Storm data and unusual weather phenomena

Storm data and unusual weather phenomena

Storm Data and Unusual Weather Phenomena

March 2005

Time Path Path

Local/ Length Width

Location Date Standard (Miles) (Yards)

MISSOURI, East

Cole County

Jefferson City 07 0134CST

The ASOS at the Jefferson City airport

recorded a 58 mph wind gust.

MISSOURI, Lower

Pemiscot County

Hayti 30 2030CST

2035CST

MISSOURI, Northeast

NONE REPORTED.

MISSOURI, Northwest

Bates County

2 NNW Amsterdam 03 1735CST

Bates County

1 N Amsterdam 03 1740CST

Bates County

4 S Butler 03 1823CST

Cass County

Raymore 03 1835CST

Clay County

Kearney 06 2130CST

MOZ038 Lafayette

10 1619CST

A peak wind gust of 61 mph was measured

at Higginsville by the Cooperative

Observer. Wind gusts from 40 to 55 mph

were common elsewhere across much of

west central Missouri.

Nodaway County

5 E Maryville 30 0900CST

Thunderstorm winds broke off 18 to 24

inch tree limbs.

Nodaway County

2 E Maryville 30 0903CST

One barn had roof blown off. One

building suffered minor damage. Trees

had some damage and a few power lines

were downed.

Worth County

Denver 30 1015CST

Barn suffered some damage from strong

thunderstorm winds.

Mercer County

Princeton 30 1036CST

Linn County

6 N Purdin 30 1045CST

Six to ten inch tree limbs down.

Sullivan County

1 W Browning 30 1045CST

Six to ten inch tree limbs down.

MISSOURI, Southeast

Ripley County

Fairdealing to 30 1930CST

7 SE Doniphan 1932CST

Dime to nickel-size hail was reported at

three places in eastern Ripley County.

Butler County

Poplar Bluff 30 1959CST

Scott County

Scott City 30 2000CST

One-inch hail occurred along Interstate

55.

Cape Girardeau

County

4 SW Cape Girardeau 30 2005CST

The tin roof was ripped off a barn on

Highway 74, about 2 miles west of

Interstate 55. The roof was blown into

some power lines, which were knocked

down. At the nearby Cape Girardeau

airport, the peak wind gust recorded by

the automated observing system was 54

MPH.

Cape Girardeau

County

Randles to 30 2005CST

5 W Cape Girardeau 2020CST

Dime to quarter-size hail fell in

extreme southern Cape Girardeau County.

The report of quarter-size hail was from

Randles.

Stoddard County

Acorn Ridge to 30 2005CST

Dexter 2015CST

Butler County

2 W Fisk 30 2015CST

Scott County

Oran 30 2025CST

Stoddard County

Advance 30 2045CST

Scott County

2.5 N Sikeston to 30 2049CST

Sikeston 2055CST

One-inch hail fell just north of

Sikeston, while dime-size hail fell in

Sikeston.

Mississippi County

Charleston 30 2110CST

A line of thunderstorms developed over

southeast Missouri, near a line from

Poplar Bluff to Cape Girardeau. As the

line moved east to the Mississippi

River, some storms along the line

produced large hail and an isolated

report of damaging winds. The most

severe storm along the line tracked

through northern Scott and southern Cape

Girardeau Counties, producing hail up to

golf ball size and minor wind damage.

MISSOURI, Southwest

Vernon County

Fair Haven 03 1906CST

Vernon County

6 N Walker 03 1909CST

Cedar County

El Dorado Spgs 03 1920CST

St. Clair County

7 S Appleton City 03 2015CST

Cedar County

Stockton 03 2050CST

Polk County

Fair Play 03 2158CST

Cedar County

Stockton 03 2158CST

Polk County

Half Way 03 2200CST

MONTANA, Central

MTZ009>011-013- North Rocky Mountain Front – Eastern

044>049 Glacier – Hill – Chouteau – Toole –

Liberty – Eastern Pondera – Blaine –

Southern Rocky Mountain Front – Eastern

Teton

06 0420MST

1600MST

A deep low pressure system over central

Canada was responsible for a high wind

event along the Rocky Mountain Front and

adjacent plains on the 6th. Reported

wind speeds include: a gust to 73 mph at

East Glacier Park 11 SE; a gust to 54

mph at Harlem 16S and a gust to 46 mph

at Great Falls Airport. Additionally,

sustained winds of 40 mph were reported

for several hours at Oilmont 14E,

Fairfield 7NE, Cut Bank, Valier,

Blackleaf, Turner 6NW, Inverness 20N

and Loma 20N. The strong wind helped

spread a grass fire near Valier. Over

150 acres of grass burned from a fire

caused by exhaust from a vehicle.

MTZ012-050-054 Cascade – Judith Basin – Meagher

14 1800MST

Heavy snow fell across a portion of

North Central Montana during the

afternoon and early evening of the 14th.

Reported snow fall amounts include: 11

inches at Neihart 7NW, 8 inches at

Millegan 14SE and 6 inches at Hobson

20SW. The heavy snow created slick and

hazardous driving surfaces and

contributed to over 40 motor vehicle

accidents.

MTZ009-012>015- North Rocky Mountain Front – Cascade –

044-046>047-051- Chouteau – Southern Lewis And Clark –

054>055 Madison – Toole – Eastern Pondera –

Blaine – Fergus – Meagher – Gallatin

17 0900MST

1930MST

A Canadian cold front swept across a

broad area of North Central Montana on

the 17th bringing heavy snow and gusty

winds. Reported snow fall amounts

include: 14 inches at the Crystal Lake

SNOTEL site; 8 inches at Neihart 7S; 7

inches at Neihart, Gold Butte and

Conrad; 6 inches at Marias Pass 1 WNW,

Shonkin, Pony and Lewistown 25S and 5

inches at Bozeman 7SE and Chester.

MTZ009>014-044- North Rocky Mountain Front – Eastern

047>050 Glacier – Hill – Cascade – Chouteau –

Southern Lewis And Clark – Toole –

Blaine – Southern Rocky Mountain Front

– Eastern Teton – Judith Basin

23 0732MST

1800MST

A vigorous spring storm brought heavy

snow to a wide area of North Central and

Southwest Montana on the 23rd. Reported

snow fall amounts include: 16 inches at

Holter Dam; 15 inches at Eden; 12 inches

at Shonkin 7S, Holter Dam 6S, Rogers

Pass, Heart Butte 6W; 10 inches at

Sunburst 6S, Gold Butte 7N; 8 inches at

Havre 25S, Hobson, Choteau, Stanford,

Millegan 14SE; 7 inches at Great Falls,

Cut Bank 25NW, Hogeland 2W, Babb,

Augusta 25NW, Neihart 7NNW, Great Falls

3SW; 6 inches at Grass Range and 5

inches at Martinsdale 3NNW and West

Yellowstone 9N.

MONTANA, East

MTZ016>017- Central And Se Phillips – Central And

019>020-022>026- Southern Valley – Sheridan – Western

059>062 Roosevelt – Garfield – Mccone – Richland

– Dawson – Prairie – Northern Phillips

– Little Rocky Mountains – Northern

Valley – Eastern Roosevelt

06 0805MST

1650MST

Strong winds affected much of northeast

Montana during the morning and afternoon

hours of the 6th. The strong winds were

associated with a cold front and upper

level disturbance that crossed the area.

Sustained wind speeds of 40 to 45 mph

were common. A few locations had wind

gusts in the 58 to 69 mph range. A few

of the stronger wind gusts included:

King Coulee Raws Site (Valley County):

69 mph

Bluff Creek Raws Site (Valley County):

58 mph

Poplar Raws Site (Roosevelt County):

58 mph

MTZ017-017-022-059 Central And Southern Valley – Garfield

– Northern Phillips

17 0100MST

1600MST

An area of low pressure in Wyoming

brought heavy snow in narrow bands to a

portion of northeast Montana. The

heaviest snow fell in a 10 to 15 mile

band across northern Phillips county,

southwest Valley, and portions of

northern Garfield county. A few of the

heavier snow totals included:

3 miles south of Whitewater (Phillips

County): 6 inches

20 miles south/southwest of Glasgow

(Valley County): 12 inches

30 miles southwest of Glasgow (Valley

County): 6 inches

30 miles northeast of Jordan (Garfield

County): 6-8 inches

MTZ016-059>060 Central And Se Phillips – Northern

Phillips – Little Rocky Mountains

22 2100MST

23 2300MST

An area of low pressure that developed

in Wyoming brought heavy snow to much of

Phillips County late in the evening of

the 22nd through the pre-dawn hours of

the 23rd. Additional light snow

continued to fall through the evening

hours of the 23rd. In addition,

northeast winds of 15 to 25 mph with

high gusts produced areas of blowing and

drifting snow. A few of the more

impressive snowfall totals included:

Zortman: 9 inches

35 miles south of Malta: 7 inches, with

drifts of 3 to 4 feet

Whitewater: 6 inches

Malta: 5 inches

MONTANA, South

MTZ040-056-066>068 Northern Park County – Red Lodge

Foothills – Beartooth Foothills –

Absarokee / Beartooth Mountains Crazy

Mountains

12 0600MST

1800MST

8 inches 4W Alpine Cole Creek Snotel; 8

inches 2S Red Lodge; 7 inches 13ENE

Wilsall South Fork of the Shields Snotel

in the Crazy Mountains; 7 inches 6S

Roscoe; 6 inches 5NW Alpine; 6 inches in

Mcleod; 6 inches in Clyde Park; 10

inches 5W Red Lodge

MTZ029-031-063 Musselshell – Northern Rosebud – Judith

Gap

17 1500MST

2300MST

8 inches in Judith Gap; 11 inches LOSE

Roundup; 7 inches IOS Roundup; 6 inches

15S Colstrip.

