Storm data and unusual weather phenomena

Storm data and unusual weather phenomena

Storm Data and Unusual Weather Phenomena

Time Path Path

Local/ Length Width

Location Date Standard (Miles) (Yards)

NEW JERSEY, Northeast

Bergen County

Ft Lee 02 1500EST

1530EST

Flash flooding of roadways due to

torrential downpours from

thunderstorms.

Passaic County

Clifton 24 1850EST

1900EST

A man fell into a swiftly flowing

tributary of the Passaic River around

8 pm EDT and was killed. Heavy rains of

up to 3 inches had fallen in the area

during Friday and Saturday (the 23rd

and 24th) which caused the stream to

run more swiftly than normal. M39IW

Hudson County

Jersey City 29 1800EST

1900EST

Cars submerged by thunderstorm flash

flooding. Rescues performed.

Hudson County

Bayonne 29 1850EST

NEW JERSEY, South and Northwest

Sussex County

Vernon 01 1330EST

Thunderstorms with intense cloud to

ground lightning caused havoc across

Sussex County during the afternoon and

evening of June 1st. At about 2:30 PM

EDT, lightning struck a home on

Cardinal Road in Vernon, igniting a

fire. The fire was under control

within an hour, however the house

was nearly destroyed. In Andover,

lightning sparked a roof fire at a

Rolling Hills Apartment. Meanwhile

in Frankford along North Shore Road,

a large tree fell onto the middle

portion of a homes roof during the

evening of June 1st. A woman outside

the home at the time confirmed that

lightning was the cause of the

downed tree. A telephone pole was

downed on Running Hills Drive along

with several downed wires on Route

94 due to lightning strikes. State

Police, during the late evening of

June 1, directed traffic at a failed

traffic light at Ross’s Corner, where

Routes 15, 206 and 565 meet. Minor

power outages were reported in the

Sparta area. There were no injuries

reported across the county.

Sussex County

Vernon 01 1337EST

Thunderstorms knocked down trees and

power lines in the Vernon Valley area

during the early afternoon of June 1st.

Sussex County

Sussex 01 1435EST

A gust front arrived in Sussex, New

Jersey ahead of the parent

thunderstorm. As a result of the

strong winds, trees and power lines

were knocked down in the Sussex area

during the afternoon of June 1st.

Sussex County

Newton 01 1700EST

A strong thunderstorm blew through

Newton, New Jersey (Sussex County)

around 6:00 PM EDT on June 1st.

Lightning struck a tree and some

gusty winds downed some branches.

Heavy downpours in association

with the thunderstorm caused some

brief but minor street flooding.

Hunterdon County

Countywide 01 1745EST

A severe thunderstorm, which blew

through Hunterdon County, New Jersey

during the early evening of June

1st, knocked down power lines all

across the county.

Hunterdon County

Flemington 01 1810EST

Trees were knocked down in Flemington,

New Jersey during the early evening of

June 1st as a severe thunderstorm blew

through Hunterdon County.

Monmouth County

Allentown 01 1830EST

Severe thunderstorms rolled across

parts of Monmouth County, New Jersey

during the evening of June 1st. Strong

winds from the thunderstorms downed

power lines on Yardville-Allentown

Road around 8:30 PM EDT.

Somerset County

Millstone 01 1840EST

A severe thunderstorm, which rolled

across Somerset County, New Jersey

during the early evening of June 1st,

downed trees and power lines in the

Millstone area.

Mercer County

Ewing Township 01 1840EST

A couple of severe thunderstorms

rolled across Mercer County, New

Jersey between 7:40 PM EDT and 8:30

PM EDT on June 1st. Strong winds

associated with the thunderstorms

downed power lines all across the

county. In addition to the downed

power lines, trees were knocked

down on Barry Road in Hopewell

Township.

NEW JERSEY, South and Northwest

Mercer County

Princeton 01 1900EST

A home, off Meetinghouse Court near

Griggs Farm development, was struck

by lightning around 8 PM EDT on

June 1st producing smoky conditions.

Also around 8 PM EDT, there was

smoke reported at the Quaker Bridge

Mall, which was at an escalator due

to a power outage. No injuries were

reported in either events.

Morris County

Dover 01 1900EST

During the early evening hours of

June 1st, lightning struck a home at

80 Maple Avenue in Dover, forcing

the family from their home and

sparking a fire in the homes attic.

No injuries were reported as a result

of the lightning strike and fire,

however some 2,500 customers in

Dover were left without power during

the storm.

Somerset County

Rocky Hill 01 1900EST

During a thunderstorm at about 8 PM

EDT, lightning struck the chimney

of an apartment building on Spring

Road in Montgomery Township. Two

of the apartments suffered some

damage and its occupants were

relocated, however no injuries

resulted.

Morris County

Schooleys Mtn 01 1900EST

A home at 1 Stuart Court in

Washington Township was struck

by lightning during the evening

of June 1st. The lightning

strike caused a fire to the roof

line, and 4 occupants were

evacuated from the dwelling with

no injuries reported.

Mercer County

Ewing Township 01 1900EST

2000EST

Law enforcement reported street

flooding on Stokes Avenue in Ewing

around 8 p.m. EDT. The road was

rendered temporarily impassable,

but the water receded by 9 p.m.

EDT. The storm total from Mercer

County Airport was 1.10 inches,

most of which fell within an hour.

Burlington County

Countywide 01 2000EST

Thunderstorms during the evening

of June 1st caused havoc across

Burlington County, New Jersey and

nearby counties. Lightning sparked

a house fire in Medford, which

destroyed the home. No one at the

home was hurt, however a Medford

firefighter was taken to a nearby

hospital as he suffered from

dehydration. Also, a shed fire

occurred in Mount Laurel on

Hainesport-Mount Laurel Road, and

a house fire occurred on Avon Court.

Both fires were caused by lightning

strikes, and both structures

sustained severe damage. Meanwhile,

two house fires occurred on King

Avenue in Evesham when lightning

struck a utility pole at 11:37 PM

EDT, dropping a power line in front

of both homes. This energized the

water lines into each home and

sparked small fires. There were no

injuries reported and the dollar

amount in damage was not available.

Lightning strikes also damaged

computer systems at the Burlington

County Central Communications

building and also at the National

Weather Service Office in Mount

Holly, NJ. Numerous wires were

downed throughout Medford, Evesham

and Mount Laurel from the intense

cloud to ground lightning strikes.

Some 60,000 customers were without

power in Burlington, Camden and

Gloucester Counties.

Salem County

Carneys Pt 01 2008EST

Trees and power lines were knocked

down at 9:08 PM EDT on June 1st in

Carney’s Point Township, New Jersey

when thunderstorms rumbled across

Salem County.

Gloucester County

Bridgeport to 01 2010EST

Turnersville

Severe thunderstorms rumbled their way

across Gloucester County, New Jersey

during the evening of June 1st. As a

result of strong winds associated with

the thunderstorms, trees and power

lines were knocked down from Logan

Township to Washington Township.

Camden County

Gibbsboro 01 2040EST

Severe thunderstorms rumbled across

parts of Camden County around 9:40

PM EDT on June 1st. Damaging winds

produced by the thunderstorms downed

trees and power lines in Gibbsboro

to near the Turnersville area.

Burlington County

Evesboro 01 2045EST

Winds from severe thunderstorms

downed trees and power lines across

portions of Evesham Township, New

Jersey on eastward, during the

evening of June 1st.

Gloucester County

Verga 01 2200EST

At around 10:00 PM EDT in the

Millburn, New Jersey area, the

fire department at Gero Park was

struck by lightning, which damaged

several pieces of electronic

equipment, including computers and

communications equipment, and a small

hole was discovered in the roof of the

building. Earlier in the evening, at

about 7:45 PM EDT, lightning struck

a Great Hills Road home, where light

smoke was observed coming from the

attic of the home, and two circuit

breakers had been tripped from the

electrical surge. No injuries were

reported from either event.

Gloucester County

2 SSE Paulsboro 02 2120EST 0.8 250

A fast moving thunderstorm tracked

northward during the evening of June

2nd across southern New Jersey, then

merged with additional thunderstorms

arriving from the west as it entered

Gloucester County about 10:20 PM EDT.

The merging thunderstorm produced an

F0 tornado in East Greenwich Township,

New Jersey. The National Weather

Service Office in Mount Holly, New

Jersey conducted a storm survey and

confirmed that a weak tornado with

65 mph winds touched down. The path

length of the tornado was three-

quarters of a mile and the path

width was mostly around 100 yards,

but at its maximum it reached 250

yards. Numerous trees were knocked

down and snapped in a six block

area. Three homes sustained major

damage from downed trees, and another

twenty homes had minor damage. Roofing

material from a house on County Lane

Road was found a quarter of a mile

away near the Mount Royal Firehouse.

Camden County

Haddonfield 03 0307EST

0500EST

Runoff from the heavy rain that fell

around Midnight EDT on the 3rd caused

some minor flooding along the Cooper

River. The Cooper River at Haddonfield

was above its 2.8 foot flood stage from

307 a.m. EDT through 6 a.m. EDT on the

3rd. It crested at 2.84 feet at 345

a.m. EDT on the 3rd. Doppler Radar

storm total estimates averaged between

1 and 2 inches. Actual storm totals

included 1.80 inches in Pennsauken

and 1.22 inches in Somerdale.

Gloucester County

Mullica Hill 09 1455EST

Strong winds from a severe thunderstorm

knocked down trees in Mullica Hill, New

Jersey at 3:55 PM EDT. Also at the same

time, a large tree was knocked down in

Woodbury, New Jersey. While not severe,

the same thunderstorm produced hail to

the size of peas in Glassboro between

4:00 PM EDT and 4:15 PM EDT.

NJZ024 Eastern Cape May

18 1800EST

28 2100EST

A seven-year-old boy drowned during the

evening of the 18th in Ocean City after

getting caught in a rip current. M7IW

Warren County

2 W Alpha 19 1638EST

A severe thunderstorm, which rumbled

across parts of Warren County, New

Jersey during the early evening of

June 19th, downed trees and power

lines near the town of Alpha at

5:38 PM EDT.

Monmouth County

Roosevelt 23 1603EST

1608EST

A severe thunderstorm tore down trees

and wires in the southwestern part of

Monmouth County. Most of the reported

wind damage was in Millstone Township

and Roosevelt Borough.

Hunterdon County

Allerton 23 2000EST

A 59-year old male camper was

apparently struck by lightning and died

while resting in a hammock during the

evening of June 23rd. The man was in

a hammock, in Round Valley Reservoir,

which was anchored to several trees. It

is believed that the lightning bolt hit

the tree, struck the ground, then

traveled into the man. M59UT

Monmouth County

Roosevelt 23 2200EST

Lightning struck a home in Roosevelt,

setting the house on fire. The extent

of damage to the home was not known,

however no injuries were reported.

Ocean County

1 N Metedeconk 24 1430EST

A total of 1,100 customers lost power

during the afternoon of June 24th in

Point Pleasant as wires were knocked

down from lightning strikes.

Monmouth County

South Portion 24 1700EST

1900EST

Thunderstorms with heavy rain dropped

a Doppler Radar estimated two to four

inches of rain across southern

Monmouth County. This caused poor

drainage flooding and flooding of

smaller creeks in the county. Street

flooding also occurred in Sea Bright.

Gloucester County

Central Portion 24 1720EST

1930EST

Camden County

Southeast Portion 24 1735EST

1930EST

Burlington County

West Central Portion 24 1800EST

2000EST

Thunderstorms with heavy rain caused

flooding of roadways and small streams

from central Gloucester County

northeast through central portions of

Burlington County. Doppler Radar storm

total estimates average 2 to 4 inches

in this area. In Gloucester County,

several roads were closed in and around

Pitman with up to three feet of water

on them. Roadway closures in Burlington

County occurred in Burlington,

Pemberton and Southampton Townships.

Measured storm totals included 4.20

inches in Glassboro (Gloucester

County), 2.89 inches in Medford

(Burlington County) and 2.59 inches in

Wrightstown (Burlington County).

Cumberland County

Southeast Portion 25 0315EST

0515EST

Cape May County

Northwest Portion 25 0355EST

0600EST

Repeating thunderstorms with torrential

downpours dropped a Doppler Radar

estimated six to ten inches of rain

across southeastern parts of Cumberland

County and northwestern parts of Cape

May County. This caused considerable

roadway and field flooding as well as

some stream flooding. Storm totals

included 6.25 inches in Millville.

Warren County

Millbrook to 27 1930EST

Carpenterville 30 1803EST

Several days of heavy rain throughout

the Delaware River Basin culminated

with major flooding along the Delaware

River from the 28th through the 30th.

It was the second to fourth highest

crest on record for the Delaware River

along Warren County. The crest was

slightly lower than the April 2005

flood in Belvidere and Phillipsburg,

but the second highest on record (since

1955) at Tocks Island. President

George W. Bush declared Warren County

a disaster area. Sporadic periods of

heavy rain started on the 23rd, but

the most widespread and heaviest rain

fell from the night of the 27th into

the morning of the 28th. Event totals

in Warren County averaged three to

eight inches, but storm totals

exceeded ten inches in parts of the

Upper Delaware Basin in New York State.

The Delaware River at Tocks Island was

above its 21 foot flood stage from 906

a.m. EDT on the 28th through 1043 a.m.

EDT on the 30th. It crested at 33.87

feet at 915 a.m. EDT on the 29th, the

second highest crest on record. Farther

downstream at Belvidere, the Delaware

River was above its 22 foot flood stage

from 1145 a.m. EDT on the 28th through

303 a.m. EDT on the 30th. It crested

at 27.16 feet at 1130 a.m. EDT on the

29th, the fourth highest crest on

record. Farther downstream at

Phillipsburg, the Delaware River was

above its 22 foot flood stage from

830 p.m. EDT on the 27th through

703 p.m. EDT on the 30th. It crested

at 37.09 feet at 1215 p.m. EDT on

the 29th, the fourth highest crest on

record.

Hunterdon County

Countywide 28 0400EST

30 1935EST

Several days of heavy rain throughout

the Delaware River Basin culminated

with major flooding along the Delaware

River from the 28th through the 30th.

It was the fourth highest crest on

record for the Delaware River along

Hunterdon County. The crest was

slightly lower than the April 2005

flood. President George W. Bush

declared Hunterdon County a disaster

area. One man in Lambertville drowned

when he walked into flood waters.

Sporadic periods of heavy rain started

on the 23rd, but the most widespread

and heaviest rain fell from the night

of the 27th into the morning of the

28th. Event totals in Hunterdon County

averaged four to eight inches, but

storm totals exceeded 10 inches in

parts of the Upper Delaware Basin in

New York State.

The Delaware River at Riegelsville

(Bucks County) was above its 22 foot

flood stage from 451 a.m. EDT on the

28th through 632 p.m. EDT on the 30th.

It crested at 33.62 feet at 300 p.m.

EDT on the 29th, the fourth highest

crest on record. Farther downstream

at Frenchtown, the Delaware River was

above its 16 foot flood stage from

827 a.m. EDT on the 28th through 835

p.m. EDT on the 30th. It crested at

22.90 feet at 500 p.m. EDT on the

4th, the fourth highest crest on

record. Farther downstream, at

Stockton, the Delaware River was

above its 18 foot flood stage from

4 a.m. EDT on the 28th through 620

p.m. EDT on the 30th. It crested at

25.35 feet at 7 p.m. EDT on the

29th, the fourth highest crest on

record. Farther downstream, at

Lambertville the Delaware River was

above its 13 foot flood stage from

805 a.m. EDT on the 28th through

401 p.m. EDT on the 30th. It

crested at 19.08 feet at 6 p.m. EDT

on the 29th, the fourth highest crest

on record. Inland the South Branch of

the Raritan River at High Bridge was

above its 10 foot flood stage from

107 p.m. EDT through 422 p.m. EDT on

the 28th. It crested at 10.11 feet

at 2 p.m. EDT. Farther downstream at

Stanton, the South Branch of the

Raritan was above its 8 foot flood

stage from 750 a.m. EDT through 927

p.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested at

9.33 feet at 1130 a.m. EDT.

M?IW

Mercer County

Countywide 28 0611EST

30 1752EST

Several days of heavy rain throughout

the Delaware River Basin culminated

with major flooding along the Delaware

River from the 28th through the 30th.

It was the fourth or fifth highest

crest on record for the Delaware River

along Mercer County. The crest was

slightly lower than the April 2005

flood. President George W. Bush

declared Mercer heavy rain started on

the 23rd, but the most widespread and

heaviest rain fell from the night of

the 27th into the morning of the 28th.

Event totals in Mercer County averaged

three to six inches, but storm totals

exceeded 10 inches in parts of the

Upper Delaware Basin in New York

State. The hardest hit municipalities

were Trenton and Ewing with the Island

and Glen Afton sections of Trenton

affected the most.

The Delaware River at Washington’s

Crossing was above its 20 foot flood

stage from 825 p.m. EDT on the 28th

through 912 a.m. EDT on the 30th. It

crested at 22.54 feet at 700 p.m. EDT

on the 29th, the fourth highest crest

on record. The Delaware River at

Trenton was above its 20 foot flood

stage from 746 a.m. EDT on the 28th

through 652 p.m. EDT on the 30th. It

crested at 25.09 feet at 845 p.m. EDT

on the 29th, the fifth highest crest

on record. Inland the Assunpink Creek

at Trenton was above its 7 foot flood

stage from 711 a.m. EDT a.m. through

1231 a.m. EDT on the 28th. It

crested at 7.49 feet at 1030 EDT.

Camden County

Haddonfield 28 0629EST

1030EST

A nearly stationary frontal system

produced sporadic periods of heavy

rain occurred across New Jersey from

the 23rd into the morning of the 28th.

A low pressure system that developed

along the Atlantic seaboard combined

with the front and caused the most

widespread and heaviest rain to occur

during the first half of the day on the

28th. The heavy rain caused minor

flooding along the Cooper River. Tidal

flooding also occurred along the

Delaware River. Flooding though was

worse farther north along the Delaware

River. Event totals in Camden County

average three to six inches. The Cooper

River at Haddonfield was above its 2.8

foot flood from 729 a.m. EDT through

1130 a.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested

at 2.92 feet at 930 a.m. EDT. Storm

totals included 3.79 inches in Blue

Anchor.

Somerset County

Countywide 28 0649EST

29 1021EST

Sporadic periods of heavy rain occurred

across New Jersey from the 23rd into

the morning of the 28th. The most

widespread and heaviest rain occurred

during the first half of the day on the

28th. The culmination of the heavy rain

caused mainly minor flooding along the

main stem rivers in Somerset County on

the 28th and 29th. Flooding was worse

along the Delaware River. Event totals

in Somerset County averaged three to

six inches.

Along the main stem of the Raritan

River at Manville was above its 14

foot flood stage from 543 p.m. EDT

on the 28th through 310 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 15.76 feet at

930 p.m. EDT on the 28th. Farther

downstream, the Raritan River at Bound

Brook was above its 28 foot flood stage

from 1007 p.m. EDT on the 28th through

247 a.m. EDT on the 29th. It crested at

28.24 feet at 1128 p.m. EDT on the

28th. The North Branch of the Raritan

River at North Branch was above its

12.3 foot flood stage from 1033 a.m.

EDT through 520 p.m. EDT on the 28th.

It crested at 13.93 feet. Farther

downstream at Raritan, the North Branch

of the Raritan River was above its 10

foot flood stage from 115 p.m. EDT

through 608 p.m. EDT on the 28th. It

crested at 10.72 feet at 345 p.m. EDT.

Farther downstream at the village of

South Branch, the North Branch of the

Raritan River was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 749 a.m. EDT on the

28th through 202 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 9.95 feet at 845 p.m.

EDT on the 28th. The Millstone River at

Griggstown was above its 10 foot flood

stage from 1231 p.m. EDT on the 28th

through 1121 a.m. EDT on the 29th. It

crested at 10.54 feet at 4 p.m. EDT on

the 28th.

Sussex County

Montague to 28 0730EST

Flatbrookville 30 0500EST

Several days of heavy rain throughout

the Delaware River Basin culminated

with major flooding along the Delaware

River from the 28th through the 30th.

It was the second or third highest

crest on record for the Delaware River

along Sussex County. The crest was the

second highest on record (since 1955)

at Tocks Island (Warren County) and

the third highest crest on record at

Montague. President George W. Bush

declared Sussex County a disaster

area. Sporadic periods of heavy rain

started on the 23rd, but the most

widespread and heaviest rain fell from

the night of the 27th into the morning

of the 28th. Event totals in Sussex

County averaged four to six inches,

but storm totals exceeded ten inches

in parts of the Upper Delaware Basin

in New York State.

The Delaware River at Montague was

above its 25 foot flood stage from

830 a.m. EDT on the 28th through 345

p.m. EDT on the 29th. It crested at

32.16 feet at 1015 p.m. EDT on the

28th, the third highest crest on

record. Farther downstream in Warren

County, the Delaware River at Tocks

Island was above its 21 foot flood

stage from 906 a.m. EDT on the 28th

through 1043 a.m. EDT on the 30th. It

crested at 33.87 feet at 915 a.m. EDT

on the 29th, the second highest crest

on record. The flow from the Delaware

River slowed the run-off from the Flat

Brook and caused flooding along the

brook. The Flat Brook at Flatbrookville

was above its 6 foot flood stage from

545 p.m. EDT through 1152 p.m. EDT on

the 28th. It crested at 6.25 feet at

815 p.m. EDT on the 28th.

Salem County

Carneys Pt 29 0217EST

A severe thunderstorm rolled across

parts of Salem County, New Jersey

during the very early morning hours of

June 29th. The strong winds produced

by the thunderstorm downed trees in

Carney’s Point, New Jersey at 3:17 AM

EDT.

Gloucester County

5 NW Glassboro 29 0243EST

During the very early morning hours of

June 29th, a severe thunderstorm rolled

across Gloucester County, New Jersey.

Trees and power lines were downed at

3:43 AM EDT from South Harrison

northeastward through Deptford

Township.

Camden County

Audubon 29 0256EST

Strong winds from a severe thunderstorm

downed trees in Gloucester Township,

New Jersey and Audubon, New Jersey

(both in Camden County) at 3:56 AM EDT

on June 29th.

Burlington County

Cinnaminson to 29 0303EST

Palmyra

A severe thunderstorm rolled across

northwestern Burlington County, New

Jersey during the very early morning

hours of June 29th. Trees and power

lines were downed at 4:03 AM EDT in

Cinnaminson. Riverside and Palmyra as

a result of strong winds.

Gloucester County

Turnersville 29 2130EST

A severe thunderstorm affected a

portion of Gloucester County, New

Jersey during the evening of June 29th.

The severe thunderstorm produced

nickel to quarter size hail in

Washington Township, near

Turnersville, at 10:30 PM EDT.

Burlington County

Rancocas 29 2145EST

Penny size hail fell in Westampton

Township.

NEW MEXICO, Central and North

Rio Arriba County

Canjilon 01 1255MST

1315MST

About 15 to 20 minutes with email hail

and intermittent larger hail reported

at the Canjilon Ranger Station.

Guadalupe County

Pastura 02 1512MST

Union County

Grenville 02 1550MST

Bernalillo County

Albuquerque Intl Arpt 06 1453MST

Union County

3 N Capulin to 12 1440MST

Capulin 1445MST

Large hail reported from the Volcano

National Monument south into Capulin.

Harding County

5 S Yates 12 1500MST

San Miguel County

Las Vegas Arpt 14 1517MST

San Miguel County

Las Vegas Arpt 14 1908MST

NMZ004>007 Sangre De Cristo Mountains–Northeast

Highlands–Harding–Far Northeast

Plains

15 1355MST

1926MST

Gusty winds developed as a strong upper

level trough moved over northern New

Mexico. In some cases the peak gusts

were aided by outflow winds from high

based virga showers.

Los Alamos County

2 S Los Alamos 22 1230MST

Los Alamos County

Los Alamos 22 1255MST

1305MST

San Miguel County

9 WSW Mineral Hill 22 1405MST

San Miguel County

17 N Pecos 22 1430MST

San Miguel County

2 N Mineral Hill 22 1432MST

Union County

6 N Folsom 22 1420MST

Union County

13 NE Folsom 22 1505MST

Quay County

3 SSW Ragland 22 1745MST

1750MST

Numerous 2 to 3 inch tree limbs snapped

off.

Mora County

12 N Wagon Mound 23 1530MST

Santa Fe County

2 SE Edgewood to 23 2145MST

Edgewood 2150MST

Storm produced swath of penny to half

dollar size hail near

San Miguel County

Las Vegas 24 1130MST

San Miguel County

12 NE Trementina 24 1640MST

Heavy rain and pea size hail also

reported.

Colfax County

13 NE Cimarron 24 1832MST

Bernalillo County

8 N Albuquerque Intl 26 1845MST

Bernalillo County

9 NE Albuquerque Intl 26 1909MST

Bernalillo County

12 NE Albuquerque Intl 26 1909MST

A storm with heavy rain produced high

winds over northeast sections of

Albuquerque. The Sandia Peak Tram

system reported gusts to 90 mph at the

top of the tram (10300 feet) and 70

mph wind at the base terminal (6900

feet).

Sandoval County

Rio Rancho 27 2000MST

2120MST

Bernalillo County

Albuquerque 27 2010MST

2120MST

Sandoval County

Rio Rancho 27 2048MST

2105MST

Bernalillo County

Albuquerque 27 2053MST

2110MST

Strong storms moved across Rio Rancho

and north central Albuquerque with

heavy rain and a swath of hail. Parts

of Rio Rancho, Corrales and the

Albuquerque North Valley had rains of

about 2 inches in 60 to 90 minutes.

Several dirt roads were unpassable or

washed out in Rio Rancho. Los Rios Road

on the east side of Highway 528

suffered the worst damage as the runoff

reclaimed the arroyo that had been

filled as a road in new housing

development situated on the sandy slope

of the mesa between Corrales and Rio

Rancho. Ponding problems developed

along Edith Blvd in the Albuquerque

North Valley filling streets to curb

full and reaching several inches into a

few homes.

NEW MEXICO, South Central and Southwest

Sierra County

Truth Or Consequences 01 1742MST

1756MST

Otero County

Alamogordo 22 1540MST

Otero County

Alamogordo 22 1545MST

1745MST

Strong thunderstorms developed over the

southern Sacramento Mountains and along

the eastern heights of Alamogordo. One

storm in particular dropped about an

inch and a half of rain in 40 minutes

over Marble Canyon, which drains into

eastern Alamogordo. Other storms added

heavy rain and several inches of

drifting small hail to that section of

town. Strong winds blew shingles off

houses, but flooding was the main

problem. Roads along the eastern heights

turned into raging torrents which flowed

westward into the center of town. Mud

flowed into numerous houses and several

vehicles were swept into arroyos. A gas

main was broken which led to the

evacuation of residents in the vicinity.

The state of NM put the damage total at

about $1.3 million.

NEW MEXICO, Southeast

Eddy County

Carlsbad 10 1410MST

1417MST

Pea to nickel size hail fell in

northern portions of Carlsbad,

specifically at the intersection of

Canal and Pierce.

Lea County

Tatum 21 1819MST

A NWS cooperative observer recorded a

58 mph wind gust on his home

anemometer. No damage was reported.

Eddy County

Carlsbad 22 2050MST

2300MST

The public reported one foot of water

flowing over some of the local roads

in Carlsbad.

Lea County

1 S Hobbs 29 1700MST

NEW YORK, Central

Steuben County

Bath 01 1820EST

2200EST

Several road washouts due to

thunderstorms with heavy rainfall. A

trailer park had to be evacuated.

Onondaga County

Plainville 19 1057EST

Trees blown down and several roofs

damaged.

Steuben County

Thurston 22 1925EST

Trees blown down by strong

thunderstorm winds.

Steuben County

Caton 22 1945EST

Trees blown down by strong thunderstorm

winds.

Steuben County

Lindley 22 1950EST

Trees blown down by strong thunderstorm

winds.

Chemung County

Elmira 22 2010EST

Trees and wires blown down by strong

thunderstorm

Delaware County

Cooks Falls 26 1300EST

28 2300EST

Record flooding occurred on the Beaver

Kill Creek at Cooks Falls. The Beaver

Kill rose to the flood stage of 10 feet

June 26 at 200 PM EDT, then fell below

flood stage temporarily, before rising

above flood stage again June 28th at

500 am EDT. The Beaver Kill Creek

crested at 20.54 feet June 28th at

around 11:00 am EDT. The previous

record measured from flood marks was

20.3 feet October 10, 1903

Sullivan County

5 W Liberty 26 1445EST

2300EST

A front from southern New England to

near Washington D.C Sunday morning

the 25th moved slowly west, to a

position from just north of New

England, south-southwest across the

Adirondacks through central New York

and then down the spine of the

Appalachians by Monday morning the

26th. Tropical moisture moved westward

and engulfed nearly all of New York

State and most of northern and

eastern Pennsylvania by Monday morning.

This resulted in a widespread area of

moderate to heavy rain across

all of central New York and northeast

Pennsylvania including the Poconos and

Catskills by Monday morning the 26th.

The heaviest rain occurred in the

Poconos and Catskills where rainfall

amounts totaled between 1.5 and 4

inches by 8 am EDT Monday. In Sullivan

County, 2 to 4 inches of rain fell by

Monday morning, which saturated soils.

Another round of heavy rain showers

and thunderstorms moved back into the

northern part of the county during the

day Monday the 26th. This additional

heavy rainfall caused flash flooding

in Youngsville closing Route 52. There

were many streams overflowing their

banks in and around Youngsville Monday

afternoon and evening.

Steuben County

Jasper 26 1600EST

2300EST

Heavy rainfall washed out several roads

in the Jasper area Monday afternoon and

evening the 26th.

Delaware County

Colchester 26 1700EST

2300EST

A front from southern New England to

near Washington D.C Sunday morning the

25th moved slowly west to a position

from just north of New England,

south-southwest across the Adirondacks

through central New York, and then

down the spine of the Appalachians by

Monday morning the 26th. Tropical

moisture moved westward and engulfed

nearly all of New York State and most

of northern and eastern Pennsylvania

by Monday morning. This resulted in a

widespread area of moderate to heavy

rain across all of central New York

and northeast Pennsylvania including

the Poconos and Catskills by Monday

morning the 26th. The heaviest

rainfall occurred in the Poconos and

Catskills where rainfall amounts

totaled between 1.5 and 4 inches by

8 am EDT Monday. In Delaware county,

flash flooding began around 6 pm

Monday evening as another batch of

heavy rain concentrated extreme

rainfall again over much of Delaware

County during the day Monday. With the

soils saturated from Sunday and Sunday

night’s rainfall, major flash flooding

began. The town of Colchester took the

brunt early on and the residents

evacuated voluntarily. All roads in

the town of Colchester were closed

as of Monday evening.

