a road block in the suspect’s path with his patrol car, the veteran officer attempted to exit the vehicle; however, the suspect allegedly rammed into the patrol car with his vehicle. Upon impact, the victim officer was ejected from the patrol unit and was thrown over the median divider into the opposite lane of the high-way. He suffered fatal injuries to the front of the head, as well as to his neck and upper torso. Responding emergency medical technicians pronounced the victim officer dead at the scene. Though the suspect attempted to flee on foot, the first responding officer apprehended and arrested the man a short distance from the scene of the incident. The 26-year-old male, who was on probation for a previous arrest of Aggravated Assault, was charged with Capital Murder.

MISSOURI

On December 9 at 12:05 p.m., a 48-year-old detective with the Dent County Sheriff’s Department was shot to death while attempting an arrest. Responding to a report of a double homicide at a residence in a rural area of the county, the veteran detective, with 10 years of law enforcement experience, and the sheriff arrived at the suspected killer’s residence. A witness to the murders had identified the man but had provided incorrect information concerning his vehicle. Although the officers did not see the described vehicle at the residence, they approached the home. A woman, later identified as the suspect’s girlfriend, opened the door and spoke to the officers. As the officers continued walking toward the residence, the sus-pect allegedly stepped to the door with a .22-caliber semiautomatic handgun hid-den behind his back. When the detective was within 10 feet of the door, the assailant fired at least three shots, striking the victim officer in her abdomen and fatally on the left rear side of her head. The sheriff received a superficial wound to the abdomen, but he was able to draw his service weapon and return fire, striking the suspect in the left side of his face and his left leg. The suspect’s girlfriend was shot twice as she and the suspect retreated into the residence. The man exchanged gunfire with other officers who arrived to assist, but he surrendered a short time later. The victim detective was airlifted to a local hospital where she died about 4 a.m. the next day. Both the 53-year-old male and his girlfriend recovered from their injuries. The man previously had been arrested for Possession/Sales of Dangerous Drugs, DWI/Leaving the Scene of an Accident, and Carrying a Concealed Weapon. He had a prior law enforcement relation-ship with the victim officer and was also known to be a user of a controlled substance and was under the influence of a controlled substance at the time of the incident. He was charged with three counts of First-Degree Murder, four counts of Armed Criminal Action, Assault of a Law Enforcement Officer, and Felony Possession of a Controlled Substance.

NEW YORK

On February 11 at 9:25 a.m., a trooper with the New York State Police was killed while investigating a complaint from a woman in Crown Point reporting she had been threatened with a knife by her former boyfriend. While the 28-year-old trooper with just over 1 year of law enforcement experience was obtaining a deposition from the woman in her residence, the ex-boyfriend returned and exited his vehicle armed with a .30-30-caliber lever-action rifle. Apparently, he fired three shots into the residence, one of which struck the victim trooper in the lower back, penetrating his body armor and mortally wounding him. The 36-year-old suspect then entered the residence in pursuit of the complainant and fired one more round at the trooper, striking the collar of his jacket. The man located the woman and shot her twice at close range before killing himself with a single gunshot to the chest.

A 36-year-old deputy with the Broome County Sheriff’s Office was killed with his own weapon in an unprovoked attack at 3:30 a.m. on July 4 in Kirkwood, New York. Prior to the incident, three males, aged 22, 22, and 23, had apparently stolen a pickup truck from a dealership in Pennsylvania and had driven it to a small park in Kirkwood, where they had left a second vehicle. The three then returned to Pennsylvania in the pickup truck where they drove it through the front door of a fireworks store that apparently sold firearms as well. They took approximately 12 firearms before returning to the park in New York. The three were transferring the stolen weapons from the pickup truck to the second vehicle when the veteran officer, with 13 years of law enforcement experience, arrived. Apparently, as the officer exited his vehicle, the 23-year-old suspect and one of the 22-year-old men hid in weeds behind the truck. The other 22-year-old man dove under the truck and began firing at the deputy with a .40-caliber weapon, striking the officer in the knee, the abdomen, and the body armor he was wearing. The alleged shooter then entered the truck and ran over the victim officer, who struggled to obtain his weapon, a .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun. The other 22-year-old suspect then ran out of the weeds and tried to shoot the officer with a 9 mm weapon, but the magazine ejected. Apparently, the suspect then took the officer’s weapon and fatally shot him in the head several times. A passerby found the victim officer on the ground near his patrol vehicle 1-2 hours after the incident. All three men were arrested on July 6. The 22-year-old men, both of whom had previous arrest records, were charged with First-Degree Murder. The 23-year-old suspect was charged with Criminal Pos-session of a Weapon.

OHIO

A deputy sheriff with the Muskingum County Sheriff’s Office was shot and killed during a traffic stop on January 8 in Zanesville. The 39-year-old deputy sheriff, with more than 8 years of law enforcement experience, radioed a registration request on a license plate at 6 p.m. and also indicated that same car was parked at a residence where some-one was flagging him down. A short time later, a male caller placed a 911 cell phone call to report that a deputy was down. Arriving at the scene, the investigators found the veteran deputy, who was wearing body armor, fatally shot in the left side of the head. They recovered a .45-caliber shell casing as well as the victim deputy’s pocket note-book, opened to a page that had a Social Security number written on it. Investigators soon learned that the number was assigned to the boyfriend of the suspect vehicle’s owner. Moreover, he had been seen driving the car earlier in the day, and he had picked up his girlfriend at her place of employment shortly after the shooting. Officers spotted the ve-hicle later that evening however, and the driver pulled away when deputies tried to stop the car. The occupants later abandoned the car and fled on foot to a wooded area where they were appre-hended. The suspect had a .45-caliber semiautomatic handgun in his possession and admitted to deputies that he had shot an officer. The 27-year-old male, who was on probation at the time of the shooting, was arrested and charged with Aggravated Murder.

A Dayton police officer with nearly 2 years of law enforcement experience was critically wounded after responding to a domestic disturbance call at 3:30 p.m. on May 15, 2000. The 40-year-old officer and her partner were in their patrol vehicle en route to the residence where a man was reported to have shot at his girlfriend and her 4-year-old son. The suspect was leaving the residence as officers arrived, and a short car chase ensued. He stopped his vehicle, exited with a .30-caliber semi-automatic rifle and aimed it at the victim officer’s partner. Both officers exited the patrol vehicle and took cover, the partner behind the vehicle and the officer behind the vehicle’s right front fender as four other officers arrived at the scene. The first officers at the scene ordered the man to put down his weapon, but he replied that if they didn’t drop their weapons he would shoot them. A little more than a minute later, the suspect reportedly approached the officer who had taken cover behind the right front fender of the police car and told her to drop her gun or he would “blow her head off.” The officer, who was wearing body armor, placed her gun on the ground and raised her hands. The suspect then shot the victim officer in the neck from less than 5 feet away. Her partner returned fire and shot the man six times. The 21-year-old offender, who was on conditional release pending criminal prosecution, was known to law enforcement as a drug dealer. He was treated for his wounds, then charged with three counts of Felony Assault, two counts of Aggravated Robbery, one count each of Child Endangerment, Failure to Comply, Carrying Concealed Weapon, Having Weapons Under Disability, and Unlawful Possession of Dangerous Weapons. The victim officer was left quadriplegic as a result of the shooting and died of her injuries on August 25, 2002, at the age of 43.

A 31-year-old patrol officer with the Massillon Police Department was shot and killed August 9 just after 8:30 p.m. The 7-year veteran was assisting state troopers in the pursuit of an armed suspect who had fled a traffic stop. During the initial stop by the Ohio State Highway Patrol, the driver refused to give the trooper his license and fled the scene entering Massillon city limits. The suspect stopped a second time, pointed a 7.62×25 mm semiautomatic pistol at the pursuing trooper, and then fled to a nearby construction site. The trooper retreated to his cruiser and notified his dispatcher that the suspect was armed. However, the victim officer, who arrived at the construction site to assist the troopers, did not receive the dispatch that the suspect was armed due to a delay in transmitting information because of different radio frequencies. The suspect allegedly shot at the patrol officer once, hitting his driver side mirror. As the officer exited his vehicle, the suspect shot a second time striking the officer fatally in the left lower back below his protective vest. The trooper who had been in pursuit of the suspect and three other Massillon police officers arrived at the scene. The suspect drove his vehicle at the officers firing his hand-gun at them. Officers returned fire as the suspect circled past them. When the 61-year-old male stopped and exited his vehicle, officers shot and killed him at the scene.