MTZ029-031>032- Musselshell – Northern Rosebud – Custer

034>038-040-042- – Northern Stillwater – Yellowstone –

056>058-067 Powder River – Carter – Southern Big

Horn – Northern Park County – Golden

Valley – Red Lodge Foothills – Northern

Big Horn Southern Rosebud – Absarokee /

Beartooth Mountains

24 1000MST

150OMST

An early Spring storm moved across South

Central Montana bringing heavy, wet snow

to portions of the Billings County

Warning Area. The following are some

totals from this storm:

8 inches 18NW Ryegate; 6 inches in

Forsyth, Huntley, Fort Smith, Roundup,

Broadview, Billings, and Birney; 9

inches in Crow Agency; 10 inches in

Rapelje; 8 inches 2E Ryegate, 8 inches

in Clyde Park, 8 inches 12E Ashland, 6

inches 10S Volborg, 9 inches 2S Red

Lodge, 6 inches 5SE Volborg, 6 inches

16W Alzada, 8 inches 60S Miles City, 8

inches at both Cole Creek and Burnt

Mountain Snotels

MONTANA, West

MTZ006>007-043 Bitterroot / Sapphire Mountains – Butte

/ Pintlar Region – Blackfoot Region

12 1044MST

1600MST

Vigorous late winter storm blanketed the

valleys of West Central Montana with 5

to 12 inches of new snow, with as much

as much as 14 inches of new snow

reported at Georgetown Lake.

MTZ002-004-006- West Glacier Region – Lower Clark Fork

006-043 Region – Bitterroot / Sapphire Mountains

– Blackfoot Region

17 0541MST

210OMST

Late winter storm brought 8 to 13 inches

of new snow over the mountains of

Northwest Montana with 4 to 8 inches in

the valleys. Widespread west winds at 15

to 25 mph also caused drifting of snow.

Schools were closed in the northern

Flathead valley due to heavy snowfall.

Trees also snapped under the load from

heavy snow. Some trees fell onto power

lines causing outages across the

northern Flathead valley as well.

Several vehicle rollovers were also

reported.

NEBRASKA, Central

NEZ004>010- Sheridan – Eastern Cherry – Keya Paha –

022>029-035>038- Boyd – Brown – Rock Holt – Garden –

056>059-069>071-094 Grant Hooker – Thomas Blaine – Loup –

Garfield – Wheeler – Arthur – Mcpherson

– Logan – Custer – Deuel – Keith –

Perkins – Lincoln Chase – Hayes –

Frontier – Western Cherry

10 0930MST

2000MST

A strong low pressure system moved

through Nebraska overnight with high

winds affecting the area behind the

passing cold front. Northwesterly winds

of 35-45 mph with gusts to 60 mph caused

low visibility due to blowing dust in

isolated areas. The low visibility

caused a multi-vehicle pile-up on

Interstate 80 about 6 miles west of

North Platte. The accident occurred at

2:05 pm and involved 5 semis and 3 cars.

Three semis and 2 cars were engulfed in

flames. The accident claimed 3 lives

(indirect fatalities) and injured 4

(indirect). West bound lanes on

Interstate 80 were closed for 4 hours

and cast bound lanes on Interstate 80

were closed for 10 hours.

NEZ005>006- Eastern Cherry – Keya Paha – Brown –

008>009-023>026- Rock – Grant – Hooker – Thomas – Blaine

035>037-094 – Arthur – Mcpherson – Logan – Western

Cherry

21 15000ST

22 15000ST

A strong low pressure system moved out

of Eastern Colorado and into the Central

Plains dumping significant snow. Keya

Paha County received 6-8 inches of snow,

Blaine County received 9-12 inches, and

Eastern Cherry County received 12-16

inches. Breezy winds also created areas

of blowing and drifting snow across

roadways. A semi-trailer and truck

rolled over in the Long Pine Hills due

to the slick road conditions. No one was

injuried in the accident. Other cars

lost control on snow covered roads but

there were no injuries.

Logan County

9 N Stapleton 29 1756CST

Custer County

2 NW Arnold 29 1848CST

Lincoln County

North Platte 29 1905CST

Custer County

13 SW Anselmo 29 1910CST

1925CST

Hail covered the ground.

Lincoln County

6 NNE North Platte 29 1920CST

Custer County

Anselmo 29 1945CST

Hail was 2 inches deep.

Blaine County

7 SSE Brewster 29 2010CST

Hail covered the ground.

Loup County

15 W Taylor 29 2025CST

Loup County

Almeria 29 2030CST

Loup County

10 NW Almeria 29 2035CST

Frontier County

13 SE Stockville 29 2042CST

Frontier County

6 S Eustis 29 2055CST

Holt County

18 SW Amelia 29 2120CST

Rock County

14 ESE Rose 29 2120CST

Holt County

17 WSW Chambers 29 2140CST

Holt County

5 SW Amelia 29 2150CST

NEBRASKA, East

Gage County

1 E Adams 06 1900CST

Johnson County

2 W Sterling 06 1905CST

NEZ011>012- Knox – Cedar – Thurston – Antelope –

015>018-030>034- Pierce – Wayne – Boone – Madison –

042>045-050>053 Stanton – Cuming – Burt – Platte –

Colfax – Dodge – Washington – Butler –

Saunders – Douglas – Sarpy

10 1000CST

17000ST

Intense low pressure over the Great

Lakes region combined with high pressure

building east out of the Rockies and

provided a prolonged high wind event

over northeast and cast central Nebraska

and portions of western Iowa. Sustained

winds of 30 to 40 mph with gusts of 55

to a little over 60 mph were common

throughout the area. The strong winds

caused sporadic tree and roof damage,

and there were several reports across

the area of trees uprooted and a few

semi trucks were overturned. One person

was injured in Decatur Nebraska

(northern Burt county) when a roof of a

building under construction blew on top

of his house causing substantial damage.

Some of the higher gusts measured by

AWOS or ASOS sites included … 62 mph

in Fremont at 110 pm, 60 mph at Norfolk

at 247 pm, 59 mph in Albion at 1010 am,

59 mph at Columbus at 115 pm, 59 mph in

Tekamah at 119 pm, and 55 mph in Omaha

at 224 pm.

NEBRASKA, Extreme Northeast

NEZ013>014 Dixon – Dakota

10 1000CST

1730CST

Sustained winds of 40 to 45 mph with

gusts around 60 mph persisted from late

morning until late afternoon. The winds

caused tree damage with a few branches

and smaller tree debris broken off.

There was minor damage to buildings,

mostly to shingles and gutters.

NEBRASKA, Extreme Southwest

NONE REPORTED.

NEBRASKA, South Central

NOT RECEIVED.

NEBRASKA, West

Scotts Bluff County

3 NE Scottsbluff 30 1506MST 0.1 50

1509MST

Very weak tornado over open country.

NEVADA, North

NVZ034 Ruby Mountains/E Humboldt Range

23 0300PST

1300PST

A winter storm brought 19 inches of snow

to the Dorsey Basin Snotel site in the

East Humboldt range and 15 inches to

Lamoille Canyon #3 Snotel.

NEVADA, South

NONE REPORTED.

NEVADA, West

NVZ003 Greater Reno/Carson City/Minden Area

19 1000PST

20 2100PST

A winter storm moved through northeast

California and western Nevada on the

19th and 20th. Two to three feet of snow

fell in the higher elevations of the

Sierra, with 6 to 8 inches reported in

areas to the lee of the Sierra.

Storm total snowfall amounts:

Virginia City (6340 ft.) 8 inches

Carson City (5400 ft.) 6 inches

NVZ002 Greater Lake Tahoe Area

19 1000PST

20 210OPST

A winter storm moved through northeast

California and western Nevada on the

19th and 20th. Two to three feet of snow

fell in the higher elevations of the

Sierra, with 6 to 8 inches reported in

areas to the lee of the Sierra.

Storm total snowfall amounts:

Mt. Rose Ski Resort (summit) 22 inches

(mid-mountain) 10 inches

5 ENE Incline Village

(7300 ft.) 20 inches

1 NE Incline Village

(6500 ft.) 15 inches

Spooner Summit 12 inches

NVZ001 Mineral/Southern Lyon

19 1445PST

Wind gust of 65 knots (75 mph) recorded

at the Walker Lake RAWS sensor.

NVZ002 Greater Lake Tahoe Area

19 180OPST

Wind gust of 55 knots (63 mph) recorded

at the Galena Creek RAWS sensor.

NVZ003 Greater Reno/Carson City/Minden Area

19 190OPST

Wind gust of 50 knots (58 mph) recorded

at DRI Sage building in Stead.

NVZ002 Greater Lake Tahoe Area

21 210OPST

22 190OPST

The second winter storm in a week moved

through the Sierra Nevada and western

Nevada region. This storm, however, was

not as strong as the earlier one. From

late on the 21st through the 22nd up to

two feet of snow fell in the Sierra,

with rain falling western Nevada.

Storm total snowfall amounts:

Mt. Rose Ski Resort

(mid-mountain) 22 inches

NEW HAMPSHIRE, North and Central

NHZ001>010- Northern Coos – Southern Coos – Northern

013>014 Grafton – Northern Carroll – Southern

Grafton – Southern Carroll – Sullivan –

Merrimack – Belknap – Strafford –

Interior Rockingham – Coastal Rockingham

01 0100EST

02 0500EST

Low pressure developed off the southern

New England coast during the evening of

Monday, February 28, and intensified as

moved northeast into the Gulf of Maine

on Tuesday, March 1. Snow moved into New

Hampshire during the early morning hours

and dropped between 5 and 14 inches

across the entire state before ending

during the early morning hours of

March 2.