Delaware County

Fishs Eddy 26 1800EST

29 0800EST

Major flooding occurred on the East

Branch of the Delaware River at

Fishes Eddy. The Delaware River at

Fishes Eddy peaked just above the

flood stage of 13 feet Monday evening

the 26th before falling back below

flood stage late Monday night. The

East Branch of the Delaware then rose

again Tuesday morning and exceeded the

flood stage at Fishes Eddy at 800 am

EDT Tuesday the 27th. The East Branch

then continued to rise Tuesday

afternoon through Wednesday, cresting

at 21.45 feet at 1100 am EDT Wednesday

the 28th. This was about a foot short

of the previous record of 22.49 feet

which occurred just 14 months earlier

in April 2005

Broome County

West Portion 27 0345EST

0800EST

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into upstate New York ahead

of a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms across

much of central New York late Monday

evening the 26th through Tuesday

morning the 27th. A total of 2 to 4

inches of rain fell over the western

half of Broome County, including the

Binghamton, Vestal, Johnson City and

Endicott areas. This rainfall, in

addition to Sunday and Monday’s

rainfall, caused numerous roads to

become flooded, especially in the

Vestal area. The rain tapered off

Tuesday morning after sunrise

allowing the flash flooding to abate

temporarily.

Cortland County

Countywide 27 0345EST

0800EST

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into upstate New York ahead

of a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms across

much of central New York late Monday

evening the 26th through Tuesday

morning the 27th. A total of 2 to 4

inches of rain fell over the county.

This rainfall, in addition to Sunday

and Monday’s rainfall, caused numerous

roads to become flooded across the

county. The flash flooding abated

during the mid to late morning hours

Tuesday the 27th as the rain tapered

off.

Sullivan County

North Portion 27 0400EST

28 1400EST

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into the Catskills ahead of

a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms from

eastern Pennsylvania into the

Catskills late Monday evening the

26th through Tuesday morning the

27th. By 8 am Tuesday, another 3 to

5 inches of rain fell across northern

Sullivan County which caused major

flash flooding. Additional rain

fell Tuesday afternoon into pressure

Wednesday morning as the front moved

back east and combined with a low

system moving up the eastern seaboard.

The additional rainfall brought

rainfall totals to between 6 and 12

inches in the far northern part of

Sullivan County. The extreme rainfall

caused catastrophic flash flooding to

become more widespread and affect

Livingston Manor, Roscoe,

Jeffersonville and other locations in

the northern part of the county. The

flash flooding was described as the

worst in at least 40 years and in some

areas it was the worst ever. Small

streams and creeks caused massive

flooding, inundating Livingston Manor

entirely, flooding numerous roads.

Over 1500 homes were flooded of which

30 were destroyed and over 700 heavily

damaged. Numerous bridges were flooded

as well as many businesses. Total

losses are estimated at around 100

million dollars. One person was killed

by the flooding when she was washed out

of her home by the flood waters.

F15MH

Madison County

North Portion 27 0435EST

1000EST

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into upstate New York ahead

of a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms across

much upstate New York late Monday

evening the 26th through Tuesday

morning the 27th. From 2 to 4 inches

of rain fell across much of Madison

County. This rain fell on saturated

ground from previous rains that

occurred Sunday and Monday leading to

major flash flooding in the northern

portion of the county. Widespread

street flooding was reported with

several homes experiencing crumbled

foundations due to high waters. The

rains tapered off by late morning

allowing the flooding to abate.

Delaware County

Walton 27 0745EST

29 1200EST

At Walton, record flooding occurred on

the West Branch of the Delaware River.

The river level rose above the flood

stage of 9.5 feet Tuesday June 27th at

8:45 AM EDT. The river rose above the

moderate flood level of 14 feet June 27

at 2:30 PM EDT. The river rose above

the major flood level of 16 feet June

28, 3:15 AM EDT. The crest was 16.85

feet June 28 4:30 AM EDT. The previous

record was January 19, 1996 where the

crest was 16.36 feet. The flooding near

Walton was described in the Binghamton

Press and Sun Bulletin as “Unlike the

flood of 1996, caused by overflowing

waters of the West Branch of the

Delaware River, this season’s flooding

damage was inflicted by fast-moving,

“rip-and-tear” waters in the many

streams and small tributaries that

wreaked havoc on surrounding land,

buildings, and equipment. In some

cases, stream corridors changed

directions, cutting right through

the middle of fields.” Quote is from

John Thurgood, Agriculture extension

leader for the Watershed Agriculture

Council.

Delaware County

Countywide 27 0810EST

28 1300EST

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into upstate New York ahead

of a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms across

much of upstate New York late Monday

evening the 26th through Tuesday

morning the 27th. From 3 to 5 inches

of rain fell across Delaware County by

Tuesday morning. The rain fell on

saturated ground from previous rains

that occurred Sunday and Monday leading

to major flash flooding in Hancock,

Colchester and surrounding areas by

Tuesday morning. Hancock experienced

the worst flooding this town had ever

seen with most of the downtown

underwater. In addition, Walton,

Downsville, Delhi and Sidney also

became inundated with record flooding

as intense rainfall focused on these

areas later Tuesday. Numerous streams

and creeks were flooding homes,

businesses, roads, bridges and

government facilities. Despite the

major flash flooding that was occurring

Tuesday morning, the situation was

about to turn even more grim. The

front, which was across the eastern

Great Lakes Tuesday morning, moved back

east and combined with a low pressure

system that moved up the eastern

seaboard by Tuesday night. This set the

stage for additional heavy rains from

Tuesday evening to Wednesday morning

deluging Delaware County with more

rains that brought three day totals to

8 to 15 inches. This caused even more

catastrophic flooding to most of the

county by Wednesday morning the 28th.

At least 200 structures were damaged

in Hancock alone, the entire business

district of Walton was under 6 to 7

feet of water. Several small streams

and the Susquehanna River combined to

cause major flooding in the village of

Sidney, NY. Many homes were flooded in

Sidney with up to 6 feet of water.

Amphenol Corporation in Sidney was

flooded by up to 5 feet of water

causing 40 million dollars worth of

damage. The flooding also caused

Interstate 88 to collapse early

Wednesday morning near Unadilla killing

two truck drivers. The flooding caused

189 million dollars worth of damage to

roads alone. Damages are estimated at

250 million dollars from the floods.

At least 1000 homes were damaged by

flood waters with 30 homes completely

destroyed. Hundreds of businesses were

damaged including major corporations

like Amphenol and Kraft foods. There

were at least 10 businesses destroyed.

Over 500 people were evacuated with

hundreds of people rescued from the

flood waters. At least 20 bridges were

flooded. During the height of the

flood, all roads were closed in

Delaware County as a state of emergency

was declared Tuesday. This flood will

go down as the worst flood on record

ever experienced by Delaware County.

M?VE, M?VE

Steuben County

Addison 27 0900EST

1500EST

Heavy rains caused localized flash

flooding in the Addison and Cameron

areas where several roads were flooded.

Sullivan County

Callicoon 27 1000EST

29 1800EST

Record flooding occurred on the

Delaware River at Calicoon. The

Delaware River at Calicoon rose above

the 12 foot flood stage late in the

morning on Tuesday the 27th. The

Delaware River continued to rise

Tuesday and Wednesday cresting at a

record level of 20.37 feet at 700 pm

EDT Wednesday the 28th. This broke

the previous record of 17.80 feet

which occurred just 14 months earlier

in April 2005.

Broome County

Conklin 27 1315EST

30 2359EST

Both Broome and Susquehanna County were

inundated with record flooding from the

Susquehanna River near Conklin. Not

only did the river rise to record

levels, this left all the local

tributary streams with no outlet.

There was deep water from the backwater

built-up in the communities of Conklin

and Kirkwood in New York and Hallstead

and Great Bend in Pennsylvania. Many

homes and several businesses, big and

small, were destroyed along the Route

11 and Route 7 corridors that parallel

the Susquehanna River. The Conklin

gage-house was flooded, and quit

briefly near the flood crest. The

river rose to the flood stage of 11

feet June 27th at 2:15 pro EDT. The

river rose to the major flood level

of 20.0 feet June 27 at 11:45 pro EDT.

The river crested at 25.0 feet on

June 28th at 11:30 am EDT. This broke

the previous record of 20.83 feet set

in 1948. The Susquehanna River at

Conklin remained above the major

flooding level of 20 feet through

the end of June.

Delaware County

Hale Eddy 27 1330EST

29 0800EST

At Hale Eddy, major flooding occurred

on the West Branch of the Delaware

River. The river rose to the flood

stage of 11 feet June 27th at 2:30

PM EDT. The river reached the

moderate flooding level of 13 feet

June 27th at 7:20 PM EDT. The river

rose to the major flooding level of

15 feet June 28th at 2:30 AM EDT.

The river crested at 19.1 feet June

28th at 2:00 PM EDT which was about

one foot short of the record

measured from flood marks of 20.3

feet October 10, 1903.

Otsego County

27 1400EST

28 1400EST

Widespread heavy rain moved through

Otsego County and upstate New York

during the day Monday with more

heavy rain Monday night and Tuesday

morning. This rainfall saturated

the soils before another more

widespread area of heavy rainfall

occurred Tuesday afternoon and

night. Tropical moisture combined

with a slow-moving front and low

pressure system moving up

the eastern seaboard to bring

extreme rainfall to Otsego County.

The serious flash flooding began

in Otsego County during the

afternoon of Tuesday the 27th and

continued until Wednesday afternoon

as a total of 6 to 12 inches of

rain fell by Wednesday the 28th.

The highest rainfall was near

Unadilla where the Susquehanna

River reached record levels. No

one was killed from the floods

in Otsego County. A state of

emergency was declared Tuesday

afternoon as all roads were

closed. The sewer plant in Oneonta

was flooded sending raw sewage into

the Susquehanna River. Hardest

hit areas were Leonardsville,

Cooperstown, Hartwick, Bridgewater

and Oneonta. Route 20 was under

nearly three feet of water in East

Winfield. Total damage is estimated

at 50 million dollars. This was

described as the worst flooding in at

least 45 years. A total of 75 roads

were flooded in the county.

Tioga County

Countywide 27 1410EST

28 1400EST

Tropical moisture streamed northward

into south central New York ahead of a

frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture brought heavy showers

and thunderstorms across much of

upstate New York Sunday through Tuesday

morning. Rainfall by Tuesday morning

totaled 1 to 2 inches in Tioga County.

This initial rainfall saturated the

soils before another round of heavier

rain moved into the county Tuesday

afternoon as the front moved back east

and combined with a low pressure

system moving up the eastern seaboard.

This scenario spelled disaster for

Tioga County. Total rainfall for the

three day period ending Wednesday was

up to 6 inches. This heavy rain sent

nearly all streams and creeks over

their banks in what was described as

the worst flash flooding this county

has ever seen. Flash flooding began in

Owego at 310 pm EDT Tuesday the 27th

with some businesses downtown taking on

water. By early evening, flash flooding

was affecting the Waverly area and soon

became widespread Tuesday night

especially in the Campville area as

another 1 to 3 inches of rain fell.

Numerous roads, bridges, businesses

and homes were flooded. A total of 5000

homes were affected with 500 homes

damaged and 10 destroyed. Hardest hit

areas were Tioga, Campville, Owego,

Nichols, Barton, and Apalachin. Total

damage in Tioga County is estimated at

around 100 million dollars. No one was

killed. A state of emergency was

declared for Tioga county Tuesday

evening.

Broome County

Binghamton 27 1430EST

30 2359EST

The Susquehanna River in Binghamton is

estimated to have crested at 25.0 feet

Wednesday June 28th, 11:00 AM EDT. The

top of the flood walls protecting

downtown Binghamton are at 25.6 feet.

The Susquehanna River lapped over the

top of these flood walls. This made for

dramatic photos, but there was no

serious flooding in the protected

areas. There were 3000 people evacuated

in Binghamton as a precaution. The

most serious flooding in Binghamton was

at Lourdes Hospital. The hospital was

evacuated and shut down. The lower

level of the hospital flooded. The

river remained above the flood stage in

Binghamton through the end of June.

Chenango County

Bainbridge 27 1445EST

30 2359EST

The communities of Bainbridge and

Sidney were inundated with major

flooding during this period The major

source of jobs in the valley is the

Amphenol Corporation. This plant closed

due to 4 to 5 feet of water that

damaged the plant. The Susquehanna

River at Bainbridge rose to the 13 foot

flood stage Tuesday June 27th at 3:45

pm EDT. The river continued to rise

above the moderate inundation stage of

20 feet on Wednesday, June 28th at 4:45

am EDT. The river rose above the major

inundation stage of 22 feet on

Wednesday, June 28th at 8:45 am EDT.

The river crested at a new record of

27.03 feet Thursday June 29th at 11:00

am EDT. The old record flood was March

29, 1914 at 23.10 feet. The gage was

first established in 1907. The river

remained above the flood stage

through the end of June.

Steuben County

Bath 27 1500EST

2100EST

Heavy rains caused flooding of

several roads in the Bath area

Tuesday afternoon and evening

the 27th.

Schuyler County

Burdett 27 1515EST

2200EST

Heavy rains caused flash flooding

along Route 414 in Burdett, Odessa

and the Town of Hector.

Broome County

Countywide 27 1600EST

28 1400EST

Tropical moisture streaming into

upstate New York ahead of a

frontal system which moved

westward into the eastern

Great Lakes by Tuesday morning the

27th started the flash flood

problems in western Broome County

early Tuesday. The rain abated for

a time during the day Tuesday before

another batch of heavy rain fell

Tuesday afternoon into Wednesday

morning as the front moved back

east and combined with a low pressure

system moving up the eastern seaboard.

This scenario spelled disaster for

Broome County. Total rainfall for the

three day period ending Wednesday was

up to 9 inches, especially in the

Conklin and Windsor areas, which were

particularly hard hit. This additional

heavy rain sent nearly all streams and

creeks over their banks in what was

the worst flash flooding this county

has ever seen. The county’s

infrastructure was challenged as major

flash flooding began around 5 pm EDT

Tuesday and lasted into Wednesday

afternoon. A total of at least 40

roads, 5 bridges, dozens of businesses

and over 1800 homes were flooded. At

least 800 homes in Broome County were

destroyed Damages are estimated at 200

million dollars. All major highways in

the Binghamton area were closed due to

the flooding including Interstate 81,

Route 17, Route 26 and Interstate 88.

At least 6000 people were ordered to

evacuate from both river and flash

flooding. The Nanticoke Creek and

Tracey Creek were among many creeks

and streams causing major flooding. A

state of emergency was declared Tuesday

evening for Broome County. The National

Guard was called out to assist in

numerous water rescues, evacuations and

to prevent looting. Hardest hit areas

were Conklin, Kirkwood, Chenango Forks,

Endicott, Vestal, Johnson City and

Endwell. In Conklin, 50 percent of the

business district was flooded. The

National Guard had to airlift 300

people to safety who were stranded by

flood waters as the evacuation shelter

at the local high school became

surrounded by flood waters. In Windsor,

there were at least 100 people in

shelters. Countywide over 3000 people

were in shelters. In addition to the

flash flooding, the Susquehanna and

Chenango Rivers, which flow into the

Binghamton area were at record high

levels Wednesday. The rivers challenged

the levee system that protects the

city of Binghamton as the water

overtopped and undermined the levee in

spots. Many homes, roads and businesses

along the Chenango and Susquehanna

Rivers were severely impacted by flood

waters from Windsor to Conklin,

Kirkwood, Binghamton, Vestal, Endwell,

Johnson City, and Endicott. The flood

was the worst in Broome County history

as the Susquehanna River broke previous

record stages by 3 to 4 feet with river

gauging going back almost 100 years.

Fortunately no one was injured or

killed in Broome County from the

massive floods.

Tompkins County

Caroline 27 1630EST

28 0400EST

Heavy rains associated with a cold

front and tropical moisture caused

flash flooding in the Caroline area.

There were several roads closed by

the flooding. A total of 2 to 5

inches of rain fell in Tompkins

County from Monday the 26th through

Wednesday the 28th. The heaviest rain

occurred in the Caroline area where

around 5 inches fell.

Chenango County

Countywide 27 1700EST

28 1400EST

A steady stream of tropical moisture

flowing north into upstate New York

ahead of a frontal system across the

eastern Great Lakes brought periods

of heavy rain and thunderstorms to

Chenango County from early Monday

the 26th through Tuesday morning the

27th. From 1.5 to 4 inches of rain

fell by Tuesday morning. This rain

saturated soils before another batch

of heavy rain fell Tuesday afternoon

into Wednesday morning as the front

moved back east and combined with a

low pressure system moving up the

eastern seaboard. This additional

rainfall caused most small streams

and creeks to burst their banks

beginning Tuesday the 27th in the

evening. The rain finally tapered

off early Wednesday morning the 28th.

A total of 4 to 7 inches of rain fell

across Chenango County which caused

numerous small streams and creeks to

overflow their banks. The serious

flooding began Tuesday evening around

6 pm EDT and lasted into Wednesday

afternoon. Hardest hit areas were

Afton, Bainbridge, Norwich and

Sherburne. In Norwich, the Canasawcta

Creek flooded the entire west side of

the city with hundreds evacuated. In

addition, the entire business district

took on water. It is estimated that

one half of all homes and businesses

in Norwich had some flood damage.

Damages were estimated in the millions

as at least 300 homes were affected by

the flood waters. 200 people were

forced to evacuate, 10 people were

rescued from the floods. A total of

250 roads were flooded with 2 bridges

destroyed. One man was killed by the

flood waters.

M31VE

Chemung County

East Portion 27 1700EST

2300EST

Heavy rains caused several roads to be

flooded in the Southport and Chemung

areas Tuesday evening the 27th.

Sullivan County

Barryville 27 1700EST

29 1900EST

Record flooding occurred on the

Delaware River at Barryville. The

Delaware River at Barryville rose

above the 17 foot flood stage

Tuesday evening the 27th. The Delaware

River continued to rise Tuesday and

Wednesday cresting at a record level

of 28.97 feet at 1100 am EDT Wednesday

the 28th. This broke the previous

record of 24.80 feet which occurred

just 14 months earlier in April 2005

Broome County

Vestal 27 1825EST

30 2359EST

The Vestal river gage on the

Susquehanna River is located 8 miles

west of the Binghamton Washington

Street Gage. Vestal is on

the left bank of the river and the

Town of Union Communities of Johnson

City, Endwell and Endicott are on the

right bank of the Susquehanna River.

Each community had extensive flood

losses, too numerous to list. Some of

the more notable losses are the many

homes in areas like the Castle Gardens

development which were recovering from

losses due to the April 2005 flooding.

The inundation of the Enjoi Golf

Course forced the cancellation of the

“BC Open”, a PGA Tour Event. This was

a further economic blow for many

businesses in the region. The Vestal

gage reached the flood stage of 18

feet June 27th at 7:25 pm EDT. It

rose to the moderate flooding level of

21 feet June 27th at 11:00 PM EDT. It

rose to the major flood level, June

28th at 4:00 AM EDT. The river gage

was flooded but continued sending

data even though the gage float was

as high as it could go. The gage

topped out at 32.98 feet, but the USGS

made a measurement of the watermark and

have the provisional crest at 33.5

feet. The old record for Vestal was

30.5 feet measured from watermarks

March 18, 1936. The April 3, 2005

flood crest was 28.87 feet. The local

basin average rainfall for June 26 to

29 was 6.87 inches. The river remained

well above the flood stage through the

end of June at Vestal.

Oneida County

Countywide 27 1830EST

28 1430EST

Tropical moisture streamed northward

into upstate New York ahead of a

frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

brought an initial round of heavy rain

to Oneida County by Tuesday morning.

From 2 to 4 inches of rain fell by

Tuesday morning. The rain abated for a

short time during the day Tuesday

before another batch of heavy rain

fell Tuesday afternoon into Wednesday

morning as the front moved back east

and combined with a low pressure

system moving up the eastern seaboard.

Total rainfall for the three day

period ending Wednesday was between 4

and 8 inches. This scenario caused the

worst flash flooding in Oneida County

in 20 years, impacting many areas of

the county starting at 730 pm EDT

Tuesday and lasting into Wednesday.

Hardest hit areas were Western,

Deerfield, Vernon and Verona, Kirkland,

Oriskany Falls and Steuben. There was

one bridge washed out with at least 17

roads flooded. In the town of

Deerfield, 22 homes were flooded by

the West Canada Creek. No one was

killed by the flooding with damage

estimates around 50 million dollars.

A state of emergency was declared for

Oneida County as numerous roads were

closed which included the New York

State Thruway.

Chenango County

Sherburne 27 1835EST

30 2359EST

Record flooding occurred at Sherburne

on the Chenango River. At the peak of

the flooding, there was three feet of

water on Main Street in Sherburne.

The river reached the flood stage of

8 feet June 27th at 7:35 PM EDT. The

river rose to the moderate flood level

of 9 feet June 28th at 9:45 PM EDT.

The river rose to the major flood

level of 10.6 feet June 28th at 1:00

AM EDT. The record crest was 11.35

feet June 28th at 12:45 PM EDT. The

old record was 11.2 feet set March 28,

1914. The third highest crest is 10.78

feet April 3, 2005. The basin average

rainfall for June 26 to 29 was 5.84

inches. The river at Sherburne remained

above the flood stage through the end

of June.

Delaware County

Delhi 27 2020EST

29 0000EST

At Delhi, New York, major flooding

occurred on the West Branch of the

Delaware River. The river rose above

the flood stage of 8 feet June 27th

at 9:20 PM EDT. The river rose above

the moderate flood level of 9.5 feet

June 28th at 2:30 AM EDT. The river

rose above the major flood level of

10.5 feet June 28th at 3:30 AM EDT.

The river crested at 11.75 feet

June 28th at 6:45 AM EDT. The

record is 12.24 feet November 9, 1996.

Delaware County

Unadilla 27 2030EST

30 2359EST

The Susquehanna River at Unadilla rose

to the 11 foot flood stage Tuesday

June 27th at 09:30 pm EDT. The river

continued to rise above the moderate

inundation stage of 13 feet on

Wednesday June 28th at 5:45 am EDT.

The river rose above the major

inundation stage of 14.5 feet on

Wednesday June 28th at 10:00 am EDT.

The river crested at a new record of

17.73 feet Thursday June 29th at 5:15

am EDT. The old record flood was March

18, 1936 at 16.60 feet. The gage was

established 1938. The river at Unadilla

remained above flood stage through the

end of June.

Broome County

Windsor 27 2045EST

30 2359EST

The Susquehanna River rose to the

flood stage of 15.5 feet Tuesday June

27th at 9:45 pro EDT. The river

continued to rise above the moderate

inundation stage of 18.5 feet

Tuesday June 27th at 11:46 pm EDT.

The river rose above the major

inundation level of 20.50 feet

Wednesday June 28th at 12:45 am

EDT. The first crest was 23.72 feet

on June 28th at 1:00 pro EDT, and

the second crest was 24.27 feet. The

old record was 21.22 feet January 200,

1996. The gage was established in

1988. The Susquehanna River at

Windsor remained above flood stage

through the end of June.

Cortland County

Cincinnatus 27 2131EST

28 1400EST

At Cincinnatus on the Otselic River,

only minor flooding occurred. The

river rose above the flood stage of 8

feet June 27th at 10:31 PM EDT. The

river crested at 9.59 feet June 28th

at 2:01 AM EDT. The record is 12.5

feet July 8, 1935. The basin average

rainfall for June 26 to 29 was 5.76

inches.

Broome County

Chenango Forks 27 2204EST

30 0900EST

Moderate flooding occurred at Chenango

Forks on the Chenango River. The river

rose to the flood stage of 10 feet

June 27th at 11:04 PM EDT. The river

rose to the moderate flood level of

12.6 feet June 28th at 7:22 AM EDT.

The river crested at 13.74 feet June

28th at around 4 pm EDT. The flood of

record is 20.3 feet July 8, 1935. This

June 2006 flood crest ranks 9th. The

local basin average rainfall for

June 26 to 29 was 5.82 inches.

Madison County

Countywide 27 2300EST

28 1300EST

Tropical moisture streamed northward

into upstate New York ahead of a

frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the

eastern Great Lakes by Tuesday morning

the 27th. This brought an initial

round of heavy rain to Madison County

by Tuesday morning causing significant

flash flooding in the northern portion

of the county. The rain abated for a

short time during the day Tuesday the

27th before another batch of heavy

rain fell Tuesday afternoon into

Wednesday morning as the front moved

back east and combined with a low

pressure system moving up the eastern

seaboard. Total rainfall for the three

day period ending Wednesday was between

4 and 8 inches. This scenario caused

major flash flooding in Madison County,

impacting many areas of

the county starting at around Midnight

EDT Wednesday and lasting into

Wednesday morning. Hardest hit areas

were south of Route 20, including

Georgetown, Lebanon, Hamilton, and De

Ruyter. Colgate University also had

major flooding. A state of emergency

was declared for the county. There

were 12 bridges washed out, numerous

roads flooded, and dozens of people

rescued from the flood waters. 50

people had to be evacuated from the

flood waters. No one was killed by

the flooding with damage estimated at

around 25 million dollars.

Chenango County

Greene 27 2300EST

30 1200EST

Near record flooding occurred at

Greene on the Chenango River. The

current record at Greene is 22.0 feet

set July 8, 1935. The river rose to

the flood stage of 13 feet June 28th,

12:00 AM EDT. The river rose to the

moderate flood level of 17 feet June

28th at 5:00 AM EDT. The river

crested at 21.16 feet June 28th at

4:20 PM EDT.

Chenango County

Rockdale 28 0131EST

30 0700EST

Record flooding occurred on the

Unadilla River at Rockdale. The

flooding beat the old record by one

foot. The news stories about the

record flooding were centered on a

Mount Upton firefighter, who nearly

lost his own life in a swift water

rescue that sent a 5-year old boy to

the hospital. The firefighter was

swept into the Unadilla River, but

was wearing a flotation device and was

rescued himself. The other flood news

was the enormous amount of dairy

farmland and crops that were destroyed

by flooding. The river reached the

flood stage of 11 feet June 28th at

2:31 AM EDT. The river rose to the

moderate flood level of 12 feet June

28th, at 5:45 AM EDT. The river rose

to the major flood category of 13 feet

June 28th at 10:00 AM EDT. The crest

was 13.96 feet on June 29th, at 12:00

AM EDT. The old record at Rockdale was

12.98 feet set December 31, 1942. The

basin average rainfall for June 26 to

29 was 5.92 inches.

Tioga County

Owego 28 0330EST

30 2359EST

Several neighborhoods in Owego became

virtual islands during this flood. The

Susquehanna River at Owego rose above

the flood stage of 30 feet June 28th

at 4:30 AM EDT. Moderate flooding (32

feet) began June 28th, at 7:30 AM EDT.

Major flooding (33 feet) began June

28th at 9:30 AM EDT. The crest of

35.85 feet was reached June 29th, at

01:30 AM EDT which set a new record.

The old record was 33.18 feet April

3, 2005. The January 20 1996 flood

crest was 32.97 feet. The river at

Owego remained above flood stage

through the end of June.

Broome County

Deposit 28 0900EST

1800EST

At Oquaga Creek at Deposit, record

flooding occurred. The crest was 10.51

feet June 28, 2006 at 10:00 AM. The

old records are 8.98 feet July 4,

1970; 8.44 feet September 18, 2004;

and 7.61 feet April 3, 2005.

Steuben County

Bradford 28 1820EST

Large branches were blown down by

strong thunderstorm winds.

Cayuga County

Moravia 28 1925EST

Oneida County

Camden 28 2115EST

Trees were blown down by strong

thunderstorm winds.

Seneca County

Waterloo 29 1619EST

Seneca County

Seneca Falls 29 1625EST

Steuben County

Corning 29 1640EST

Cortland County

Marathon 29 1640EST

Cayuga County

Auburn 29 1644EST

Chemung County

Elmira 29 1650EST

Cayuga County

Auburn 29 1650EST

Tioga County

Candor 29 1715EST

Tioga County

Spencer 29 1715EST

Tompkins County

West Danby 29 1729EST

Tioga County

Candor 29 1730EST

Tioga County

Apalachin 29 1805EST

Broome County

Endicott 29 1810EST

Delaware County

East Meredith 29 2003EST

Delaware County

Davenport 29 2008EST

Delaware County

Meridale 29 2008EST

Delaware County

Davenport 29 2008EST

Tioga County

Owego 30 1340EST

Steuben County

Hammondsport 30 1540EST

Steuben County

Bath 30 1540EST

Trees and wires were blown down by

strong thunderstorm winds.

NEW YORK, Coastal

Westchester County

Central Portion 01 1245EST

Trees and wires downed.

Orange County

Middletown 01 1315EST

Trees and power lines.

Orange County

Countywide 01 1400EST

1500EST

Lightning struck several structures

in Orange County, causing numerous

fires. House fires were reported in

Hugenot, Port Jervis, and Middletown.

Westchester County

Mt Kisco 01 1418EST

Putnam County

Carmel 01 1740EST

Trees and power lines downed by

thunderstorm winds.

Rockland County

Stony Pt 01 1800EST

1815EST

Lightning struck at least 6 houses

in Stony Point.

Richmond County

West Central Portion 01 1900EST

2000EST

Flash flooding on the West Shore

Expressway. Thunderstorms developed

in a moist and unstable atmosphere

on June 1st. Not only did the storms

produce very heavy rain and strong

winds, they were also prolific

lightning producers.

Richmond County

Richmond 01 2000EST

Lightning struck a police car,

narrowly missing a police officer

standing in front of the North Shore’s

120th precinct station house.

New York County

East Central Portion 02 1530EST

1630EST

Flash flooding occurred on the FDR,

causing it to be closed.

Queens County

Flushing 02 1530EST

1600EST

Heavy rainfall caused flash flooding

of roadways.

Richmond County

Countywide 02 1600EST

1700EST

Rainfall falling at the rate of nearly

two inches per hour caused flash

flooding of streets across Staten

Island. Hylan Blvd was affected the

worst with at least a foot of water

being observed flowing swiftly down

the street.

Anywhere between 2 and 4 inches of

rain fell across New York City from

late afternoon into the evening hours

on June 2nd due to thunderstorms that

tapped a very moist and unstable

airmass. Central Park recorded 3.53

inches of rainfall.

Orange County

2 S Maybrook 20 1625EST

Westchester County

1 W Mt Kisco 29 1415EST

Trees downed in addition to the

penny size hail.

Richmond County

Tottenville 29 1745EST

1750EST

Penny to nickel size hail was

observed.