OREGON

On September 14, at 8 a.m., a 38-year-old deputy with the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office was shot and killed while investigating a disturbance call that included a report of public indecency at a motel located in a rural area of the county. The officer interviewed the suspect, obtained his identification, and returned to the patrol vehicle to provide the information to the dispatch office. The deputy, who had nearly 9 years of law enforcement experience, indicated to the dispatcher that the man seemed irritated and had lied about not having a vehicle and identification. The dispatch office sent a back-up officer to the scene. Soon after the corporal arrived, the dispatch office received a call from another motel resident who reported hearing the suspect loading a firearm. The assisting officer joined the deputy at the suspect’s vehicle parked near the motel room. At first, the suspect seemed cooperative, but after the deputy completed the citation, he asked the suspect for permission to search the vehicle’s trunk for firearms. The trunk lid was already open, and the man reached up toward the lid in what appeared to be a movement to close it. Instead, he suddenly reached inside the trunk and pulled out a .44-caliber lever-action rifle that had been concealed under a blanket. Both officers immediately drew their firearms and began to fire. The deputy, who was wearing body armor at the time of the attack, fired four shots before he was fatally struck in the face by a round fired by the suspect. The corporal fired seven rounds, striking the suspect with at least one of the shots. Both the deputy and the suspect died at the scene. The suspect, a 36-year-old male, was on probation and had a history of resisting arrest, drug possession, and other battery charges. He also was a known user of narcotics and was under the influence of a controlled substance at the time of the incident.

PENNSYLVANIA

About 9:30 p.m. on January 30, a patrol officer with the Upper Darby Town-ship Police Department was shot and killed while investigating a suspicious vehicle. The 43-year-old officer, with nearly 9 years of law enforcement experience, radioed police dispatchers that he would be out of his vehicle checking two subjects. Within minutes a back-up officer arrived to find the victim officer fatally shot once in the side of his head. A witness to the shooting reported that when the victim officer started to transmit on police radio via his shoulder microphone, a man pulled a .32-caliber semiautomatic handgun from his pocket, fired a shot, and fled the area by vehicle. Information regarding the individual was broadcast to all surrounding jurisdictions, and in the early hours of January 31, the suspect’s vehicle was observed by the Pennsylvania State Police. A pursuit ensued and ended when the suspect’s vehicle crashed. The 52-year-old male, who had an extensive arrest record, was a known drug dealer, and was on probation at the time of the incident, was arrested and charged with Murder, Aggravated Assault, Firearms, and related offenses.

At 3:30 p.m. on November 10, a 34-year-old trooper with the Pennsylvania State Police died as the result of a gun-shot wound inflicted around 2:30 a.m. on November 9 by an armed DUI suspect in Ebensburg during a traffic pursuit and stop. In an initial traffic stop effected by a municipal officer, the suspected DUI violator was unsteady and belligerent, prompting the officer to call for backup. When the responding officer arrived, the suspect brandished a weapon, then fled the scene. A chase ensued during which the suspect apparently stopped his vehicle twice for periods of 10-20 minutes, but he did not respond to officers’ attempts to negotiate his surrender. Officers from two other municipal departments assisted in the pursuit, and a fourth municipal department deployed tire-deflation devices that flattened three of the tires on the suspect’s vehicle. However, the suspect drove off again, and the veteran trooper, who had nearly 11 years’ law enforcement experience, and his partner joined the chase. They followed two of the municipal police vehicles on a route parallel to the pursuit route in an apparent attempt to head off the suspect. As the two municipal vehicles and the state police vehicle turned right onto a connecting street, the suspect reportedly turned left onto the same street, heading directly at on-coming police cars. Though the first municipal car avoided impact with the suspect, the second collided with him. The suspect swerved across the street and struck a utility pole near the state police car that was stopped with no room to continue forward. He then allegedly exited his vehicle with a gun in each hand and fired at the state police vehicle from a distance of approximately 7 yards. Wearing body armor and using his car for cover, the trooper, his partner, and municipal officers all returned fire. The suspect allegedly fired at least eight rounds; one bullet from a .41 magnum handgun struck the victim trooper in the forehead over his left eye. Officers hit the suspect in the torso and extremities with approximately 12 rounds before he collapsed. Both the victim trooper and the suspect were treated by emergency medical technicians at the scene and flown to a nearby hospital where they both underwent surgery. However, the victim trooper died of massive brain injuries the following day. The 45-year-old suspect, who had a previous arrest for DUI and was under the influence of alcohol at the time of the incident, recovered from his wounds and was charged with First-Degree Murder, one count of Criminal Homicide, two counts of Criminal Attempt/Criminal Homicide, six counts of Aggravated Assault, eight counts of Recklessly Endangering An-other Person, and one count of Fleeing or Attempting to Elude Police Officers.

PUERTO RICO

A 28-year-old agent with the Police of Puerto Rico, Toa Baja, was shot outside her apartment in Guaynabo at 3:30 a.m. on January 9 in a suspected ambush. Apparently, the agent, who had 7 years of law enforcement experience, encountered a man near her vehicle as she was leaving her residence to go to work. The agent and the man began talking, but the conversation turned into an argument. He then allegedly drew a 9 mm handgun and shot the agent six times in the chest. The victim officer was taken to a local hospital where she died at 4 p.m. on January 21. The unidentified male remains at large at time of publication.

Shortly before 11:30 p.m. on January 11, an agent with the Police of Puerto Rico in Puerto Nuevo was killed during a robbery. The 37-year-old agent, who had 16 years of experience in law enforcement, was off duty and at a bar in Puerto Nuevo when two men entered and said they were robbing the establishment. One of the men approached the agent and demanded money. In an at-tempt to subdue the individual, the agent was shot twice at close range with a 9 mm semiautomatic handgun during an ensuing struggle. The victim agent was shot in the front of the head and in the rear upper right side of his back. The suspects then fled the bar with about $200 and the victim agent’s service weapon, a 9 mm semiautomatic hand-gun. Both men remain at large at time of publication.

A 36-year-old police officer with the Police of Puerto Rico was ambushed at 9 a.m. January 15 in Guayama while at the courthouse securing indictments related to a car theft ring apparently involving a Guayama police officer. The officer, with more than 13 years of law enforcement experience, had gone to the Guayama courthouse to discuss the case at the State Attorney General’s office. After the meeting, the officer was standing in front of that office and talking to a Vic Tim of the car theft ring when the officer suspected of involvement in the theft ring approached them. The officer suspected of involvement in the ring told the other officer that a mechanic assisting in the case was approaching from the opposite direction. When the officer turned to look for the mechanic, the suspect officer allegedly drew a 9 mm semiautomatic handgun from his fanny pack and fired one shot, hitting the victim officer in the back of the head and killing him instantly. A court deputy and a Puerto Rico police officer who were on the scene drew their weapons and told the 39-year-old suspect to drop his gun. The suspect instead fired another round at the pair, wounding the deputy. Both law enforcement officers returned fire, critically injuring the suspect. He was taken to a hospital and died there 10 days later.

On April 24, at 7:50 p.m., an officer with the Department of Veterans Affairs in San Juan, Puerto Rico, was shot to death in an ambush while he attended his post at the back gate of the Veteran’s Hospital in Rio Piedras. A video from the hospital’s security system showed that the 53-year-old officer, who had 23 years of law enforcement experience, was approached by two individuals while he was performing his duties in the guard station. When the officer noticed the individuals, they were already very close to the guard house. A struggle ensued, and one of the assailants shot the victim officer with a .38-caliber handgun at point blank range. One bullet struck the officer in his chest and a second shot wounded him fatally in the side of his head. Investigating officers believe that the suspects were attempting to steal the victim officer’s service revolver, but they were unsuccessful. The unidentified assailants, who remain at large at time of publication, were also seen fleeing from the scene after the murder of the officer.