NHZ001>010- Northern Coos – Southern Coos – Northern

013>014 Grafton – Northern Carroll – Southern

Carroll – Sullivan – Merrimack – Belknap

– Strafford – Interior Rockingham –

Coastal Rockingham

08 0300EST

09 0800EST

Low pressure moved across southern New

England during the night of Monday,

March 7, and redeveloped off the New

England coast on Tuesday, March 8. Snow

spread into New Hampshire during the

early morning hours of Tuesday and

accumulated 5 to 12 inches before ending

during the morning on March 9.

NHZ001>002- Northern Coos – Southern Coos – Northern

004>010-013>014 Carroll – Southern Grafton – Southern

Carroll – Sullivan – Merrimack – Belknap

– Strafford – Interior Rockingham –

Coastal Rockingham

11 1400EST

13 0300EST

Low pressure moving out of the midwest

on Friday, March 11, redeveloped off the

New England coast Friday evening and

slowly moved through the Gulf of Maine

on Saturday, March 12. Snow accumulated

4 to 15 inches across most of the state

before ending during the early morning

hours of March 13.

NEW HAMPSHIRE, Southern

NHZ011>012 Cheshire – Hillsborough

01 0000EST

2100EST

Heavy snow and gusty winds affected

southwest New Hampshire and all of

southern New England, as low pressure

reformed off the mid Atlantic coast and

tracked southeast of the region.

Snowfall totals of 4 to 8 inches were

widely observed.

Some specific snowfall totals, as

reported by trained spotters, included 9

inches in Marlow, East Alstead, and

Keene; 8 inches in Peterborough; 7

inches in Rindge, Hinsdale, and

Greenfield; and 6 inches in Francestown,

Manchester, Hudson, and Nashua.

NHZ011>012 Cheshire – Hillsborough

08 1400EST

09 0300EST

Low pressure strengthened rapidly off

the Delaware coast and tracked southeast

of New England, bringing heavy snow to

southwest New Hampshire. Snowfall totals

of 4 to 8 inches were widely observed.

The snow and gusty winds made travel

difficult. Several roads around

Manchester were closed due to icy

conditions, and many spinouts were

reported throughout the region. Many

flights were delayed or canceled at

Manchester Airport.

Some specific snowfall totals, as

reported by trained spotters, included 9

inches in Manchester, 8 inches in Keene,

7 inches in Winchester and Hinsdale, and

6 inches in Stoddard, Bedford, Milford,

and Hillsborough.

NHZ011>012 Cheshire – Hillsborough

12 0700EST

2100EST

Low pressure south of Long Island

strengthened rapidly as it headed to the

Canadian Maritimes, and brought heavy

snow to southwest New Hampshire and much

of interior southern New England.

Snowfall totals of 6 to 12 inches were

widely observed in Cheshire and

Hillsborough Counties.

State police reported numerous vehicles

off roads around the region, especially

on Interstate 93. A number of flights at

Manchester Airport were delayed or

canceled as a result of the storm.

Some specific snowfall totals, as

reported by trained spotters, included

14 inches in Francestown; 13 inches in

Alstead; 12 inches in Dublin, Marlow,

Stoddard, Keene, Peterborough, and

Wilton; 10 inches in Swanzey and South

Weare; 8 inches in Hinsdale and Nashua;

and 6 inches in Hudson and Manchester.

NEW JERSEY, Northeast

NJZ003-005>006-011 Bergen – Essex – Hudson – Union

01 0000EST

0630EST

A weak high pressure ridge extended

southwest across the region from New

England as a low pressure system

intensified and moved northeast. This

strong low passed south of Long Island

Monday night and east of the New England

coast during Tuesday.

Light snow developed northeast across

the region between 1 and 3 pm Monday

afternoon. As the low rapidly

intensified and moved closer to the

region, narrow bands of heavy snow swept

northeast across the region. The last

band of heavy snow swept northeast

across the region between 5 am and 6:30

am Tuesday morning, March 1 st. Storm

Total Snowfall amounts ranged from 5

to 10 inches.

Here are selected snowfall totals for:

Bergen County – from 5.4 inches at River

Vale to 7.5 inches at Lodi.

Union County – from 6.3 inches at

Garwood to 7.6 inches at Elizabeth.

Essex County – from 6.0 inches at

Bloomfield to 9.5 inches at Newark

Airport.

Hudson County – from 5 .3 inches at

Bayonne to 8.0 inches at Harrison.

NJZ003>006-011 Bergen – Eastern Passaic – Essex –

Hudson – Union

08 1400EST

1500EST

A strong arctic cold front intensified

as it swept southeast across the region.

This caused rain to change to snow,

temperatures to fall from the 40s into

the 20s, and northwest winds that gusted

between 40 and 55 mph. Near blizzard

conditions occurred for a short time.

Storm total snowfalls ranged from around

2 to 4 inches.

Wet and mild antecedent conditions were

followed by more than a 20 degree drop

in temperature in 3 hours with strong

gusty winds. This resulted in a “flash”

freeze across roads that resulted in

hundreds of vehicle accidents.

NEW JERSEY, South and Northwest

NJZ001-007>010- Sussex – Warren – Morris – Hunterdon –

012>020-027 Somerset – Middlesex Western Monmouth

Eastern Monmouth Mercer – Salem –

Gloucester – Camden – Northwestern

Burlington Western Ocean Southeastern

Burlington

01 0000EST

0900EST

NJZ021>022-026 Cumberland – Western Atlantic – Eastern

Ocean

01 0000EST

0700EST

Heavy snow fell across northern and

southwestern New Jersey from the morning

of February 28th into the morning of the

1st. Across coastal Ocean County,

interior Atlantic County and Cumberland

County precipitation fell as snow, but

mixed with rain at times during the

daytime on February 28th. Temperatures

in these areas remained above freezing

until the evening of February 28th and

slowed the accumulations. Precipitation

fell as mainly rain in Cape May County

and coastal Atlantic County until the

rain changed to snow late in the evening

of February 28th. Snow began during the

morning of February 28th in the southern

half of the state and from around Noon

EST into the afternoon in the northern

half of the state. Heavier bands of

accumulating snow moved over the

southwestern and northern parts of the

state during the afternoon and evening

of February 28th. The snow ended across

the southern half of the state before

the sun rose on the 1st and ended during

the morning in the northern half of the

state. Accumulations averaged 4 to 8

inches, with some higher amounts in

Sussex and Warren Counties and lower

amounts in the southeastern part of the

state.

Many schools dismissed early on February

28th. Rutgers University cancelled all

its classes after 430 p.m. EST on

February 28th. Many after school

activities and classes as well as

municipal and school board meetings were

cancelled. Many minor accidents occurred.

In Burlington County, a 17-year-old boy,

a 17-year-old girl and their 41-year-old

bus driver were injured when two school

buses collided in Medford Township.

Specific accumulations included 9.6

inches in Barry Lakes (Sussex County),

9.1 inches in Belvidere (Warren County),

9.0 inches in Califon (Hunterdon County),

8.9 inches in Sparta (Sussex County),

8.6 inches in Stewartsville (Warren

County), 8.0 inches in Southampton

(Burlington County), Milton (morris

County) and Wrightstown (Burlington

County), 7.9 inches in West Windsor

(Mercer County), 7.8 inches in Marcella

(Morris County), 7.6 inches in Wertsville

(Hunterdon County), 7.5 inches in Butler

(Morris County) and Hackettstown (Warren

County), 7.2 inches in Pottersville

(Somerset County), 7.0 inches in

Lindenwold (Camden County) and Clarksboro

(Gloucester County), 6.8 inches in

Medford (Burlington County) and Metuchen

(Middlesex County), 6.7 inches in New

Brunswick (Middlesex County), Somerville

(Somerset County) and Cream Ridge

(Monmouth County), 6.3 inches in West

Windsor (Mercer County), 6.0 inches in

Pennsauken (Camden County), Whippany

(Morris County) and Flemington (Hunterdon

County), 5.8 inches in Manchester (Ocean

County), 5.5 inches in Verga (Gloucester

County) and Monroeville (Salem County),

5.0 inches in New Egypt (Ocean County),

4.4 inches in Hammonton (Atlantic

County), 3.8 inches in Seabrook

(Cumberland County), 1.3 inches at the

Atlantic City International Airport and

1.0 inch in Margate (Atlantic County)

and Brant Beach (Ocean County).

The wintry weather was caused by a true

northeaster. A low pressure system

developed in the Gulf of Mexico on

Sunday February 27th. It moved northeast

and already was a 995 millibar low

pressure system when it was near

Jacksonville, Florida at 7 p.m. EST on

February 27th. It moved northeast and

deepened to a 992 millibar low near

Charleston, South Carolina at 1 a.m. EST

on February 28th, a 990 millibar low

near Wilmington, North Carolina at 7

a.m. EST on February 28th, a 984

millibar low just east of Elizabeth City,

North Carolina at 1 p.m. EST on February

28th, a 980 millibar low about 150 miles

east of Fenwick Island, Delaware at 7

p.m. EST on February 28th and still a

980 millibar low about 250 miles east

of Long Beach Island, New Jersey at 1

a.m. EST on the 1st. The combination of

the low pressure system’s storm track

being fairly offshore, the lack of a

surface high pressure system to its

north and marginal surface temperatures

for snow kept accumulations from being

heavier.