Richmond County

Tottenville 29 1745EST

1750EST

Trees and power lines downed.

Richmond County

Huguenot 29 1800EST

1900EST

Flash flooding of roads submerged

vehicles. A few houses were surrounded

by 5 feet of water.

New York County

East Portion 29 1830EST

1900EST

Major flash flooding on FDR Drive.

Queens County

Bayside 29 1845EST

Slow moving thunderstorms produced a

wide array of severe weather. Flash

flooding, large hail, and damaging

winds were all experienced when

thunderstorms ignited in a very moist

and unstable airmass during the

afternoon and evening of June 29th.

Bronx County

Bronx 29 1815EST

Lightning stuck a person at Crotona

Park pool. Extent of injuries unknown.

NEW YORK, East

Ulster County

Lake Katrine 01 1300EST

A trained spotterreported penny-sized

hail at Lake Katrine.

Dutchess County

Hyde Park 01 1335EST

A trained spotter reported

nickle-sized hail at the Vanderbilt

National Historic Site in Hyde Park.

Ulster County

Highland 01 1335EST

A trained spotter reported penny-sized

hail in Highland.

Dutchess County

Rhinebeck 01 1405EST

A trained spotter reported penny-sized

hail at Rhinebeck.

Dutchess County

Stanfordville 01 1427EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

trees and wires blown down along Route

82 in Stanfordville.

Rensselaer County

Rensselaer 01 1811EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

numerous small trees blown down in

Rensselaer.

On the last day of May a north-south

stationary front over central New York

dissipated leaving residual moisture

and instability over upstate New York.

At daybreak on June 1, a slow-moving

cold front over the St Lawrence

Valley sliced into this unstable air

mass over upstate New York producing

afternoon thunderstorms, several of

which became severe, containing large

hail and damaging wind gusts.

Warren County

Bolton 19 1400EST

Park/Forest Service personnel reported

trees blown down on Lake George’s Big

Burn Island and Hatchett Island. Minor

injuries were occurred when a tree

fell on a tent.

Washington County

Whitehall 19 1437EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

wires were blown down onto Route 12

in Whitehall.

Saratoga County

Northumberland 19 1457EST

Law enforcement personnel reported a

tree and wires blown down on Lindsay

Road at Route 32.

Washington County

Easton 19 1515EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

wires blown down on Hoge Road in

Easton.

Rensselaer County

Troy 19 1550EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

trees and wire were blown down in Troy.

Albany County

Bethlehem Center 19 1556EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

that trees were blown onto a power

line along Beaver Dam Road.

Columbia County

Stuyvesant 19 1605EST

Fire Department personnel in

Stuyvesant report that 5 trees were

blown down.

Ulster County

Saugerties 19 1621EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

that trees and wires were blown down

in Saugerties.

Dutchess County

Washington Hollow 19 1740EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

that trees were blown down in

Washington Hollow.

Early in the day on June 19, low

pressure was over western Quebec

Province with a cold front trailing

southwestward to a weak wave over the

northern Great Lakes, then southward

to the central Mississippi Valley.

The air over eastern New York became

more unstable during the day as a

moderate west southwesterly breeze

brought more moisture into the

Northeast. Several severe

thunderstorms formed in the afternoon

producing damaging wind gusts.

Dutchess County

Pleasant Vly 20 1632EST

1732EST

A trained spotter reported

penny-sized hail at Pleasant Valley.

Dutchess County

Moores Mill 20 1655EST

A trained spotter reported

nickle-sized hail at Moores Mill.

Early in the day on June 20, a fairly

strong cold front lay in an arc from

near the mouth of the St Lawrence

Valley to just north of the Ohio

Valley. The front moved southeastward

to off the Atlantic Coast late at

night. The air mass covering eastern

New York was moist and unstable. As

the front moved across eastern New

York in the afternoon, it produced a

couple of severe thunderstorms

containing large hail.

Dutchess County

La Grange 25 1815EST 0.5 150

1835EST

An Emergency Manager reported that

a tornado occurred at Lagrangeville.

The tornado was on the ground between

15 and 30 seconds traveling half a

mile and cutting a path 150 yards

wide.

On June 24, a weak wave of low

pressure had moved northeastward

through New England. In its wake, it

left a stationary front boundary

along the New England coast. The air

mass over southeastern New York State

was moist and fairly unstable and there

was considerable environmental wind

shear over the region. On the evening

of June 25, a supercell thunderstorm

formed in Dutchess County. This

thunderstorm briefly produced an Fl

tornado, which was on the ground 15 to

30 seconds cutting a path a half mile

long and 150 yards wide in the vicinity

of Lagrangeville.

Fulton County

Bleecker 26 1745EST

An emergency Manager reported that

trees were blown down in Bleecker.

From June 24 through June 25 an upper

level ridge strengthened off the

eastern Atlantic Coast. The increasing

southeasterly flow in the low levels

of the atmosphere along the New

England coast caused a nearly

stationary front near the Atlantic

Coast to drift northwestward into

New York State. During the afternoon

of June 25, this front lay from the

northern Champlain Valley to the

central southern tier of New York.

A band of heavy rainfall occurred just

to the southeast of this front. The

heaviest rainfall was from the

Catskills to the mid Hudson Valley.

A few thunderstorms formed along the

frontal boundary over east central

New York during the afternoon. One

thunderstorm became severe, producing

damaging wind gusts.

Warren County

Pottersville 26 2300EST

27 0500EST

According to a newspaper report, a

woman suffered minor injuries near

Pottersville when the vehicle she was

driving fell through a section of

Olmstead Road that was undermined by

flooding Fish Creek. The flood water

was from the combination of heavy

rainfall and a breached beaver dam.

On June 26, a slowly-moving frontal

boundary left 3 to 4 inches of

rainfall in its wake as it drifted

northwestward across the Lake

George Northern Saratoga region of

eastern New York. The rainfall caused

a beaver dam near Pottersville to

burst which resulted in a washout of

a section of County Route 19, also

known as Olmsteadville Road. County

highway repair personnel said that the

heavy rainfall resulted in partial

damage to 7 roads in the county, and

they estimated that the damage was

about 40,000 dollars.

Herkimer County

Ilion 28 0245EST

0845EST

An emergency manager reported that

Fulmer Creek flooded a trailer park

in German Flatts, about 5 miles

southeast of Ilion. Twelve homes

were evacuated.

Herkimer County

Little Falls 28 0245EST

An emergency manager reported that

Routes 5 and 168 were closed due to

flooding and mud slides.

Herkimer County

Little Falls 28 0245EST

An emergency manager reported that

a house was lifted off its foundation

in Little Falls, due to a mud slide.

Fulton County

Stratford 28 0500EST

1100EST

An emergency manager reported that

flooding of the East Canada Creek

caused numerous evacuations across

the western portion of Fulton County

in the vicinity of Stratford and

Dolgeville. Route 29A was flooded at

Stratfortd.

Herkimer County

Dolgeville 28 0500EST

1100EST

An emergency manager reported that

East Canada Creek was flooding and

that evacuations have occurred along

Main Street in the village of

Dolgeville. The water level rose to

the bottom the Route 29 bridge.

Montgomery County

Ames 28 0500EST

1100EST

An emergency manager reported that

widespread flooding along Brimestone

Creek occurred. West Ames Road and

Old Sharon Road, between Route 10

and Latimer and Shunk Roads, were

closed due to flooding.

Schoharie County

Charlotteville 28 0600EST

1200EST

A trained spotter reported that a

small bridge was flooded at

Charlotteville.

Schoharie County

Cobleskill 28 0600EST

1200EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

that State Route 7 was closed due to

flooding from the Cobleskill Creek at

the east end of the village of

Cobleskill.

Schoharie County

Gilboa 28 0700EST

A trained spotter reported that

there was a mud slide across Stryker

Road in Gilboa.

Montgomery County

Canajoharie 28 0700EST

1300EST

A trained spotter reported that

evacuations occurred along Route 80,

which was closed due to flooding,

near the village of Fort Plain. A

state of emergency was in effect in

Montgomery County.

Schoharie County

Warnerville 28 0705EST

1305EST

A trained spotter reported that the

Cobleskill Creek flooded several

buildings and roads in Warnerville

including the Post Office.

Schoharie County

Richmondville 28 0745EST

A trained spotter reported that a

mud slide occurred in Richmondville.

Schoharie County

Gilboa 28 0750EST

1350EST

A trained spotter reported that

Campbell Road to Gilboa was closed due

to flooding from the Keyserkill Creek.

A State of Emergency was in effect in

Schoharie County.

Herkimer County

Ingham Mills 28 0815EST

1415EST

An emergency manager reported that

water was spilling from the Kyser Lake

Dam on East Canada Creek and that

evacuations were occurring downstream.

The National Grids buildings were

flooded.

Schoharie County

Broome Center 28 0842EST

1442EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

that State Route 145 was flooded from

the Catskill Creek to the vicinity of

Broome Center.

Herkimer County

Dolgeville 28 0900EST

1500EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

that a building was washed into East

Canada Creek in Dolgeville.

Herkimer County

Ilion 28 0900EST

1500EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

that around 200 people were evacuated

from Ilion, Dolgeville, Mohawk, and

Frankfort due to flooding.

Schoharie County

Cobleskill 28 0917EST

1517EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

that Route 10 to the west of

Cobleskill was impassable due to

flooding.

Hamilton County

Indian Lake 28 0920EST

1520EST

A trained spotter reported that

Cedar River and Big Brook were

flooding.

Ulster County

Willow 28 0923EST

1523EST

A trained spotter reported that

may streams in the vicinity of

Willow were flooding.

Hamilton County

Benson 28 1000EST

1600EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

that Route 30 and Stoney Road were

closed due to flooding

Fulton County

Oppenheim 28 1023EST

1623EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

that several roads in the area

surrounding Oppenheim were closed

due to flooding.

Greene County

Catskill 28 1115EST

1715EST

Law enforcement personnel reported

that several roads in Greene County

were closed in, and near the towns

of Catskill, Cairo and Haines Falls

due to flooding.

An upper level ridge over the western

Atlantic Ocean which had been building

westward for a couple of days prior to

June 28 began to slowly retreat on

June 28 as an upper level trough over

the Mississippi Valley began drifting

very slowly eastward. A frontal

boundary which had drifted westward

into western New York on June 27 began

drifting eastward and was over east

central New York at daybreak on June

28. A small low pressure was in the

vicinity of the eastern Southern Tier

of New York State. This was a weak

cyclone of tropical origin. A band of

heavy rainfall occurred just to the

southeast of the front, The heaviest

rainfall was from the eastern Southern

Tier of New York State to the southern

Adirondacks. Three to 5 inches of

rainfall occurred in east central

New York over about a 24-hour period

from daybreak June 27 to June 28. And

from June 26 to 28, nearly 10 inches of

rain occurred in the southern

Adirondacks according to radar

estimates. Additional rainfall

occurred on the morning of June 28 as

the tropical cyclone moved northward

through eastern New York State.

The heavy rainfall produced widespread

flooding across east central New York

State. There was severe major level

flooding on portions of the Mohawk

River and some of its tributaries,

and moderate to near major flooding

on some of the Catskill Mountain

drainages. Record flooding occurred

on the Mohawk River at Little Falls

and on the Canajoharie Creek, A

record flood may have occurred on

the East Canada Creek between

Dolgeville and the Mohawk River. Also,

moderate to near major flooding

occurred at Kast Bridge, Hinckley,

and Schenectady, Flooding, mainly

minor, occurred along the Hudson River

and its tributaries, including Hope

(here moderate to near major flooding

was observed), Troy, Riverbank, and

Ft. Edward. In the Catskills,

flooding approached major levels near

Kingston on the Esopus. Elsewhere in

the Catskills, mainly minor flooding

was noted.

Readers are referred to the E-5

report from the National Weather

Service’s Albany office for details

on the flooding that occurred on

the main stem (gaged) rivers.

There was a considerable amount of

flood damage. However as of mid

summer 2006, when this report was

filed, the damage figure was very

preliminary. Damage was estimated to

be around 50 million dollars. About

8,000 customers of National Grid were

without power. In some cases, power

was intentionally cut to homes and

businesses to reduce the fire threat.

A 117-mile stretch of the New York

State Thruway was closed between

Interchange 25A and Interchange 34A

beginning at 11:45 am June 28, 2006

and lasting until 10:15 am June 29,

2006. Flooding from the Mohawk River

between Fultonville and Canajoharie

led to portions of the Thruway being

under five feet of water. This was

the worst flooding on the Barge Canal

during the navigation season since its

reconstruction in 1905. Forty-five

locks were closed. In some locations,

the flood waters deposited 100-foot

deep debris piles. Thirty-five

vessels were stranded in the canal

system. Freight and passenger rail

services were interrupted between

Albany and Buffalo.

Schenectady County

Niskayuna 29 1320EST

A former National Weather Service

employee reported that two 10-inch

diameter trees were blown down in

Niskayuna by Lock 7 and Rosendale

Roads.

Dutchess County

Moores Mill 29 1520EST

Newspaper personnel reported that

nickel-sized hail occurred at Moors

Mill.

Albany County

Altamont 29 1640EST

A member of the general public

estimated that penny-sized hail

occurred at Altamont.

Schenectady County

Rotterdam 29 1652EST

A trained spotter reported that

nickle-sized hail occurred at

Rotterdam.

Schenectady County

Scotia to 29 1653EST

Rotterdam

A trained spotter reported that

penny-sized hail occurred at Scotia.

Schenectady County

Schenectady 29 1705EST

Law enforcement personnel report

that trees were blown down onto cars

and a house on Campbell Avenue in

Schenectady.

Saratoga County

West Milton 29 1727EST

Law enforcement personnel report

that trees were blown down in

West Milton.

Fulton County

Stratford 29 1910EST

A trained spotter reported that

quarter-sized haft occurred in

Stratford.

Saratoga County

Malta 29 1940EST

A National Weather Service employee

reported a measured wind gust of 60

miles an hour in a thunderstorm at

Malta. After being nearly stationary

while deepening for several days, an

upper-level trough from the Great

Lakes to the lower Ohio Valley was

accelerating eastward at daybreak on

June 29. An associated weak low

pressure over Lake Erie trailed a

cold front through the Ohio Valley.

During the day, this system moved

rapidly eastward and touched off

thunderstorms in the warm, humid air

mass over eastern New York and

adjacent western New England from

mid afternoon through early evening.

There were many severe thunderstorms

containing large hail and damaging

wind gusts. The bulk of the severe

activity was in, or near the Capital

District.

Hamilton County

Hope Falls 29 1952EST

Park/Forest Service personnel

reported that quarter-sized hail

occurred in Hope Falls.

NEW YORK, North

Franklin County

4 SW Santa Clara 19 1205EST

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This led to the

development of thunderstorms across

northern New York during midday. A

few thunderstorms produced severe

weather, including damaging winds

that downed trees and several large

branches near Santa Clara.

St. Lawrence County

Childwood 19 1210EST

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This resulted in

the development of thunderstorms

across northern New York during

midday. A few thunderstorms produced

severe weather, including damaging

winds that downed several large

branches and a few trees near

Childwold.

Franklin County

Saranac Lake 19 1235EST

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered

a very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This led to the

development of thunderstorms across

northern New York during midday of

the 19th. A few thunderstorms produced

severe weather, including damaging

winds that knocked down several large

branches and resulted in minor power

outages in Saranac Lake.

Essex County

Wilmington 19 1245EST

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered

a very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This resulted in

the development of thunderstorms

across northern New York during

midday on the 19th. A few

thunderstorms produced severe

weather, including damaging winds

that downed trees in Wilmington.

Clinton County

Schuyler Falls 19 1320EST

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This led to the

development of thunderstorms across

northern New York during midday on

the 19th, that moved into the

Champlain Valley by early afternoon.

A few thunderstorms produced severe

weather, including damaging winds

that downed several large branches

at Schuyler Falls.

Clinton County

Plattsburgh 19 1340EST

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York around midday on

the 19th and developed a line of

thunderstorms that intensified as they

moved into the Champlain Valley by

early afternoon. These thunderstorms

produced severe weather, in the form

of wind damage, across Clinton county,

including numerous trees and utility

poles blown over in Plattsburgh.

Essex County

Crown Pt 19 1350EST

Essex County

Moriah 19 1350EST

Essex County

Westport 19 1350EST

Essex County

Willsboro 19 1350EST

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York around midday on

the 19th. This developed a line of

thunderstorms that intensified as

they moved into the Champlain Valley

by early afternoon. These

thunderstorms produced severe

weather, in the form of wind damage,

across Essex county, including

numerous trees and powerlines down

in Willsboro, Moriah, Crown Point and

Westport.

Essex County

Ticonderoga 20 1130EST

A mid-level atmospheric disturbance

and surface cold front moved across a

moderately unstable airmass during

midday of the 20th. This led to

scattered thunderstorms across the

Champlain Valley of New York,

including a severe thunderstorm in

Ticonderoga that produced penny size

(3/4 inch diameter) hail.

Essex County

Countywide 26 1215EST

2000EST

On the morning of the 26th … a deep

upper atmospheric trough was located

across the Mississippi River Valley,

while a quasi-stationary warm front

was across the Champlain Valley. This

combination allowed copious amounts

of moisture to advect northward from

the Gulf of Mexico into the Champlain

Valley in the form of rain on the

26th. Widespread rainfall totals

across the Champlain Valley in New

York were 1 to 3 inches, with a

concentrated area of 3 to 5 inches in

southeast Essex county. Some observed

rainfall totals included Schroon

Lake with 3.83 inches and Mineville

with 3.60 inches. Several roads were

flooded in the Ticonderoga–Schroon

Lake area, including Routes 9N and 22

and some basement flooding was

observed. Roads were flooded in

Minerva, including a washout on

Potterville Rd.

Essex County

Keene 28 0700EST

1200EST

On the early morning of the 28th, a

persistent deep upper atmospheric

trough was located across the

Mississippi River Valley, while

a cold front and weak area of low

pressure was slowly moving east

across New York. More steady

rainfall fell across Essex county

New York, an area that had

witnessed heavy rainfall for the

last several days. The end result

was several bankfull streams and

rivers with flooded fields as well

as some scattered flooding of roads,

including the Hulls Falls Road in

Keene, along the upper reaches of

the East Branch of the AuSable River.

St. Lawrence County

Chippewa Bay 30 1235EST

A strong mid-level disturbance, with

a cold temperature pool aloft, moved

across the Saint Lawrence Valley of

New York during the early afternoon

of the 30th. The instability generated

was enough to create isolated

thunderstorms across the region,

which produced Quarter size hail

(one inch diameter) at Chippewa Bay.

NEW YORK, West

Cayuga County

Cato 19 1050EST

Oswego County

West Monroe 19 1140EST

Showers and thunderstorms developed

ahead of a cold front during the late

morning and early afternoon hours.

The thunderstorm winds downed trees

in Cato and West Monroe. In Cato, a

roof was torn off a garage by the

wind.

Cattaraugus County

Allegany 19 1920EST

Thunderstorms accompanied the

passage of a cold front during the

evening hours. In the town of

Allegany in Cattaraugus county the

thunderstorm winds downed power lines.

Allegany County

Bolivar 22 1805EST

Allegany County

Andover 22 1840EST

Thunderstorms developed in a warm,

moist flow ahead of an approaching

cold front. The winds from one

thunderstorm downed trees and power

lines in Bolivar and Andover as it

crossed Allegany county.

Chautauqua County

Lakewood 28 1522EST

Monroe County

Penfield 28 1550EST

Cattaraugus County

South Dayton 28 1551EST

Monroe County

Webster 28 1600EST

Allegany County

Belmont 28 1615EST

Ontario County

Clifton Spgs 28 1640EST

Wayne County

Clyde 28 1730EST

Cayuga County

Cato 28 1805EST

Showers and thunderstorms accompanied

the passage of a cold front during the

afternoon hours. The thunderstorms

produced damaging winds and large

hail. Winds downed trees in Clifton

Springs, Webster, Belmont, and Cato.

A garage door was blown-in in Webster.

Hail up to 1.75 inch fell in Lakewood,

South Dayton, Clyde and Penfield.

Allegany County

Rushford 29 1504EST

Monroe County

Henrietta 29 1511EST

Thunderstorms developed across the

region as an upper level trough

crossed during the afternoon hours.

One and a half inch hail fell in

Henrietta. In Rushford, the

thunderstorm winds downed power lines.

Allegany County

West Clarksville 29 1525EST

A house was struck by lightning and

set ablaze in the town of West

Clarksville. The house was destroyed

and left unlivable. A family of three

was left homeless.

Erie County

Cheektowaga 30 1320EST

Erie County

Lancaster 30 1345EST

Erie County

Cheektowaga 30 1355EST

1405EST

Wyoming County

Varysburg 30 1430EST

Erie County

Colden 30 1450EST

Erie County

Hamburg 30 1810EST

Niagara County

Wheatfield 30 1855EST

Thunderstorms developed during the

afternoon hours as an upper level

trough crossed the region. The storms

produced hail up to one inch in

diameter. Hail reports spanned from

Wheatfield across Cheektowaga,

Lancaster, Hamburg and Colden to

Varysburg. One thunderstorm spawned

a tornado which moved across the Town

of Cheektowaga. The tornado initially

touched down around 2:55 p.m. on

Walden Avenue near Harlem Road and

traveled from the northwest to the

southeast through the town. On Walden

Avenue, a construction trailer was

moved several hundred feet. The worker

in the trailer suffered minor

injuries. As the tornado moved across

the New York State Thruway, it lifted

a tractor trailer and deposited on its

side across the Jersey barrier. The

driver of the truck suffered a broken

leg. The tornado continued on its

southeast trek damaging a 20 by 30

foot section of a wall on a warehouse

and then downed trees as it crossed

through central Cheektowaga. The

tornado touched down several times

along its path. Its final touchdown

was at the Parkside Village Mobile

Home Park around 3:05 p.m. where

three mobile homes sustained

significant damage and eight others

sustained minor damage. The tornado

was ranked an 171 with a path length

of three miles and a width of 75

yards.

Lewis County

Indian River 30 1555EST

Jefferson County

Limerick 30 1615EST

Jefferson County

Watertown 30 1635EST

Thunderstorms developed during the

afternoon hours as an upper level

trough crossed the region. The storms

produced hail up to one inch in

diameter in Jefferson county. In

Indian River, Lewis county, the

thunderstorm winds downed trees.

Number of Estimated

Persons Damage

Location Killed Injured Property Crops

NEW JERSEY, Northeast

Bergen County

Ft Lee 0 0

Flash flooding of roadways due to

torrential downpours from

thunderstorms.

Passaic County

Clifton 1 0

A man fell into a swiftly flowing

tributary of the Passaic River around

8 pm EDT and was killed. Heavy rains of

up to 3 inches had fallen in the area

during Friday and Saturday (the 23rd

and 24th) which caused the stream to

run more swiftly than normal. M39IW

Hudson County

Jersey City 0 0

Cars submerged by thunderstorm flash

flooding. Rescues performed.

Hudson County

Bayonne 0 0

NEW JERSEY, South and Northwest

Sussex County

Vernon 0 0 0

Thunderstorms with intense cloud to

ground lightning caused havoc across

Sussex County during the afternoon and

evening of June 1st. At about 2:30 PM

EDT, lightning struck a home on

Cardinal Road in Vernon, igniting a

fire. The fire was under control

within an hour, however the house was

nearly destroyed. In Andover,

lightning sparked a roof fire at a

Rolling Hills Apartment. Meanwhile in

Frankford along North Shore Road, a

large tree fell onto the middle

portion of a homes roof during the

evening of June 1st. A woman outside

the home at the time confirmed

that lightning was the cause of the

downed tree. A telephone pole was

downed on Running Hills Drive along

with several downed wires on Route

94 due to lightning strikes. State

Police, during the late evening of

June 1, directed traffic at a failed

traffic light at Ross’s Corner, where

Routes 15, 206 and 565 meet. Minor

power outages were reported in the

Sparta area. There were no injuries

reported across the county.

Sussex County

Vernon 0 0 0

Thunderstorms knocked down trees and

power lines in the Vernon Valley area

during the early afternoon of June 1st.

Sussex County

Sussex 0 0 0

A gust front arrived in Sussex, New

Jersey ahead of the parent

thunderstorm. As a result of the

strong winds, trees and power lines

were knocked down in the Sussex area

during the afternoon of June 1st.

Sussex County

Newton 0 0 0 0

A strong thunderstorm blew through

Newton, New Jersey (Sussex County)

around 6:00 PM EDT on June 1st.

Lightning struck a tree and some

gusty winds downed some branches.

Heavy downpours in association

with the thunderstorm caused some

brief but minor street flooding.

Hunterdon County

Countywide 0 0 0

A severe thunderstorm, which blew

through Hunterdon County, New Jersey

during the early evening of June

1st, knocked down power lines all

across the county.

Hunterdon County

Flemington 0 0 0

Trees were knocked down in Flemington,

New Jersey during the early evening of

June 1st as a severe thunderstorm blew

through Hunterdon County.

Monmouth County

Allentown 0 0 0

Severe thunderstorms rolled across

parts of Monmouth County, New Jersey

during the evening of June 1st. Strong

winds from the thunderstorms downed

power lines on Yardville-Allentown

Road around 8:30 PM EDT.

Somerset County

Millstone 0 0 0

A severe thunderstorm, which rolled

across Somerset County, New Jersey

during the early evening of June 1st,

downed trees and power lines in the

Millstone area.

Mercer County

Ewing Township 0 0 0

A couple of severe thunderstorms

rolled across Mercer County, New

Jersey between 7:40 PM EDT and 8:30

PM EDT on June 1st. Strong winds

associated with the thunderstorms

downed power lines all across the

county. In addition to the downed

power lines, trees were knocked

down on Barry Road in Hopewell

Township.

NEW JERSEY, South and Northwest

Mercer County

Princeton 0 0 0

A home, off Meetinghouse Court near

Griggs Farm development, was struck

by lightning around 8 PM EDT on

June 1st producing smoky conditions.

Also around 8 PM EDT, there was

smoke reported at the Quaker Bridge

Mall, which was at an escalator due

to a power outage. No injuries were

reported in either events.

Morris County

Dover 0 0 0

During the early evening hours of

June 1st, lightning struck a home at

80 Maple Avenue in Dover, forcing

the family from their home and

sparking a fire in the homes attic.

No injuries were reported as a result

of the lightning strike and fire,

however some 2,500 customers in

Dover were left without power during

the storm.

Somerset County

Rocky Hill 0 0 0

During a thunderstorm at about 8 PM

EDT, lightning struck the chimney

of an apartment building on Spring

Road in Montgomery Township. Two

of the apartments suffered some

damage and its occupants were

relocated, however no injuries

resulted.

Morris County

Schooleys Mtn 0 0 0

A home at 1 Stuart Court in

Washington Township was struck

by lightning during the evening

of June 1st. The lightning

strike caused a fire to the roof

line, and 4 occupants were

evacuated from the dwelling with

no injuries reported.

Mercer County

Ewing Township 0 0

Law enforcement reported street

flooding on Stokes Avenue in Ewing

around 8 p.m. EDT. The road was

rendered temporarily impassable,

but the water receded by 9 p.m.

EDT. The storm total from Mercer

County Airport was 1.10 inches,

most of which fell within an hour.

Burlington County

Countywide 0 0 1M 0

Thunderstorms during the evening

of June 1st caused havoc across

Burlington County, New Jersey and

nearby counties. Lightning sparked

a house fire in Medford, which

destroyed the home. No one at the

home was hurt, however a Medford

firefighter was taken to a nearby

hospital as he suffered from

dehydration. Also, a shed fire

occurred in Mount Laurel on

Hainesport-Mount Laurel Road, and

a house fire occurred on Avon Court.

Both fires were caused by lightning

strikes, and both structures

sustained severe damage. Meanwhile,

two house fires occurred on King

Avenue in Evesham when lightning

struck a utility pole at 11:37 PM

EDT, dropping a power line in front

of both homes. This energized the

water lines into each home and

sparked small fires. There were no

injuries reported and the dollar

amount in damage was not available.

Lightning strikes also damaged

computer systems at the Burlington

County Central Communications

building and also at the National

Weather Service Office in Mount

Holly, NJ. Numerous wires were

downed throughout Medford, Evesham

and Mount Laurel from the intense

cloud to ground lightning strikes.

Some 60,000 customers were without

power in Burlington, Camden and

Gloucester Counties.

Salem County

Carneys Pt 0 0 0

Trees and power lines were knocked

down at 9:08 PM EDT on June 1st in

Carney’s Point Township, New Jersey

when thunderstorms rumbled across

Salem County.

Gloucester County

Bridgeport to 0 0 0

Turnersville

Severe thunderstorms rumbled their way

across Gloucester County, New Jersey

during the evening of June 1st. As a

result of strong winds associated with

the thunderstorms, trees and power

lines were knocked down from Logan

Township to Washington Township.

Camden County

Gibbsboro 0 0 0

Severe thunderstorms rumbled across

parts of Camden County around 9:40

PM EDT on June 1st. Damaging winds

produced by the thunderstorms downed

trees and power lines in Gibbsboro

to near the Turnersville area.

Burlington County

Evesboro 0 0 0

Winds from severe thunderstorms

downed trees and power lines across

portions of Evesham Township, New

Jersey on eastward, during the

evening of June 1st.

Gloucester County

Verga 0 0 0

At around 10:00 PM EDT in the

Millburn, New Jersey area, the

fire department at Gero Park was

struck by lightning, which damaged

several pieces of electronic

equipment, including computers and

communications equipment, and a small

hole was discovered in the roof of the

building. Earlier in the evening, at

about 7:45 PM EDT, lightning struck

a Great Hills Road home, where light

smoke was observed coming from the

attic of the home, and two circuit

breakers had been tripped from the

electrical surge. No injuries were

reported from either event.

Gloucester County

2 SSE Paulsboro 0 0 100K

A fast moving thunderstorm tracked

northward during the evening of June

2nd across southern New Jersey, then

merged with additional thunderstorms

arriving from the west as it entered

Gloucester County about 10:20 PM EDT.

The merging thunderstorm produced an

F0 tornado in East Greenwich Township,

New Jersey. The National Weather

Service Office in Mount Holly, New

Jersey conducted a storm survey and

confirmed that a weak tornado with

65 mph winds touched down. The path

length of the tornado was three-

quarters of a mile and the path

width was mostly around 100 yards,

but at its maximum it reached 250

yards. Numerous trees were knocked

down and snapped in a six block

area. Three homes sustained major

damage from downed trees, and another

twenty homes had minor damage. Roofing

material from a house on County Lane

Road was found a quarter of a mile

away near the Mount Royal Firehouse.