A 29-year-old agent with the Police of Puerto Rico, San Juan, was fatally shot during an undercover drug operation in Rio Piedras at 4:30 a.m. on September 26. Shortly after arriving in civilian clothes at a housing project and exiting their un-marked vehicles, the veteran agent with 7 years’ law enforcement experience and a dozen other agents overheard shouts throughout the housing project warning of the presence of law enforcement. Moments later, a series of shots rang out from the upper levels of two high-rise buildings, striking the parking lot below. Police agents took cover behind their vehicles and requested assistance. For approximately 7 minutes, snipers fired about 50 rounds from high-powered rifles. At some point in the attack, one round struck the victim agent in the back of the head, killing him instantly. Remaining agents and responding tactical units raided the upper floors of the buildings and recovered three rifles, a pistol, and large quantities of heroin and cocaine. Although seven individuals were detained immediately following the incident, all were subsequently released. The investigation is ongoing.

SOUTH CAROLINA

Two officers with the Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office were shot and killed on January 8 in an apparent ambush in Burton. At 4:30 p.m., the 35-year-old corporal, with nearly 12 years’ law enforcement experience, and 43-year-old lance corporal, with nearly 11 years’ law enforcement experience, were responding to a domestic disturbance call and radioed dispatch that they were ready to enter the mobile home for which the disturbance call was reported. Moments later, several neighbors called the dispatcher and reported shots fired. Investigators determined that the gunman, who was hiding in the closet, jumped out and fired 20 shots from his 7.62×39 mm semiautomatic rifle in a half-circle around the room, ambush-style. Responding officers found the corporal, who was wearing body armor, near the bedroom door with massive head injuries, as well as shots to his upper back, arms, and hands. The lance corporal, who was also wearing protective body armor, had been shot in the upper torso, the rear below his waist, arms, hands, and fatally to the front of his head. Police apprehended a 39-year-old suspect after a motorist observed him hiding nearby under a small bridge and notified the authorities. The man, who had a prior arrest record, was arrested without incident and charged with two counts of Murder.

Just before 8:30 p.m. on January 19, a 36-year-old private with the Charleston Police Department, who had more than 6 years of law enforcement experience, was shot and killed in an unprovoked attack by an individual leaving a shooting at a fast-food restaurant. Before the incident, the suspect had been involved in a traffic accident near a restaurant where emergency medical personnel were eating. The personnel were tending to the individual when he became enraged and began firing a .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun at them. As the suspect fled, he killed one paramedic and severely injured another. The fleeing suspect came upon the officer, who was wearing body armor and working an off-duty assignment at a local college dormitory. The suspect recognized him as a law enforcement officer and fired at the Vic Tim officer from a distance of 6-10 feet, striking him in the torso and arm and fatally in the head. The 19-year-old suspect escaped from that scene and fired at another officer also working off duty at another location. Following a footchase with several officers in pursuit, the suspect was apprehended. He was charged with two counts of Murder, Assault and Battery with Intent to Kill, and Possession of a Firearm during Violent Crime. Shortly before 2:30 in the morning on July 7, a 38-year-old corporal with the South Carolina Highway Patrol was shot and killed during a traffic stop. While supervising a safety checkpoint in Goose Creek, the officer, who had more than 12 years of law enforcement experience, approached the passenger’s side of a vehicle that had been stopped at the checkpoint. The passenger reportedly exited the car and fired twice at the corporal with a .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun, mortally wounding him in the front lower torso/stomach area below his protective vest. The victim officer fired several rounds at the suspect who, it was later learned, was a prison escapee. The other officers also returned fire, wounding the suspect, whose weapon malfunctioned during the gunbattle. The 22-year-old alleged killer fled the scene but was later arrested and charged with Murder and two counts of Attempted Murder. The driver of the vehicle, a 20-year-old female, was arrested and charged with Possession of a Stolen Vehicle, Accessory After the Fact of Murder, and several drug offenses.

A patrol officer with the Myrtle Beach Police Department was fatally shot at 12:30 a.m. on December 29 while investigating a suspicious person. The 28-year-old patrol officer and another on-duty officer, each in a marked patrol vehicle, had stopped at the same time at an all-night restaurant for coffee. They observed a man who one of the officers recognized as a suspect in a recent shooting/homicide. The two officers approached the man in the parking lot, and knowing that the suspect was a potentially violent and armed offender, the officers attempted to search him for weapons. The officers turned the suspect around to do the search, and the man, who for only a few seconds had his back to the officers, suddenly turned around and fired two shots with a .45-caliber semiautomatic handgun. Both rounds hit the patrol officer, who was wearing body armor, fatally in the front of the head. The other officer and the suspect exchanged gunfire. The suspect was hit in the leg but managed to get away in a car allegedly driven by his girlfriend. The 25-year-old man was apprehended a short time later and charged with Murder, Assault and Battery with Intent to Kill, Grand Larceny (value $5,000 or more), and Resisting Arrest with a Deadly Weapon.

TENNESSEE

A Chattanooga police officer with nearly 4 years of law enforcement experience was shot and killed with her service weapon, a .45-caliber semiautomatic handgun, after struggling with a college student who had fled an area hospital while awaiting a mental evaluation. The 26-year-old officer was wearing body armor when she was shot seven times at close range in the front of the head, the front upper torso, arms, and fatally in the rear of the head. The incident occurred shortly before 1:30 p.m. on May 6. Earlier that day, another Chattanooga police officer had transported the male student to the hospital for a mental evaluation after school officials reported that the student was a danger to himself or others. While awaiting evaluation, the student escaped from the examination room, and the officer who had transported him to the hospital began chasing him. The officer requested assistance. Responding to the request, the victim officer notified the police dispatcher that she had the suspect in sight and that he was running. A few seconds later, the victim officer radioed the dispatcher that she was struggling with the suspect, and about 20 seconds after that, the officer said the suspect was trying to get her gun. Additional responding officers arrived at the scene to find the suspect was standing over the victim officer, who was lying on the ground. The 20-year-old male attempted to elude the responding officers but was taken into custody less than a block from the scene. After the shooting, the suspect had apparently thrown the victim officer’s weapon into a drainage culvert, but other officers later recovered it during the crime scene investigation. The man, who was apparently under the influence of narcotics at the time of the incident, was arrested and charged with First-Degree Murder.

On December 4 about 6:05 p.m., a 33-year-old detective with the Narcotics Unit of the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office was shot while assisting in the delivery of a search warrant for cocaine and marijuana violations at a home in Memphis. The detective, who had nearly 9 years of law enforcement experience, was assigned to guard the door-breaching team and to enter the residence first with his weapon. As the warrant team approached the residence, the detective positioned himself to the right of the front door. Entry officers knocked on the door, stated their official identity, and announced their intentions. When the occupant of the dwelling did not respond after a reasonable amount of time, the officers rammed the outer security door and began to breach the inner door. Someone inside the dwelling began shooting at the officers through the door and walls. The detective, who was wearing body armor at the time of the attack, was wounded in the chest when a bullet from a .357-caliber revolver entered through the right armhole of the vest. He was carried by officers to safety where he received initial medical aid and then was transported to a local medical center. While some of the officers exchanged gunfire with the alleged assailant, deputies entered the residence with a K-9 police dog and arrested two men. One suspect, a 45-year-old male who was a known narcotics dealer and who had an extensive history of arrests for drug- and alcohol-related offenses, was charged with First-Degree Murder and Convicted Felon in Possession of a Handgun. The officers subsequently determined that the second man was not an offender but was only a witness who was present in the residence at the time of the incident. The victim detective underwent two emergency surgeries but died at the hospital about 8 p.m.