NJZ014-024>026 Eastern Monmouth – Eastern Cape May –

Eastern Atlantic – Eastern Ocean

01 0000EST

0200EST

NJZ014-024>026 Eastern Monmouth – Eastern Cape May –

Eastern Atlantic – Eastern Ocean

01 0000EST

1500EST

Moderate beach erosion and minor tidal

flooding occurred with the northeaster

along the New Jersey Coast. The most

intense onshore flow occurred from mid

morning on February 28th into the early

morning of the 1st. Minor tidal flooding

occurred with the overnight high tide.

The intense and offshore storm track the

low pressure system took gave the New

Jersey coast about a 12 hour period of

intense northeast winds (25 to 35 mph)

and this led to the minor tidal flooding

and beach erosion. In Monmouth County, 2

to 3 foot vertical cuts were common from

Asbury Park south. In Ocean County, in

Harvey Cedars, a 5 foot vertical by 10

foot horizontal cut occurred to 800 feet

of dune from Bergen to Cumberland

Avenues. Two to four foot vertical cuts

were common from Ship Bottom additional

south. In Beach Haven, there was a

complete loss of berm protection and an

8 foot loss of sand at the Merivale

Avenue street end. One house was now

exposed to the ocean. In Atlantic

County, two to four foot vertical cuts

occurred, except in Ventnor where the

vertical cut reached five feet at the

south end of the city. Walkways and

fences were also damaged. Some walkways

now ended at the water’s edge. The

Ventnor Beach was just rebuilt in 2004.

In Cape May County, Ocean City was hit

the hardest with 3 to 4 foot vertical

cuts from the fishing to the amusement

pier and an 8 to 10 foot cut from 8th

Street to Seaspray Avenue with dune

fencing down in some areas. Elsewhere in

the county, vertical cuts averaged 1 to

3 feet. Sea Isle City reported loss of

dune fencing and rocks were exposed.

The overnight (February 28th) high tide

reached 6.78 feet above mean lower low

water at Sandy Hook (Monmouth County)

and 6.80 feet above mean lower low water

at Cape May (Cape May County). Minor

tidal flooding begins at 6.7 feet above

mean lower low water.

The minor tidal flooding and beach

erosion was caused by a northeaster. The

low pressure system developed in the

Gulf of Mexico on Sunday February 27th.

It moved northeast and was near

Jacksonville, Florida at 7 p.m. EST on

February 27th. It moved northeast and

deepened and was near Charleston, South

Carolina at 1 a.m. EST on February 28th,

just cast of Wilmington, North Carolina

at 7 a.m. EST on February 28th, just

east of Elizabeth City, North Carolina

at 1 p.m. EST on February 28th, and

deepened to a 980 millibar low about 150

miles east of Fenwick Island, Delaware

at 7 p.m. EST on February 28th. The low

remained about the same strength (980

millibar) as it passed about 250 miles

east of Long Beach Island, New Jersey

at 1 a.m. EST on the 1st. The lack of a

surface high pressure system to the

north of this system prevented the

pressure gradient and hence the winds,

heavy surf and tidal flooding from being

worse.

NJZ001-007>010- Sussex – Warren – Morris – Hunterdon –

120>027 Somerset – Middlesex – Western Monmouth

Eastern Monmouth Mercer – Salem –

Gloucester – Camden – Northwestern

Burlington – Western Ocean Cumberland

Western Atlantic – Western Cape May –

Eastern Cape May – Eastern Atlantic –

Eastern Ocean Southeastern Burlington

08 0900EST

1900EST

The combination of a strong cold frontal

passage during the morning of the 8th

and a rapidly intensifying low pressure

system off the Middle Atlantic and New

England States brought snow and plunging

temperatures during the day on the 8th.

Actual accumulations averaged an inch or

two in the southern part of New Jersey

and 2 to 4 inches in the northern part

of the state. The snow combined with the

sharp drop in temperatures to bring

treacherous driving conditions on

untreated roadways during the afternoon

and evening and countless accidents

occurred, especially in the northern

half of the state.

Precipitation started as rain before

sunrise on the 8th. The cold front moved

through New Jersey between 7 a.m. and 10

a.m. EST (from northwest to southeast)

as a low pressure system on the front

was intensifying. Temperatures dropped

quickly behind this front both at the

surface and aloft. The rain changed to

snow between 8 a.m. (northwest areas

first) and Noon EST (southeast areas

last). About an hour after the

precipitation changed to snow,

temperatures dropped below freezing

as the snow continued to fall. The snow

ended during the mid and late afternoon

from west to east across the state. But,

its lingering effects lasted well into

the morning rush on the 9th as the wind

blew the snow back on the road.

Townships averaged about a dozen weather

related accidents, especially in the

northern half of the state. In Hunterdon

County, Interstate 78 was closed for

five miles because of more than twenty

accidents. About 75 accidents were

reported across northern New Jersey

on interstates 287, 78 and 80 and New

Jersey State Route 24. In Somerset

County, an accident on westbound

Interstate 78 that involved a tractor-

trailer and vehicle caused serious

injuries. In Monmouth County, a roadway

was closed in Holmdel Township after a

vehicle knocked down a pole. Problems in

Monmouth County persisted through the

next morning as multiple accidents in

the southbound lanes of New Jersey State

Route 18 in Colts Neck closed the road

for several hours. In Long Branch, nine

accidents occurred within 45 minutes.

Many after school activities and classes

were cancelled on the 8th. The regional

spelling bee in Monmouth County was

postponed.

Specific snow accumulations included 4.0

inches in Oakhurst (Monmouth County) and

Brick Township (Ocean County), 3.5 inches

in Manalapan (Monmouth County), 3.0

inches in Wantage (Sussex County), 2.8

inches in Marcella (Moms County) and

Stewartsville (Warren County), 2.5

inches in Florence (Burlington County)

and Skillman (Somerset County), 2.3

inches in Ewing (Mercer County), 2.0

inches in Metuchen (Middlesex County),

1.9 inches in Somerdale (Camden County),

1.5 inches in Tabernacle (Burlington

County) and East Amwell Township

(Hunterdon County), 1.4 inches in

Chatham (Morris County), 1.0 inch in

Seabrook (Cumberland County) and 0.3

inches at the Atlantic City

International Airport.

The snow was caused by the combination

of the cold frontal passage and the

rapidly intensifying low pressure system

that developed on the front during the

morning of the 8th. The low moved

northeast and was an already intense 986

mb near Danville, Virginia at 7 a.m. EST

on the 8th. From there it continued to

move northeast and deepened to a 978 mb

low just east of Long Beach Island, New

Jersey at 1 p.m. EST on the 8th, to a

970 mb low over Nantucket Island,

Massachusetts at 7 p.m. EST on the 8th

to a 964 mb low just southwest of

Yarmouth, Nova Scotia at 1 a.m. EST on

the 9th.

NJZ001-007>010-012- Sussex – Warren – Morris – Hunterdon –

014>023-025>027 Somerset – Middlesex Eastern Monmouth

Mercer Salem Gloucester – Camden –

Northwestern Burlington – Western Ocean

– Cumberland Western Atlantic Western

Cape May – Eastern Atlantic – Eastern

Ocean – Southeastern Burlington

08 1100EST

2359EST

NJZ013-024 Western Monmouth – Eastern Cape May

08 1200EST

2359EST

In addition to the snow, strong gusty

northwest winds developed during the

afternoon and evening of the 8th as a

low pressure system intensified off the

Middle Atlantic and New England States.

Wind gusts reached around 70 mph in Cape

May County. The strong winds caused

isolated power outages throughout New

Jersey and hampered snow removal crews

as it blew snow back onto already

cleared or salted roads. Peak wind gusts

included 72 mph in Strathmere (Cape May

County), 70 mph in Cape May (Cape May

County), 64 mph in Keansburg (Monmouth

County), 63 mph at High Point (the

highest point in New Jersey in Sussex

County), 57 mph in Sandy Hook (Monmouth

County) and Bamegat Light (Ocean County),

50 mph in Atlantic City (Atlantic

County), 49 mph in Wrightstown

(Burlington County), 45 mph in Millville

(Cumberland County) and 44 mph in

Trenton (Mercer County).

The strong winds were caused by a

rapidly intensifying low pressure system

that developed on the cold front during

the morning of the 8th. The low moved

northeast and was an already intense 986

mb near Danville, Virginia at 7 a.m. EST

on the 8th. From there it continued to

move northeast and deepened to a 978 mb

low just east of Long Beach Island, New

Jersey at 1 p.m. EST on the 8th, to a

970 mb low over Nantucket Island,

Massachusetts at 7 p.m. EST on the 8th

to a 964 mb low just southwest of

Yarmouth, Nova Scotia at 1 a.m. EST on

the 9th.

NJZ001-007>008 Sussex – Warren – Morris

11 2100EST

12 0500EST

Snow fell across northwest New Jersey

during the evening and overnight on the

11th and accumulated between two and

five inches in most areas with the

highest accumulations over the higher

terrain. Snow began in Sussex County

during the evening of the 11th and

spread into Morris and Warren Counties

by Midnight EST. The snow ended before

sunrise on the 12th. Untreated and less

traveled roads were treacherous. Specific

accumulations included 4.9 inches in

Marcella (Morris County), 2.5 inches in

Butler and Randolph (Morris County) and

2.0 inches in Wantage (Sussex County).