Camden County

Haddonfield 0 0

Runoff from the heavy rain that fell

around Midnight EDT on the 3rd caused

some minor flooding along the Cooper

River. The Cooper River at Haddonfield

was above its 2.8 foot flood stage from

307 a.m. EDT through 6 a.m. EDT on the

3rd. It crested at 2.84 feet at 345

a.m. EDT on the 3rd. Doppler Radar

storm total estimates averaged between

1 and 2 inches. Actual storm totals

included 1.80 inches in Pennsauken

and 1.22 inches in Somerdale.

Gloucester County

Mullica Hill 0 0 0

Strong winds from a severe thunderstorm

knocked down trees in Mullica Hill, New

Jersey at 3:55 PM EDT. Also at the same

time, a large tree was knocked down in

Woodbury, New Jersey. While not severe,

the same thunderstorm produced hail to

the size of peas in Glassboro between

4:00 PM EDT and 4:15 PM EDT.

NJZ024

1 0 0 0

A seven-year-old boy drowned during the

evening of the 18th in Ocean City after

getting caught in a rip current. M7IW

Warren County

2 W Alpha 0 0

A severe thunderstorm, which rumbled

across parts of Warren County, New

Jersey during the early evening of

June 19th, downed trees and power

lines near the town of Alpha at

5:38 PM EDT.

Monmouth County

Roosevelt 0 0

A severe thunderstorm tore down trees

and wires in the southwestern part of

Monmouth County. Most of the reported

wind damage was in Millstone Township

and Roosevelt Borough.

Hunterdon County

Allerton 1 0 0 0

A 59-year old male camper was

apparently struck by lightning and died

while resting in a hammock during the

evening of June 23rd. The man was in

a hammock, in Round Valley Reservoir,

which was anchored to several trees. It

is believed that the lightning bolt hit

the tree, struck the ground, then

traveled into the man. M59UT

Monmouth County

Roosevelt 0 0 0

Lightning struck a home in Roosevelt,

setting the house on fire. The extent

of damage to the home was not known,

however no injuries were reported.

Ocean County

1 N Metedeconk 0 0 0

A total of 1,100 customers lost power

during the afternoon of June 24th in

Point Pleasant as wires were knocked

down from lightning strikes.

Monmouth County

South Portion 0 0

Thunderstorms with heavy rain dropped

a Doppler Radar estimated two to four

inches of rain across southern

Monmouth County. This caused poor

drainage flooding and flooding of

smaller creeks in the county. Street

flooding also occurred in Sea Bright.

Gloucester County

Central Portion 0 0

Camden County

Southeast Portion 0 0

Burlington County

West Central Portion 0 0

Thunderstorms with heavy rain caused

flooding of roadways and small streams

from central Gloucester County

northeast through central portions of

Burlington County. Doppler Radar storm

total estimates average 2 to 4 inches

in this area. In Gloucester County,

several roads were closed in and around

Pitman with up to three feet of water

on them. Roadway closures in Burlington

County occurred in Burlington,

Pemberton and Southampton Townships.

Measured storm totals included 4.20

inches in Glassboro (Gloucester

County), 2.89 inches in Medford

(Burlington County) and 2.59 inches in

Wrightstown (Burlington County).

Cumberland County

Southeast Portion 0 0

Cape May County

Northwest Portion 0 0

Repeating thunderstorms with torrential

downpours dropped a Doppler Radar

estimated six to ten inches of rain

across southeastern parts of Cumberland

County and northwestern parts of Cape

May County. This caused considerable

roadway and field flooding as well as

some stream flooding. Storm totals

included 6.25 inches in Millville.

Warren County

Millbrook to 0 0 15M

Carpenterville

Several days of heavy rain throughout

the Delaware River Basin culminated

with major flooding along the Delaware

River from the 28th through the 30th.

It was the second to fourth highest

crest on record for the Delaware River

along Warren County. The crest was

slightly lower than the April 2005

flood in Belvidere and Phillipsburg,

but the second highest on record (since

1955) at Tocks Island. President

George W. Bush declared Warren County

a disaster area. Sporadic periods of

heavy rain started on the 23rd, but

the most widespread and heaviest rain

fell from the night of the 27th into

the morning of the 28th. Event totals

in Warren County averaged three to

eight inches, but storm totals

exceeded ten inches in parts of the

Upper Delaware Basin in New York State.

The Delaware River at Tocks Island was

above its 21 foot flood stage from 906

a.m. EDT on the 28th through 1043 a.m.

EDT on the 30th. It crested at 33.87

feet at 915 a.m. EDT on the 29th, the

second highest crest on record. Farther

downstream at Belvidere, the Delaware

River was above its 22 foot flood stage

from 1145 a.m. EDT on the 28th through

303 a.m. EDT on the 30th. It crested

at 27.16 feet at 1130 a.m. EDT on the

29th, the fourth highest crest on

record. Farther downstream at

Phillipsburg, the Delaware River was

above its 22 foot flood stage from

830 p.m. EDT on the 27th through

703 p.m. EDT on the 30th. It crested

at 37.09 feet at 1215 p.m. EDT on

the 29th, the fourth highest crest on

record.

Hunterdon County

Countywide 1 0 6.5M

Several days of heavy rain throughout

the Delaware River Basin culminated

with major flooding along the Delaware

River from the 28th through the 30th.

It was the fourth highest crest on

record for the Delaware River along

Hunterdon County. The crest was

slightly lower than the April 2005

flood. President George W. Bush

declared Hunterdon County a disaster

area. One man in Lambertville drowned

when he walked into flood waters.

Sporadic periods of heavy rain started

on the 23rd, but the most widespread

and heaviest rain fell from the night

of the 27th into the morning of the

28th. Event totals in Hunterdon County

averaged four to eight inches, but

storm totals exceeded 10 inches in

parts of the Upper Delaware Basin in

New York State.

The Delaware River at Riegelsville

(Bucks County) was above its 22 foot

flood stage from 451 a.m. EDT on the

28th through 632 p.m. EDT on the 30th.

It crested at 33.62 feet at 300 p.m.

EDT on the 29th, the fourth highest

crest on record. Farther downstream

at Frenchtown, the Delaware River was

above its 16 foot flood stage from

827 a.m. EDT on the 28th through 835

p.m. EDT on the 30th. It crested at

22.90 feet at 500 p.m. EDT on the

4th, the fourth highest crest on

record. Farther downstream, at

Stockton, the Delaware River was

above its 18 foot flood stage from

4 a.m. EDT on the 28th through 620

p.m. EDT on the 30th. It crested at

25.35 feet at 7 p.m. EDT on the

29th, the fourth highest crest on

record. Farther downstream, at

Lambertville the Delaware River was

above its 13 foot flood stage from

805 a.m. EDT on the 28th through

401 p.m. EDT on the 30th. It

crested at 19.08 feet at 6 p.m. EDT

on the 29th, the fourth highest crest

on record. Inland the South Branch of

the Raritan River at High Bridge was

above its 10 foot flood stage from

107 p.m. EDT through 422 p.m. EDT on

the 28th. It crested at 10.11 feet

at 2 p.m. EDT. Farther downstream at

Stanton, the South Branch of the

Raritan was above its 8 foot flood

stage from 750 a.m. EDT through 927

p.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested at

9.33 feet at 1130 a.m. EDT.

M?IW

Mercer County

Countywide 0 0 8M

Several days of heavy rain throughout

the Delaware River Basin culminated

with major flooding along the Delaware

River from the 28th through the 30th.

It was the fourth or fifth highest

crest on record for the Delaware River

along Mercer County. The crest was

slightly lower than the April 2005

flood. President George W. Bush

declared Mercer heavy rain started on

the 23rd, but the most widespread and

heaviest rain fell from the night of

the 27th into the morning of the 28th.

Event totals in Mercer County averaged

three to six inches, but storm totals

exceeded 10 inches in parts of the

Upper Delaware Basin in New York

State. The hardest hit municipalities

were Trenton and Ewing with the Island

and Glen Afton sections of Trenton

affected the most.

The Delaware River at Washington’s

Crossing was above its 20 foot flood

stage from 825 p.m. EDT on the 28th

through 912 a.m. EDT on the 30th. It

crested at 22.54 feet at 700 p.m. EDT

on the 29th, the fourth highest crest

on record. The Delaware River at

Trenton was above its 20 foot flood

stage from 746 a.m. EDT on the 28th

through 652 p.m. EDT on the 30th. It

crested at 25.09 feet at 845 p.m. EDT

on the 29th, the fifth highest crest

on record. Inland the Assunpink Creek

at Trenton was above its 7 foot flood

stage from 711 a.m. EDT a.m. through

1231 a.m. EDT on the 28th. It

crested at 7.49 feet at 1030 EDT.

Camden County

Haddonfield 0 0

A nearly stationary frontal system

produced sporadic periods of heavy

rain occurred across New Jersey from

the 23rd into the morning of the 28th.

A low pressure system that developed

along the Atlantic seaboard combined

with the front and caused the most

widespread and heaviest rain to occur

during the first half of the day on the

28th. The heavy rain caused minor

flooding along the Cooper River. Tidal

flooding also occurred along the

Delaware River. Flooding though was

worse farther north along the Delaware

River. Event totals in Camden County

average three to six inches. The Cooper

River at Haddonfield was above its 2.8

foot flood from 729 a.m. EDT through

1130 a.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested

at 2.92 feet at 930 a.m. EDT. Storm

totals included 3.79 inches in Blue

Anchor.

Somerset County

Countywide 0 0

Sporadic periods of heavy rain occurred

across New Jersey from the 23rd into

the morning of the 28th. The most

widespread and heaviest rain occurred

during the first half of the day on the

28th. The culmination of the heavy

rain caused mainly minor flooding

along the main stem rivers in Somerset

County on the 28th and 29th. Flooding

was worse along the Delaware River.

Event totals in Somerset County

averaged three to six inches.

Along the main stem of the Raritan

River at Manville was above its 14

foot flood stage from 543 p.m. EDT

on the 28th through 310 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 15.76 feet

at 930 p.m. EDT on the 28th. Farther

downstream, the Raritan River at

Bound Brook was above its 28 foot

flood stage from 1007 p.m. EDT on

the 28th through 247 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 28.24 feet at

1128 p.m. EDT on the 28th. The North

Branch of the Raritan River at North

Branch was above its 12.3 foot flood

stage from 1033 a.m. EDT through 520

p.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested at

13.93 feet. Farther downstream at

Raritan, the North Branch of the

Raritan River was above its 10 foot

flood stage from 115 p.m. EDT through

608 p.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested

at 10.72 feet at 345 p.m. EDT.

Farther downstream at the village of

South Branch, the North Branch of the

Raritan River was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 749 a.m. EDT on the

28th through 202 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 9.95 feet at 845 p.m.

EDT on the 28th. The Millstone River at

Griggstown was above its 10 foot flood

stage from 1231 p.m. EDT on the 28th

through 1121 a.m. EDT on the 29th. It

crested at 10.54 feet at 4 p.m. EDT on

the 28th.

Sussex County

Montague to 0 0 600K

Flatbrookville

Several days of heavy rain throughout

the Delaware River Basin culminated

with major flooding along the Delaware

River from the 28th through the 30th.

It was the second or third highest

crest on record for the Delaware River

along Sussex County. The crest was the

second highest on record (since 1955)

at Tocks Island (Warren County) and

the third highest crest on record at

Montague. President George W. Bush

declared Sussex County a disaster

area. Sporadic periods of heavy rain

started on the 23rd, but the most

widespread and heaviest rain fell from

the night of the 27th into the morning

of the 28th. Event totals in Sussex

County averaged four to six inches,

but storm totals exceeded ten inches

in parts of the Upper Delaware Basin

in New York State.

The Delaware River at Montague was

above its 25 foot flood stage from

830 a.m. EDT on the 28th through 345

p.m. EDT on the 29th. It crested at

32.16 feet at 1015 p.m. EDT on the

28th, the third highest crest on

record. Farther downstream in Warren

County, the Delaware River at Tocks

Island was above its 21 foot flood

stage from 906 a.m. EDT on the 28th

through 1043 a.m. EDT on the 30th. It

crested at 33.87 feet at 915 a.m. EDT

on the 29th, the second highest crest

on record. The flow from the Delaware

River slowed the run-off from the Flat

Brook and caused flooding along the

brook. The Flat Brook at Flatbrookville

was above its 6 foot flood stage from

545 p.m. EDT through 1152 p.m. EDT on

the 28th. It crested at 6.25 feet at

815 p.m. EDT on the 28th.

Salem County

Carneys Pt 0 0

A severe thunderstorm rolled across

parts of Salem County, New Jersey

during the very early morning hours of

June 29th. The strong winds produced

by the thunderstorm downed trees in

Carney’s Point, New Jersey at 3:17 AM

EDT.

Gloucester County

5 NW Glassboro 0 0

During the very early morning hours of

June 29th, a severe thunderstorm rolled

across Gloucester County, New Jersey.

Trees and power lines were downed at

3:43 AM EDT from South Harrison

northeastward through Deptford

Township.

Camden County

Audubon 0 0

Strong winds from a severe thunderstorm

downed trees in Gloucester Township,

New Jersey and Audubon, New Jersey

(both in Camden County) at 3:56 AM EDT

on June 29th.

Burlington County

Cinnaminson to 0 0

Palmyra

A severe thunderstorm rolled across

northwestern Burlington County, New

Jersey during the very early morning

hours of June 29th. Trees and power

lines were downed at 4:03 AM EDT in

Cinnaminson. Riverside and Palmyra as

a result of strong winds.

Gloucester County

Turnersville 0 0 0

A severe thunderstorm affected a portion

of Gloucester County, New Jersey during

the evening of June 29th. The severe

thunderstorm produced nickel to quarter

size hail in Washington Township, near

Turnersville, at 10:30 PM EDT.

Burlington County

Rancocas 0 0

Penny size hail fell in Westampton

Township.

NEW MEXICO, Central and North

Rio Arriba County

Canjilon 0 0

About 15 to 20 minutes with email hail

and intermittent larger hail reported at

the Canjilon Ranger Station.

Guadalupe County

Pastura 0 0

Union County

Grenville 0 0

Bernalillo County

Albuquerque Intl Arpt 0 0

Union County

3 N Capulin to 0 0

Capulin

Large hail reported from the Volcano

National Monument south into Capulin.

Harding County

5 S Yates 0 0

San Miguel County

Las Vegas Arpt 0 0

San Miguel County

Las Vegas Arpt 0 0

NMZ004>007

0 0

Gusty winds developed as a strong upper

level trough moved over northern New

Mexico. In some cases the peak gusts

were aided by outflow winds from high

based virga showers.

Los Alamos County

2 S Los Alamos 0 0

Los Alamos County

Los Alamos 0 0

San Miguel County

9 WSW Mineral Hill 0 0

San Miguel County

17 N Pecos 0 0

San Miguel County

2 N Mineral Hill 0 0

Union County

6 N Folsom 0 0

Union County

13 NE Folsom 0 0

Quay County

3 SSW Ragland 0 0

Numerous 2 to 3 inch tree limbs snapped

off.

Mora County

12 N Wagon Mound 0 0

Santa Fe County

2 SE Edgewood to 0 0

Edgewood

Storm produced swath of penny to half

dollar size hail near

San Miguel County

Las Vegas 0 0

San Miguel County

12 NE Trementina 0 0

Heavy rain and pea size hail also

reported.

Colfax County

13 NE Cimarron 0 0

Bernalillo County

8 N Albuquerque Intl 0 0

Bernalillo County

9 NE Albuquerque Intl 0 0

Bernalillo County

12 NE Albuquerque Intl 0 0

A storm with heavy rain produced high

winds over northeast sections of

Albuquerque. The Sandia Peak Tram

system reported gusts to 90 mph at the

top of the tram (10300 feet) and 70

mph wind at the base terminal (6900

feet).

Sandoval County

Rio Rancho 0 0

Bernalillo County

Albuquerque 0 0

Sandoval County

Rio Rancho 0 0

Bernalillo County

Albuquerque 0 0

Strong storms moved across Rio Rancho

and north central Albuquerque with

heavy rain and a swath of hail. Parts

of Rio Rancho, Corrales and the

Albuquerque North Valley had rains of

about 2 inches in 60 to 90 minutes.

Several dirt roads were unpassable or

washed out in Rio Rancho. Los Rios Road

on the east side of Highway 528

suffered the worst damage as the runoff

reclaimed the arroyo that had been

filled as a road in new housing

development situated on the sandy slope

of the mesa between Corrales and Rio

Rancho. Ponding problems developed

along Edith Blvd in the Albuquerque

North Valley filling streets to curb

full and reaching several inches into a

few homes.

NEW MEXICO, South Central and Southwest

Sierra County

Truth Or Consequences 0 0

Otero County

Alamogordo 0 0

Otero County

Alamogordo 0 0

Strong thunderstorms developed over the

southern Sacramento Mountains and along

the eastern heights of Alamogordo. One

storm in particular dropped about an

inch and a half of rain in 40 minutes

over Marble Canyon, which drains into

eastern Alamogordo. Other storms added

heavy rain and several inches of

drifting small hail to that section of

town. Strong winds blew shingles off

houses, but flooding was the main

problem. Roads along the eastern

heights turned into raging torrents

which flowed westward into the center

of town. Mud flowed into numerous

houses and several vehicles were swept

into arroyos. A gas main was broken

which led to the evacuation of

residents in the vicinity. The state

of NM put the damage total at about

$1.3 million.

NEW MEXICO, Southeast

Eddy County

Carlsbad 0 0 0 0

Pea to nickel size hail fell in northern

portions of Carlsbad, specifically at

the intersection of Canal and Pierce.

Lea County

Tatum 0 0 0 0

A NWS cooperative observer recorded a 58

mph wind gust on his home anemometer. No

damage was reported.

Eddy County

Carlsbad 0 0 0 0

The public reported one foot of water

flowing over some of the local roads

in Carlsbad.

Lea County

1 S Hobbs 0 0 0 0

NEW YORK, Central

Steuben County

Bath 0 0 50K

Several road washouts due to

thunderstorms with heavy rainfall. A

trailer park had to be evacuated.

Onondaga County

Plainville 0 0 20K

Trees blown down and several roofs

damaged.

Steuben County

Thurston 0 0

Trees blown down by strong thunderstorm

winds.

Steuben County

Caton 0 0

Trees blown down by strong thunderstorm

winds.

Steuben County

Lindley 0 0

Trees blown down by strong thunderstorm

winds.

Chemung County

Elmira 0 0 25K

Trees and wires blown down by strong

thunderstorm

Delaware County

Cooks Falls 0 0

Record flooding occurred on the Beaver

Kill Creek at Cooks Falls. The Beaver

Kill rose to the flood stage of 10 feet

June 26 at 200 PM EDT, then fell below

flood stage temporarily, before rising

above flood stage again June 28th at 500

am EDT. The Beaver Kill Creek crested at

20.54 feet June 28th at around 11:00 am

EDT. The previous record measured from

flood marks was 20.3 feet October 10,

1903

Sullivan County

5 W Liberty 0 0 25K

A front from southern New England to

near Washington D.C Sunday morning

the 25th moved slowly west, to a

position from just north of New England,

south-southwest across the Adirondacks

through central New York and then down

the spine of the Appalachians by Monday

morning the 26th. Tropical moisture

moved westward and engulfed nearly all

of New York State and most of northern

and eastern Pennsylvania by Monday

morning. This resulted in a widespread

area of moderate to heavy rain across

all of central New York and northeast

Pennsylvania including the Poconos and

Catskills by Monday morning the 26th.

The heaviest rain occurred in the

Poconos and Catskills where rainfall

amounts totaled between 1.5 and 4

inches by 8 am EDT Monday. In Sullivan

County, 2 to 4 inches of rain fell by

Monday morning, which saturated soils.

Another round of heavy rain showers

and thunderstorms moved back into the

northern part of the county during the

day Monday the 26th. This additional

heavy rainfall caused flash flooding

in Youngsville closing Route 52. There

were many streams overflowing their

banks in and around Youngsville Monday

afternoon and evening.

Steuben County

Jasper 0 0 5K

Heavy rainfall washed out several roads

in the Jasper area Monday afternoon and

evening the 26th.

Delaware County

Colchester 0 0 50k

A front from southern New England to

near Washington D.C Sunday morning the

25th moved slowly west to a position

from just north of New England,

south-southwest across the Adirondacks

through central New York, and then

down the spine of the Appalachians by

Monday morning the 26th. Tropical

moisture moved westward and engulfed

nearly all of New York State and most

of northern and eastern Pennsylvania

by Monday morning. This resulted in a

widespread area of moderate to heavy

rain across all of central New York

and northeast Pennsylvania including

the Poconos and Catskills by Monday

morning the 26th. The heaviest

rainfall occurred in the Poconos and

Catskills where rainfall amounts

totaled between 1.5 and 4 inches by

8 am EDT Monday. In Delaware county,

flash flooding began around 6 pm

Monday evening as another batch of

heavy rain concentrated extreme

rainfall again over much of Delaware

County during the day Monday. With the

soils saturated from Sunday and Sunday

night’s rainfall, major flash flooding

began. The town of Colchester took the

brunt early on and the residents

evacuated voluntarily. All roads in

the town of Colchester were closed

as of Monday evening.

Delaware County

Fishs Eddy 0 0

Major flooding occurred on the East

Branch of the Delaware River at

Fishes Eddy. The Delaware River at

Fishes Eddy peaked just above the

flood stage of 13 feet Monday evening

the 26th before falling back below

flood stage late Monday night. The

East Branch of the Delaware then rose

again Tuesday morning and exceeded the

flood stage at Fishes Eddy at 800 am

EDT Tuesday the 27th. The East Branch

then continued to rise Tuesday

afternoon through Wednesday, cresting

at 21.45 feet at 1100 am EDT Wednesday

the 28th. This was about a foot short

of the previous record of 22.49 feet

which occurred just 14 months earlier

in April 2005

Broome County

West Portion 0 0 50K

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into upstate New York ahead

of a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms across

much of central New York late Monday

evening the 26th through Tuesday

morning the 27th. A total of 2 to 4

inches of rain fell over the western

half of Broome County, including the

Binghamton, Vestal, Johnson City and

Endicott areas. This rainfall, in

addition to Sunday and Monday’s

rainfall, caused numerous roads to

become flooded, especially in the

Vestal area. The rain tapered off

Tuesday morning after sunrise

allowing the flash flooding to abate

temporarily.

Cortland County

Countywide 0 0 25K

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into upstate New York ahead

of a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms across

much of central New York late Monday

evening the 26th through Tuesday

morning the 27th. A total of 2 to 4

inches of rain fell over the county.

This rainfall, in addition to Sunday

and Monday’s rainfall, caused numerous

roads to become flooded across the

county. The flash flooding abated

during the mid to late morning hours

Tuesday the 27th as the rain tapered

off.

Sullivan County

North Portion 1 0 100M

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into the Catskills ahead of

a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms from

eastern Pennsylvania into the

Catskills late Monday evening the

26th through Tuesday morning the

27th. By 8 am Tuesday, another 3 to

5 inches of rain fell across northern

Sullivan County which caused major

flash flooding. Additional rain

fell Tuesday afternoon into pressure

Wednesday morning as the front moved

back east and combined with a low

system moving up the eastern seaboard.

The additional rainfall brought

rainfall totals to between 6 and 12

inches in the far northern part of

Sullivan County. The extreme rainfall

caused catastrophic flash flooding to

become more widespread and affect

Livingston Manor, Roscoe,

Jeffersonville and other locations in

the northern part of the county. The

flash flooding was described as the

worst in at least 40 years and in some

areas it was the worst ever. Small

streams and creeks caused massive

flooding, inundating Livingston Manor

entirely, flooding numerous roads.

Over 1500 homes were flooded of which

30 were destroyed and over 700 heavily

damaged. Numerous bridges were flooded

as well as many businesses. Total

losses are estimated at around 100

million dollars. One person was killed

by the flooding when she was washed

out of her home by the flood waters.

F15MH

Madison County

North Portion 0 0 200K

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into upstate New York ahead

of a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms across

much upstate New York late Monday

evening the 26th through Tuesday

morning the 27th. From 2 to 4 inches

of rain fell across much of Madison

County. This rain fell on saturated

ground from previous rains that

occurred Sunday and Monday leading to

major flash flooding in the northern

portion of the county. Widespread

street flooding was reported with

several homes experiencing crumbled

foundations due to high waters. The

rains tapered off by late morning

allowing the flooding to abate.

Delaware County

Walton 0 0 10M

At Walton, record flooding occurred on

the West Branch of the Delaware River.

The river level rose above the flood

stage of 9.5 feet Tuesday June 27th at

8:45 AM EDT. The river rose above the

moderate flood level of 14 feet June 27

at 2:30 PM EDT. The river rose above

the major flood level of 16 feet June

28, 3:15 AM EDT. The crest was 16.85

feet June 28 4:30 AM EDT. The previous

record was January 19, 1996 where the

crest was 16.36 feet. The flooding near

Walton was described in the Binghamton

Press and Sun Bulletin as “Unlike the

flood of 1996, caused by overflowing

waters of the West Branch of the

Delaware River, this season’s flooding

damage was inflicted by fast-moving,

“rip-and-tear” waters in the many

streams and small tributaries that

wreaked havoc on surrounding land,

buildings, and equipment. In some

cases, stream corridors changed

directions, cutting right through

the middle of fields.” Quote is from

John Thurgood, Agriculture extension

leader for the Watershed Agriculture

Council.

Delaware County

Countywide 2 0 250M

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into upstate New York ahead

of a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms across

much of upstate New York late Monday

evening the 26th through Tuesday

morning the 27th. From 3 to 5 inches

of rain fell across Delaware County by

Tuesday morning. The rain fell on

saturated ground from previous rains

that occurred Sunday and Monday leading

to major flash flooding in Hancock,

Colchester and surrounding areas by

Tuesday morning. Hancock experienced

the worst flooding this town had ever

seen with most of the downtown

underwater. In addition, Walton,

Downsville, Delhi and Sidney also

became inundated with record flooding

as intense rainfall focused on these

areas later Tuesday. Numerous streams

and creeks were flooding homes,

businesses, roads, bridges and

government facilities. Despite the

major flash flooding that was occurring

Tuesday morning, the situation was

about to turn even more grim. The

front, which was across the eastern

Great Lakes Tuesday morning, moved back

east and combined with a low pressure

system that moved up the eastern

seaboard by Tuesday night. This set the

stage for additional heavy rains from

Tuesday evening to Wednesday morning

deluging Delaware County with more

rains that brought three day totals to

8 to 15 inches. This caused even more

catastrophic flooding to most of the

county by Wednesday morning the 28th.

At least 200 structures were damaged

in Hancock alone, the entire business

district of Walton was under 6 to 7

feet of water. Several small streams

and the Susquehanna River combined to

cause major flooding in the village of

Sidney, NY. Many homes were flooded in

Sidney with up to 6 feet of water.

Amphenol Corporation in Sidney was

flooded by up to 5 feet of water

causing 40 million dollars worth of

damage. The flooding also caused

Interstate 88 to collapse early

Wednesday morning near Unadilla killing

two truck drivers. The flooding caused

189 million dollars worth of damage to

roads alone. Damages are estimated at

250 million dollars from the floods.

At least 1000 homes were damaged by

flood waters with 30 homes completely

destroyed. Hundreds of businesses were

damaged including major corporations

like Amphenol and Kraft foods. There

were at least 10 businesses destroyed.

Over 500 people were evacuated with

hundreds of people rescued from the

flood waters. At least 20 bridges were

flooded. During the height of the

flood, all roads were closed in

Delaware County as a state of emergency

was declared Tuesday. This flood will

go down as the worst flood on record

ever experienced by Delaware County.

M?VE, M?VE

Steuben County

Addison 0 0 5K

Heavy rains caused localized flash

flooding in the Addison and Cameron

areas where several roads were flooded.

Sullivan County

Callicoon 0 0

Record flooding occurred on the

Delaware River at Calicoon. The

Delaware River at Calicoon rose above

the 12 foot flood stage late in the

morning on Tuesday the 27th. The

Delaware River continued to rise

Tuesday and Wednesday cresting at a

record level of 20.37 feet at 700 pm

EDT Wednesday the 28th. This broke

the previous record of 17.80 feet

which occurred just 14 months earlier

in April 2005.

Broome County

Conklin 0 0 10M

Both Broome and Susquehanna County were

inundated with record flooding from the

Susquehanna River near Conklin. Not

only did the river rise to record

levels, this left all the local

tributary streams with no outlet.

There was deep water from the backwater

built-up in the communities of Conklin

and Kirkwood in New York and Hallstead

and Great Bend in Pennsylvania. Many

homes and several businesses, big and

small, were destroyed along the Route

11 and Route 7 corridors that parallel

the Susquehanna River. The Conklin

gage-house was flooded, and quit

briefly near the flood crest. The

river rose to the flood stage of 11

feet June 27th at 2:15 pro EDT. The

river rose to the major flood level

of 20.0 feet June 27 at 11:45 pro EDT.

The river crested at 25.0 feet on

June 28th at 11:30 am EDT. This broke

the previous record of 20.83 feet set

in 1948. The Susquehanna River at

Conklin remained above the major

flooding level of 20 feet through

the end of June.

Delaware County

Hale Eddy 0 0

At Hale Eddy, major flooding occurred

on the West Branch of the Delaware

River. The river rose to the flood

stage of 11 feet June 27th at 2:30

PM EDT. The river reached the

moderate flooding level of 13 feet

June 27th at 7:20 PM EDT. The river

rose to the major flooding level of

15 feet June 28th at 2:30 AM EDT.

The river crested at 19.1 feet June

28th at 2:00 PM EDT which was about

one foot short of the record

measured from flood marks of 20.3

feet October 10, 1903.

Otsego County

0 0 50M

Widespread heavy rain moved through

Otsego County and upstate New York

during the day Monday with more

heavy rain Monday night and Tuesday

morning. This rainfall saturated

the soils before another more

widespread area of heavy rainfall

occurred Tuesday afternoon and

night. Tropical moisture combined

with a slow-moving front and low

pressure system moving up

the eastern seaboard to bring

extreme rainfall to Otsego County.

The serious flash flooding began

in Otsego County during the

afternoon of Tuesday the 27th and

continued until Wednesday afternoon

as a total of 6 to 12 inches of

rain fell by Wednesday the 28th.

The highest rainfall was near

Unadilla where the Susquehanna

River reached record levels. No

one was killed from the floods

in Otsego County. A state of

emergency was declared Tuesday

afternoon as all roads were

closed. The sewer plant in Oneonta

was flooded sending raw sewage into

the Susquehanna River. Hardest

hit areas were Leonardsville,

Cooperstown, Hartwick, Bridgewater

and Oneonta. Route 20 was under

nearly three feet of water in East

Winfield. Total damage is estimated

at 50 million dollars. This was

described as the worst flooding in at

least 45 years. A total of 75 roads

were flooded in the county.