TEXAS

A 37-year-old captain with the White Settlement Police Department was fatally shot at 1:15 p.m. on April 24. He and an investigator were backing up other officers responding to a domestic disturbance call involving an armed suspect. When the captain, a 16-year veteran to law enforcement, and the investigator arrived at the residence, the investigator remained in front of the suspect’s house, and the captain went around the house and positioned himself in the backyard. As the suspect exited the house with a semiautomatic handgun, the captain entered the house through the backdoor. Officers in front of the house ordered the man to drop his gun and get on the ground. The man refused and returned to his house. A short time later, officers heard several shots from inside the house. Moments later, the captain came through the front door and collapsed. Officers rushed to the captain’s aid, removed him from the scene, and attempted to treat his wounds. The captain suffered four gunshot wounds to the chest and one each in the shoulder and left arm from the suspect’s .45-caliber semiautomatic pistol. He was taken to a local hospital where he died of the chest wounds during surgery. Officers attempted to contact the suspect, but received no response. A SWAT team took over the scene and attempted to establish contact with the suspect, also to no avail. After obtaining a search warrant, the SWAT team entered the house and found the 68-year-old male dead from seven gunshot wounds received in the exchange of gunfire with the victim officer.

A sergeant with the Limestone County Sheriff’s Office serving on an auto theft task force was killed about 3:40 p.m. on May 2 in an ambush as he and other officers were preparing to investigate stolen farm equipment on a property near Shive. The 34-year-old officer, with 12 years of law enforcement experience, was among other officers getting permission for the search from a woman at the house when he was fatally shot in the chest. A shot from a .25-06-caliber bolt-action rifle came from the direction of a barn behind the house. Gunfire trapped two officers in the house until a male ran into the woods behind the house. Officers began to set up a search area to look for the individual whom they suspected fired the shots. Two officers–one with the Department of Public Safety and one with the Lampasas County Sheriff’s Office–were shot and wounded at about 5:45 p.m. as they were setting up a perimeter around the search area. The victim sergeant and the injured officers were taken from the scene in an armored car. More than 75 officers from several law enforcement agencies searched for the man using tracking dogs and helicopters. Just before 9 a.m. on May 3, officers found the body of the 34-year-old man lying within the perimeter. On parole for felony theft, he had apparently shot himself near some trees on the property.

A sergeant with the City of Andrews Department of Public Safety’s drug task force died of injuries sustained at 9:30 a.m. on May 16 while confronting an individual aboard a long-distance commercial bus in Pecos. The 38-year-old sergeant, with more than 9 years of experience in law enforcement, boarded the bus with two other officers to con-duct a routine drug interdiction operation. The sergeant walked to the back of the bus and began questioning a man who, unknown to officials at the time, was a wanted felon. The man drew a .380-caliber semiautomatic handgun and fired twice at the victim officer at close range, striking him in the back and fatally in the chest. The other officers fired three shots at the suspect, striking and killing him. The victim officer was transported to a local hospital and then to a Lubbock hospital where he died of his injuries about 8 hours later. The 19-year-old suspect, who was under the influence of narcotics at the time of the incident, had several prior arrests, including Evading Arrest-Detention and Aggravated Assault Causing Serious Bodily Injury.

A 34-year-old police officer with the Beaumont Police Department died of head injuries after he was intentionally struck by a vehicle while responding to a domestic dispute call on September 6 just after 11 p.m. The officer, who had nearly 12 years of law enforcement experience, responded to the call with another officer. Apparently, a man had sexually assaulted his girlfriend and attacked the girl’s father with a baseball bat, causing a severe head wound. When emergency medical service (EMS) personnel arrived at the scene, the suspect assaulted them by punching through a window in the ambulance and using the bat to smash the ambulance’s windshield. Upon arrival, the initial responding officer exited his vehicle and walked along the road toward the ambulance and the EMS workers. As the officer approached them, the suspect, who had gotten into his car, struck the victim officer with the vehicle in spite of the officer’s efforts to elude the speeding vehicle. The officer sustained fatal fractures to the back of the head. Then, the suspect drove the car into the ambulance, injuring the girlfriend’s father and the EMS personnel who were treating him. The suspect, aged 23, was immediately taken into custody by other responding officers, arrested, and charged with Capital Murder, Sexual Assault, and Aggravated Assault with a Deadly Weapon.

A patrol officer with the Ferris Police Department was gunned down just before 3 p.m. on October 6 after responding to a disturbance call regarding a person with a firearm at a local grocery store and gasoline station. The 28-year-old officer, who had more than 2 years of law enforcement experience, was dispatched to the scene where a clerk reported a male who was wielding a shot-gun in the parking lot had shot a man. After securing the safety of several people at the scene, the officer saw the body of the victim on the ground between a gasoline pump and a pick-up truck. Reportedly, the suspect then opened fire with a 12-gauge shotgun, striking the victim officer from a distance of 21-50 feet under the left arm, in the front be-low the waist, and fatally in the front up-per torso, where a shot entered his body armor through the side panels. Before collapsing to the ground, the victim officer returned fire striking the suspect, who had taken cover inside a car, at least three times. The suspect, injured and still carrying the shotgun, exited the car and ran to evade police; however, he was apprehended by a police officer responding to the scene. Law enforcement personnel later found that the 30-year-old suspect had been picked up on a mental warrant a few weeks before the incident. The victim officer was flown to a Dallas hospital, but he died during surgery. The suspect was arrested and charged with two counts of Capital Murder.

UTAH

About 7:40 a.m. on November 18, a 39-year-old police officer with the West Jordan Police Department was shot and killed in an ambush. The officer, an 8-year veteran of law enforcement, responded to a call from a man who said his son had pulled a gun on him while they were at the home of his son’s friend. The son had left the residence of the subdivision where the alleged incident occurred. When the officer arrived, the father pointed the officer in the direction he believed his son had left on foot. As the officer, who was wearing body armor, entered a park within the subdivision, the suspect, who was concealed by a fence, fired three shots from a 9 mm semiautomatic hand-gun. One fatal shot struck the victim officer in the head. The suspect fled on foot, carjacked a van, and drove to another subdivision several miles away. After he was confronted by a detective, the 16-year-old suspect, with a criminal history that included Possession of Burglary Tools, Carrying a Loaded Firearm-Vehicle, and Assault-Risk of Bodily Injury, shot and killed himself with his own gun.

VIRGINIA

Shortly before 2:45 p.m. on May 17, a 43-year-old deputy with the Pittsylvania County Sheriff’s Office was killed along a highway near Danville during a traffic stop. Attempting to intervene in a domestic dispute, the deputy, who had nearly 3 years of law enforcement experience, had stopped two drivers along a highway. One driver was a woman; the other was her boyfriend, who was following her. The officer, who knew the man through a non-law enforcement relationship, was aware the pair were having domestic problems. The deputy spoke to the woman to assure she was unharmed. She asked the officer to serve a “Trespassing Notice” on her boyfriend, and the officer allowed her to leave. The officer apparently did not have a notice available, so he called for another unit to bring him the paperwork. It took an investigator about 3 minutes to arrive. At the scene, the investigator found the victim officer fatally wounded. The victim officer was wearing body armor; however, he was fatally shot once at close range in the side of the head. Investigators later determined the victim officer had been shot with a .380-caliber semiautomatic handgun. The suspect had left the scene. Subsequent investigation led officers to the 23-year-old suspect’s home where he was taken into custody later that day and charged with Capital Murder.