The snow was caused by an “Alberta type”

low pressure system that moved from

northern Minnesota on the morning of the

10th east into Lake Erie around sunrise

on the 11th. The low moved through

Northwest New Jersey during the evening

on the 11th and intensified as it moved

east reaching just south of Nantucket,

Massachusetts around sunrise on the

12th. Heavier snow fell farther to the

northeast.

NJZ012 Middlesex

15 1200EST

1800EST

A brushfire with 30 to 40-foot-high

flames burned across 75 to 100 acres in

Raritan Center within Edison Township.

The fire could be seen from Rahway

(Union County) to East Brunswick (within

Middlesex County). The fire burned for

about six hours until firefighters

finished dousing the blaze. One dozen

municipalities, twenty-three fire

departments and one hundred and three

firefighters responded to the scene. The

brushfire began in an area with 10 to

12-foot-high reeds that were very dry.

Gusty northwest winds led to a longer

battle with the fire. The peak wind gust

at Newark International Airport for the

day was 30 mph and the average wind speed

of 16.1 mph was the fifth windiest day

of March 2005.

NJZ001 Sussex

20 0300EST

1100EST

A high pressure ridge that extended from

James Bay, Canada to the Middle Atlantic

coastal waters left enough cold air in

place near the surface to cause a wintry

mix of precipitation to occur during the

first half of the day on the 20th.

Precipitation moved in aloft preceding a

warm front and fell as mainly freezing

rain over the higher terrain of Sussex

County between 3 a.m. and 11 a.m. EST.

Ice accretions were less than one-tenth

of an inch. Some snow and sleet mixed in

with any accumulations less than one-

quarter of an inch. By 11 a.m. EST

enough warm air moved in at the surface

to change the precipitation over to

plain rain in all areas. Untreated

roadways were hazardous before the

change to plain rain.

NJZ001 Sussex

23 0900EST

24 0500EST

NJZ007>010 Warren – Morris – Hunterdon – Somerset

23 1200EST

24 0400EST

A low pressure system exiting the United

States from the Delmarva Peninsula

brought rain and then snow to Warren and

Moms Counties and heavy snow to Sussex

County. Accumulations averaged 2 to 5

inches in most of Warren and Morris

Counties and 5 to 8 inches across the

higher terrain of Warren and Morris

Counties and in Sussex County. Farther

south, about an inch or two of snow fell

in Somerset and Hunterdon Counties.

Following the pattern of other winter

storms this season, the accumulating

snow hit the evening commute the hardest

which was described as a nightmare.

Precipitation in northwest New Jersey

(except in Sussex County) started as rain

during the morning of the 23rd and

changed to snow during the afternoon.

The change to snow worked its way from

the higher terrain downward. Across

Sussex County, precipitation fell mainly

as snow. In all areas the snow continued

through the night and ended just before

sunrise on the 24th.

Numerous and mostly minor accidents

occurred mainly during the evening

commute. One fatal accident occurred in

White Township (Warren County) when a

61-year-old woman died. She lost control

of her vehicle on County Route 519 and

slid sideways into an oncoming van. The

vehicle then struck a guardrail. The

driver and passenger of the van suffered

minor injuries. The evening commute was

progressively worse on the Pennsylvania

side of the Delaware River.

Accumulations included 7.7 inches in

Wantage (Sussex County), 6.8 inches in

Barry Lakes (Sussex County), 6.7 inches

in Marcella (Morris County), 5.5 inches

in Blairstown (Warren County), 5.0

inches in Rockaway (Morris County), 3.0

inches in Chatham (Morris County), 2.5

inches in Hackettstown (Warren County)

and Morristown (Moms County), 2.0 inches

in Pottersville (Somerset County), 1.9

inches in Belvidere (Warren County) and

1.0 inch in Flemington (Hunterdon

County).

The late winter storm was caused by a

low pressure system that formed in the

Southern Plains States on the 21st and

moved east and reached Memphis, Tennessee

early in the evening on the 22nd, in

central Kentucky around sunrise on the

23rd, just west of Norfolk at 1 p.m. EST

on the 23rd, just east of Wallops Island,

Virginia at 7 p.m. EST on the 23rd and

about 200 miles cast of Cape May, New

Jersey at 1 a.m. EST on the 24th.

NJZ001 Sussex

27 2300EST

28 0800EST

Pockets of freezing rain occurred across

Sussex County during the overnight of

March 27th. As rain moved into the

region on the evening of the 27th, some

surface temperatures cooled to or below

the freezing mark. Light freezing rain

fell through the night until temperatures

rose above freezing shortly after sunrise

on the 28th. Ice accretions were up to

two-tenths of an inch. Untreated roadways

and walkways were slippery.

The nearest surface high pressure system

at the onset of the rain was south of

Novas Scotia and could not lock in the

cold air near the surface. In addition,

the surface pressure difference (and thus

the wind) between the low pressure system

arriving from the Gulf Coast States and

the departing high pressure system

produced enough of a southeast wind to

scour away the cold air near the surface.

Burlington County

Countywide 28 1200EST

2000EST

Salem County

Countywide 28 1200EST

1800EST

Gloucester County

Countywide 28 1300EST

1900EST

Hunterdon County

Countywide 28 1300EST

2100EST

Sussex County

Countywide 28 1300EST

2300EST

Warren County

Countywide 28 1300EST

2200EST

Middlesex County

Countywide 28 1400EST

2200EST

Monmouth County

Countywide 28 1400EST

2200EST

Heavy rain caused poor drainage flooding

and left the region vulnerable to any

additional heavy rain as the ground was

saturated. Rain began falling during the

late evening on the 27th, but fell at its

heaviest during the afternoon and evening

of the 28th as scattered thunderstorms

occurred. The rain ended by late that

evening. The evening commute was more

difficult as usual as there was much

ponding of water in poor drainage

locations. Storm totals averaged around

two inches.

On the 30th, the combination of runoff

and melting snow led to isolated low-

lying area flooding along the Delaware

River in Warren County. In Harmony

Township, river flooding reached homes

on Riversedge Lane and River Road. The

Delaware River at Ricgelsville crested

at 21.3 feet that morning. Flood stage

at that location is 22 feet.

Storm totals included 2.65 in Freehold

(Monmouth County), 2.58 inches in Sussex

(Sussex County), 2.14 inches in Andover

(Sussex County), 2.10 inches in Newton

(Sussex County), 2.06 inches in Califon

(Hunterdon County), 2.04 inches in

Belvidere (Warren County), 2.02 inches

in Riegclsville (Warren County), 1.95

inches in New Lisbon (Burlington County),

1.88 inches in Bloomsbury (Hunterdon

County), 1.75 inches in West Deptford

(Gloucester County), 1.74 inches in

Mount Laurel (Burlington County), 1.72

inches in Columbia (Warren County), 1.65

inches in Willingboro (Burlington County)

and 1.60 inches in Mount Holly

(Burlington County).

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both

the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic

Ocean. The low pressure system moved

from western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on

the 27th northeast to eastern Tennessee

at 7 p.m. EST on the 27th and eastern

Kentucky at 7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A

secondary low pressure system formed

over North Carolina during the morning

of the 28th. It would become the main

low pressure system as it moved northeast

to near Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m.

EST on the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m.

EST on the 29th and about 100 miles east

of Atlantic City at 7 a.m. EST on the

29th.

NJZ018 Camden

28 1729EST

2045EST

The combination of heavy rain and

saturated ground from recent heavy rains

caused poor drainage and some river

flooding in Camden County. Rain began

falling during the late evening on the

27th, but fell at its heaviest during

the afternoon and evening of the 28th as

thunderstorms occurred. Storm totals

averaged between one and two inches.

The Cooper River at Haddonfield was above

its 2.8 foot flood stage from 529 p.m.

through 845 p.m. EST on the 28th. It

crested at 2.88 feet at 630 p.m. EST.

Storm totals included 1.91 inches in

Somerdale, 1.72 inches in Audubon, 1.66

inches in Pennsauken and 1.40 inches in

Cherry Hill.

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both the

Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean.

The low pressure system moved from

western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on the

27th northeast to eastern Tennessee at

7 p.m. EST on the 27th and eastern

Kentucky at 7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A

secondary low pressure system formed

over North Carolina during the morning

of the 28th. It would become the main

low pressure system as it moved northeast

to near Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m.

EST on the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m.

EST on the 29th and about 100 miles east

of Atlantic City at 7 a.m. EST on the

29th.

NJZ015 Mercer

28 1809EST

2318EST

The combination of heavy rain and

saturated ground from recent heavy rains

caused poor drainage and some creek

flooding in Mercer County. Rain began

falling during the late evening on the

27th, but fell at its heaviest during

the afternoon and evening of the 28th as

thunderstorms occurred. Storm totals

averaged between one and two inches.

The Assunpink Creek at Trenton was above

its 7 foot flood stage from 609 p.m.

through 1118 p.m. EST on the 28th. It

crested at 7.33 feet at 9 p.m. EST.

Storm totals included 2.00 inches in

Windsor, 1.72 inches in Hightstown, 1.66

inches in Washington’s Crossing and 1.46

inches in Trenton.

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both

the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic

Ocean. The low pressure system moved from

western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on the

27th northeast to eastern Tennessee at

7 p.m. EST on the 27th and eastern

Kentucky at 7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A

secondary low pressure system formed

over North Carolina during the morning

of the 28th. It would become the main

low pressure system as it moved northeast

to near Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m. EST

on the 29th and about 100 miles east of

Atlantic City at 7 a.m. EST on the 29th.