Tioga County

Countywide 0 0 100M

Tropical moisture streamed northward

into south central New York ahead of a

frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture brought heavy showers

and thunderstorms across much of

upstate New York Sunday through Tuesday

morning. Rainfall by Tuesday morning

totaled 1 to 2 inches in Tioga County.

This initial rainfall saturated the

soils before another round of heavier

rain moved into the county Tuesday

afternoon as the front moved back east

and combined with a low pressure

system moving up the eastern seaboard.

This scenario spelled disaster for

Tioga County. Total rainfall for the

three day period ending Wednesday was

up to 6 inches. This heavy rain sent

nearly all streams and creeks over

their banks in what was described as

the worst flash flooding this county

has ever seen. Flash flooding began in

Owego at 310 pm EDT Tuesday the 27th

with some businesses downtown taking on

water. By early evening, flash flooding

was affecting the Waverly area and soon

became widespread Tuesday night

especially in the Campville area as

another 1 to 3 inches of rain fell.

Numerous roads, bridges, businesses

and homes were flooded. A total of 5000

homes were affected with 500 homes

damaged and 10 destroyed. Hardest hit

areas were Tioga, Campville, Owego,

Nichols, Barton, and Apalachin. Total

damage in Tioga County is estimated at

around 100 million dollars. No one was

killed. A state of emergency was

declared for Tioga county Tuesday

evening.

Broome County

Binghamton 0 0 5M

The Susquehanna River in Binghamton is

estimated to have crested at 25.0 feet

Wednesday June 28th, 11:00 AM EDT. The

top of the flood walls protecting

downtown Binghamton are at 25.6 feet.

The Susquehanna River lapped over the

top of these flood walls. This made for

dramatic photos, but there was no

serious flooding in the protected

areas. There were 3000 people evacuated

in Binghamton as a precaution. The

most serious flooding in Binghamton was

at Lourdes Hospital. The hospital was

evacuated and shut down. The lower

level of the hospital flooded. The

river remained above the flood stage in

Binghamton through the end of June.

Chenango County

Bainbridge 0 0 50M

The communities of Bainbridge and

Sidney were inundated with major

flooding during this period The major

source of jobs in the valley is the

Amphenol Corporation. This plant closed

due to 4 to 5 feet of water that

damaged the plant. The Susquehanna

River at Bainbridge rose to the 13 foot

flood stage Tuesday June 27th at 3:45

pm EDT. The river continued to rise

above the moderate inundation stage of

20 feet on Wednesday, June 28th at 4:45

am EDT. The river rose above the major

inundation stage of 22 feet on

Wednesday, June 28th at 8:45 am EDT.

The river crested at a new record of

27.03 feet Thursday June 29th at 11:00

am EDT. The old record flood was March

29, 1914 at 23.10 feet. The gage was

first established in 1907. The river

remained above the flood stage

through the end of June.

Steuben County

Bath 0 0 5K

Heavy rains caused flooding of

several roads in the Bath area

Tuesday afternoon and evening

the 27th.

Schuyler County

Burdett 0 0 15K

Heavy rains caused flash flooding

along Route 414 in Burdett, Odessa

and the Town of Hector.

Broome County

Countywide 0 0 200M

Tropical moisture streaming into

upstate New York ahead of a

frontal system which moved

westward into the eastern

Great Lakes by Tuesday morning the

27th started the flash flood

problems in western Broome County

early Tuesday. The rain abated for

a time during the day Tuesday before

another batch of heavy rain fell

Tuesday afternoon into Wednesday

morning as the front moved back

east and combined with a low pressure

system moving up the eastern seaboard.

This scenario spelled disaster for

Broome County. Total rainfall for the

three day period ending Wednesday was

up to 9 inches, especially in the

Conklin and Windsor areas, which were

particularly hard hit. This additional

heavy rain sent nearly all streams and

creeks over their banks in what was

the worst flash flooding this county

has ever seen. The county’s

infrastructure was challenged as major

flash flooding began around 5 pm EDT

Tuesday and lasted into Wednesday

afternoon. A total of at least 40

roads, 5 bridges, dozens of businesses

and over 1800 homes were flooded. At

least 800 homes in Broome County were

destroyed Damages are estimated at 200

million dollars. All major highways in

the Binghamton area were closed due to

the flooding including Interstate 81,

Route 17, Route 26 and Interstate 88.

At least 6000 people were ordered to

evacuate from both river and flash

flooding. The Nanticoke Creek and

Tracey Creek were among many creeks

and streams causing major flooding. A

state of emergency was declared Tuesday

evening for Broome County. The National

Guard was called out to assist in

numerous water rescues, evacuations and

to prevent looting. Hardest hit areas

were Conklin, Kirkwood, Chenango Forks,

Endicott, Vestal, Johnson City and

Endwell. In Conklin, 50 percent of the

business district was flooded. The

National Guard had to airlift 300

people to safety who were stranded by

flood waters as the evacuation shelter

at the local high school became

surrounded by flood waters. In Windsor,

there were at least 100 people in

shelters. Countywide over 3000 people

were in shelters. In addition to the

flash flooding, the Susquehanna and

Chenango Rivers, which flow into the

Binghamton area were at record high

levels Wednesday. The rivers challenged

the levee system that protects the

city of Binghamton as the water

overtopped and undermined the levee in

spots. Many homes, roads and businesses

along the Chenango and Susquehanna

Rivers were severely impacted by flood

waters from Windsor to Conklin,

Kirkwood, Binghamton, Vestal, Endwell,

Johnson City, and Endicott. The flood

was the worst in Broome County history

as the Susquehanna River broke previous

record stages by 3 to 4 feet with river

gauging going back almost 100 years.

Fortunately no one was injured or

killed in Broome County from the

massive floods.

Tompkins County

Caroline 0 0 50K

Heavy rains associated with a cold

front and tropical moisture caused

flash flooding in the Caroline area.

There were several roads closed by

the flooding. A total of 2 to 5

inches of rain fell in Tompkins

County from Monday the 26th through

Wednesday the 28th. The heaviest rain

occurred in the Caroline area where

around 5 inches fell.

Chenango County

Countywide 0 0 50M

A steady stream of tropical moisture

flowing north into upstate New York

ahead of a frontal system across the

eastern Great Lakes brought periods

of heavy rain and thunderstorms to

Chenango County from early Monday

the 26th through Tuesday morning the

27th. From 1.5 to 4 inches of rain

fell by Tuesday morning. This rain

saturated soils before another batch

of heavy rain fell Tuesday afternoon

into Wednesday morning as the front

moved back east and combined with a

low pressure system moving up the

eastern seaboard. This additional

rainfall caused most small streams

and creeks to burst their banks

beginning Tuesday the 27th in the

evening. The rain finally tapered

off early Wednesday morning the 28th.

A total of 4 to 7 inches of rain fell

across Chenango County which caused

numerous small streams and creeks to

overflow their banks. The serious

flooding began Tuesday evening around

6 pm EDT and lasted into Wednesday

afternoon. Hardest hit areas were

Afton, Bainbridge, Norwich and

Sherburne. In Norwich, the Canasawcta

Creek flooded the entire west side of

the city with hundreds evacuated. In

addition, the entire business district

took on water. It is estimated that

one half of all homes and businesses

in Norwich had some flood damage.

Damages were estimated in the millions

as at least 300 homes were affected by

the flood waters. 200 people were

forced to evacuate, 10 people were

rescued from the floods. A total of

250 roads were flooded with 2 bridges

destroyed. One man was killed by the

flood waters.

M31VE

Chemung County

East Portion 0 0 5K

Heavy rains caused several roads to be

flooded in the Southport and Chemung

areas Tuesday evening the 27th.

Sullivan County

Barryville 0 0

Record flooding occurred on the

Delaware River at Barryville. The

Delaware River at Barryville rose

above the 17 foot flood stage

Tuesday evening the 27th. The Delaware

River continued to rise Tuesday and

Wednesday cresting at a record level

of 28.97 feet at 1100 am EDT Wednesday

the 28th. This broke the previous

record of 24.80 feet which occurred

just 14 months earlier in April 2005

Broome County

Vestal 0 0 50M

The Vestal river gage on the

Susquehanna River is located 8 miles

west of the Binghamton Washington

Street Gage. Vestal is on

the left bank of the river and the

Town of Union Communities of Johnson

City, Endwell and Endicott are on the

right bank of the Susquehanna River.

Each community had extensive flood

losses, too numerous to list. Some of

the more notable losses are the many

homes in areas like the Castle Gardens

development which were recovering from

losses due to the April 2005 flooding.

The inundation of the Enjoi Golf

Course forced the cancellation of the

“BC Open”, a PGA Tour Event. This was

a further economic blow for many

businesses in the region. The Vestal

gage reached the flood stage of 18

feet June 27th at 7:25 pm EDT. It

rose to the moderate flooding level of

21 feet June 27th at 11:00 PM EDT. It

rose to the major flood level, June

28th at 4:00 AM EDT. The river gage

was flooded but continued sending

data even though the gage float was

as high as it could go. The gage

topped out at 32.98 feet, but the USGS

made a measurement of the watermark and

have the provisional crest at 33.5

feet. The old record for Vestal was

30.5 feet measured from watermarks

March 18, 1936. The April 3, 2005

flood crest was 28.87 feet. The local

basin average rainfall for June 26 to

29 was 6.87 inches. The river remained

well above the flood stage through the

end of June at Vestal.

Oneida County

Countywide 0 0 50M

Tropical moisture streamed northward

into upstate New York ahead of a

frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

brought an initial round of heavy rain

to Oneida County by Tuesday morning.

From 2 to 4 inches of rain fell by

Tuesday morning. The rain abated for a

short time during the day Tuesday

before another batch of heavy rain

fell Tuesday afternoon into Wednesday

morning as the front moved back east

and combined with a low pressure

system moving up the eastern seaboard.

Total rainfall for the three day

period ending Wednesday was between 4

and 8 inches. This scenario caused the

worst flash flooding in Oneida County

in 20 years, impacting many areas of

the county starting at 730 pm EDT

Tuesday and lasting into Wednesday.

Hardest hit areas were Western,

Deerfield, Vernon and Verona, Kirkland,

Oriskany Falls and Steuben. There was

one bridge washed out with at least 17

roads flooded. In the town of

Deerfield, 22 homes were flooded by

the West Canada Creek. No one was

killed by the flooding with damage

estimates around 50 million dollars.

A state of emergency was declared for

Oneida County as numerous roads were

closed which included the New York

State Thruway.

Chenango County

Sherburne 0 0 5M

Record flooding occurred at Sherburne

on the Chenango River. At the peak of

the flooding, there was three feet of

water on Main Street in Sherburne.

The river reached the flood stage of

8 feet June 27th at 7:35 PM EDT. The

river rose to the moderate flood level

of 9 feet June 28th at 9:45 PM EDT.

The river rose to the major flood

level of 10.6 feet June 28th at 1:00

AM EDT. The record crest was 11.35

feet June 28th at 12:45 PM EDT. The

old record was 11.2 feet set March 28,

1914. The third highest crest is 10.78

feet April 3, 2005. The basin average

rainfall for June 26 to 29 was 5.84

inches. The river at Sherburne remained

above the flood stage through the end

of June.

Delaware County

Delhi 0 0 5M

At Delhi, New York, major flooding

occurred on the West Branch of the

Delaware River. The river rose above

the flood stage of 8 feet June 27th

at 9:20 PM EDT. The river rose above

the moderate flood level of 9.5 feet

June 28th at 2:30 AM EDT. The river

rose above the major flood level of

10.5 feet June 28th at 3:30 AM EDT.

The river crested at 11.75 feet

June 28th at 6:45 AM EDT. The

record is 12.24 feet November 9, 1996.

Delaware County

Unadilla 0 0 10M

The Susquehanna River at Unadilla rose

to the 11 foot flood stage Tuesday

June 27th at 09:30 pm EDT. The river

continued to rise above the moderate

inundation stage of 13 feet on

Wednesday June 28th at 5:45 am EDT.

The river rose above the major

inundation stage of 14.5 feet on

Wednesday June 28th at 10:00 am EDT.

The river crested at a new record of

17.73 feet Thursday June 29th at 5:15

am EDT. The old record flood was March

18, 1936 at 16.60 feet. The gage was

established 1938. The river at Unadilla

remained above flood stage through the

end of June.

Broome County

Windsor 0 0 5M

The Susquehanna River rose to the

flood stage of 15.5 feet Tuesday June

27th at 9:45 pro EDT. The river

continued to rise above the moderate

inundation stage of 18.5 feet

Tuesday June 27th at 11:46 pm EDT.

The river rose above the major

inundation level of 20.50 feet

Wednesday June 28th at 12:45 am

EDT. The first crest was 23.72 feet

on June 28th at 1:00 pro EDT, and

the second crest was 24.27 feet. The

old record was 21.22 feet January 200,

1996. The gage was established in

1988. The Susquehanna River at

Windsor remained above flood stage

through the end of June.

Cortland County

Cincinnatus 0 0

At Cincinnatus on the Otselic River,

only minor flooding occurred. The

river rose above the flood stage of 8

feet June 27th at 10:31 PM EDT. The

river crested at 9.59 feet June 28th

at 2:01 AM EDT. The record is 12.5

feet July 8, 1935. The basin average

rainfall for June 26 to 29 was 5.76

inches.

Broome County

Chenango Forks 0 0

Moderate flooding occurred at Chenango

Forks on the Chenango River. The river

rose to the flood stage of 10 feet

June 27th at 11:04 PM EDT. The river

rose to the moderate flood level of

12.6 feet June 28th at 7:22 AM EDT.

The river crested at 13.74 feet June

28th at around 4 pm EDT. The flood of

record is 20.3 feet July 8, 1935. This

June 2006 flood crest ranks 9th. The

local basin average rainfall for

June 26 to 29 was 5.82 inches.

Madison County

Countywide 0 0 25M

Tropical moisture streamed northward

into upstate New York ahead of a

frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the

eastern Great Lakes by Tuesday morning

the 27th. This brought an initial

round of heavy rain to Madison County

by Tuesday morning causing significant

flash flooding in the northern portion

of the county. The rain abated for a

short time during the day Tuesday the

27th before another batch of heavy

rain fell Tuesday afternoon into

Wednesday morning as the front moved

back east and combined with a low

pressure system moving up the eastern

seaboard. Total rainfall for the three

day period ending Wednesday was between

4 and 8 inches. This scenario caused

major flash flooding in Madison County,

impacting many areas of

the county starting at around Midnight

EDT Wednesday and lasting into

Wednesday morning. Hardest hit areas

were south of Route 20, including

Georgetown, Lebanon, Hamilton, and De

Ruyter. Colgate University also had

major flooding. A state of emergency

was declared for the county. There

were 12 bridges washed out, numerous

roads flooded, and dozens of people

rescued from the flood waters. 50

people had to be evacuated from the

flood waters. No one was killed by

the flooding with damage estimated at

around 25 million dollars.

Chenango County

Greene 0 0 2M

Near record flooding occurred at

Greene on the Chenango River. The

current record at Greene is 22.0 feet

set July 8, 1935. The river rose to

the flood stage of 13 feet June 28th,

12:00 AM EDT. The river rose to the

moderate flood level of 17 feet June

28th at 5:00 AM EDT. The river

crested at 21.16 feet June 28th at

4:20 PM EDT.

Chenango County

Rockdale 0 0 2M 1M

Record flooding occurred on the

Unadilla River at Rockdale. The

flooding beat the old record by one

foot. The news stories about the

record flooding were centered on a

Mount Upton firefighter, who nearly

lost his own life in a swift water

rescue that sent a 5-year old boy to

the hospital. The firefighter was

swept into the Unadilla River, but

was wearing a flotation device and was

rescued himself. The other flood news

was the enormous amount of dairy

farmland and crops that were destroyed

by flooding. The river reached the

flood stage of 11 feet June 28th at

2:31 AM EDT. The river rose to the

moderate flood level of 12 feet June

28th, at 5:45 AM EDT. The river rose

to the major flood category of 13 feet

June 28th at 10:00 AM EDT. The crest

was 13.96 feet on June 29th, at 12:00

AM EDT. The old record at Rockdale was

12.98 feet set December 31, 1942. The

basin average rainfall for June 26 to

29 was 5.92 inches.

Tioga County

Owego 0 0 5M

Several neighborhoods in Owego became

virtual islands during this flood. The

Susquehanna River at Owego rose above

the flood stage of 30 feet June 28th

at 4:30 AM EDT. Moderate flooding (32

feet) began June 28th, at 7:30 AM EDT.

Major flooding (33 feet) began June

28th at 9:30 AM EDT. The crest of

35.85 feet was reached June 29th, at

01:30 AM EDT which set a new record.

The old record was 33.18 feet April

3, 2005. The January 20 1996 flood

crest was 32.97 feet. The river at

Owego remained above flood stage

through the end of June.

Broome County

Deposit 0 0

At Oquaga Creek at Deposit, record

flooding occurred. The crest was 10.51

feet June 28, 2006 at 10:00 AM. The

old records are 8.98 feet July 4,

1970; 8.44 feet September 18, 2004;

and 7.61 feet April 3, 2005.

Steuben County

Bradford 0 0

Large branches were blown down by

strong thunderstorm winds.

Cayuga County

Moravia 0 0

Oneida County

Camden 0 0 5K

Trees were blown down by strong

thunderstorm winds.

Seneca County

Waterloo 0 0

Seneca County

Seneca Falls 0 0

Steuben County

Corning 0 0

Cortland County

Marathon 0 0

Cayuga County

Auburn 0 0

Chemung County

Elmira 0 0

Cayuga County

Auburn 0 0

Tioga County

Candor 0 0

Tioga County

Spencer 0 0

Tompkins County

West Danby 0 0

Tioga County

Candor 0 0

Tioga County

Apalachin 0 0

Broome County

Endicott 0 0

Delaware County

East Meredith 0 0

Delaware County

Davenport 0 0

Delaware County

Meridale 0 0

Delaware County

Davenport 0 0

Tioga County

Owego 0 0

Steuben County

Hammondsport 0 0

Steuben County

Bath 0 0 5K

Trees and wires were blown down by

strong thunderstorm winds.

NEW YORK, Coastal

Westchester County

Central Portion 0 0

Trees and wires downed.

Orange County

Middletown 0 0

Trees and power lines.

Orange County

Countywide 0 0

Lightning struck several structures

in Orange County, causing numerous

fires. House fires were reported in

Hugenot, Port Jervis, and Middletown.

Westchester County

Mt Kisco 0 0

Putnam County

Carmel 0 0

Trees and power lines downed by

thunderstorm winds.

Rockland County

Stony Pt 0 0

Lightning struck at least 6 houses

in Stony Point.

Richmond County

West Central Portion 0 0

Flash flooding on the West Shore

Expressway. Thunderstorms developed

in a moist and unstable atmosphere

on June 1st. Not only did the storms

produce very heavy rain and strong

winds, they were also prolific

lightning producers.

Richmond County

Richmond 0 0

Lightning struck a police car,

narrowly missing a police officer

standing in front of the North Shore’s

120th precinct station house.

New York County

East Central Portion 0 0

Flash flooding occurred on the FDR,

causing it to be closed.

Queens County

Flushing 0 0

Heavy rainfall caused flash flooding

of roadways.

Richmond County

Countywide 0 0

Rainfall falling at the rate of nearly

two inches per hour caused flash

flooding of streets across Staten

Island. Hylan Blvd was affected the

worst with at least a foot of water

being observed flowing swiftly down

the street.

Anywhere between 2 and 4 inches of

rain fell across New York City from

late afternoon into the evening hours

on June 2nd due to thunderstorms that

tapped a very moist and unstable

airmass. Central Park recorded 3.53

inches of rainfall.

Orange County

2 S Maybrook 0 0

Westchester County

1 W Mt Kisco 0 0

Trees downed in addition to the

penny size hail.

Richmond County

Tottenville 0 0

Penny to nickel size hail was

observed.

Richmond County

Tottenville 0 0

Trees and power lines downed.

Richmond County

Huguenot 0 0

Flash flooding of roads submerged

vehicles. A few houses were surrounded

by 5 feet of water.

New York County

East Portion 0 0

Major flash flooding on FDR Drive.

Queens County

Bayside 0 0

Slow moving thunderstorms produced a

wide array of severe weather. Flash

flooding, large hail, and damaging

winds were all experienced when

thunderstorms ignited in a very moist

and unstable airmass during the

afternoon and evening of June 29th.

Bronx County

Bronx 0 1

Lightning stuck a person at Crotona

Park pool. Extent of injuries unknown.

NEW YORK, East

Ulster County

Lake Katrine 0 0

A trained spotter reported penny-sized

hail at Lake Katrine.

Dutchess County

Hyde Park 0 0

A trained spotter reported

nickle-sized hail at the Vanderbilt

National Historic Site in Hyde Park.

Ulster County

Highland 0 0

A trained spotter reported penny-sized

hail in Highland.

Dutchess County

Rhinebeck 0 0

A trained spotter reported penny-sized

hail at Rhinebeck.

Dutchess County

Stanfordville 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

trees and wires blown down along Route

82 in Stanfordville.

Rensselaer County

Rensselaer 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

numerous small trees blown down in

Rensselaer.

On the last day of May a north-south

stationary front over central New York

dissipated leaving residual moisture

and instability over upstate New York.

At daybreak on June 1, a slow-moving

cold front over the St Lawrence

Valley sliced into this unstable air

mass over upstate New York producing

afternoon thunderstorms, several of

which became severe, containing large

hail and damaging wind gusts.

Warren County

Bolton 0 3

Park/Forest Service personnel reported

trees blown down on Lake George’s Big

Burn Island and Hatchett Island. Minor

injuries were occurred when a tree

fell on a tent.

Washington County

Whitehall 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

wires were blown down onto Route 12

in Whitehall.

Saratoga County

Northumberland 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported a

tree and wires blown down on Lindsay

Road at Route 32.

Washington County

Easton 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

wires blown down on Hoge Road in

Easton.

Rensselaer County

Troy 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

trees and wire were blown down in Troy.

Albany County

Bethlehem Center 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

that trees were blown onto a power

line along Beaver Dam Road.

Columbia County

Stuyvesant 0 0

Fire Department personnel in

Stuyvesant report that 5 trees were

blown down.

Ulster County

Saugerties 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

that trees and wires were blown down

in Saugerties.

Dutchess County

Washington Hollow 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

that trees were blown down in

Washington Hollow.

Early in the day on June 19, low

pressure was over western Quebec

Province with a cold front trailing

southwestward to a weak wave over the

northern Great Lakes, then southward

to the central Mississippi Valley.

The air over eastern New York became

more unstable during the day as a

moderate west southwesterly breeze

brought more moisture into the

Northeast. Several severe

thunderstorms formed in the afternoon

producing damaging wind gusts.

Dutchess County

Pleasant Vly 0 0

A trained spotter reported

penny-sized hail at Pleasant Valley.

Dutchess County

Moores Mill 0 0

A trained spotter reported

nickle-sized hail at Moores Mill.

Early in the day on June 20, a fairly

strong cold front lay in an arc from

near the mouth of the St Lawrence

Valley to just north of the Ohio

Valley. The front moved southeastward

to off the Atlantic Coast late at

night. The air mass covering eastern

New York was moist and unstable. As

the front moved across eastern New

York in the afternoon, it produced a

couple of severe thunderstorms

containing large hail.

Dutchess County

La Grange 0 0

An Emergency Manager reported that

a tornado occurred at Lagrangeville.

The tornado was on the ground between

15 and 30 seconds traveling half a

mile and cutting a path 150 yards

wide.

On June 24, a weak wave of low

pressure had moved northeastward

through New England. In its wake, it

left a stationary front boundary

along the New England coast. The air

mass over southeastern New York State

was moist and fairly unstable and there

was considerable environmental wind

shear over the region. On the evening

of June 25, a supercell thunderstorm

formed in Dutchess County. This

thunderstorm briefly produced an Fl

tornado, which was on the ground 15 to

30 seconds cutting a path a half mile

long and 150 yards wide in the vicinity

of Lagrangeville.

Fulton County

Bleecker 0 0

An emergency Manager reported that

trees were blown down in Bleecker.

From June 24 through June 25 an upper

level ridge strengthened off the

eastern Atlantic Coast. The increasing

southeasterly flow in the low levels

of the atmosphere along the New

England coast caused a nearly

stationary front near the Atlantic

Coast to drift northwestward into

New York State. During the afternoon

of June 25, this front lay from the

northern Champlain Valley to the

central southern tier of New York.

A band of heavy rainfall occurred just

to the southeast of this front. The

heaviest rainfall was from the

Catskills to the mid Hudson Valley.

A few thunderstorms formed along the

frontal boundary over east central

New York during the afternoon. One

thunderstorm became severe, producing

damaging wind gusts.

Warren County

Pottersville 0 1 40K

According to a newspaper report, a

woman suffered minor injuries near

Pottersville when the vehicle she was

driving fell through a section of

Olmstead Road that was undermined by

flooding Fish Creek. The flood water

was from the combination of heavy

rainfall and a breached beaver dam.

On June 26, a slowly-moving frontal

boundary left 3 to 4 inches of

rainfall in its wake as it drifted

northwestward across the Lake

George Northern Saratoga region of

eastern New York. The rainfall caused

a beaver dam near Pottersville to

burst which resulted in a washout of

a section of County Route 19, also

known as Olmsteadville Road. County

highway repair personnel said that the

heavy rainfall resulted in partial

damage to 7 roads in the county, and

they estimated that the damage was

about 40,000 dollars.

Herkimer County

Ilion 0 0

An emergency manager reported that

Fulmer Creek flooded a trailer park

in German Flatts, about 5 miles

southeast of Ilion. Twelve homes

were evacuated.

Herkimer County

Little Falls 0 0

An emergency manager reported that

Routes 5 and 168 were closed due to

flooding and mud slides.

Herkimer County

Little Falls 0 0

An emergency manager reported that

a house was lifted off its foundation

in Little Falls, due to a mud slide.

Fulton County

Stratford 0 0

An emergency manager reported that

flooding of the East Canada Creek

caused numerous evacuations across

the western portion of Fulton County

in the vicinity of Stratford and

Dolgeville. Route 29A was flooded at

Stratfortd.

Herkimer County

Dolgeville 0 0

An emergency manager reported that

East Canada Creek was flooding and

that evacuations have occurred along

Main Street in the village of

Dolgeville. The water level rose to

the bottom the Route 29 bridge.

Montgomery County

Ames 0 0

An emergency manager reported that

widespread flooding along Brimestone

Creek occurred. West Ames Road and

Old Sharon Road, between Route 10

and Latimer and Shunk Roads, were

closed due to flooding.

Schoharie County

Charlotteville 0 0

A trained spotter reported that a

small bridge was flooded at

Charlotteville.

Schoharie County

Cobleskill 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

that State Route 7 was closed due to

flooding from the Cobleskill Creek at

the east end of the village of

Cobleskill.

Schoharie County

Gilboa 0 0

A trained spotter reported that

there was a mud slide across Stryker

Road in Gilboa.

Montgomery County

Canajoharie 0 0

A trained spotter reported that

evacuations occurred along Route 80,

which was closed due to flooding,

near the village of Fort Plain. A

state of emergency was in effect in

Montgomery County.

Schoharie County

Warnerville 0 0

A trained spotter reported that the

Cobleskill Creek flooded several

buildings and roads in Warnerville

including the Post Office.

Schoharie County

Richmondville 0 0

A trained spotter reported that a

mud slide occurred in Richmondville.

Schoharie County

Gilboa 0 0

A trained spotter reported that

Campbell Road to Gilboa was closed due

to flooding from the Keyserkill Creek.

A State of Emergency was in effect in

Schoharie County.

Herkimer County

Ingham Mills 0 0

An emergency manager reported that

water was spilling from the Kyser Lake

Dam on East Canada Creek and that

evacuations were occurring downstream.

The National Grids buildings were

flooded.

Schoharie County

Broome Center 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

that State Route 145 was flooded from

the Catskill Creek to the vicinity of

Broome Center.

Herkimer County

Dolgeville 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

that a building was washed into East

Canada Creek in Dolgeville.

Herkimer County

Ilion 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

that around 200 people were evacuated

from Ilion, Dolgeville, Mohawk, and

Frankfort due to flooding.

Schoharie County

Cobleskill 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

that Route 10 to the west of

Cobleskill was impassable due to

flooding.

Hamilton County

Indian Lake 0 0

A trained spotter reported that

Cedar River and Big Brook were

flooding.

Ulster County

Willow 0 0

A trained spotter reported that

may streams in the vicinity of

Willow were flooding.

Hamilton County

Benson 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

that Route 30 and Stoney Road were

closed due to flooding

Fulton County

Oppenheim 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

that several roads in the area

surrounding Oppenheim were closed

due to flooding.

Greene County

Catskill 0 0

Law enforcement personnel reported

that several roads in Greene County

were closed in, and near the towns

of Catskill, Cairo and Haines Falls

due to flooding.

An upper level ridge over the western

Atlantic Ocean which had been building

westward for a couple of days prior to

June 28 began to slowly retreat on

June 28 as an upper level trough over

the Mississippi Valley began drifting

very slowly eastward. A frontal

boundary which had drifted westward

into western New York on June 27 began

drifting eastward and was over east

central New York at daybreak on June

28. A small low pressure was in the

vicinity of the eastern Southern Tier

of New York State. This was a weak

cyclone of tropical origin. A band of

heavy rainfall occurred just to the

southeast of the front, The heaviest

rainfall was from the eastern Southern

Tier of New York State to the southern

Adirondacks. Three to 5 inches of

rainfall occurred in east central

New York over about a 24-hour period

from daybreak June 27 to June 28. And

from June 26 to 28, nearly 10 inches of

rain occurred in the southern

Adirondacks according to radar

estimates. Additional rainfall

occurred on the morning of June 28 as

the tropical cyclone moved northward

through eastern New York State.

The heavy rainfall produced widespread

flooding across east central New York

State. There was severe major level

flooding on portions of the Mohawk

River and some of its tributaries,

and moderate to near major flooding

on some of the Catskill Mountain

drainages. Record flooding occurred

on the Mohawk River at Little Falls

and on the Canajoharie Creek, A

record flood may have occurred on

the East Canada Creek between

Dolgeville and the Mohawk River. Also,

moderate to near major flooding

occurred at Kast Bridge, Hinckley,

and Schenectady, Flooding, mainly

minor, occurred along the Hudson River

and its tributaries, including Hope

(here moderate to near major flooding

was observed), Troy, Riverbank, and

Ft. Edward. In the Catskills,

flooding approached major levels near

Kingston on the Esopus. Elsewhere in

the Catskills, mainly minor flooding

was noted.