WASHINGTON

A deputy, aged 46, with the King County Sheriff’s Office was killed during an investigation of a suspicious incident shortly after 5 p.m. on June 22 in Newcastle. The deputy, who had 7 years of experience in law enforcement, responded to a call about a naked man who was pounding on vehicles in traffic. Seeing the individual trying to forcibly board a bus, the deputy tried to calm the man, but he charged the officer. The deputy then sprayed the individual with Mace, but it had no effect on him. The two men struggled, and a passerby tried to assist the officer. The deputy and the naked man fell to the ground. As the deputy fell, his .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun came out of its holster. The man with whom the deputy was struggling picked up the gun and began shooting. The deputy started to run but was struck once in the hip area below his protective vest and fell to the ground. The 44-year-old suspect approached the officer and fatally shot him three times at close range in the back of the head. He fired an additional 13 rounds in the area and fled to his wife’s nearby apartment. The suspect called King County dispatchers and surrendered almost immediately. Officials recovered the victim deputy’s weapon in the apartment. The suspect, who was on probation and under the influence of a controlled sub-stance at the time of the incident, was arrested and charged with Aggravated Murder First Degree.

WISCONSIN

Two patrol officers with the Hobart/Lawrence Police Department were killed about 4:20 p.m. on July 22 in an ambush. Their shift had just begun, and they were sitting in their patrol vehicle parked along a highway in Hobart going over paperwork. A full-size pick-up truck veered to the left and accelerated to 70 mph, came across the center line, and hit the patrol car broadside. A 56-year-old officer with more than 32 years of law enforcement experience, and a 32-year-old officer with just over 3 years’ law enforcement experience were killed instantly in the incident. Both were wearing body armor. The 27-year-old male driver, who was slightly injured, admitted to investigating officers that he intentionally rammed the officers’ car deliberately killing the two officers. He was arrested the same day and charged with two counts of First-Degree Intentional Homicide.

Section I–Law Enforcement Officers Accidentally Killed

Methodology

This section contains data regarding accidental deaths of duly sworn local, state, and federal law enforcement officers who met the same criteria as the officers who were feloniously killed. The officers were working in an official capacity, had full arrest powers, were wearing a badge (ordinarily), carried a firearm (ordinarily), and were paid from governmental funds set aside specifically for payment of sworn law enforcement representatives.

Overview

According to data reported by local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies, 77 law enforcement officers were accidentally killed while acting in official capacities in 2002. These officers’ deaths occurred in 32 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. City police departments employed 29 of the victim officers; county police and sheriff’s offices employed 24 officers; state agencies employed 14 of the officers; federal agencies employed 8; and Puerto Rico employed 2 of the victim officers. (See Table 53.) Seventy-three separate incidents, including one that occurred in 1999 and another that occurred in 2001, claimed the lives of the 77 officers.

The 77 officers killed in accidents in 2002 was one fewer than the 78 accidental deaths reported in 2001. A comparison of the data from 5 and 10 years ago showed that the number of officers killed in 2002 was 5 fewer than the 82 accidentally killed in 1998 and 18 more than the 59 accidentally killed in 1993. (Based on Table 44.)

Victims

The average age of the 77 law enforcement officers accidentally killed in 2002 was 39. According to data provided to the national Program, 5 victim officers were under the age of 25, and 13 officers were from 25 to 30 years of age. Twenty-nine officers were from 31 to 40 years of age, and 29 officers were 40 years of age or older. The age of 1 of the victim officers was not available. By race, 71 of the officers accidentally killed were white, 2 were black, and 2 were American Indian/Alaskan Native. Race was not available for 2 victim officers. (See Tables 48 and 49.)

Collectively, officers accidentally killed in 2002 had an average of 10 years of law enforcement service. Four officers had less than l year of service, 20 officers had from 1 to 4 years of service, 21 officers had from 5 to 10 years of experience, and 31 officers had served over 10 years. Law enforcement experience was not reported for 1 victim. (See Table 50.)

Circumstances Surrounding Deaths

The data collected about the circumstances surrounding officers’ accidental deaths revealed that the largest number of officers (42) were killed in automobile accidents, 12 were struck by vehicles, 7 died in motorcycle accidents, and 6 were killed in aircraft accidents. Three officers were accidentally shot, and 7 died in other accidental situations. (See Table 53.)

In the 10-year period, 1993 through 2002, 55.9 percent of the victim officers were killed in automobile accidents and 16.3 percent were struck by vehicles. Additionally, 8.5 percent of the victim officers were involved in aircraft accidents and 7.2 percent were fatally injured in motorcycle accidents. Data also showed that 4.3 percent of the victim officers were accidentally shot, and 7.8 percent of the deaths involved other accidental situations. (Based on Table 52.)

Places

Of the 77 accidental deaths reported to the national UCR Program in 2002, 40 occurred in the South. Twenty line-of-duty deaths occurred in the West, 10 in the Midwest, and 5 in the Northeast. Two victim officers were killed in accidents in Puerto Rico.

From 1993 through 2002, law enforcement agencies in the South reported 325 accidental deaths, agencies in the West reported 149, those in the Midwest recorded 124, and agencies in the Northeast reported 63 officer deaths. Law enforcement agencies in the U.S. Territories reported 20 officer deaths during this 10-year period. (See Table 44.)

Times

During 2002, the greatest number of fatal injuries (11) occurred during the hours of 12:01 p.m. to 2 p.m. The fewest number of injuries resulting in officers’ accidental deaths (2) in 2002 occurred from 4:01 a.m. to 6 a.m. The time of the incident regarding the accidental death of 1 victim officer was not available. In 2002, 63.2 percent of accidental officer deaths occurred from 12:01 p.m. to midnight. (See Table 45.)

During the past decade, the majority of officers killed in accidents (11.7 percent) were injured during the hours of 10:01 p.m. to midnight. The fewest officers (6.2 percent) were fatally injured within the time frames of 4:01 a.m. to 6 a.m. and 6:01 a.m. to 8 a.m. From 1993 to 2002, 53.1 percent of the incidents in which victim officers were accidentally killed or fatally injured occurred from 12:01 p.m. to midnight. (Based on Table 45.)

A breakdown of the 2002 data by day of the week showed that more officers (23) received fatal injuries due to accidental situations on Wednesday than on any other day of week. The fewest officers, 5, were injured on Sunday. Similarly, during the 10-year span of 1993 to 2002, the majority of officers (109) were fatally injured on Wednesday, and the fewest officers (77) received fatal injuries on Sunday. (See Table 46.)

A review of the 2002 data by month revealed that 10 victim officers were fatally injured in June, which had more officers killed accidentally than any other month. No officers suffered fatal injuries in accidents in April. During the 10-year period 1993 to 2002, more officers (71) were involved in fatal accidents in October than in any other month. Over the same time frame, the fewest number (38) of officers were fatally injured in April. (See Table 47.)