NJZ010 Somerset

28 1840EST

30 1045EST

The combination of heavy rain and

saturated ground caused poor drainage

and some river flooding in Somerset

County. Rain began falling during the

late evening on the 27th, but fell at

its heaviest during the afternoon and

evening of the 28th as thunderstorms

occurred. Storm totals averaged around

two inches.

The Millstone River at Griggstown was

above its 10 foot flood stage from 730

p.m. EST on the 28th through 1045 a.m.

EST on the 30th. It crested at 12.3 feet

at 8 a.m. EST on the 29th. The North

Branch of the Raritan River at South

Branch was above its 7 foot flood stage

from 640 p.m. EST on the 28th through

733 a.m. EST on the 29th. It crested at

8.7 feet at Midnight EST on the 29th.

Storm totals included 2.40 inches in

Basking Ridge, 2.12 inches in Far Hills,

1.96 inches in North Plainfield, 1.90

inches in Somerville and 1.44 inches in

Belle Mead.

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both the

Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean.

The low pressure system moved from

western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on the 27th

northeast to eastern Tennessee at 7 p.m.

EST on the 27th and eastern Kentucky at

7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A secondary low

pressure system formed over North

Carolina during the morning of the 28th.

It would become the main low pressure

system as it moved northeast to near

Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST on the

28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m. EST on

the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m. EST on

and about 100 miles cast of Atlantic

City at 7 a.m. EST on the 29th.

NJZ016>019 Salem – Gloucester – Camden –

Northwestern Burlington

29 0100EST

0600EST

The combination of runoff from the heavy

rain, the funneling of water into Delaware

Bay and higher than normal astronomical

tides coming off the full moon produced

minor tidal flooding at the times of high

tide early in the morning on the 29th.

The high tide in Burlington reached 9.94

feet above mean lower low water. Minor

tidal flooding begins at 9.0 feet above

mean lower low water. The high tide at

Philadelphia Pier 12 reached 8.35 feet

above mean lower low water. Minor tidal

flooding begins there at 8.2 feet above

mean lower low water. Less widespread

minor tidal flooding occurred with the

early morning high tides on the 30th and

31st.

The onshore flow was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast from

western Alabama on the morning of the

27th. It reformed over North Carolina

during the morning of the 28th and become

the main low pressure system as it moved

northeast to near Norfolk, Virginia

during the afternoon on the 28th,

through Chesapeake Bay the evening on

the 28th, across Delaware Bay around

Midnight EST on the 29th and about then

cast of Atlantic City by sunrise on the

29th. The counterclockwise circulation

around this low helped push water into

Delaware Bay and slow the runoff from

the nearby heavy rain and the snowmelt

from the upper parts of the Delaware

River.

NJZ008 Morris

29 0307EST

31 2359EST

The combination of heavy rain and melting

snow produced poor drainage and river

flooding in Morris County that lasted

well into April. Rain began falling

during the late evening on the 27th, but

fell at its heaviest during the afternoon

and evening of the 28th as thunderstorms

occurred. Storm totals averaged around

three inches. Lincoln Park Borough was

one of the hardest hit municipalities

in the county as they received flooding

near the Pompton and Passaic River

confluence and the Beaver Brook. Several

roads were barricaded. In Denville, some

backyards were flooded by the Rockaway

River.

The Rockaway River above the Boonton

Reservoir was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 315 a.m. EST through 956 p.m.

EST on the 29th. It crested at 5.47 feet

at 10 a.m. EST. The Rockaway River below

the Boonton Reservoir was above its 5

foot flood stage from 307 a.m. EST on the

29th through 530 a.m. EST on the 31st.

It crested at 6.37 feet at 1045 a.m. EST

on the 29th. The Pequannock River at the

Macopin Intake Dam was above its 5.5 foot

flood stage from 445 a.m.EST on the 29th

through 2 a.m. EST on the 30th. It

crested at 5.59 feet at 1015 a.m. EST on

the 29th. The Passaic River at Pine Brook

was above its 19 foot flood stage from

1030 p.m. EST on the 29th through 515 p.m.

EST on April 1st. It crested at 19.41

feet at 645 p.m. EST on the 30th. Farther

downstream, the Passaic River at Two

Bridges was above its 9 foot flood stage

from 10 p.m. EST on the 29th through 4

p.m. EDT on April 9th. The March highest

crest was 10.26 feet at 3 a.m. EST on the

31st. Storm totals included 3.30 inches

in Milton, 2.88 inches in Pequannock,

2.70 inches in Boonton, 2.60 inches in

Lake Hopatcong and Morristown and 1.87

inches in Chatham.

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both

the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic

Ocean. The low pressure system moved

from western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on

the 27th northeast to eastern Tennessee

at 7 p.m. EST on the 27th and eastern

Kentucky at 7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A

secondary low pressure system formed

over North Carolina during the morning

of the 28th. It would become the main

low pressure system as it moved northeast

to near Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m.

EST on the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m.

EST on the 29th and about 100 miles east

of Atlantic City at 7 a.m. EST on the

29th.

NEW MEXICO, Central and North

NMZ002>006-008- Northwest Mountains Including Jemez –

010>013 Upper Rio Grande Valley – Sangre De

Cristo Mountains Northeast Highlands –

Harding – Westcentral Mountains –

Sandia/Manzano Mountains Central High

Plains/Estancia Valley County – Conchas

Lake/Guadalupe – Quay

14 0000MST

15 1500MST

A storm which began with heavy snows

along the eastern slopes of the Sangre

de Cristo mountains and the Sandia

mountains pushed cold air through the

central valleys and covered the eastern

plains with cold readings. Amounts peaked

at near 17-19 inches at Chacon and Pecos

while 24-28 inches was measured near

Gascon. The Sandia Park area reported

15-22 inches. Snow eventually spread west

in the central valley with 4-8 inches

reported in Albuquerque metro area and

nearly 12 inches across the Jcmcz

Mountains and Los Alamos with 10 inches

reported cast and southeast of Cuba. The

storm dumped 4 to 9 inches across the

eastern plains as it finally moved east

out of the state, Mountain communities

northwest of Las Vegas had 48 hours

totals of 30-36 inches.

NMZ016 Lincoln County High Plains/Hondo Valley

29 0950MST

High winds reported at Sierra Blanca

Airport 15 NE of Ruidoso.

NMZ005-007 Northeast Highlands – Far Northeast

Plains

30 2100MST

31 1600MST

Heavy snow of 6-8 inches was reported

between Raton and Clayton with driving

winds.

NEW MEXICO, South Central and Southwest

NONE REPORTED.

NEW MEXICO, Southeast

NMZ028 Eddy County Plains

15 0300MST

1300MST

Winter weather affected parts of New

Mexico during the day on the 15th. Light

snow accumulations up to one inch were

reported across the northwestern half of

the Eddy County plains.

NMZ029 Northern Lea County

15 0400MST

1400MST

More significant snowfall occurred over

northern Lea County on the 15th as a

winter storm affected portions of the

New Mexico plains. Between four and five

inch snow accumulations were reported

across northern Lea County from Caprock

to Crossroads.

NMZ028-033 Eddy County Plains – Central Lea County

29 1200MST

1600MST

A potent storm system moved east over

the Southern Plains on the 29th and

caused severe non-thunderstorm winds over

southeastern New Mexico. Numerous reports

of downed power lines and poles were

received along with reports of blown down

trees. The roof was blown off of a

trailer home near Hobbs. Wind gusts to

58 MPH were recorded at both the

Carlsbad and Hobbs airports.

NEW YORK, Central

NYZ009-015>018- Northern Oneida – Yates – Seneca –

022>025-036>037- Southern Cayuga – Onondaga – Steuben –

044>046-055>057-062 Schuyler – Chemung – Tompkins – Madison

– Southern Oneida – Cortland – Chenango

– Otsego – Tioga – Broome – Delaware –

Sullivan

1 0300EST

1200EST

A strong winter storm brought 8 to 14

inches of snow to all of central New

York. Isolated snow amounts were as much

as two feet. A Midwest storm slowly moved

east and combined with another storm

moving north along the east coast on

February 27th to bring copious moisture

to the region on February 28th. The snow

moved in from the south starting in the

afternoon and early evening on February

28th. The snow continued through the

night, heavy at times, before tapering

off to light snow and flurries late in

the morning on March 1st.

NYZ056>057-062 Broome – Delaware – Sullivan

24 0400EST

0700EST

An intensifying storm moved north along

the east coast on March 23rd and 24th.

Light snow, possibly mixed with rain,

moved into the region midday on the 23rd.

The snow became heavy at times late in

the afternoon and continued into the

evening. Snowfall amounts were 6 to 8

inches with some amounts up to a foot

mainly at higher elevations. Water

equivalents of the snow were between

half an inch and an inch.

Otsego County

Gilbertsville 28 1400EST

1730EST

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches. A few locations received more

than 3 inches. In addition, snowmelt was

causing high stream flows before the

rain started late on the 27th. The

flooding caused Mill Street to be closed

in Gilbertsville.

Tioga County

Countywide 28 1505EST

2330EST

State Route 96 in Owego closed due to

flooding of the Owego Creek. Several

other roads were closed in Tioga Center

and Berkshire. Most roads were closed due

to flooding with one road in Berkshire

closed due to a mudslide. A strong

Atlantic coast storm brought around 2

inches of rain that fell on wet or

frozen saturated ground. In addition to

the rain adding to the runoff there was

snowmelt, which could of added another

inch or 2 of water equivalent. Streams

and creeks were already running high due

to snowmelt before the rain came starting

late on the 27th.