Readers are referred to the E-5

report from the National Weather

Service’s Albany office for details

on the flooding that occurred on

the main stem (gaged) rivers.

There was a considerable amount of

flood damage. However as of mid

summer 2006, when this report was

filed, the damage figure was very

preliminary. Damage was estimated to

be around 50 million dollars. About

8,000 customers of National Grid were

without power. In some cases, power

was intentionally cut to homes and

businesses to reduce the fire threat.

A 117-mile stretch of the New York

State Thruway was closed between

Interchange 25A and Interchange 34A

beginning at 11:45 am June 28, 2006

and lasting until 10:15 am June 29,

2006. Flooding from the Mohawk River

between Fultonville and Canajoharie

led to portions of the Thruway being

under five feet of water. This was

the worst flooding on the Barge Canal

during the navigation season since its

reconstruction in 1905. Forty-five

locks were closed. In some locations,

the flood waters deposited 100-foot

deep debris piles. Thirty-five

vessels were stranded in the canal

system. Freight and passenger rail

services were interrupted between

Albany and Buffalo.

Schenectady County

Niskayuna 0 0

A former National Weather Service

employee reported that two 10-inch

diameter trees were blown down in

Niskayuna by Lock 7 and Rosendale

Roads.

Dutchess County

Moores Mill 0 0

Newspaper personnel reported that

nickel-sized hail occurred at Moors

Mill.

Albany County

Altamont 0 0

A member of the general public

estimated that penny-sized hail

occurred at Altamont.

Schenectady County

Rotterdam 0 0

A trained spotter reported that

nickle-sized hail occurred at

Rotterdam.

Schenectady County

Scotia to 0 0

Rotterdam

A trained spotter reported that

penny-sized hail occurred at Scotia.

Schenectady County

Schenectady 0 0

Law enforcement personnel report

that trees were blown down onto cars

and a house on Campbell Avenue in

Schenectady.

Saratoga County

West Milton 0 0

Law enforcement personnel report

that trees were blown down in

West Milton.

Fulton County

Stratford 0 0

A trained spotter reported that

quarter-sized haft occurred in

Stratford.

Saratoga County

Malta 0 0

A National Weather Service employee

reported a measured wind gust of 60

miles an hour in a thunderstorm at

Malta. After being nearly stationary

while deepening for several days, an

upper-level trough from the Great

Lakes to the lower Ohio Valley was

accelerating eastward at daybreak on

June 29. An associated weak low

pressure over Lake Erie trailed a

cold front through the Ohio Valley.

During the day, this system moved

rapidly eastward and touched off

thunderstorms in the warm, humid air

mass over eastern New York and

adjacent western New England from

mid afternoon through early evening.

There were many severe thunderstorms

containing large hail and damaging

wind gusts. The bulk of the severe

activity was in, or near the Capital

District.

Hamilton County

Hope Falls 0 0

Park/Forest Service personnel

reported that quarter-sized hail

occurred in Hope Falls.

NEW YORK, North

Franklin County

4 SW Santa Clara 0 0 5K

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This led to the

development of thunderstorms across

northern New York during midday. A

few thunderstorms produced severe

weather, including damaging winds

that downed trees and several large

branches near Santa Clara.

St. Lawrence County

Childwood 0 0 2K

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This resulted in

the development of thunderstorms

across northern New York during

midday. A few thunderstorms produced

severe weather, including damaging

winds that downed several large

branches and a few trees near

Childwold.

Franklin County

Saranac Lake 0 0 3K

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered

a very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This led to the

development of thunderstorms across

northern New York during midday of

the 19th. A few thunderstorms produced

severe weather, including damaging

winds that knocked down several large

branches and resulted in minor power

outages in Saranac Lake.

Essex County

Wilmington 0 0 5K

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered

a very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This resulted in

the development of thunderstorms

across northern New York during

midday on the 19th. A few

thunderstorms produced severe

weather, including damaging winds

that downed trees in Wilmington.

Clinton County

Schuyler Falls 0 0 2K

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This led to the

development of thunderstorms across

northern New York during midday on

the 19th, that moved into the

Champlain Valley by early afternoon.

A few thunderstorms produced severe

weather, including damaging winds

that downed several large branches

at Schuyler Falls.

Clinton County

Plattsburgh 0 0 10K

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York around midday on

the 19th and developed a line of

thunderstorms that intensified as they

moved into the Champlain Valley by

early afternoon. These thunderstorms

produced severe weather, in the form

of wind damage, across Clinton county,

including numerous trees and utility

poles blown over in Plattsburgh.

Essex County

Crown Pt 0 0 2K

Essex County

Moriah 0 0 5K

Essex County

Westport 0 0 3K

Essex County

Willsboro 0 0 5K

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York around midday on

the 19th. This developed a line of

thunderstorms that intensified as

they moved into the Champlain Valley

by early afternoon. These

thunderstorms produced severe

weather, in the form of wind damage,

across Essex county, including

numerous trees and powerlines down

in Willsboro, Moriah, Crown Point and

Westport.

Essex County

Ticonderoga 0 0

A mid-level atmospheric disturbance

and surface cold front moved across a

moderately unstable airmass during

midday of the 20th. This led to

scattered thunderstorms across the

Champlain Valley of New York,

including a severe thunderstorm in

Ticonderoga that produced penny size

(3/4 inch diameter) hail.

Essex County

Countywide 0 0 25K

On the morning of the 26th … a deep

upper atmospheric trough was located

across the Mississippi River Valley,

while a quasi-stationary warm front

was across the Champlain Valley. This

combination allowed copious amounts

of moisture to advect northward from

the Gulf of Mexico into the Champlain

Valley in the form of rain on the

26th. Widespread rainfall totals

across the Champlain Valley in New

York were 1 to 3 inches, with a

concentrated area of 3 to 5 inches in

southeast Essex county. Some observed

rainfall totals included Schroon

Lake with 3.83 inches and Mineville

with 3.60 inches. Several roads were

flooded in the Ticonderoga–Schroon

Lake area, including Routes 9N and 22

and some basement flooding was

observed. Roads were flooded in

Minerva, including a washout on

Potterville Rd.

Essex County

Keene 0 0 5K

On the early morning of the 28th, a

persistent deep upper atmospheric

trough was located across the

Mississippi River Valley, while

a cold front and weak area of low

pressure was slowly moving east

across New York. More steady

rainfall fell across Essex county

New York, an area that had

witnessed heavy rainfall for the

last several days. The end result

was several bankfull streams and

rivers with flooded fields as well

as some scattered flooding of roads,

including the Hulls Falls Road in

Keene, along the upper reaches of

the East Branch of the AuSable River.

St. Lawrence County

Chippewa Bay 0 0

A strong mid-level disturbance, with

a cold temperature pool aloft, moved

across the Saint Lawrence Valley of

New York during the early afternoon

of the 30th. The instability generated

was enough to create isolated

thunderstorms across the region,

which produced Quarter size hail

(one inch diameter) at Chippewa Bay.

NEW YORK, West

Cayuga County

Cato 0 0 20K

Oswego County

West Monroe 0 0 15K

Showers and thunderstorms developed

ahead of a cold front during the late

morning and early afternoon hours.

The thunderstorm winds downed trees

in Cato and West Monroe. In Cato, a

roof was torn off a garage by the

wind.

Cattaraugus County

Allegany 0 0 8K

Thunderstorms accompanied the

passage of a cold front during the

evening hours. In the town of

Allegany in Cattaraugus county the

thunderstorm winds downed power lines.

Allegany County

Bolivar 0 0 8K

Allegany County

Andover 0 0 5K

Thunderstorms developed in a warm,

moist flow ahead of an approaching

cold front. The winds from one

thunderstorm downed trees and power

lines in Bolivar and Andover as it

crossed Allegany county.

Chautauqua County

Lakewood 0 0 5K l0K

Monroe County

Penfield 0 0 10K

Cattaraugus County

South Dayton 0 0 5K 5K

Monroe County

Webster 0 0 15K

Allegany County

Belmont 0 0 10K

Ontario County

Clifton Spgs 0 0 8K

Wayne County

Clyde 0 0 8K

Cayuga County

Cato 0 0 10K

Showers and thunderstorms accompanied

the passage of a cold front during the

afternoon hours. The thunderstorms

produced damaging winds and large

hail. Winds downed trees in Clifton

Springs, Webster, Belmont, and Cato.

A garage door was blown-in in Webster.

Hail up to 1.75 inch fell in Lakewood,

South Dayton, Clyde and Penfield.

Allegany County

Rushford 0 0 15K

Monroe County

Henrietta 0 0 10K

Thunderstorms developed across the

region as an upper level trough

crossed during the afternoon hours.

One and a half inch hail fell in

Henrietta. In Rushford, the

thunderstorm winds downed power lines.

Allegany County

West Clarksville 0 0 50K

A house was struck by lightning and

set ablaze in the town of West

Clarksville. The house was destroyed

and left unlivable. A family of three

was left homeless.

Erie County

Cheektowaga 0 0 10K

Erie County

Lancaster 0 0 8K

Erie County

Cheektowaga 750 2 250K

Wyoming County

Varysburg 0 0 8K

Erie County

Colden 0 0 8K

Erie County

Hamburg 0 0 5K

Niagara County

Wheatfield 0 0 5K

Thunderstorms developed during the

afternoon hours as an upper level

trough crossed the region. The storms

produced hail up to one inch in

diameter. Hail reports spanned from

Wheatfield across Cheektowaga,

Lancaster, Hamburg and Colden to

Varysburg. One thunderstorm spawned

a tornado which moved across the Town

of Cheektowaga. The tornado initially

touched down around 2:55 p.m. on

Walden Avenue near Harlem Road and

traveled from the northwest to the

southeast through the town. On Walden

Avenue, a construction trailer was

moved several hundred feet. The worker

in the trailer suffered minor

injuries. As the tornado moved across

the New York State Thruway, it lifted

a tractor trailer and deposited on its

side across the Jersey barrier. The

driver of the truck suffered a broken

leg. The tornado continued on its

southeast trek damaging a 20 by 30

foot section of a wall on a warehouse

and then downed trees as it crossed

through central Cheektowaga. The

tornado touched down several times

along its path. Its final touchdown

was at the Parkside Village Mobile

Home Park around 3:05 p.m. where

three mobile homes sustained

significant damage and eight others

sustained minor damage. The tornado

was ranked an 171 with a path length

of three miles and a width of 75

yards.

Lewis County

Indian River 0 0 15K

Jefferson County

Limerick 0 0 8K

Jefferson County

Watertown 0 0 5K

Thunderstorms developed during the

afternoon hours as an upper level

trough crossed the region. The storms

produced hail up to one inch in

diameter in Jefferson county. In

Indian River, Lewis county, the

thunderstorm winds downed trees.

Location Character of Storm

NEW JERSEY, Northeast

Bergen County

Ft Lee Flash Flood

Flash flooding of roadways due to

torrential downpours from

thunderstorms.

Passaic County

Clifton Flash Flood

A man fell into a swiftly flowing

tributary of the Passaic River around

8 pm EDT and was killed. Heavy rains of

up to 3 inches had fallen in the area

during Friday and Saturday (the 23rd

and 24th) which caused the stream to

run more swiftly than normal. M39IW

Hudson County

Jersey City Flash Flood

Cars submerged by thunderstorm flash

flooding. Rescues performed.

Hudson County

Bayonne Hail (0.75)

NEW JERSEY, South and Northwest

Sussex County

Vernon Lightning

Thunderstorms with intense cloud to

ground lightning caused havoc across

Sussex County during the afternoon and

evening of June 1st. At about 2:30 PM

EDT, lightning struck a home on

Cardinal Road in Vernon, igniting a

fire. The fire was under control

within an hour, however the house

was nearly destroyed. In Andover,

lightning sparked a roof fire at a

Rolling Hills Apartment. Meanwhile

in Frankford along North Shore Road,

a large tree fell onto the middle

portion of a homes roof during the

evening of June 1st. A woman outside

the home at the time confirmed

that lightning was the cause of the

downed tree. A telephone pole was

downed on Running Hills Drive along

with several downed wires on Route

94 due to lightning strikes. State

Police, during the late evening of

June 1, directed traffic at a failed

traffic light at Ross’s Corner, where

Routes 15, 206 and 565 meet. Minor

power outages were reported in the

Sparta area. There were no injuries

reported across the county.

Sussex County

Vernon Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorms knocked down trees and

power lines in the Vernon Valley area

during the early afternoon of June

lst.

Sussex County

Sussex Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A gust front arrived in Sussex, New

Jersey ahead of the parent

thunderstorm. As a result of the

strong winds, trees and power lines

were knocked down in the Sussex area

during the afternoon of June 1st.

Sussex County

Newton Lightning

A strong thunderstorm blew through

Newton, New Jersey (Sussex County)

around 6:00 PM EDT on June 1st.

Lightning struck a tree and some

gusty winds downed some branches.

Heavy downpours in association

with the thunderstorm caused some

brief but minor street flooding.

Hunterdon County

Countywide Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm, which blew

through Hunterdon County, New Jersey

during the early evening of June

1st, knocked down power lines all

across the county.

Hunterdon County

Flemington Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees were knocked down in Flemington,

New Jersey during the early evening of

June 1st as a severe thunderstorm blew

through Hunterdon County.

Monmouth County

Allentown Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Severe thunderstorms rolled across

parts of Monmouth County, New Jersey

during the evening of June 1st. Strong

winds from the thunderstorms downed

power lines on Yardville-Allentown

Road around 8:30 PM EDT.

Somerset County

Millstone Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm, which rolled

across Somerset County, New Jersey

during the early evening of June 1st,

downed trees and power lines in the

Millstone area.

Mercer County

Ewing Township Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A couple of severe thunderstorms

rolled across Mercer County, New

Jersey between 7:40 PM EDT and 8:30

PM EDT on June 1st. Strong winds

associated with the thunderstorms

downed power lines all across the

county. In addition to the downed

power lines, trees were knocked

down on Barry Road in Hopewell

Township.

NEW JERSEY, South and Northwest

Mercer County

Princeton Lightning

A home, off Meetinghouse Court near

Griggs Farm development, was struck

by lightning around 8 PM EDT on

June 1st producing smoky conditions.

Also around 8 PM EDT, there was

smoke reported at the Quaker Bridge

Mall, which was at an escalator due

to a power outage. No injuries were

reported in either events.

Morris County

Dover Lightning

During the early evening hours of

June 1st, lightning struck a home at

80 Maple Avenue in Dover, forcing

the family from their home and

sparking a fire in the homes attic.

No injuries were reported as a result

of the lightning strike and fire,

however some 2,500 customers in

Dover were left without power during

the storm.

Somerset County

Rocky Hill Lightning

During a thunderstorm at about 8 PM

EDT, lightning struck the chimney

of an apartment building on Spring

Road in Montgomery Township. Two

of the apartments suffered some

damage and its occupants were

relocated, however no injuries

resulted.

Morris County

Schooleys Mtn Lightning

A home at 1 Stuart Court in

Washington Township was struck

by lightning during the evening

of June 1st. The lightning

strike caused a fire to the roof

line, and 4 occupants were

evacuated from the dwelling with

no injuries reported.

Mercer County

Ewing Township Heavy Rain

Law enforcement reported street

flooding on Stokes Avenue in Ewing

around 8 p.m. EDT. The road was

rendered temporarily impassable,

but the water receded by 9 p.m.

EDT. The storm total from Mercer

County Airport was 1.10 inches,

most of which fell within an hour.

Burlington County

Countywide Lightning

Thunderstorms during the evening

of June 1st caused havoc across

Burlington County, New Jersey and

nearby counties. Lightning sparked

a house fire in Medford, which

destroyed the home. No one at the

home was hurt, however a Medford

firefighter was taken to a nearby

hospital as he suffered from

dehydration. Also, a shed fire

occurred in Mount Laurel on

Hainesport-Mount Laurel Road, and

a house fire occurred on Avon Court.

Both fires were caused by lightning

strikes, and both structures

sustained severe damage. Meanwhile,

two house fires occurred on King

Avenue in Evesham when lightning

struck a utility pole at 11:37 PM

EDT, dropping a power line in front

of both homes. This energized the

water lines into each home and

sparked small fires. There were no

injuries reported and the dollar

amount in damage was not available.

Lightning strikes also damaged

computer systems at the Burlington

County Central Communications

building and also at the National

Weather Service Office in Mount

Holly, NJ. Numerous wires were

downed throughout Medford, Evesham

and Mount Laurel from the intense

cloud to ground lightning strikes.

Some 60,000 customers were without

power in Burlington, Camden and

Gloucester Counties.

Salem County

Carneys Pt Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees and power lines were knocked

down at 9:08 PM EDT on June 1st in

Carney’s Point Township, New Jersey

when thunderstorms rumbled across

Salem County.

Gloucester County

Bridgeport to Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Turnersville

Severe thunderstorms rumbled their way

across Gloucester County, New Jersey

during the evening of June 1st. As a

result of strong winds associated with

the thunderstorms, trees and power

lines were knocked down from Logan

Township to Washington Township.

Camden County

Gibbsboro Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Severe thunderstorms rumbled across

parts of Camden County around 9:40

PM EDT on June 1st. Damaging winds

produced by the thunderstorms downed

trees and power lines in Gibbsboro

to near the Turnersville area.

Burlington County

Evesboro Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Winds from severe thunderstorms

downed trees and power lines across

portions of Evesham Township, New

Jersey on eastward, during the

evening of June 1st.

Gloucester County

Verga Lightning

At around 10:00 PM EDT in the

Millburn, New Jersey area, the

fire department at Gero Park was

struck by lightning, which damaged

several pieces of electronic

equipment, including computers and

communications equipment, and a small

hole was discovered in the roof of the

building. Earlier in the evening, at

about 7:45 PM EDT, lightning struck

a Great Hills Road home, where light

smoke was observed coming from the

attic of the home, and two circuit

breakers had been tripped from the

electrical surge. No injuries were

reported from either event.

Gloucester County

2 SSE Paulsboro Tornado (F0)

A fast moving thunderstorm tracked

northward during the evening of June

2nd across southern New Jersey, then

merged with additional thunderstorms

arriving from the west as it entered

Gloucester County about 10:20 PM EDT.

The merging thunderstorm produced an

F0 tornado in East Greenwich Township,

New Jersey. The National Weather

Service Office in Mount Holly, New

Jersey conducted a storm survey and

confirmed that a weak tornado with

65 mph winds touched down. The path

length of the tornado was three-

quarters of a mile and the path

width was mostly around 100 yards,

but at its maximum it reached 250

yards. Numerous trees were knocked

down and snapped in a six block

area. Three homes sustained major

damage from downed trees, and another

twenty homes had minor damage. Roofing

material from a house on County Lane

Road was found a quarter of a mile

away near the Mount Royal Firehouse.

Camden County

Haddonfield Flood

Runoff from the heavy rain that fell

around Midnight EDT on the 3rd caused

some minor flooding along the Cooper

River. The Cooper River at Haddonfield

was above its 2.8 foot flood stage from

307 a.m. EDT through 6 a.m. EDT on the

3rd. It crested at 2.84 feet at 345

a.m. EDT on the 3rd. Doppler Radar

storm total estimates averaged between

1 and 2 inches. Actual storm totals

included 1.80 inches in Pennsauken

and 1.22 inches in Somerdale.

Gloucester County

Mullica Hill Thunderstom Wind (G50)

Strong winds from a severe thunderstorm

knocked down trees in Mullica Hill, New

Jersey at 3:55 PM EDT. Also at the same

time, a large tree was knocked down in

Woodbury, New Jersey. While not severe,

the same thunderstorm produced hail to

the size of peas in Glassboro between

4:00 PM EDT and 4:15 PM EDT.

NJZ024

Rip Current

A seven-year-old boy drowned during the

evening of the 18th in Ocean City after

getting caught in a rip current. M7IW

Warren County

2 W Alpha Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm, which rumbled

across parts of Warren County, New

Jersey during the early evening of

June 19th, downed trees and power

lines near the town of Alpha at

5:38 PM EDT.

Monmouth County

Roosevelt Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A severe thunderstorm tore down trees

and wires in the southwestern part of

Monmouth County. Most of the reported

wind damage was in Millstone Township

and Roosevelt Borough.

Hunterdon County

Allerton Lightning

A 59-year old male camper was

apparently struck by lightning and died

while resting in a hammock during the

evening of June 23rd. The man was in

a hammock, in Round Valley Reservoir,

which was anchored to several trees. It

is believed that the lightning bolt hit

the tree, struck the ground, then

traveled into the man. M59UT

Monmouth County

Roosevelt Lightning

Lightning struck a home in Roosevelt,

setting the house on fire. The extent

of damage to the home was not known,

however no injuries were reported.

Ocean County

1 N Metedeconk Lightning

A total of 1,100 customers lost power

during the afternoon of June 24th in

Point Pleasant as wires were knocked

down from lightning strikes.

Monmouth County

South Portion Flash Flood

Thunderstorms with heavy rain dropped

a Doppler Radar estimated two to four

inches of rain across southern

Monmouth County. This caused poor

drainage flooding and flooding of

smaller creeks in the county. Street

flooding also occurred in Sea Bright.

Gloucester County

Central Portion Flash Flood

Camden County

Southeast Portion Flash Flood

Burlington County

West Central Portion Flash Flood

Thunderstorms with heavy rain caused

flooding of roadways and small streams

from central Gloucester County

northeast through central portions of

Burlington County. Doppler Radar storm

total estimates average 2 to 4 inches

in this area. In Gloucester County,

several roads were closed in and around

Pitman with up to three feet of water

on them. Roadway closures in Burlington

County occurred in Burlington,

Pemberton and Southampton Townships.

Measured storm totals included 4.20

inches in Glassboro (Gloucester County),

2.89 inches in Medford (Burlington

County) and 2.59 inches in Wrightstown

(Burlington County).

Cumberland County

Southeast Portion Flash Flood

Cape May County

Northwest Portion Flash Flood

Repeating thunderstorms with torrential

downpours dropped a Doppler Radar

estimated six to ten inches of rain

across southeastern parts of Cumberland

County and northwestern parts of Cape

May County. This caused considerable

roadway and field flooding as well as

some stream flooding. Storm totals

included 6.25 inches in Millville.

Warren County

Millbrook to Flood

Carpenterville

Several days of heavy rain throughout

the Delaware River Basin culminated

with major flooding along the Delaware

River from the 28th through the 30th.

It was the second to fourth highest

crest on record for the Delaware River

along Warren County. The crest was

slightly lower than the April 2005

flood in Belvidere and Phillipsburg,

but the second highest on record (since

1955) at Tocks Island. President

George W. Bush declared Warren County

a disaster area. Sporadic periods of

heavy rain started on the 23rd, but

the most widespread and heaviest rain

fell from the night of the 27th into

the morning of the 28th. Event totals

in Warren County averaged three to

eight inches, but storm totals

exceeded ten inches in parts of the

Upper Delaware Basin in New York State.

The Delaware River at Tocks Island was

above its 21 foot flood stage from 906

a.m. EDT on the 28th through 1043 a.m.

EDT on the 30th. It crested at 33.87

feet at 915 a.m. EDT on the 29th, the

second highest crest on record. Farther

downstream at Belvidere, the Delaware

River was above its 22 foot flood stage

from 1145 a.m. EDT on the 28th through

303 a.m. EDT on the 30th. It crested

at 27.16 feet at 1130 a.m. EDT on the

29th, the fourth highest crest on

record. Farther downstream at

Phillipsburg, the Delaware River was

above its 22 foot flood stage from

830 p.m. EDT on the 27th through

703 p.m. EDT on the 30th. It crested

at 37.09 feet at 1215 p.m. EDT on

the 29th, the fourth highest crest on

record.

Hunterdon County

Countywide Flood

Several days of heavy rain throughout

the Delaware River Basin culminated

with major flooding along the Delaware

River from the 28th through the 30th.

It was the fourth highest crest on

record for the Delaware River along

Hunterdon County. The crest was

slightly lower than the April 2005

flood. President George W. Bush

declared Hunterdon County a disaster

area. One man in Lambertville drowned

when he walked into flood waters.

Sporadic periods of heavy rain started

on the 23rd, but the most widespread

and heaviest rain fell from the night

of the 27th into the morning of the

28th. Event totals in Hunterdon County

averaged four to eight inches, but

storm totals exceeded 10 inches in

parts of the Upper Delaware Basin in

New York State.

The Delaware River at Riegelsville

(Bucks County) was above its 22 foot

flood stage from 451 a.m. EDT on the

28th through 632 p.m. EDT on the 30th.

It crested at 33.62 feet at 300 p.m.

EDT on the 29th, the fourth highest

crest on record. Farther downstream

at Frenchtown, the Delaware River was

above its 16 foot flood stage from

827 a.m. EDT on the 28th through 835

p.m. EDT on the 30th. It crested at

22.90 feet at 500 p.m. EDT on the

4th, the fourth highest crest on

record. Farther downstream, at

Stockton, the Delaware River was

above its 18 foot flood stage from

4 a.m. EDT on the 28th through 620

p.m. EDT on the 30th. It crested at

25.35 feet at 7 p.m. EDT on the

29th, the fourth highest crest on

record. Farther downstream, at

Lambertville the Delaware River was

above its 13 foot flood stage from

805 a.m. EDT on the 28th through

401 p.m. EDT on the 30th. It

crested at 19.08 feet at 6 p.m. EDT

on the 29th, the fourth highest crest

on record. Inland the South Branch of

the Raritan River at High Bridge was

above its 10 foot flood stage from

107 p.m. EDT through 422 p.m. EDT on

the 28th. It crested at 10.11 feet

at 2 p.m. EDT. Farther downstream at

Stanton, the South Branch of the

Raritan was above its 8 foot flood

stage from 750 a.m. EDT through 927

p.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested at

9.33 feet at 1130 a.m. EDT.

M?IW

Mercer County

Countywide Flood

Several days of heavy rain throughout

the Delaware River Basin culminated

with major flooding along the Delaware

River from the 28th through the 30th.

It was the fourth or fifth highest

crest on record for the Delaware River

along Mercer County. The crest was

slightly lower than the April 2005

flood. President George W. Bush

declared Mercer heavy rain started on

the 23rd, but the most widespread and

heaviest rain fell from the night of

the 27th into the morning of the 28th.

Event totals in Mercer County averaged

three to six inches, but storm totals

exceeded 10 inches in parts of the

Upper Delaware Basin in New York

State. The hardest hit municipalities

were Trenton and Ewing with the Island

and Glen Afton sections of Trenton

affected the most.

The Delaware River at Washington’s

Crossing was above its 20 foot flood

stage from 825 p.m. EDT on the 28th

through 912 a.m. EDT on the 30th. It

crested at 22.54 feet at 700 p.m. EDT

on the 29th, the fourth highest crest

on record. The Delaware River at

Trenton was above its 20 foot flood

stage from 746 a.m. EDT on the 28th

through 652 p.m. EDT on the 30th. It

crested at 25.09 feet at 845 p.m. EDT

on the 29th, the fifth highest crest

on record. Inland the Assunpink Creek

at Trenton was above its 7 foot flood

stage from 711 a.m. EDT a.m. through

1231 a.m. EDT on the 28th. It

crested at 7.49 feet at 1030 EDT.

Camden County

Haddonfield Flood

A nearly stationary frontal system

produced sporadic periods of heavy

rain occurred across New Jersey from

the 23rd into the morning of the 28th.

A low pressure system that developed

along the Atlantic seaboard combined

with the front and caused the most

widespread and heaviest rain to occur

during the first half of the day on the

28th. The heavy rain caused minor

flooding along the Cooper River. Tidal

flooding also occurred along the

Delaware River. Flooding though was

worse farther north along the Delaware

River. Event totals in Camden County

average three to six inches. The Cooper

River at Haddonfield was above its 2.8

foot flood from 729 a.m. EDT through

1130 a.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested

at 2.92 feet at 930 a.m. EDT. Storm

totals included 3.79 inches in Blue

Anchor.

Somerset County

Countywide Flood

Sporadic periods of heavy rain occurred

across New Jersey from the 23rd into

the morning of the 28th. The most

widespread and heaviest rain occurred

during the first half of the day on the

28th. The culmination of the heavy rain

caused mainly minor flooding along the

main stem rivers in Somerset County on

the 28th and 29th. Flooding was worse

along the Delaware River. Event totals

in Somerset County averaged three to

six inches.

Along the main stem of the Raritan

River at Manville was above its 14

foot flood stage from 543 p.m. EDT

on the 28th through 310 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 15.76 feet

at 930 p.m. EDT on the 28th. Farther

downstream, the Raritan River at

Bound Brook was above its 28 foot

flood stage from 1007 p.m. EDT on

the 28th through 247 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 28.24 feet at

1128 p.m. EDT on the 28th. The North

Branch of the Raritan River at North

Branch was above its 12.3 foot flood

stage from 1033 a.m. EDT through 520

p.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested at

13.93 feet. Farther downstream at

Raritan, the North Branch of the

Raritan River was above its 10 foot

flood stage from 115 p.m. EDT through

608 p.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested

at 10.72 feet at 345 p.m. EDT.

Farther downstream at the village of

South Branch, the North Branch of the

Raritan River was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 749 a.m. EDT on the

28th through 202 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 9.95 feet at 845 p.m.

EDT on the 28th. The Millstone River at

Griggstown was above its 10 foot flood

stage from 1231 p.m. EDT on the 28th

through 1121 a.m. EDT on the 29th. It

crested at 10.54 feet at 4 p.m. EDT on

the 28th.

Sussex County

Montague to Flood

Flatbrookville

Several days of heavy rain throughout

the Delaware River Basin culminated

with major flooding along the Delaware

River from the 28th through the 30th.

It was the second or third highest

crest on record for the Delaware River

along Sussex County. The crest was the

second highest on record (since 1955)

at Tocks Island (Warren County) and

the third highest crest on record at

Montague. President George W. Bush

declared Sussex County a disaster

area. Sporadic periods of heavy rain

started on the 23rd, but the most

widespread and heaviest rain fell from

the night of the 27th into the morning

of the 28th. Event totals in Sussex

County averaged four to six inches,

but storm totals exceeded ten inches

in parts of the Upper Delaware Basin

in New York State.