Table 44

Law Enforcement Officers Accidentally Killed

Region, Geographic Division, and State, 1993-2002

Area Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 681 59 62 59 52 63

NORTHEAST 63 3 5 8 7 8

New England 20 0 1 5 1 2

Connecticut 3 0 0 0 0 1

Maine 3 0 1 0 1 0

Massachusetts 11 0 0 4 0 1

New Hampshire 1 0 0 1 0 0

Rhode Island 2 0 0 0 0 0

Vermont 0 0 0 0 0 0

Middle Atlantic 43 3 4 3 6 6

New Jersey 11 2 0 1 1 2

New York 20 1 3 1 3 2

Pennsylvania 12 0 1 1 2 2

MIDWEST 124 16 14 11 6 14

East North Central 81 9 12 7 3 10

Illinois 15 3 1 1 0 5

Indiana 19 1 2 0 1 2

Michigan 17 1 4 3 1 1

Ohio 18 0 4 3 1 1

Wisconsin 12 4 1 0 0 1

West North Central 43 7 2 4 3 4

Iowa 4 3 0 0 0 1

Kansas 7 1 0 3 0 0

Minnesota 7 1 0 0 1 0

Missouri 21 2 2 1 1 3

Nebraska 3 0 0 0 1 0

North Dakota 0 0 0 0 0 0

South Dakota 1 0 0 0 0 0

SOUTH 325 26 30 31 23 23

South Atlantic 152 14 17 14 12 6

Delaware 3 0 0 0 2 0

District of Columbia 5 0 1 1 1 0

Florida 42 5 3 6 0 4

Georgia 23 3 5 0 3 1

Maryland 16 1 2 1 1 0

North Carolina 29 3 2 3 1 1

South Carolina 17 1 2 1 2 0

Virginia 12 1 1 2 1 0

West Virginia 5 0 1 0 1 0

East South Central 61 4 3 6 5 5

Alabama 16 2 0 4 2 1

Kentucky 6 0 0 0 1 1

Mississippi 13 2 2 1 0 1

Tennessee 26 0 1 1 2 2

West South Central 112 8 10 11 6 12

Arkansas 15 1 0 1 0 3

Louisiana 27 1 2 2 4 2

Oklahoma 11 0 0 2 0 1

Texas 59 6 8 6 2 6

WEST 149 11 13 9 12 16

Mountain 55 4 6 3 2 5

Arizona 18 2 2 1 0 0

Colorado 8 1 0 0 1 1

Idaho 1 0 0 1 0 0

Montana 1 0 0 0 0 0

Nevada 7 0 0 0 1 2

New Mexico 7 0 0 0 0 1

Utah 9 0 2 1 0 1

Wyoming 4 1 2 0 0 0

Pacific 94 7 7 6 10 11

Alaska 5 0 2 0 0 0

California 65 4 5 4 9 7

Hawaii 5 0 0 2 0 1

Oregon 12 2 0 0 1 3

Washington 7 1 0 0 0 0

U.S. TERRITORIES 20 3 0 0 4 2

American Samoa 1 0 0 0 0 0

Guam 0 0 0 0 0 0

Mariana Islands 0 0 0 0 0 0

Puerto Rico 18 3 0 0 4 2

U.S. Virgin Islands 1 0 0 0 0 0

Area 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 82 65 84 78 77

NORTHEAST 3 6 13 5 5

New England 1 2 6 2 0

Connecticut 1 0 1 0 0

Maine 0 1 0 0 0

Massachusetts 0 1 4 1 0

New Hampshire 0 0 0 0 0

Rhode Island 0 0 1 1 0

Vermont 0 0 0 0 0

Middle Atlantic 2 4 7 3 5

New Jersey 0 2 1 1 1

New York 2 1 4 0 3

Pennsylvania 0 1 2 2 1

MIDWEST 9 11 20 13 10

East North Central 8 5 15 8 4

Illinois 0 0 3 0 2

Indiana 3 3 3 3 1

Michigan 0 2 4 1 0

Ohio 2 0 2 4 1

Wisconsin 3 0 3 0 0

West North Central 1 6 5 5 6

Iowa 0 0 0 0 0

Kansas 0 0 3 0 0

Minnesota 0 2 1 0 2

Missouri 1 2 0 5 4

Nebraska 0 2 0 0 0

North Dakota 0 0 0 0 0

South Dakota 0 0 1 0 0

SOUTH 41 36 35 40 40

South Atlantic 18 18 16 16 21

Delaware 0 0 0 1 0

District of Columbia 1 0 0 0 1

Florida 6 7 2 7 2

Georgia 3 2 4 0 2

Maryland 3 0 5 0 3

North Carolina 2 3 2 6 6

South Carolina 1 3 2 0 5

Virginia 2 2 0 1 2

West Virginia 0 1 1 1 0

East South Central 5 8 9 9 7

Alabama 1 2 0 2 2

Kentucky 1 0 1 0 2

Mississippi 1 1 2 2 1

Tennessee 2 5 6 5 2

West South Central 18 10 10 15 12

Arkansas 7 0 1 1 1

Louisiana 4 6 4 1 1

Oklahoma 3 1 2 1 1

Texas 4 3 3 12 9

WEST 23 11 15 19 20

Mountain 9 3 5 9 9

Arizona 5 2 2 1 3

Colorado 0 1 1 2 1

Idaho 0 0 0 0 0

Montana 0 0 0 0 1

Nevada 2 0 0 1 1

New Mexico 0 0 0 4 2

Utah 1 0 2 1 1

Wyoming 1 0 0 0 0

Pacific 14 8 10 10 11

Alaska 0 0 0 1 2

California 12 4 9 5 6

Hawaii 0 1 0 1 0

Oregon 0 1 1 2 2

Washington 2 2 0 1 1

U.S. TERRITORIES 6 1 1 1 2

American Samoa 1 0 0 0 0

Guam 0 0 0 0 0

Mariana Islands 0 0 0 0 0

Puerto Rico 4 1 1 1 2

U.S. Virgin Islands 1 0 0 0 0

Table 45

Law Enforcement Officers Accidentally Killed

Time of Day, 1993-2002

Time Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 681 59 62 59 52 63

A.M.

12:01 – 2 73 8 4 6 6 9

2:01 – 4 57 7 4 8 3 5

4:01 – 6 41 5 5 2 5 2

6:01 – 8 41 2 3 3 3 2

8:01 – 10 47 1 2 7 6 5

10:01 – Noon 50 9 2 6 2 3

P.M.

12:01 – 2 58 6 0 3 5 3

2:01 – 4 65 3 9 4 3 5

4:01 – 6 48 3 4 2 5 9

6:01 – 8 50 3 2 3 3 5

8:01 – 10 52 5 9 1 3 3

10:01 – Midnight 77 5 12 10 7 9

Time not reported 22 2 6 4 1 3

Time 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 82 65 84 78 77

A.M.

12:01 – 2 7 8 11 10 4

2:01 – 4 8 6 9 4 3

4:01 – 6 4 7 5 4 2

6:01 – 8 8 4 5 5 6

8:01 – 10 3 5 8 5 5

10:01 – Noon 6 4 5 5 8

P.M.

12:01 – 2 5 9 9 7 11

2:01 – 4 11 5 8 10 7

4:01 – 6 9 4 2 2 8

6:01 – 8 10 3 6 8 7

8:01 – 10 4 2 8 9 8

10:01 – Midnight 5 6 7 9 7

Time not reported 2 2 1 0 1

Table 46

Law Enforcement Officers Accidentally Killed

Day of Week, 1993-2002

Day Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 681 59 62 59 52 63

Sunday 77 6 8 7 6 8

Monday 91 5 8 13 8 6

Tuesday 108 11 9 7 8 8

Wednesday 109 11 7 10 7 8

Thursday 91 5 8 4 7 12

Friday 103 11 10 6 8 10

Saturday 102 10 12 12 8 11

Day 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 82 65 84 78 77

Sunday 13 10 5 9 5

Monday 10 13 8 13 7

Tuesday 15 7 15 13 15

Wednesday 14 3 14 12 23

Thursday 10 13 13 10 9

Friday 14 8 17 11 8

Saturday 6 11 12 10 10

Table 47

Law Enforcement Officers Accidentally Killeed

Month, 1993-2002

Month Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 681 59 62 59 52 63

January 63 3 9 5 4 4

February 66 7 4 7 8 8

March 44 3 4 3 4 3

April 38 2 4 4 6 6

May 56 3 3 7 4 4

June 59 4 1 8 6 5

July 69 15 7 9 2 3

August 50 3 8 6 2 5

September 53 1 2 3 1 7

October 71 8 4 2 9 7

November 56 7 10 3 2 7

December 56 3 6 2 4 4

Month 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 82 65 84 78 77

January 9 6 10 6 7

February 8 3 7 10 4

March 6 5 5 8 3

April 6 3 3 4 0

May 5 9 9 4 8

June 7 5 9 4 10

July 7 6 10 3 7

August 3 4 7 7 5

September 9 4 7 10 9

October 9 7 9 9 7

November 5 4 4 6 8

December 8 9 4 7 9

Table 48

Law Enforcement Officers Accidentally Killed

Profile of Victim Officers, Age Groups, 1993-2002

Victim officers Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 681 59 62 59 52 63

Age

Under 25 years 47 1 3 4 2 7

25 – 30 years 171 16 20 21 17 15

31 – 40 years 233 23 21 19 24 20

Over 40 years 225 18 17 15 9 20

Age not reported 5 1 1 0 0 1

Average years of age 37 38 36 35 35 36

Victim officers 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 82 65 84 78 77