NYZ055 Tioga

28 1817EST

31 2359EST

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Susquehanna River at Waverly,

NY / Sayre, PA rose above its flood stage

of 11 feet on the 28th, crested at 15.08

feet at 12 AM on the 30th, then fell

slowly but stayed over flood stage into

April. After the rainstorm, temperatures

were warm enough to cause additional

snowmelt.

NYZ057 Delaware

28 1900EST

29 1036EST

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Beaver Kill at Cooks Falls

went above its flood stage of 10 feet the

evening of the 28th. The river crested at

10.42 feet at 5:15 AM on the 29th, before

falling back below flood stage late

morning on the 29th.

NYZ045 Chenango

28 2133EST

31 1039EST

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Susquehanna River at

Bainbridge went above its flood stage of

13 feet late on the 28th, crested at 15.3

feet at 8 PM on the 29th, then fell below

flood stage on the 31 st. Additional

snowmelt after the rainstorm caused to

river to remain high.

Sullivan County

Bloomingburg 29 0010EST

0330EST

Heavy rain washed out a road. A strong

Atlantic storm dropped 2 to 3 inches of

rain on an already saturated ground. Most

of the rain fell on the 28th. Also adding

to the runoff was several inches of water

equivalent from snowmelt.

NYZ056 Broome

29 0100EST

31 2359EST

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Susquehanna River at Conklin

went above its flood stage of 11 feet

early on the 29th, crested at 15.09 feet

at 2:30 PM on the 29th. The river stayed

above flood stage into April due to

additional snowmelt.

NYZ056 Broome

29 0443EST

31 1029EST

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Susquehanna River at Vestal

went above its flood stage of 18 feet

early on the 29th, crested at 20.80 feet

at 6:00 PM also on the 29th, then fell

back below flood stage on the 31st.

Additional snowmelt occurred after the

rainstorm keeping river levels high.

NYZ045 Chenango

31 1645EST

2359EST

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition snowmelt

before and after the rainstorm was

causing elevated river flows. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few

more inches. The Susquehanna River at

Bainbridge went briefly below its flood

stage of 13 feet on the 31st before

rising back over flood stage.

Temperatures in the 50s on the 31st

caused added snowmelt rising the river.

Another slow moving storm from the Ohio

Valley brought 2 to 3 inches of rain

on April 2nd and 3rd. By the time the

river fell below flood stage most of the

snow had melted. This additional rain

and snowmelt caused the river to rise

rapidly to a crest of 20.47 feet at 4:15

AM on April 4th. This was the 6th highest

crest at Bainbridge for almost the last

100 years. The river fell below flood

stage the morning of April 6th.

NYZ044 Cortland

31 2005EST

2359EST

The Tioughnioga River at Cortland rose

above its flood stage of 8 feet late on

March 31st. The rise was due to rain that

fell on March 28th and snowmelt during

the week leading up to the 31st. The

water equivalent of the snow amounted to

several inches. A slow moving storm from

the Ohio Valley brought 2 to 3 inches of

rain on April 2nd and 3rd. By the time

the river fell below flood stage most of

the snow had melted. This additional rain

and snowmelt caused the river to rise to

a crest of 14.07 feet at 2:00 PM EST on

April 3th. This was a record flood crest

at Cortland. The previous flood of record

was 13.82 feet in 1950.

NYZ045 Chenango

31 2230EST

2359EST

The Chenango River at Sherbume rose above

its flood stage of 8 feet late on the

31st. The rise was due to rain that fell

on the 28th and snowmelt during the week

leading up to the 31st. The water

equivalent of the snow amounted to

several inches. A slow moving storm from

the Ohio Valley brought 2 to 3 inches of

rain on April 2nd and 3rd. By the time

the river fell below flood stage most

of the snow had melted. This additional

rain and snowmelt caused the river to

rise to a crest of 10.78 feet at 2:30 AM

on April 3th. This was the 2nd highest

flood crest at Sherbume.

NEW YORK, Coastal

NYZ068>072- Putnam – Rockland – Northern Westchester

074>076-078>079-081 – Southern Westchester New York

(Manhattan) Richmond (Staten Is.) – Kings

(Brooklyn) – Queens – Northwest Suffolk

Northeast Suffolk Southeast Suffolk

01 0100EST

0815EST

A weak high pressure ridge extended

southwest across the region from New

England as a low pressure system

intensified and moved northeast. This

strong low passed south of Long Island

Monday night and cast of the New England

coast during Tuesday.

Light snow developed northeast across

the region between 1 and 4 pm Monday

afternoon. As the low rapidly intensified

and moved closer to the region, narrow

bands of heavy snow swept northeast

across the region. The last band of

heavy snow swept northeast across the

region between 7:30 am and 8:30 am

Tuesday morning, March 1st. Storm Total

Snowfall amounts ranged from 5 to 9

inches.

Here are selected snowfall totals for:

Rockland County – from 7.2 inches at New

City to 8.0 inches at Sloatsburg.

Westchester County – from 5.0 inches at

Scarsdale to 8.0 inches at Yorktown

Heights.

Putnam County – from 6.5 inches at Lake

Peekskill to 8.5 inches at Lake Carmel.

New York (Manhattan) – 7.5 inches was

measured at the Central Park Zoo.

Richmond (Staten Island) – from 6.1

inches at Bulls Head to 6.5 inches at

New Dorf.

Kings (Brooklyn) – from 5.0 inches at

Graves End to 6.0 inches at Shecpshead

Bay.

Queens County – from 5.0 inches at JFK

Airport to 7.0 inches at LaGuardia

Airport.

Suffolk County – from 5.5 inches at the

NWS Office in Upton, Sag Harbor,

Patchogue, and Deer Park to 7.2 inches

in Smithtown.

At Islip Airport, 6.6 inches was

measured.

NYZ069>081 Rockland – Northern Westchester –

Southern Westchester – New York

(Manhattan) – Bronx – Richmond (Staten

Is.) – Kings (Brooklyn) – Queens –

Nassau – Northwest Suffolk – Northeast

Suffolk – Southwest Suffolk – Southeast

Suffolk

08 1300EST

1700EST

NYZ076 Queens

8 1910EST

A strong arctic cold front intensified

as it swept southeast across the region.

This caused rain to change to snow,

temperatures to fall from the 40s into

the 20s, and northwest winds that gusted

between 40 and 55 mph. A peak isolated

wind gust to 58 mph was measured by the

Automated Surface Observing System at

JFK Airport. Near blizzard conditions

occurred for a short time. Storm total

snowfalls ranged from around 2 to 4

inches.

Wet and mild antecedent conditions were

followed by more than a 20 degree drop

in temperature in 3 hours with strong

gusty winds. This resulted in a “flash”

freeze across roads that resulted in

hundreds of vehicle accidents.

NYZ078-080 Northwest Suffolk – Southwest Suffolk

12 0800EST

A low pressure system developed southeast

of Long Island before sunrise on Saturday

March 12th. This low quickly intensified

as it moved northeast. It passed near

Nantucket during Saturday afternoon and

moved east of Cape Cod by Saturday

evening.

Light rain developed across the Atlantic

coastal waters just south of Long Island

between 1 am and 2 am. As the rainfall

intensity increased, it quickly changed

to heavy wet snow. The band of heavy snow

developed from western and central

Suffolk County north across New Haven

County CT. A few areas, mainly east of

Patchogue, experienced snowfall rates in

excess of 2 inches per hour.

Storm total snowfall amounts ranged from

around 5 to 8 inches. Here are selected

amounts of at least 6 inches:

Patchogue – 8 inches

Lake Ronkonkoma – 7.5 inches

Rocky Point – 6.8 inches

Mount Sinai – 6.7 inches

Sayville – 6.5 inches

Shoreham – 6.4 inches

Port Jefferson – 6.3 inches

Medford and North Patchogue – 6.0 inches

NYZ067>068 Orange – Putnam

23 2100EST

2200EST

As a ridge of high pressure extended

southeast across New England, a low

pressure system moved northeast along

a warm front. The low quickly passed

southeast of Long Island early

Thursday morning on March 24th.

Snow quickly developed and spread

northeast across the region during

Wednesday afternoon. It became heavy

during Wednesday evening. Storm total

snowfall amounts ranged from around

6 to 10 inches. In Orange County,

snowfall accumulations ranged from

6.0 inches at Cornwall-On-Hudson to

10.0 inches at Circleville.

NEW YORK, East

NYZ066 Eastern Dutchess

01 0600EST

02 0000EST

NYZ065 Western Dutchess

01 0600EST

02 0000EST

The average total snowfall across

Dutchess County was 9 inches.

NYZ064 Eastern Ulster

01 0600EST

02 0000EST

NYZ063 Western Ulster

01 0600EST

02 0000EST

Average total snowfall across Ulster

County was 11 inches.

NYZ061 Eastern Columbia

01 0700EST

02 0000EST

NYZ060 Western Columbia

01 0700EST

02 0000EST

Average total snowfall across

Columbia County was 10 inches.

NYZ059 Eastern Greene

01 0700EST

02 0000EST

NYZ058 Western Greene

01 0700EST

02 0000EST

Average total snowfall across

Greene County was 11 inches.

NYZ052 Eastern Albany

01 0900EST

02 0000EST

NYZ051 Western Albany

01 0900EST

02 0000EST

Average total snowfall across

Albany County was 13 inches.

NYZ054 Eastern Rensselaer

01 0900EST

02 0000EST

NYZ053 Western Rensselaer

01 0900EST

02 0000EST

Average total snowfall across

Rensselaer County was 11 inches.