The Delaware River at Montague was

above its 25 foot flood stage from

830 a.m. EDT on the 28th through 345

p.m. EDT on the 29th. It crested at

32.16 feet at 1015 p.m. EDT on the

28th, the third highest crest on

record. Farther downstream in Warren

County, the Delaware River at Tocks

Island was above its 21 foot flood

stage from 906 a.m. EDT on the 28th

through 1043 a.m. EDT on the 30th. It

crested at 33.87 feet at 915 a.m. EDT

on the 29th, the second highest crest

on record. The flow from the Delaware

River slowed the run-off from the Flat

Brook and caused flooding along the

brook. The Flat Brook at Flatbrookville

was above its 6 foot flood stage from

545 p.m. EDT through 1152 p.m. EDT on

the 28th. It crested at 6.25 feet at

815 p.m. EDT on the 28th.

Salem County

Carneys Pt Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm rolled across

parts of Salem County, New Jersey

during the very early morning hours of

June 29th. The strong winds produced

by the thunderstorm downed trees in

Carney’s Point, New Jersey at 3:17 AM

EDT.

Gloucester County

5 NW Glassboro Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

During the very early morning hours of

June 29th, a severe thunderstorm rolled

across Gloucester County, New Jersey.

Trees and power lines were downed at

3:43 AM EDT from South Harrison

northeastward through Deptford

Township.

Camden County

Audubon Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Strong winds from a severe thunderstorm

downed trees in Gloucester Township,

New Jersey and Audubon, New Jersey

(both in Camden County) at 3:56 AM EDT

on June 29th.

Burlington County

Cinnaminson to Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Palmyra

A severe thunderstorm rolled across

northwestern Burlington County, New

Jersey during the very early morning

hours of June 29th. Trees and power

lines were downed at 4:03 AM EDT in

Cinnaminson. Riverside and Palmyra as

a result of strong winds.

Gloucester County

Turnersville Hail (1.00)

A severe thunderstorm affected a

portion of Gloucester County, New

Jersey during the evening of June 29th.

The severe thunderstorm produced

nickel to quarter size hail in

Washington Township, near

Turnersville, at 10:30 PM EDT.

Burlington County

Rancocas Hail (0.75)

Penny size hail fell in Westampton

Township.

NEW MEXICO, Central and North

Rio Arriba County

Canjilon Hail (1.00)

About 15 to 20 minutes with email hail

and intermittent larger hail reported

at the Canjilon Ranger Station.

Guadalupe County

Pastura Hail (1.00)

Union County

Grenville Hail (0.88)

Bernalillo County

Albuquerque Intl Arpt Thunderstorm Wind (G53)

Union County

3 N Capulin to Hail (1.00)

Capulin

Large hail reported from the Volcano

National Monument south into Capulin.

Harding County

5 S Yates Hail (0.88)

San Miguel County

Las Vegas Arpt Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

San Miguel County

Las Vegas Arpt Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

NMZ004>007

High Wind (G61)

Gusty winds developed as a strong upper

level trough moved over northern New

Mexico. In some cases the peak gusts

were aided by outflow winds from high

based virga showers.

Los Alamos County

2 S Los Alamos Hail (1.00)

Los Alamos County

Los Alamos Hail (1.00)

San Miguel County

9 WSW Mineral Hill Hail (1.00)

San Miguel County

17 N Pecos Hail (1.75)

San Miguel County

2 N Mineral Hill Hail (1.00)

Union County

6 N Folsom Hail (0.75)

Union County

13 NE Folsom Hail (1.00)

Quay County

3 SSW Ragland Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Numerous 2 to 3 inch tree limbs snapped

off.

Mora County

12 N Wagon Mound Hail (0.75)

Santa Fe County

2 SE Edgewood to Hail (1.25)

Edgewood

Storm produced swath of penny to half

dollar size hail near

San Miguel County

Las Vegas Hail (0.88)

San Miguel County

12 NE Trementina Thunderstorm Wind (G51)

Heavy rain and pea size hail also

reported.

Colfax County

13 NE Cimarron Hail (0.75)

Bernalillo County

8 N Albuquerque Intl Thunderstorm Wind (G51)

Bernalillo County

9 NE Albuquerque Intl Thunderstorm Wind (G61)

Bernalillo County

12 NE Albuquerque Intl Thunderstorm Wind (G78)

A storm with heavy rain produced high

winds over northeast sections of

Albuquerque. The Sandia Peak Tram

system reported gusts to 90 mph at the

top of the tram (10300 feet) and 70

mph wind at the base terminal (6900

feet).

Sandoval County

Rio Rancho Heavy Rain

Bernalillo County

Albuquerque Heavy Rain

Sandoval County

Rio Rancho Hail (0.88)

Bernalillo County

Albuquerque Hail (0.88)

Strong storms moved across Rio Rancho

and north central Albuquerque with

heavy rain and a swath of hail. Parts

of Rio Rancho, Corrales and the

Albuquerque North Valley had rains of

about 2 inches in 60 to 90 minutes.

Several dirt roads were unpassable or

washed out in Rio Rancho. Los Rios Road

on the east side of Highway 528

suffered the worst damage as the runoff

reclaimed the arroyo that had been

filled as a road in new housing

development situated on the sandy slope

of the mesa between Corrales and Rio

Rancho. Ponding problems developed

along Edith Blvd in the Albuquerque

North Valley filling streets to curb

full and reaching several inches into a

few homes.

NEW MEXICO, South Central and Southwest

Sierra County

Truth Or Consequences Hail (1.00)

Otero County

Alamogordo Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

Otero County

Alamogordo

Strong thunderstorms developed over the

southern Sacramento Mountains and along

the eastern heights of Alamogordo. One

storm in particular dropped about an

inch and a half of rain in 40 minutes

over Marble Canyon, which drains into

eastern Alamogordo. Other storms added

heavy rain and several inches of

drifting small hail to that section of

town. Strong winds blew shingles off

houses, but flooding was the main

problem. Roads along the eastern

heights turned into raging torrents

which flowed westward into the center

of town. Mud flowed into numerous

houses and several vehicles were

swept into arroyos. A gas main was

broken which led to the evacuation of

residents in the vicinity. The state

of NM put the damage total at about

$1.3 million.

NEW MEXICO, Southeast

Eddy County

Carlsbad Hail (0.88)

Pea to nickel size hail fell in

northern portions of Carlsbad,

specifically at the intersection of

Canal and Pierce.

Lea County

Tatum Thunderstorm Wind (50)

A NWS cooperative observer recorded a

58 mph wind gust on his home

anemometer. No damage was reported.

Eddy County

Carlsbad Flash Flood

The public reported one foot of water

flowing over some of the local roads

in Carlsbad.

Lea County

1 S Hobbs Hail (0.88)

NEW YORK, Central

Steuben County

Bath Flash Flood

Several road washouts due to

thunderstorms with heavy rainfall. A

trailer park had to be evacuated.

Onondaga County

Plainville Thunderstorm Wind (50)

Trees blown down and several roofs

damaged.

Steuben County

Thurston Thunderstorm Wind (50)

Trees blown down by strong

thunderstorm winds.

Steuben County

Caton Thunderstorm Wind (50)

Trees blown down by strong

thunderstorm winds.

Steuben County

Lindley Thunderstorm Wind (50)

Trees blown down by strong

thunderstorm winds.

Chemung County

Elmira Thunderstorm Wind (50)

Trees and wires blown down by strong

thunderstorm

Delaware County

Cooks Falls Flood

Record flooding occurred on the Beaver

Kill Creek at Cooks Falls. The Beaver

Kill rose to the flood stage of 10 feet

June 26 at 200 PM EDT, then fell below

flood stage temporarily, before rising

above flood stage again June 28th at

500 am EDT. The Beaver Kill Creek

crested at 20.54 feet June 28th at

around 11:00 am EDT. The previous

record measured from flood marks was

20.3 feet October 10, 1903

Sullivan County

5 W Liberty Flash Flood)

A front from southern New England to

near Washington D.C Sunday morning

the 25th moved slowly west, to a

position from just north of New

England, south-southwest across the

Adirondacks through central New York

and then down the spine of the

Appalachians by Monday morning the

26th. Tropical moisture moved

westward and engulfed nearly all of

New York State and most of northern

and eastern Pennsylvania by Monday

morning. This resulted in a widespread

area of moderate to heavy rain across

all of central New York and northeast

Pennsylvania including the Poconos and

Catskills by Monday morning the 26th.

The heaviest rain occurred in the

Poconos and Catskills where rainfall

amounts totaled between 1.5 and 4

inches by 8 am EDT Monday. In Sullivan

County, 2 to 4 inches of rain fell by

Monday morning, which saturated soils.

Another round of heavy rain showers

and thunderstorms moved back into the

northern part of the county during the

day Monday the 26th. This additional

heavy rainfall caused flash flooding

in Youngsville closing Route 52. There

were many streams overflowing their

banks in and around Youngsville Monday

afternoon and evening.

Steuben County

Jasper Flash Flood

Heavy rainfall washed out several roads

in the Jasper area Monday afternoon and

evening the 26th.

Delaware County

Colchester Flash Flood

A front from southern New England to

near Washington D.C Sunday morning the

25th moved slowly west to a position

from just north of New England,

south-southwest across the Adirondacks

through central New York, and then

down the spine of the Appalachians by

Monday morning the 26th. Tropical

moisture moved westward and engulfed

nearly all of New York State and most

of northern and eastern Pennsylvania

by Monday morning. This resulted in a

widespread area of moderate to heavy

rain across all of central New York

and northeast Pennsylvania including

the Poconos and Catskills by Monday

morning the 26th. The heaviest

rainfall occurred in the Poconos and

Catskills where rainfall amounts

totaled between 1.5 and 4 inches by

8 am EDT Monday. In Delaware county,

flash flooding began around 6 pm

Monday evening as another batch of

heavy rain concentrated extreme

rainfall again over much of Delaware

County during the day Monday. With the

soils saturated from Sunday and Sunday

night’s rainfall, major flash flooding

began. The town of Colchester took the

brunt early on and the residents

evacuated voluntarily. All roads in

the town of Colchester were closed

as of Monday evening.

Delaware County

Fishs Eddy Flood

Major flooding occurred on the East

Branch of the Delaware River at

Fishes Eddy. The Delaware River at

Fishes Eddy peaked just above the

flood stage of 13 feet Monday evening

the 26th before falling back below

flood stage late Monday night. The

East Branch of the Delaware then rose

again Tuesday morning and exceeded the

flood stage at Fishes Eddy at 800 am

EDT Tuesday the 27th. The East Branch

then continued to rise Tuesday

afternoon through Wednesday, cresting

at 21.45 feet at 1100 am EDT Wednesday

the 28th. This was about a foot short

of the previous record of 22.49 feet

which occurred just 14 months earlier

in April 2005

Broome County

West Portion Flash Flood

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into upstate New York ahead

of a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms across

much of central New York late Monday

evening the 26th through Tuesday

morning the 27th. A total of 2 to 4

inches of rain fell over the western

half of Broome County, including the

Binghamton, Vestal, Johnson City and

Endicott areas. This rainfall, in

addition to Sunday and Monday’s

rainfall, caused numerous roads to

become flooded, especially in the

Vestal area. The rain tapered off

Tuesday morning after sunrise

allowing the flash flooding to abate

temporarily.

Cortland County

Countywide Flash Flood

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into upstate New York ahead

of a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms across

much of central New York late Monday

evening the 26th through Tuesday

morning the 27th. A total of 2 to 4

inches of rain fell over the county.

This rainfall, in addition to Sunday

and Monday’s rainfall, caused numerous

roads to become flooded across the

county. The flash flooding abated

during the mid to late morning hours

Tuesday the 27th as the rain tapered

off.

Sullivan County

North Portion Flash Flood

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into the Catskills ahead of

a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms from

eastern Pennsylvania into the

Catskills late Monday evening the

26th through Tuesday morning the

27th. By 8 am Tuesday, another 3 to

5 inches of rain fell across northern

Sullivan County which caused major

flash flooding. Additional rain

fell Tuesday afternoon into pressure

Wednesday morning as the front moved

back east and combined with a low

system moving up the eastern seaboard.

The additional rainfall brought

rainfall totals to between 6 and 12

inches in the far northern part of

Sullivan County. The extreme rainfall

caused catastrophic flash flooding to

become more widespread and affect

Livingston Manor, Roscoe,

Jeffersonville and other locations in

the northern part of the county. The

flash flooding was described as the

worst in at least 40 years and in some

areas it was the worst ever. Small

streams and creeks caused massive

flooding, inundating Livingston Manor

entirely, flooding numerous roads.

Over 1500 homes were flooded of which

30 were destroyed and over 700 heavily

damaged. Numerous bridges were flooded

as well as many businesses. Total

losses are estimated at around 100

million dollars. One person was killed

by the flooding when she was washed out

of her home by the flood waters.

F15MH

Madison County

North Portion Flash Flood

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into upstate New York ahead

of a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms across

much upstate New York late Monday

evening the 26th through Tuesday

morning the 27th. From 2 to 4 inches

of rain fell across much of Madison

County. This rain fell on saturated

ground from previous rains that

occurred Sunday and Monday leading to

major flash flooding in the northern

portion of the county. Widespread

street flooding was reported with

several homes experiencing crumbled

foundations due to high waters. The

rains tapered off by late morning

allowing the flooding to abate.

Delaware County

Walton Flood

At Walton, record flooding occurred on

the West Branch of the Delaware River.

The river level rose above the flood

stage of 9.5 feet Tuesday June 27th at

8:45 AM EDT. The river rose above the

moderate flood level of 14 feet June 27

at 2:30 PM EDT. The river rose above

the major flood level of 16 feet June

28, 3:15 AM EDT. The crest was 16.85

feet June 28 4:30 AM EDT. The previous

record was January 19, 1996 where the

crest was 16.36 feet. The flooding near

Walton was described in the Binghamton

Press and Sun Bulletin as “Unlike the

flood of 1996, caused by overflowing

waters of the West Branch of the

Delaware River, this season’s flooding

damage was inflicted by fast-moving,

“rip-and-tear” waters in the many

streams and small tributaries that

wreaked havoc on surrounding land,

buildings, and equipment. In some

cases, stream corridors changed

directions, cutting right through

the middle of fields.” Quote is from

John Thurgood, Agriculture extension

leader for the Watershed Agriculture

Council.

Delaware County

Countywide Flash Flood

Tropical moisture continued to stream

northward into upstate New York ahead

of a frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture developed a batch of

heavy showers and thunderstorms across

much of upstate New York late Monday

evening the 26th through Tuesday

morning the 27th. From 3 to 5 inches

of rain fell across Delaware County by

Tuesday morning. The rain fell on

saturated ground from previous rains

that occurred Sunday and Monday leading

to major flash flooding in Hancock,

Colchester and surrounding areas by

Tuesday morning. Hancock experienced

the worst flooding this town had ever

seen with most of the downtown

underwater. In addition, Walton,

Downsville, Delhi and Sidney also

became inundated with record flooding

as intense rainfall focused on these

areas later Tuesday. Numerous streams

and creeks were flooding homes,

businesses, roads, bridges and

government facilities. Despite the

major flash flooding that was occurring

Tuesday morning, the situation was

about to turn even more grim. The

front, which was across the eastern

Great Lakes Tuesday morning, moved back

east and combined with a low pressure

system that moved up the eastern

seaboard by Tuesday night. This set the

stage for additional heavy rains from

Tuesday evening to Wednesday morning

deluging Delaware County with more

rains that brought three day totals to

8 to 15 inches. This caused even more

catastrophic flooding to most of the

county by Wednesday morning the 28th.

At least 200 structures were damaged

in Hancock alone, the entire business

district of Walton was under 6 to 7

feet of water. Several small streams

and the Susquehanna River combined to

cause major flooding in the village of

Sidney, NY. Many homes were flooded in

Sidney with up to 6 feet of water.

Amphenol Corporation in Sidney was

flooded by up to 5 feet of water

causing 40 million dollars worth of

damage. The flooding also caused

Interstate 88 to collapse early

Wednesday morning near Unadilla killing

two truck drivers. The flooding caused

189 million dollars worth of damage to

roads alone. Damages are estimated at

250 million dollars from the floods.

At least 1000 homes were damaged by

flood waters with 30 homes completely

destroyed. Hundreds of businesses were

damaged including major corporations

like Amphenol and Kraft foods. There

were at least 10 businesses destroyed.

Over 500 people were evacuated with

hundreds of people rescued from the

flood waters. At least 20 bridges were

flooded. During the height of the

flood, all roads were closed in

Delaware County as a state of emergency

was declared Tuesday. This flood will

go down as the worst flood on record

ever experienced by Delaware County.

M?VE, M?VE

Steuben County

Addison Flash Flood

Heavy rains caused localized flash

flooding in the Addison and Cameron

areas where several roads were flooded.

Sullivan County

Callicoon Flood

Record flooding occurred on the

Delaware River at Calicoon. The

Delaware River at Calicoon rose above

the 12 foot flood stage late in the

morning on Tuesday the 27th. The

Delaware River continued to rise

Tuesday and Wednesday cresting at a

record level of 20.37 feet at 700 pm

EDT Wednesday the 28th. This broke

the previous record of 17.80 feet

which occurred just 14 months earlier

in April 2005.

Broome County

Conklin Flood

Both Broome and Susquehanna County were

inundated with record flooding from the

Susquehanna River near Conklin. Not

only did the river rise to record

levels, this left all the local

tributary streams with no outlet.

There was deep water from the backwater

built-up in the communities of Conklin

and Kirkwood in New York and Hallstead

and Great Bend in Pennsylvania. Many

homes and several businesses, big and

small, were destroyed along the Route

11 and Route 7 corridors that parallel

the Susquehanna River. The Conklin

gage-house was flooded, and quit

briefly near the flood crest. The

river rose to the flood stage of 11

feet June 27th at 2:15 pro EDT. The

river rose to the major flood level

of 20.0 feet June 27 at 11:45 pro EDT.

The river crested at 25.0 feet on

June 28th at 11:30 am EDT. This broke

the previous record of 20.83 feet set

in 1948. The Susquehanna River at

Conklin remained above the major

flooding level of 20 feet through

the end of June.

Delaware County

Hale Eddy Flood

At Hale Eddy, major flooding occurred

on the West Branch of the Delaware

River. The river rose to the flood

stage of 11 feet June 27th at 2:30

PM EDT. The river reached the

moderate flooding level of 13 feet

June 27th at 7:20 PM EDT. The river

rose to the major flooding level of

15 feet June 28th at 2:30 AM EDT.

The river crested at 19.1 feet June

28th at 2:00 PM EDT which was about

one foot short of the record

measured from flood marks of 20.3

feet October 10, 1903.

Otsego County

Flash Flood

Widespread heavy rain moved through

Otsego County and upstate New York

during the day Monday with more

heavy rain Monday night and Tuesday

morning. This rainfall saturated

the soils before another more

widespread area of heavy rainfall

occurred Tuesday afternoon and

night. Tropical moisture combined

with a slow-moving front and low

pressure system moving up

the eastern seaboard to bring

extreme rainfall to Otsego County.

The serious flash flooding began

in Otsego County during the

afternoon of Tuesday the 27th and

continued until Wednesday afternoon

as a total of 6 to 12 inches of

rain fell by Wednesday the 28th.

The highest rainfall was near

Unadilla where the Susquehanna

River reached record levels. No

one was killed from the floods

in Otsego County. A state of

emergency was declared Tuesday

afternoon as all roads were

closed. The sewer plant in Oneonta

was flooded sending raw sewage into

the Susquehanna River. Hardest

hit areas were Leonardsville,

Cooperstown, Hartwick, Bridgewater

and Oneonta. Route 20 was under

nearly three feet of water in East

Winfield. Total damage is estimated

at 50 million dollars. This was

described as the worst flooding in at

least 45 years. A total of 75 roads

were flooded in the county.

Tioga County

Countywide Flash Flood

Tropical moisture streamed northward

into south central New York ahead of a

frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

tropical moisture brought heavy showers

and thunderstorms across much of

upstate New York Sunday through Tuesday

morning. Rainfall by Tuesday morning

totaled 1 to 2 inches in Tioga County.

This initial rainfall saturated the

soils before another round of heavier

rain moved into the county Tuesday

afternoon as the front moved back east

and combined with a low pressure

system moving up the eastern seaboard.

This scenario spelled disaster for

Tioga County. Total rainfall for the

three day period ending Wednesday was

up to 6 inches. This heavy rain sent

nearly all streams and creeks over

their banks in what was described as

the worst flash flooding this county

has ever seen. Flash flooding began in

Owego at 310 pm EDT Tuesday the 27th

with some businesses downtown taking on

water. By early evening, flash flooding

was affecting the Waverly area and soon

became widespread Tuesday night

especially in the Campville area as

another 1 to 3 inches of rain fell.

Numerous roads, bridges, businesses

and homes were flooded. A total of 5000

homes were affected with 500 homes

damaged and 10 destroyed. Hardest hit

areas were Tioga, Campville, Owego,

Nichols, Barton, and Apalachin. Total

damage in Tioga County is estimated at

around 100 million dollars. No one was

killed. A state of emergency was

declared for Tioga county Tuesday

evening.

Broome County

Binghamton Flood

The Susquehanna River in Binghamton is

estimated to have crested at 25.0 feet

Wednesday June 28th, 11:00 AM EDT. The

top of the flood walls protecting

downtown Binghamton are at 25.6 feet.

The Susquehanna River lapped over the

top of these flood walls. This made for

dramatic photos, but there was no

serious flooding in the protected

areas. There were 3000 people evacuated

in Binghamton as a precaution. The

most serious flooding in Binghamton was

at Lourdes Hospital. The hospital was

evacuated and shut down. The lower

level of the hospital flooded. The

river remained above the flood stage in

Binghamton through the end of June.

Chenango County

Bainbridge Flood

The communities of Bainbridge and

Sidney were inundated with major

flooding during this period The major

source of jobs in the valley is the

Amphenol Corporation. This plant closed

due to 4 to 5 feet of water that

damaged the plant. The Susquehanna

River at Bainbridge rose to the 13 foot

flood stage Tuesday June 27th at 3:45

pm EDT. The river continued to rise

above the moderate inundation stage of

20 feet on Wednesday, June 28th at 4:45

am EDT. The river rose above the major

inundation stage of 22 feet on

Wednesday, June 28th at 8:45 am EDT.

The river crested at a new record of

27.03 feet Thursday June 29th at 11:00

am EDT. The old record flood was March

29, 1914 at 23.10 feet. The gage was

first established in 1907. The river

remained above the flood stage

through the end of June.

Steuben County

Bath Flash Flood

Heavy rains caused flooding of

several roads in the Bath area

Tuesday afternoon and evening

the 27th.

Schuyler County

Burdett Flash Flood

Heavy rains caused flash flooding

along Route 414 in Burdett, Odessa

and the Town of Hector.

Broome County

Countywide Flash Flood

Tropical moisture streaming into

upstate New York ahead of a

frontal system which moved

westward into the eastern

Great Lakes by Tuesday morning the

27th started the flash flood

problems in western Broome County

early Tuesday. The rain abated for

a time during the day Tuesday before

another batch of heavy rain fell

Tuesday afternoon into Wednesday

morning as the front moved back

east and combined with a low pressure

system moving up the eastern seaboard.

This scenario spelled disaster for

Broome County. Total rainfall for the

three day period ending Wednesday was

up to 9 inches, especially in the

Conklin and Windsor areas, which were

particularly hard hit. This additional

heavy rain sent nearly all streams and

creeks over their banks in what was

the worst flash flooding this county

has ever seen. The county’s

infrastructure was challenged as major

flash flooding began around 5 pm EDT

Tuesday and lasted into Wednesday

afternoon. A total of at least 40

roads, 5 bridges, dozens of businesses

and over 1800 homes were flooded. At

least 800 homes in Broome County were

destroyed Damages are estimated at 200

million dollars. All major highways in

the Binghamton area were closed due to

the flooding including Interstate 81,

Route 17, Route 26 and Interstate 88.

At least 6000 people were ordered to

evacuate from both river and flash

flooding. The Nanticoke Creek and

Tracey Creek were among many creeks

and streams causing major flooding. A

state of emergency was declared Tuesday

evening for Broome County. The National

Guard was called out to assist in

numerous water rescues, evacuations and

to prevent looting. Hardest hit areas

were Conklin, Kirkwood, Chenango Forks,

Endicott, Vestal, Johnson City and

Endwell. In Conklin, 50 percent of the

business district was flooded. The

National Guard had to airlift 300

people to safety who were stranded by

flood waters as the evacuation shelter

at the local high school became

surrounded by flood waters. In Windsor,

there were at least 100 people in

shelters. Countywide over 3000 people

were in shelters. In addition to the

flash flooding, the Susquehanna and

Chenango Rivers, which flow into the

Binghamton area were at record high

levels Wednesday. The rivers challenged

the levee system that protects the

city of Binghamton as the water

overtopped and undermined the levee in

spots. Many homes, roads and businesses

along the Chenango and Susquehanna

Rivers were severely impacted by flood

waters from Windsor to Conklin,

Kirkwood, Binghamton, Vestal, Endwell,

Johnson City, and Endicott. The flood

was the worst in Broome County history

as the Susquehanna River broke previous

record stages by 3 to 4 feet with river

gauging going back almost 100 years.

Fortunately no one was injured or

killed in Broome County from the

massive floods.

Tompkins County

Caroline Flash Flood

Heavy rains associated with a cold

front and tropical moisture caused

flash flooding in the Caroline area.

There were several roads closed by

the flooding. A total of 2 to 5

inches of rain fell in Tompkins

County from Monday the 26th through

Wednesday the 28th. The heaviest rain

occurred in the Caroline area where

around 5 inches fell.

Chenango County

Countywide Flash Flood

A steady stream of tropical moisture

flowing north into upstate New York

ahead of a frontal system across the

eastern Great Lakes brought periods

of heavy rain and thunderstorms to

Chenango County from early Monday

the 26th through Tuesday morning the

27th. From 1.5 to 4 inches of rain

fell by Tuesday morning. This rain

saturated soils before another batch

of heavy rain fell Tuesday afternoon

into Wednesday morning as the front

moved back east and combined with a

low pressure system moving up the

eastern seaboard. This additional

rainfall caused most small streams

and creeks to burst their banks

beginning Tuesday the 27th in the

evening. The rain finally tapered

off early Wednesday morning the 28th.

A total of 4 to 7 inches of rain fell

across Chenango County which caused

numerous small streams and creeks to

overflow their banks. The serious

flooding began Tuesday evening around

6 pm EDT and lasted into Wednesday

afternoon. Hardest hit areas were

Afton, Bainbridge, Norwich and

Sherburne. In Norwich, the Canasawcta

Creek flooded the entire west side of

the city with hundreds evacuated. In

addition, the entire business district

took on water. It is estimated that

one half of all homes and businesses

in Norwich had some flood damage.

Damages were estimated in the millions

as at least 300 homes were affected by

the flood waters. 200 people were

forced to evacuate, 10 people were

rescued from the floods. A total of

250 roads were flooded with 2 bridges

destroyed. One man was killed by the

flood waters.

M31VE

Chemung County

East Portion Flash Flood

Heavy rains caused several roads to be

flooded in the Southport and Chemung

areas Tuesday evening the 27th.

Sullivan County

Barryville Flood

Record flooding occurred on the

Delaware River at Barryville. The

Delaware River at Barryville rose

above the 17 foot flood stage

Tuesday evening the 27th. The Delaware

River continued to rise Tuesday and

Wednesday cresting at a record level

of 28.97 feet at 1100 am EDT Wednesday

the 28th. This broke the previous

record of 24.80 feet which occurred

just 14 months earlier in April 2005

Broome County

Vestal Flood

The Vestal river gage on the

Susquehanna River is located 8 miles

west of the Binghamton Washington

Street Gage. Vestal is on

the left bank of the river and the

Town of Union Communities of Johnson

City, Endwell and Endicott are on the

right bank of the Susquehanna River.

Each community had extensive flood

losses, too numerous to list. Some of

the more notable losses are the many

homes in areas like the Castle Gardens

development which were recovering from

losses due to the April 2005 flooding.

The inundation of the Enjoi Golf

Course forced the cancellation of the

“BC Open”, a PGA Tour Event. This was

a further economic blow for many

businesses in the region. The Vestal

gage reached the flood stage of 18

feet June 27th at 7:25 pm EDT. It

rose to the moderate flooding level of

21 feet June 27th at 11:00 PM EDT. It

rose to the major flood level, June

28th at 4:00 AM EDT. The river gage

was flooded but continued sending

data even though the gage float was

as high as it could go. The gage

topped out at 32.98 feet, but the USGS

made a measurement of the watermark and

have the provisional crest at 33.5

feet. The old record for Vestal was

30.5 feet measured from watermarks

March 18, 1936. The April 3, 2005

flood crest was 28.87 feet. The local

basin average rainfall for June 26 to

29 was 6.87 inches. The river remained

well above the flood stage through the

end of June at Vestal.

Oneida County

Countywide Flash Flood

Tropical moisture streamed northward

into upstate New York ahead of a

frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the eastern Great Lakes

by Tuesday morning the 27th. This

brought an initial round of heavy rain

to Oneida County by Tuesday morning.

From 2 to 4 inches of rain fell by

Tuesday morning. The rain abated for a

short time during the day Tuesday

before another batch of heavy rain

fell Tuesday afternoon into Wednesday

morning as the front moved back east

and combined with a low pressure

system moving up the eastern seaboard.

Total rainfall for the three day

period ending Wednesday was between 4

and 8 inches. This scenario caused the

worst flash flooding in Oneida County

in 20 years, impacting many areas of

the county starting at 730 pm EDT

Tuesday and lasting into Wednesday.

Hardest hit areas were Western,

Deerfield, Vernon and Verona, Kirkland,

Oriskany Falls and Steuben. There was

one bridge washed out with at least 17

roads flooded. In the town of

Deerfield, 22 homes were flooded by

the West Canada Creek. No one was

killed by the flooding with damage

estimates around 50 million dollars.

A state of emergency was declared for

Oneida County as numerous roads were

closed which included the New York

State Thruway.

Chenango County

Sherburne Flood

Record flooding occurred at Sherburne

on the Chenango River. At the peak of

the flooding, there was three feet of

water on Main Street in Sherburne.

The river reached the flood stage of

8 feet June 27th at 7:35 PM EDT. The

river rose to the moderate flood level

of 9 feet June 28th at 9:45 PM EDT.

The river rose to the major flood

level of 10.6 feet June 28th at 1:00

AM EDT. The record crest was 11.35

feet June 28th at 12:45 PM EDT. The

old record was 11.2 feet set March 28,

1914. The third highest crest is 10.78

feet April 3, 2005. The basin average

rainfall for June 26 to 29 was 5.84

inches. The river at Sherburne remained

above the flood stage through the end

of June.