Age

Under 25 years 9 5 7 4 5

25 – 30 years 18 14 18 19 13

31 – 40 years 21 23 26 27 29

Over 40 years 34 22 33 28 29

Age not reported 0 1 0 0 1

Average years of age 38 37 38 38 39

Table 49

Law Enforcement Officers Accidentally Killed

Profile of Victim Officers, Race and Sex, 1993-2002

Victim officers Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 681 59 62 59 52 63

Race

White 586 49 56 45 44 51

Black 65 7 5 11 6 10

Asian/Pacific 10 0 0 3 1 1

Islander

American Indian/ 15 2 1 0 0 0

Alaskan Native

Race not reported 5 1 0 0 1 1

Sex

Male 638 55 60 56 48 60

Female 43 4 2 3 4 3

Victim officers 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 82 65 84 78 77

Race

White 68 60 74 68 71

Black 6 3 8 7 2

Asian/Pacific 2 1 1 1 0

Islander

American Indian/ 6 1 1 2 2

Alaskan Native

Race not reported 0 0 0 0 2

Sex

Male 74 62 80 72 71

Female 8 3 4 6 6

Table 50

Law Enforcement Officers Accidentally Killed

Profile of Victim, Years of Service, 1993-2002

Victim officers Total 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Total 681 59 62 59 52 63

Years of service

Less than 1 year 39 1 3 6 3 3

1 – 4 years 178 10 19 13 11 21

5 – 10 years 190 23 20 23 19 16

Over 10 years 260 22 20 17 16 22

Years of service 14 3 0 0 3 1

not reported

Average years of 10 11 9 9 9 9

of service

Victim officers 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Total 82 65 84 78 77

Years of service

Less than 1 year 4 6 4 5 4

1 – 4 years 27 14 21 22 20

5 – 10 years 15 15 19 19 21

Over 10 years 33 27 40 32 31

Years of service 3 3 0 0 1

not reported

Average years of 10 10 11 11 10

of service

Table 51

Law Enforcement Officers Accidentally Killed

Profile of Victim Officers, 5- and 10-Year Averages, 1983-2002

5-year averages 10-year averages

1993- 1998- 1993- 1983-

Victim officers 2002 1997 2002 2002 1992

Average

Age (years) 39 36 38 37 36

Service (years) 10 9 10 10 9

Height 5’11” 5’11” 5’10” 5’10” 5’11”

Table 52

Law Enforcement Officers Accidentally Killed

Circumstance at Scene of Incident, 1993-2002

Circumstance Total 1993 1994 1995

Total 681 59 62 59

Automobile accidents 381 38 32 33

Motorcycle accidents 49 1 8 3

Aircraft accidents 58 9 10 8

Struck by vehicles 111 4 7 10

Traffic stops, roadblocks, 38 1 3 1

etc.

Directing traffic, assisting 73 3 4 9

motorists, etc.

Accidental shootings 29 5 2 2

Crossfires, mistaken for 17 2 1 2

subject, firearm mishaps

Training sessions 9 3 1 0

Self-inflicted, cleaning 3 0 0 0

mishaps (not apparent

or confirmed suicides)

Other accidental 53 2 3 3

(falls, drownings, etc.)

Circumstance 1996 1997 1998 1999

Total 52 63 82 65

Automobile accidents 33 33 49 41

Motorcycle accidents 4 4 3 6

Aircraft accidents 1 4 4 4

Struck by vehicles 7 15 14 9

Traffic stops, roadblocks, 4 4 4 3

etc.

Directing traffic, assisting 3 11 10 6

motorists, etc.

Accidental shootings 2 1 3 3

Crossfires, mistaken for 1 1 3 2

subject, firearm mishaps

Training sessions 1 0 0 1

Self-inflicted, cleaning 0 0 0 0

mishaps (not apparent

or confirmed suicides)

Other accidental 5 6 9 2

(falls, drownings, etc.)

Circumstance 2000 2001 2002

Total 84 78 77

Automobile accidents 42 38 42

Motorcycle accidents 6 7 7

Aircraft accidents 7 5 6

Struck by vehicles 14 19 12

Traffic stops, roadblocks, 7 7 4

etc.

Directing traffic, assisting 7 12 8

motorists, etc.

Accidental shootings 3 5 3

Crossfires, mistaken for 1 2 2

subject, firearm mishaps

Training sessions 1 2 0

Self-inflicted, cleaning 1 1 1

mishaps (not apparent

or confirmed suicides)

Other accidental 12 4 7

(falls, drownings, etc.)

Table 53

Law Enforcement Officers Accidentally Killed

State and Agency by Circumstance at Scene of Incident, 2002

Automobile Motorcycle

State Agency Total accidents accidents

Total 77 42 7

ALABAMA 2 2 0

Department of Public Safety, 1 1 0

Mobile

Prichard 1 1 0

ALASKA 2 1 0

Department of Corrections, 1 1 0

Anchorage

National Park Service, King 1 0 0

Salmon

ARIZONA 3 1 1

Chandler 1 1 0

Phoenix 1 0 1

Scottsdale 1 0 0

ARKANSAS 1 0 1

State Police, Little Rock 1 0 1

CALIFORNIA 6 4 1

Highway Patrol, Santa Cruz 1 1 0

Orange County 1 0 1

San Fernando 1 0 0

San Francisco 1 1 0

U.S. Border Patrol, Chula Vista 2 2 0

COLORADO 1 0 0

Department of Natural Resources, 1 0 0

Denver

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 1 0 0

U.S. Park Police 1 0 0

FLORIDA 2 2 0

Columbia County 1 1 0

Union County 1 1 0

GEORGIA 2 1 0

DeKalb County Police 1 1 0

East Point 1 0 0

ILLINOIS 2 1 0

Bellwood 1 1 0

Chicago 1 0 0

INDIANA 1 1 0

Marion County 1 1 0

KENTUCKY 2 2 0

Department of Charitable Gaming, 1 1 0

Frankfort

Trimble County 1 1 0

LOUISIANA 1 0 0

St. John the Baptist Parish 1 0 0

MARYLAND 3 3 0

Baltimore 1 1 0

Baltimore County Police 1 1 0

Maryland National Capital Pack 1 1 0

Police, Montgomery County

MINNESOTA 2 2 0

St. Louis County 1 1 0

U.S. Forest Service, Cass Lake 1 1 0

MISSISSIPPI 1 1 0

Department of Wildlife, 1 1 0

Fisheries, and Parks, Jackson

MISSOURI 4 1 0

Highway Patrol, Willow Springs 1 0 0

Jasper County 1 0 0

St. Louis 1 1 0

Truesdale 1 0 0

MONTANA 1 0 0

Bureau of Indian Affairs, Box 1 0 0

Elder

NEVADA 1 0 1

Reno 1 0 1

NEW JERSEY 1 0 0

State Police, Cranbury 1 0 0

NEW MEXICO 2 1 0

Albuquerque 1 1 0

Bureau of Indian Affairs, Santa 1 0 0

Fe

NEW YORK 3 3 0

Buffalo 1 1 0

Cheektowaga Town 1 1 0

State Police, Tarrytown 1 1 0

NORTH CAROLINA 6 1 1

Boone 1 0 0

Charlotte-Mecklenburg 1 0 0

Chowan County 1 0 0

Pender County 1 1 0

Raleigh 1 0 1

Wayne County 1 0 0

OHIO 1 0 0

Muskingum Watershed Conservancy 1 0 0

District, New Philadelphia

OKLAHOMA 1 1 0

Department of Public Safety, 1 1 0

Enid

OREGON 2 1 0

Josephine County 1 0 0

Portland Police Bureau 1 1 0

PENNSYLVANIA 1 1 0

Plumstead Township 1 1 0

SOUTH CAROLINA 5 2 0

Berkeley County 1 0 0

Clarendon County 1 1 0

Elloree 1 1 0

Highway Patrol, Florence 1 0 0

Summerville 1 0 0

TENNESSEE 2 2 0

Clarksville 2 2 0

TEXAS 9 6 1

Coryell County 1 1 0

Dallas 1 1 0

Eagle Lake 1 1 0

Harris County 1 0 0

Harrison County 1 1 0

Houston 1 0 1

Houston County 1 0 0

Liberty County 1 1 0

U.S. Border Patrol, Weslaco 1 1 0

UTAH 1 1 0

Iron County 1 1 0

VIRGINIA 2 1 1

Dinwiddie County 1 1 0

State Police, Fairfax Station 1 0 1

WASHINGTON 1 0 0

Seattle 1 0 0

U.S. TERRITORIES 2 0 0

Puerto Rico

Hato Rey 1 0 0

San Juan 1 0 0

Aircraft Struck by Accidental

State Agency accidents vehicles shootings

Total 6 12 3

ALABAMA 0 0 0

Department of Public Safety, 0 0 0

Mobile

Prichard 0 0 0

ALASKA 1 0 0

Department of Corrections, 0 0 0

Anchorage

National Park Service, King 1 0 0

Salmon

ARIZONA 0 0 0

Chandler 0 0 0

Phoenix 0 0 0

Scottsdale 0 0 0

ARKANSAS 0 0 0

State Police, Little Rock 0 0 0

CALIFORNIA 0 0 1

Highway Patrol, Santa Cruz 0 0 0

Orange County 0 0 0

San Fernando 0 0 1

San Francisco 0 0 0

U.S. Border Patrol, Chula Vista 0 0 0

COLORADO 1 0 0

Department of Natural Resources, 1 0 0

Denver

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 0 1 0

U.S. Park Police 0 1 0

FLORIDA 0 0 0

Columbia County 0 0 0

Union County 0 0 0

GEORGIA 0 1 0

DeKalb County Police 0 0 0

East Point 0 1 0

ILLINOIS 0 0 0

Bellwood 0 0 0

Chicago 0 0 0

INDIANA 0 0 0

Marion County 0 0 0

KENTUCKY 0 0 0

Department of Charitable Gaming, 0 0 0

Frankfort

Trimble County 0 0 0

LOUISIANA 0 1 0

St. John the Baptist Parish 0 1 0

MARYLAND 0 0 0

Baltimore 0 0 0

Baltimore County Police 0 0 0

Maryland National Capital Pack 0 0 0

Police, Montgomery County

MINNESOTA 0 0 0

St. Louis County 0 0 0

U.S. Forest Service, Cass Lake 0 0 0

MISSISSIPPI 0 0 0

Department of Wildlife, 0 0 0

Fisheries, and Parks, Jackson

MISSOURI 0 2 0

Highway Patrol, Willow Springs 0 1 0

Jasper County 0 0 0

St. Louis 0 0 0

Truesdale 0 1 0

MONTANA 0 0 0

Bureau of Indian Affairs, Box 0 0 0

Elder

NEVADA 0 0 0

Reno 0 0 0

NEW JERSEY 0 1 0

State Police, Cranbury 0 1 0

NEW MEXICO 0 0 0

Albuquerque 0 0 0

Bureau of Indian Affairs, Santa 0 0 0

Fe

NEW YORK 0 0 0

Buffalo 0 0 0

Cheektowaga Town 0 0 0

State Police, Tarrytown 0 0 0

NORTH CAROLINA 3 1 0

Boone 1 0 0

Charlotte-Mecklenburg 1 0 0

Chowan County 1 0 0

Pender County 0 0 0

Raleigh 0 0 0

Wayne County 0 1 0

OHIO 0 0 0

Muskingum Watershed Conservancy 0 0 0

District, New Philadelphia

OKLAHOMA 0 0 0

Department of Public Safety, 0 0 0

Enid

OREGON 1 0 0

Josephine County 1 0 0

Portland Police Bureau 0 0 0

PENNSYLVANIA 0 0 0

Plumstead Township 0 0 0

SOUTH CAROLINA 0 3 0

Berkeley County 0 1 0

Clarendon County 0 0 0

Elloree 0 0 0

Highway Patrol, Florence 0 1 0

Summerville 0 1 0

TENNESSEE 0 0 0

Clarksville 0 0 0

TEXAS 0 1 1

Coryell County 0 0 0

Dallas 0 0 0

Eagle Lake 0 0 0

Harris County 0 0 1

Harrison County 0 0 0

Houston 0 0 0

Houston County 0 1 0

Liberty County 0 0 0

U.S. Border Patrol, Weslaco 0 0 0

UTAH 0 0 0

Iron County 0 0 0

VIRGINIA 0 0 0

Dinwiddie County 0 0 0

State Police, Fairfax Station 0 0 0

WASHINGTON 0 0 0

Seattle 0 0 0

U.S. TERRITORIES 0 1 1

Puerto Rico

Hato Rey 0 1 0

San Juan 0 0 1

Other

State Agency accidental (Detail)

Total 7

ALABAMA 0

Department of Public Safety, 0

Mobile

Prichard 0

ALASKA 0

Department of Corrections, 0

Anchorage

National Park Service, King 0

Salmon

ARIZONA 1

Chandler 0

Phoenix 0

Scottsdale 1 (explosion)

ARKANSAS 0

State Police, Little Rock 0

CALIFORNIA 0

Highway Patrol, Santa Cruz 0

Orange County 0

San Fernando 0

San Francisco 0

U.S. Border Patrol, Chula Vista 0

COLORADO 0

Department of Natural Resources, 0

Denver

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 0

U.S. Park Police 0

FLORIDA 0

Columbia County 0

Union County 0

GEORGIA 0

DeKalb County Police 0

East Point 0

ILLINOIS 1

Bellwood 0

Chicago 1 (struck by train)

INDIANA 0

Marion County 0

KENTUCKY 0

Department of Charitable Gaming, 0

Frankfort

Trimble County 0

LOUISIANA 0

St. John the Baptist Parish 0

MARYLAND 0

Baltimore 0

Baltimore County Police 0

Maryland National Capital Pack 0

Police, Montgomery County

MINNESOTA 0

St. Louis County 0

U.S. Forest Service, Cass Lake 0

MISSISSIPPI 0

Department of Wildlife, 0

Fisheries, and Parks, Jackson

MISSOURI 1

Highway Patrol, Willow Springs 0

Jasper County 1 (drowning)

St. Louis 0

Truesdale 0

MONTANA 1

Bureau of Indian Affairs, Box 1 (drowning)

Elder

NEVADA 0

Reno 0

NEW JERSEY 0

State Police, Cranbury 0

NEW MEXICO 1

Albuquerque 0

Bureau of Indian Affairs, Santa 1 (drowning)

Fe

NEW YORK 0

Buffalo 0

Cheektowaga Town 0

State Police, Tarrytown 0

NORTH CAROLINA 0

Boone 0

Charlotte-Mecklenburg 0

Chowan County 0

Pender County 0

Raleigh 0

Wayne County 0

OHIO 1

Muskingum Watershed Conservancy 1 (struck by tree)

District, New Philadelphia

OKLAHOMA 0

Department of Public Safety, 0

Enid

OREGON 0

Josephine County 0

Portland Police Bureau 0

PENNSYLVANIA 0

Plumstead Township 0

SOUTH CAROLINA 0

Berkeley County 0

Clarendon County 0

Elloree 0

Highway Patrol, Florence 0

Summerville 0

TENNESSEE 0

Clarksville 0

TEXAS 0

Coryell County 0

Dallas 0

Eagle Lake 0

Harris County 0

Harrison County 0

Houston 0

Houston County 0

Liberty County 0

U.S. Border Patrol, Weslaco 0

UTAH 0

Iron County 0

VIRGINIA 0

Dinwiddie County 0

State Police, Fairfax Station 0

WASHINGTON 1

Seattle 1 (fall from horse)

U.S. TERRITORIES 0

Puerto Rico

Hato Rey 0

San Juan 0

[FIGURES 1-4 OMITTED

COPYRIGHT 2002 Federal Bureau of Investigation

COPYRIGHT 2004 Gale Group