Delaware County

Delhi Flood

At Delhi, New York, major flooding

occurred on the West Branch of the

Delaware River. The river rose above

the flood stage of 8 feet June 27th

at 9:20 PM EDT. The river rose above

the moderate flood level of 9.5 feet

June 28th at 2:30 AM EDT. The river

rose above the major flood level of

10.5 feet June 28th at 3:30 AM EDT.

The river crested at 11.75 feet

June 28th at 6:45 AM EDT. The

record is 12.24 feet November 9, 1996.

Delaware County

Unadilla Flood

The Susquehanna River at Unadilla rose

to the 11 foot flood stage Tuesday

June 27th at 09:30 pm EDT. The river

continued to rise above the moderate

inundation stage of 13 feet on

Wednesday June 28th at 5:45 am EDT.

The river rose above the major

inundation stage of 14.5 feet on

Wednesday June 28th at 10:00 am EDT.

The river crested at a new record of

17.73 feet Thursday June 29th at 5:15

am EDT. The old record flood was March

18, 1936 at 16.60 feet. The gage was

established 1938. The river at Unadilla

remained above flood stage through the

end of June.

Broome County

Windsor Flood

The Susquehanna River rose to the

flood stage of 15.5 feet Tuesday June

27th at 9:45 pro EDT. The river

continued to rise above the moderate

inundation stage of 18.5 feet

Tuesday June 27th at 11:46 pm EDT.

The river rose above the major

inundation level of 20.50 feet

Wednesday June 28th at 12:45 am

EDT. The first crest was 23.72 feet

on June 28th at 1:00 pro EDT, and

the second crest was 24.27 feet. The

old record was 21.22 feet January 200,

1996. The gage was established in

1988. The Susquehanna River at

Windsor remained above flood stage

through the end of June.

Cortland County

Cincinnatus Flood

At Cincinnatus on the Otselic River,

only minor flooding occurred. The

river rose above the flood stage of 8

feet June 27th at 10:31 PM EDT. The

river crested at 9.59 feet June 28th

at 2:01 AM EDT. The record is 12.5

feet July 8, 1935. The basin average

rainfall for June 26 to 29 was 5.76

inches.

Broome County

Chenango Forks Flood

Moderate flooding occurred at Chenango

Forks on the Chenango River. The river

rose to the flood stage of 10 feet

June 27th at 11:04 PM EDT. The river

rose to the moderate flood level of

12.6 feet June 28th at 7:22 AM EDT.

The river crested at 13.74 feet June

28th at around 4 pm EDT. The flood of

record is 20.3 feet July 8, 1935. This

June 2006 flood crest ranks 9th. The

local basin average rainfall for

June 26 to 29 was 5.82 inches.

Madison County

Countywide Flash Flood

Tropical moisture streamed northward

into upstate New York ahead of a

frontal system which slowly moved

westward into the

eastern Great Lakes by Tuesday morning

the 27th. This brought an initial

round of heavy rain to Madison County

by Tuesday morning causing significant

flash flooding in the northern portion

of the county. The rain abated for a

short time during the day Tuesday the

27th before another batch of heavy

rain fell Tuesday afternoon into

Wednesday morning as the front moved

back east and combined with a low

pressure system moving up the eastern

seaboard. Total rainfall for the three

day period ending Wednesday was between

4 and 8 inches. This scenario caused

major flash flooding in Madison County,

impacting many areas of

the county starting at around Midnight

EDT Wednesday and lasting into

Wednesday morning. Hardest hit areas

were south of Route 20, including

Georgetown, Lebanon, Hamilton, and De

Ruyter. Colgate University also had

major flooding. A state of emergency

was declared for the county. There

were 12 bridges washed out, numerous

roads flooded, and dozens of people

rescued from the flood waters. 50

people had to be evacuated from the

flood waters. No one was killed by

the flooding with damage estimated at

around 25 million dollars.

Chenango County

Greene Flood

Near record flooding occurred at

Greene on the Chenango River. The

current record at Greene is 22.0 feet

set July 8, 1935. The river rose to

the flood stage of 13 feet June 28th,

12:00 AM EDT. The river rose to the

moderate flood level of 17 feet June

28th at 5:00 AM EDT. The river

crested at 21.16 feet June 28th at

4:20 PM EDT.

Chenango County

Rockdale Flood

Record flooding occurred on the

Unadilla River at Rockdale. The

flooding beat the old record by one

foot. The news stories about the

record flooding were centered on a

Mount Upton firefighter, who nearly

lost his own life in a swift water

rescue that sent a 5-year old boy to

the hospital. The firefighter was

swept into the Unadilla River, but

was wearing a flotation device and was

rescued himself. The other flood news

was the enormous amount of dairy

farmland and crops that were destroyed

by flooding. The river reached the

flood stage of 11 feet June 28th at

2:31 AM EDT. The river rose to the

moderate flood level of 12 feet June

28th, at 5:45 AM EDT. The river rose

to the major flood category of 13 feet

June 28th at 10:00 AM EDT. The crest

was 13.96 feet on June 29th, at 12:00

AM EDT. The old record at Rockdale was

12.98 feet set December 31, 1942. The

basin average rainfall for June 26 to

29 was 5.92 inches.

Tioga County

Owego Flood

Several neighborhoods in Owego became

virtual islands during this flood. The

Susquehanna River at Owego rose above

the flood stage of 30 feet June 28th

at 4:30 AM EDT. Moderate flooding (32

feet) began June 28th, at 7:30 AM EDT.

Major flooding (33 feet) began June

28th at 9:30 AM EDT. The crest of

35.85 feet was reached June 29th, at

01:30 AM EDT which set a new record.

The old record was 33.18 feet April

3, 2005. The January 20 1996 flood

crest was 32.97 feet. The river at

Owego remained above flood stage

through the end of June.

Broome County

Deposit Flood

At Oquaga Creek at Deposit, record

flooding occurred. The crest was 10.51

feet June 28, 2006 at 10:00 AM. The

old records are 8.98 feet July 4,

1970; 8.44 feet September 18, 2004;

and 7.61 feet April 3, 2005.

Steuben County

Bradford Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Large branches were blown down by

strong thunderstorm winds.

Cayuga County

Moravia Hail (0.75)

Oneida County

Camden Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees were blown down by strong

thunderstorm winds.

Seneca County

Waterloo Hail (0.75)

Seneca County

Seneca Falls Hail (1.25)

Steuben County

Corning Hail (0.75)

Cortland County

Marathon Hail (1.00)

Cayuga County

Auburn Hail (0.88)

Chemung County

Elmira Hail (1.00)

Cayuga County

Auburn Hail (1.00)

Tioga County

Candor Hail (0.88)

Tioga County

Spencer Hail (2.00)

Tompkins County

West Danby Hail (0.75)

Tioga County

Candor Hail (0.88)

Tioga County

Apalachin Hail (0.88)

Broome County

Endicott Hail (0.75)

Delaware County

East Meredith Hail (0.75)

Delaware County

Davenport Hail (1.00)

Delaware County

Meridale Hail (0.88)

Delaware County

Davenport Hail (0.75)

Tioga County

Owego Hail (0.88)

Steuben County

Hammondsport Hail (0.75)

Steuben County

Bath Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

NEW YORK, Coastal

Westchester County

Central Portion Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees and wires downed.

Orange County

Middletown Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees and power lines.

Orange County

Countywide Lightning

Lightning struck several structures

in Orange County, causing numerous

fires. House fires were reported in

Hugenot, Port Jervis, and Middletown.

Westchester County

Mt Kisco Hail (0.75)

Putnam County

Carmel Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees and power lines downed by

thunderstorm winds.

Rockland County

Stony Pt Lightning

Lightning struck at least 6 houses

in Stony Point.

Richmond County

West Central Portion Flash Flood

Flash flooding on the West Shore

Expressway. Thunderstorms developed

in a moist and unstable atmosphere

on June 1st. Not only did the storms

produce very heavy rain and strong

winds, they were also prolific

lightning producers.

Richmond County

Richmond Lightning

Lightning struck a police car,

narrowly missing a police officer

standing in front of the North Shore’s

120th precinct station house.

New York County

East Central Portion Flash Flood

Flash flooding occurred on the FDR,

causing it to be closed.

Queens County

Flushing Flash Flood

Heavy rainfall caused flash flooding

of roadways.

Richmond County

Countywide Flash Flood

Rainfall falling at the rate of nearly

two inches per hour caused flash

flooding of streets across Staten

Island. Hylan Blvd was affected the

worst with at least a foot of water

being observed flowing swiftly down

the street.

Anywhere between 2 and 4 inches of

rain fell across New York City from

late afternoon into the evening hours

on June 2nd due to thunderstorms that

tapped a very moist and unstable

airmass. Central Park recorded 3.53

inches of rainfall.

Orange County

2 S Maybrook Hail (0.75)

Westchester County

1 W Mt Kisco Hail (0.75)

Trees downed in addition to the

penny size hail.

Richmond County

Tottenville Hail (0.88)

Penny to nickel size hail was

observed.

Richmond County

Tottenville Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees and power lines downed.

Richmond County

Huguenot Flash Flood

Flash flooding of roads submerged

vehicles. A few houses were surrounded

by 5 feet of water.

New York County

East Portion Flash Flood

Major flash flooding on FDR Drive.

Queens County

Bayside Hail (0.88)

Slow moving thunderstorms produced a

wide array of severe weather. Flash

flooding, large hail, and damaging

winds were all experienced when

thunderstorms ignited in a very moist

and unstable airmass during the

afternoon and evening of June 29th.

Bronx County

Bronx Lightning

Lightning stuck a person at Crotona

Park pool. Extent of injuries unknown.

NEW YORK, East

Ulster County

Lake Katrine Hail (0.75)

A trained spotter reported penny-sized

hail at Lake Katrine.

Dutchess County

Hyde Park Hail (0.88)

A trained spotter reported

nickle-sized hail at the Vanderbilt

National Historic Site in Hyde Park.

Ulster County

Highland Hail (0.75)

A trained spotter reported penny-sized

hail in Highland.

Dutchess County

Rhinebeck Hail (0.75)

A trained spotter reported penny-sized

hail at Rhinebeck.

Dutchess County

Stanfordville Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Law enforcement personnel reported

trees and wires blown down along Route

82 in Stanfordville.

Rensselaer County

Rensselaer Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Law enforcement personnel reported

numerous small trees blown down in

Rensselaer.

On the last day of May a north-south

stationary front over central New York

dissipated leaving residual moisture

and instability over upstate New York.

At daybreak on June 1, a slow-moving

cold front over the St Lawrence

Valley sliced into this unstable air

mass over upstate New York producing

afternoon thunderstorms, several of

which became severe, containing large

hail and damaging wind gusts.

Warren County

Bolton Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Park/Forest Service personnel reported

trees blown down on Lake George’s Big

Burn Island and Hatchett Island. Minor

injuries were occurred when a tree

fell on a tent.

Washington County

Whitehall Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Law enforcement personnel reported

wires were blown down onto Route 12

in Whitehall.

Saratoga County

Northumberland Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Law enforcement personnel reported a

tree and wires blown down on Lindsay

Road at Route 32.

Washington County

Easton Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Law enforcement personnel reported

wires blown down on Hoge Road in

Easton.

Rensselaer County

Troy Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Law enforcement personnel reported

trees and wire were blown down in Troy.

Albany County

Bethlehem Center Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Law enforcement personnel reported

that trees were blown onto a power

line along Beaver Dam Road.

Columbia County

Stuyvesant Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Fire Department personnel in

Stuyvesant report that 5 trees were

blown down.

Ulster County

Saugerties Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Law enforcement personnel reported

that trees and wires were blown down

in Saugerties.

Dutchess County

Washington Hollow Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Law enforcement personnel reported

that trees were blown down in

Washington Hollow.

Early in the day on June 19, low

pressure was over western Quebec

Province with a cold front trailing

southwestward to a weak wave over the

northern Great Lakes, then southward

to the central Mississippi Valley.

The air over eastern New York became

more unstable during the day as a

moderate west southwesterly breeze

brought more moisture into the

Northeast. Several severe

thunderstorms formed in the afternoon

producing damaging wind gusts.

Dutchess County

Pleasant Vly Hail (0.75)

A trained spotter reported

penny-sized hail at Pleasant Valley.

Dutchess County

Moores Mill Hail (0.88)

A trained spotter reported

nickle-sized hail at Moores Mill.

Early in the day on June 20, a fairly

strong cold front lay in an arc from

near the mouth of the St Lawrence

Valley to just north of the Ohio

Valley. The front moved southeastward

to off the Atlantic Coast late at

night. The air mass covering eastern

New York was moist and unstable. As

the front moved across eastern New

York in the afternoon, it produced a

couple of severe thunderstorms

containing large hail.

Dutchess County

La Grange Tornado (F1)

An Emergency Manager reported that

a tornado occurred at Lagrangeville.

The tornado was on the ground between

15 and 30 seconds traveling half a

mile and cutting a path 150 yards

wide.

On June 24, a weak wave of low

pressure had moved northeastward

through New England. In its wake, it

left a stationary front boundary

along the New England coast. The air

mass over southeastern New York State

was moist and fairly unstable and there

was considerable environmental wind

shear over the region. On the evening

of June 25, a supercell thunderstorm

formed in Dutchess County. This

thunderstorm briefly produced an Fl

tornado, which was on the ground 15 to

30 seconds cutting a path a half mile

long and 150 yards wide in the vicinity

of Lagrangeville.

Fulton County

Bleecker Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

An emergency Manager reported that

trees were blown down in Bleecker.

From June 24 through June 25 an upper

level ridge strengthened off the

eastern Atlantic Coast. The increasing

southeasterly flow in the low levels

of the atmosphere along the New

England coast caused a nearly

stationary front near the Atlantic

Coast to drift northwestward into

New York State. During the afternoon

of June 25, this front lay from the

northern Champlain Valley to the

central southern tier of New York.

A band of heavy rainfall occurred just

to the southeast of this front. The

heaviest rainfall was from the

Catskills to the mid Hudson Valley.

A few thunderstorms formed along the

frontal boundary over east central

New York during the afternoon. One

thunderstorm became severe, producing

damaging wind gusts.

Warren County

Pottersville Flash Flood

According to a newspaper report, a

woman suffered minor injuries near

Pottersville when the vehicle she was

driving fell through a section of

Olmstead Road that was undermined by

flooding Fish Creek. The flood water

was from the combination of heavy

rainfall and a breached beaver dam.

On June 26, a slowly-moving frontal

boundary left 3 to 4 inches of

rainfall in its wake as it drifted

northwestward across the Lake

George Northern Saratoga region of

eastern New York. The rainfall caused

a beaver dam near Pottersville to

burst which resulted in a washout of

a section of County Route 19, also

known as Olmsteadville Road. County

highway repair personnel said that the

heavy rainfall resulted in partial

damage to 7 roads in the county, and

they estimated that the damage was

about 40,000 dollars.

Herkimer County

Ilion Flash Flood

An emergency manager reported that

Fulmer Creek flooded a trailer park

in German Flatts, about 5 miles

southeast of Ilion. Twelve homes

were evacuated.

Herkimer County

Little Falls Flash Flood

An emergency manager reported that

Routes 5 and 168 were closed due to

flooding and mud slides.

Herkimer County

Little Falls Flash Flood

An emergency manager reported that

a house was lifted off its foundation

in Little Falls, due to a mud slide.

Fulton County

Stratford Flash Flood

An emergency manager reported that

flooding of the East Canada Creek

caused numerous evacuations across

the western portion of Fulton County

in the vicinity of Stratford and

Dolgeville. Route 29A was flooded at

Stratfortd.

Herkimer County

Dolgeville Flash Flood

An emergency manager reported that

East Canada Creek was flooding and

that evacuations have occurred along

Main Street in the village of

Dolgeville. The water level rose to

the bottom the Route 29 bridge.

Montgomery County

Ames Flash Flood

An emergency manager reported that

widespread flooding along Brimestone

Creek occurred. West Ames Road and

Old Sharon Road, between Route 10

and Latimer and Shunk Roads, were

closed due to flooding.

Schoharie County

Charlotteville Flash Flood

A trained spotter reported that a

small bridge was flooded at

Charlotteville.

Schoharie County

Cobleskill Flash Flood

Law enforcement personnel reported

that State Route 7 was closed due to

flooding from the Cobleskill Creek at

the east end of the village of

Cobleskill.

Schoharie County

Gilboa Flash Flood

A trained spotter reported that

there was a mud slide across Stryker

Road in Gilboa.

Montgomery County

Canajoharie Flash Flood

A trained spotter reported that

evacuations occurred along Route 80,

which was closed due to flooding,

near the village of Fort Plain. A

state of emergency was in effect in

Montgomery County.

Schoharie County

Warnerville Flash Flood

A trained spotter reported that the

Cobleskill Creek flooded several

buildings and roads in Warnerville

including the Post Office.

Schoharie County

Richmondville Flash Flood

A trained spotter reported that a

mud slide occurred in Richmondville.

Schoharie County

Gilboa Flash Flood

A trained spotter reported that

Campbell Road to Gilboa was closed due

to flooding from the Keyserkill Creek.

A State of Emergency was in effect in

Schoharie County.

Herkimer County

Ingham Mills Flash Flood

An emergency manager reported that

water was spilling from the Kyser Lake

Dam on East Canada Creek and that

evacuations were occurring downstream.

The National Grids buildings were

flooded.

Schoharie County

Broome Center Flash Flood

Law enforcement personnel reported

that State Route 145 was flooded from

the Catskill Creek to the vicinity of

Broome Center.

Herkimer County

Dolgeville Flash Flood

Law enforcement personnel reported

that a building was washed into East

Canada Creek in Dolgeville.

Herkimer County

Ilion Flash Flood

Law enforcement personnel reported

that around 200 people were evacuated

from Ilion, Dolgeville, Mohawk, and

Frankfort due to flooding.

Schoharie County

Cobleskill Flash Flood

Law enforcement personnel reported

that Route 10 to the west of

Cobleskill was impassable due to

flooding.

Hamilton County

Indian Lake Flash Flood

A trained spotter reported that

Cedar River and Big Brook were

flooding.

Ulster County

Willow Flash Flood

A trained spotter reported that

may streams in the vicinity of

Willow were flooding.

Hamilton County

Benson Flash Flood

Law enforcement personnel reported

that Route 30 and Stoney Road were

closed due to flooding

Fulton County

Oppenheim Flash Flood

Law enforcement personnel reported

that several roads in the area

surrounding Oppenheim were closed

due to flooding.

Greene County

Catskill Flash Flood

Law enforcement personnel reported

that several roads in Greene County

were closed in, and near the towns

of Catskill, Cairo and Haines Falls

due to flooding.

An upper level ridge over the western

Atlantic Ocean which had been building

westward for a couple of days prior to

June 28 began to slowly retreat on

June 28 as an upper level trough over

the Mississippi Valley began drifting

very slowly eastward. A frontal

boundary which had drifted westward

into western New York on June 27 began

drifting eastward and was over east

central New York at daybreak on June

28. A small low pressure was in the

vicinity of the eastern Southern Tier

of New York State. This was a weak

cyclone of tropical origin. A band of

heavy rainfall occurred just to the

southeast of the front, The heaviest

rainfall was from the eastern Southern

Tier of New York State to the southern

Adirondacks. Three to 5 inches of

rainfall occurred in east central

New York over about a 24-hour period

from daybreak June 27 to June 28. And

from June 26 to 28, nearly 10 inches of

rain occurred in the southern

Adirondacks according to radar

estimates. Additional rainfall

occurred on the morning of June 28 as

the tropical cyclone moved northward

through eastern New York State.

The heavy rainfall produced widespread

flooding across east central New York

State. There was severe major level

flooding on portions of the Mohawk

River and some of its tributaries,

and moderate to near major flooding

on some of the Catskill Mountain

drainages. Record flooding occurred

on the Mohawk River at Little Falls

and on the Canajoharie Creek, A

record flood may have occurred on

the East Canada Creek between

Dolgeville and the Mohawk River. Also,

moderate to near major flooding

occurred at Kast Bridge, Hinckley,

and Schenectady, Flooding, mainly

minor, occurred along the Hudson River

and its tributaries, including Hope

(here moderate to near major flooding

was observed), Troy, Riverbank, and

Ft. Edward. In the Catskills,

flooding approached major levels near

Kingston on the Esopus. Elsewhere in

the Catskills, mainly minor flooding

was noted.

Readers are referred to the E-5

report from the National Weather

Service’s Albany office for details

on the flooding that occurred on

the main stem (gaged) rivers.

There was a considerable amount of

flood damage. However as of mid

summer 2006, when this report was

filed, the damage figure was very

preliminary. Damage was estimated to

be around 50 million dollars. About

8,000 customers of National Grid were

without power. In some cases, power

was intentionally cut to homes and

businesses to reduce the fire threat.

A 117-mile stretch of the New York

State Thruway was closed between

Interchange 25A and Interchange 34A

beginning at 11:45 am June 28, 2006

and lasting until 10:15 am June 29,

2006. Flooding from the Mohawk River

between Fultonville and Canajoharie

led to portions of the Thruway being

under five feet of water. This was

the worst flooding on the Barge Canal

during the navigation season since its

reconstruction in 1905. Forty-five

locks were closed. In some locations,

the flood waters deposited 100-foot

deep debris piles. Thirty-five

vessels were stranded in the canal

system. Freight and passenger rail

services were interrupted between

Albany and Buffalo.

Schenectady County

Niskayuna Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

A former National Weather Service

employee reported that two 10-inch

diameter trees were blown down in

Niskayuna by Lock 7 and Rosendale

Roads.

Dutchess County

Moores Mill Hail (0.88)

Newspaper personnel reported that

nickel-sized hail occurred at Moors

Mill.

Albany County

Altamont Hail (0.75)

A member of the general public

estimated that penny-sized hail

occurred at Altamont.

Schenectady County

Rotterdam Hail (0.88)

A trained spotter reported that

nickle-sized hail occurred at

Rotterdam.

Schenectady County

Scotia to Hail (0.75)

Rotterdam

A trained spotter reported that

penny-sized hail occurred at Scotia.

Schenectady County

Schenectady Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Law enforcement personnel report

that trees were blown down onto cars

and a house on Campbell Avenue in

Schenectady.

Saratoga County

West Milton Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Law enforcement personnel report

that trees were blown down in

West Milton.

Fulton County

Stratford Hail (1.00)

A trained spotter reported that

quarter-sized haft occurred in

Stratford.

Saratoga County

Malta Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

A National Weather Service employee

reported a measured wind gust of 60

miles an hour in a thunderstorm at

Malta. After being nearly stationary

while deepening for several days, an

upper-level trough from the Great

Lakes to the lower Ohio Valley was

accelerating eastward at daybreak on

June 29. An associated weak low

pressure over Lake Erie trailed a

cold front through the Ohio Valley.

During the day, this system moved

rapidly eastward and touched off

thunderstorms in the warm, humid air

mass over eastern New York and

adjacent western New England from

mid afternoon through early evening.

There were many severe thunderstorms

containing large hail and damaging

wind gusts. The bulk of the severe

activity was in, or near the Capital

District.

Hamilton County

Hope Falls Hail (1.00)

Park/Forest Service personnel

reported that quarter-sized hail

occurred in Hope Falls.

NEW YORK, North

Franklin County

4 SW Santa Clara Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This led to the

development of thunderstorms across

northern New York during midday. A

few thunderstorms produced severe

weather, including damaging winds

that downed trees and several large

branches near Santa Clara.

St. Lawrence County

Childwood Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This resulted in

the development of thunderstorms

across northern New York during

midday. A few thunderstorms produced

severe weather, including damaging

winds that downed several large

branches and a few trees near

Childwold.

Franklin County

Saranac Lake Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered

a very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This led to the

development of thunderstorms across

northern New York during midday of

the 19th. A few thunderstorms produced

severe weather, including damaging

winds that knocked down several large

branches and resulted in minor power

outages in Saranac Lake.

Essex County

Wilmington Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered

a very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This resulted in

the development of thunderstorms

across northern New York during

midday on the 19th. A few

thunderstorms produced severe

weather, including damaging winds

that downed trees in Wilmington.

Clinton County

Schuyler Falls Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York. This led to the

development of thunderstorms across

northern New York during midday on

the 19th, that moved into the

Champlain Valley by early afternoon.

A few thunderstorms produced severe

weather, including damaging winds

that downed several large branches

at Schuyler Falls.

Clinton County

Plattsburgh Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York around midday on

the 19th and developed a line of

thunderstorms that intensified as they

moved into the Champlain Valley by

early afternoon. These thunderstorms

produced severe weather, in the form

of wind damage, across Clinton county,

including numerous trees and utility

poles blown over in Plattsburgh.

Essex County

Crown Pt Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Essex County

Moriah Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Essex County

Westport Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Essex County

Willsboro Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A surface trough and mid-level

atmospheric disturbance encountered a

very warm and humid airmass across

northern New York around midday on

the 19th. This developed a line of

thunderstorms that intensified as

they moved into the Champlain Valley

by early afternoon. These

thunderstorms produced severe

weather, in the form of wind damage,

across Essex county, including

numerous trees and powerlines down

in Willsboro, Moriah, Crown Point and

Westport.

Essex County

Ticonderoga Hail (0.75)

A mid-level atmospheric disturbance

and surface cold front moved across a

moderately unstable airmass during

midday of the 20th. This led to

scattered thunderstorms across the

Champlain Valley of New York,

including a severe thunderstorm in

Ticonderoga that produced penny size

(3/4 inch diameter) hail.

Essex County

Countywide Flood

On the morning of the 26th … a deep

upper atmospheric trough was located

across the Mississippi River Valley,

while a quasi-stationary warm front

was across the Champlain Valley. This

combination allowed copious amounts

of moisture to advect northward from

the Gulf of Mexico into the Champlain

Valley in the form of rain on the

26th. Widespread rainfall totals

across the Champlain Valley in New

York were 1 to 3 inches, with a

concentrated area of 3 to 5 inches in

southeast Essex county. Some observed

rainfall totals included Schroon

Lake with 3.83 inches and Mineville

with 3.60 inches. Several roads were

flooded in the Ticonderoga–Schroon

Lake area, including Routes 9N and 22

and some basement flooding was

observed. Roads were flooded in

Minerva, including a washout on

Potterville Rd.

Essex County

Keene Flood

On the early morning of the 28th, a

persistent deep upper atmospheric

trough was located across the

Mississippi River Valley, while

a cold front and weak area of low

pressure was slowly moving east

across New York. More steady

rainfall fell across Essex county

New York, an area that had

witnessed heavy rainfall for the

last several days. The end result

was several bankfull streams and

rivers with flooded fields as well

as some scattered flooding of roads,

including the Hulls Falls Road in

Keene, along the upper reaches of

the East Branch of the AuSable River.

St. Lawrence County

Chippewa Bay Hail (1.00)

A strong mid-level disturbance, with

a cold temperature pool aloft, moved

across the Saint Lawrence Valley of

New York during the early afternoon

of the 30th. The instability generated

was enough to create isolated

thunderstorms across the region,

which produced Quarter size hail

(one inch diameter) at Chippewa Bay.

NEW YORK, West

Cayuga County

Cato Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Oswego County

West Monroe Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Showers and thunderstorms developed

ahead of a cold front during the late

morning and early afternoon hours.

The thunderstorm winds downed trees

in Cato and West Monroe. In Cato, a

roof was torn off a garage by the

wind.

Cattaraugus County

Allegany Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorms accompanied the

passage of a cold front during the

evening hours. In the town of

Allegany in Cattaraugus county the

thunderstorm winds downed power lines.

Allegany County

Bolivar Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Allegany County

Andover Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorms developed in a warm,

moist flow ahead of an approaching

cold front. The winds from one

thunderstorm downed trees and power

lines in Bolivar and Andover as it

crossed Allegany county.

Chautauqua County

Lakewood Hail (1.75)

Monroe County

Penfield Hail (1.50)

Cattaraugus County

South Dayton Hail (0.88)

Monroe County

Webster Thunderstorm Wind (G53)

Allegany County

Belmont Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Ontario County

Clifton Spgs Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Wayne County

Clyde Hail (0.75)

Cayuga County

Cato Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Showers and thunderstorms accompanied

the passage of a cold front during the

afternoon hours. The thunderstorms

produced damaging winds and large

hail. Winds downed trees in Clifton

Springs, Webster, Belmont, and Cato.

A garage door was blown-in in Webster.

Hail up to 1.75 inch fell in Lakewood,

South Dayton, Clyde and Penfield.

Allegany County

Rushford Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Monroe County

Henrietta Hail (1.50)

Thunderstorms developed across the

region as an upper level trough

crossed during the afternoon hours.

One and a half inch hail fell in

Henrietta. In Rushford, the

thunderstorm winds downed power lines.

Allegany County

West Clarksville Lightning

A house was struck by lightning and

set ablaze in the town of West

Clarksville. The house was destroyed

and left unlivable. A family of three

was left homeless.

Erie County

Cheektowaga Hail (1.00)

Erie County

Lancaster Hail (0.75)

Erie County

Cheektowaga Tornado (F1)

Wyoming County

Varysburg Hail (0.75)

Erie County

Colden Hail (0.75)

Erie County

Hamburg Hail (0.88)

Niagara County

Wheatfield Hail (0.88)

Thunderstorms developed during the

afternoon hours as an upper level

trough crossed the region. The storms

produced hail up to one inch in

diameter. Hail reports spanned from

Wheatfield across Cheektowaga,

Lancaster, Hamburg and Colden to

Varysburg. One thunderstorm spawned

a tornado which moved across the Town

of Cheektowaga. The tornado initially

touched down around 2:55 p.m. on

Walden Avenue near Harlem Road and

traveled from the northwest to the

southeast through the town. On Walden

Avenue, a construction trailer was

moved several hundred feet. The worker

in the trailer suffered minor

injuries. As the tornado moved across

the New York State Thruway, it lifted

a tractor trailer and deposited on its

side across the Jersey barrier. The

driver of the truck suffered a broken

leg. The tornado continued on its

southeast trek damaging a 20 by 30

foot section of a wall on a warehouse

and then downed trees as it crossed

through central Cheektowaga. The

tornado touched down several times

along its path. Its final touchdown

was at the Parkside Village Mobile

Home Park around 3:05 p.m. where

three mobile homes sustained

significant damage and eight others

sustained minor damage. The tornado

was ranked an 171 with a path length

of three miles and a width of 75

yards.

Lewis County

Indian River Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Jefferson County

Limerick Hail (1.00)

Jefferson County

Watertown Hail (1.00)

Thunderstorms developed during the

afternoon hours as an upper level

trough crossed the region. The storms

produced hail up to one inch in

diameter in Jefferson county. In

Indian River, Lewis county, the

thunderstorm winds downed trees.

COPYRIGHT 2006 World Meteorological Organization

COPYRIGHT 2006 Gale Group