NYZ049 Eastern Schenectady

01 0900EST

02 0000EST

NYZ048 Western Schenectady

01 0900EST

02 0000EST

Average total snowfall across

Schenectady County was 11 inches.

NYZ047 Schoharie

01 0900EST

02 0000EST

Average total snowfall across

Schoharie County was 10 inches.

NYZ082 Northern Fulton

01 1000EST

02 0000EST

NYZ039 Southern Fulton

01 1000EST

02 0000EST

Average total snowfall across

Fulton County was 9 inches.

NYZ040 Montgomery

01 1000EST

02 0000EST

Average total snowfall across

Montgomery County was 9 inches.

NYZ041 Northern Saratoga

01 1000EST

02 0000EST

NYZ050 Southern Saratoga

01 1000EST

02 0000EST

Average total snowfall across

Saratoga County was 12 inches.

NYZ043 Northern Washington

01 1000EST

02 0000EST

NYZ084 Southern Washington

01 1000EST

02 0000EST

Average total snowfall across

Washington County was 11 inches.

NYZ033 Hamilton

01 1500EST

02 0000EST

Average total snowfall across

Hamilton County was 8 inches.

NYZ032 Northern Herkimer

01 1500EST

02 0000EST

NYZ038 Southern Herkimer

01 1500EST

02 0000EST

The average total snowfall across

Herkimer County was 8 inches.

NYZ042 Northern Warren

01 1500EST

02 0000EST

NYZ083 Southeast Warren

01 1500EST

02 0000EST

The average total snowfall across

Warren County was 11 inches.

A surface low pressure was centered

along the mid-Atlantic Coast at the

beginning of March. This storm tracked

northeastward well off the eastern

seaboard, reaching southeast of Cape

Cod by midday on March 1. The storm

then moved into the Gulf of Maine

by late on March 1. At the same time,

another vertically stacked storm

moved slowly east from the Great

Lakes and interacted with the

low-level moisture from the surface

storm. The combination of the two

storms, along with a surface trough

anchored between them, resulted in a

significant snowstorm across much

of eastern New York and adjacent

western New England. Snowfall storm

totals across the region ranged

from 7 inches to a foot or more.

Officially, 11.7 inches of snow

fell at the National Weather Service

station in Albany. The heaviest

amount was reported in Bennington

County in Vermont, where 17.5 inches

of snow was reported in the Town

of Wadeford. Other than the usual

school and business closures, the

storm did not report any unusual

problems across the region.

NYZ053 Western Rensselaer

08 1200EST

1800EST

NYZ054 Eastern Rensselaer

08 1200EST

1800EST

The average snowfall across

Rensselaer County was 12 inches.

NYZ043 Northern Washington

08 1600EST

1800EST

NYZ084 Southern Washington

08 1600EST

1800EST

The average total snowfall across

Washington County was 9 inches.

A strong cold front moved across

eastern New York and adjacent western

New England on March 8th. As the

front slowed down across eastern New

England, a wave of low pressure

formed along it and eventually became

a closed storm system which

intensified as it moved into the

Canadian Maritimes. The front and

developing storm brought snow across

the region. A meso-scale band of

enhanced heavier snow and an upslope

wind component, resulted in heavy

snowfall across portions of the

Taconics and Berkshires. Gusty winds

also resulted in some blowing and

drifting of the snow, but not enough

to qualify as a blizzard. The

snowfall in these areas ranged from

7 inches to locally over a foot.

Seventeen inches was reported in

Averill Park, Rensselaer County, the

highest snowfall total. The snow and

blowing snow resulted minor traffic

accidents across the region.

NYZ051 Western Albany

24 0000EST

0600EST

The average snowfall total across

Western Albany County was 8.0 inches.

NYZ060 Western Columbia

24 0000EST

0600EST

The average snowfall total across

Western Columbia County was 8.0 inches.

NYZ065 Western Dutchess

24 0000EST

0600EST

The average snowfall total across

Western Dutchess County was 8.0 inches.

NYZ059 Eastern Greene

24 0000EST

0600EST

NYZ058 Western Greene

24 0000EST

0600EST

The average snowfall total across

Greene County was 9.0 inches.

NYZ054 Eastern Rensselaer

24 0000EST

0600EST

The average snowfall depth across

Eastern Rensselaer County was 7.0

inches.

NYZ064 Eastern Ulster

24 0000EST

0600EST

NYZ063 Western Ulster

24 0000EST

0600EST

The average snowfall depth across

Ulster County was 8.0 inches.

NYZ041 Northern Saratoga

24 0300EST

0600EST

The average snowfall total across

Northern Saratoga County: 10.0

inches. Highest snowfall amount

reported in Gansevoort, 12 inches.

NYZ043 Northern Washington

24 0300EST

0600EST

Average snowfall depth across

Northern Washington County: 10.0

inches. Highest snowfall amount in

Northern Washington County reported

in Cossayua, 12 inches.

The fourth coastal storm of the

month tracked from south of Long

Island to east of Cape Cod by early

March 24. This storm produced a

meso-scale band of heavy snow that

first fell to the south and west

of Albany. The band weakened as it

moved across the Greater Capital

District, but then strengthened as

it proceeded north in the Saratoga

region and Washington County. The

result was a significant snowfall

across portions of the Catskills,

Helderbergs, Saratoga region and

Taconics, while lesser amounts fell

across the remainder of the region.

A foot fell in two serperate spots,

Gansevoort, Saratoga County and

Cossayua, Washington County. No

unusual problems were reported with

this storm.

Montgomery County

Canajoharie 28 0852EST

29 0200EST

The Canajoharie Creek exceeded the

6.0-foot flood stage at the Canajoharie

Creek gage, cresting at 8.19 feet,

5:15PM on the 28th.

Schoharie County

Warnerville 28 1000EST

1100EST

The town of Warnerville was

impassable due to flooded roads.

Saratoga County

Bemis Hgts 28 1215EST

1315EST

Three roads closed, including Route

67 and Route 4, due to water coverage.

Washington County

Clarks Mills 28 1400EST

1500EST

County Route 113 closed due to

flooding.

Schenectady County

Glenville 28 1600EST

1700EST

Droms Road closed between Swaggertown

Road and Charlton Road due to flooding.

NYZ043 Northern Washington

28 1845EST

1945EST

Metawee River over flood stage.

NYZ043 Northern Washington

28 1845EST

0101EST

The Metawee River exceeded the

7.0-foot flood stage at the

Granville gage, cresting at 7.20

feet at 9:15 PM on the 28th.

NYZ064 Eastern Ulster

28 2230EST

2230EST

Springtown Road flooded.

NYZ059 Eastern Greene

28 2230EST

29 0000EST

In Cairo, 15 County Roads closed

due to flooding. Eighteen Fire

companies pumped out basements

throughout county.

NYZ060 Western Columbia

29 0030EST

0130EST

Every town in Columbia County

reported road closures due to

flooding.

NYZ050 Southern Saratoga

29 0154EST

0603EST

The Mohawk River exceeded the

188.0-foot flood stage at the

Crescent Dam gage, cresting at

188.26 feet, at 3:00AM on the 29th.

NYZ065 Western Dutchess

29 0200EST

0242EST

Due to tidal flooding as well as

locally heavy rain, the Hudson River

exceeded the 5.0-foot flood stage at

the Poughkeepsie gage, cresting at

5.05 feet, 2:30AM on the 29th.

NYZ066 Eastern Dutchess

29 0300EST

0400EST

In the Town of Northeast, Mill Road

closed due to flooding.

NYZ064 Eastern Ulster

29 0356EST

1407EST

The Esopus Creek exceeded the

20.0-foot flood stage at the Mount

Marion gage, cresting at 20.54 feet,

8:00AM on the 29th.

NYZ040 Montgomery

29 1352EST

30 0007EST

The Schoharie Creek exceeded the

6.0-foot flood stage at the

Burtonsville gage, cresting at 6.13

feet at 7:00PM on the 29th.

NYZ065 Western Dutchess

29 1352EST

1945EST

Wappingers Creek exceeded the

8.0-foot flood stage at the

Wappingers Falls gage, cresting

at 8.09 feet, 4:30PM on the 29th.

NYZ038 Southern Herkimer

30 0000EST

31 0159EST

The Mohawk River exceeded the

403.0-foot flood stage at the Utica

gage, cresting at 403.4 feet, 6:00PM

on the 30th.

A potent area of low pressure and

its associated frontal systems,

moved northeast across the Ohio

and Saint Lawrence Valleys on the

28th of March, bringing with it a

significant amount of moisture.

Since it took a more western track

than previous storms earlier in the

month, almost all of the precipitation

fell as rain. Rainfall totals,

averaging 1-2 inches, but locally as

high as 4 inches, accumulated across

portions of the eastern New York and

adjacent western New England. This

rainfall, combined with snow melt,

produced significant runoff,

resulting in widespread flooding

across the region between March 28th

through 31st. Many streams and rivers

reached or exceed bankful, including

the Mettawee, Housatonic and Mohawk

Rivers, as well as the Esopus,

Wappingers and Schoharie Creeks.

Numerous houses in Columbia and

Greene Counties sustained damage

when their basements became flooded,

and there were many reports of road

closures across a large number of

counties. One Mechanicville man was

transported to a local hospital after

being swept away by floodwaters of

the Anthony Kill. In Columbia County,

every town reported at least one

road closed due to flooding.

NEW YORK, North

NYZ026>031- Northern St. Lawrence – Northern

034>035-087 Franklin – Eastern Clinton – South-

eastern St. Lawrence – Southern

Franklin – Western Clinton – Western

Essex – Eastern Essex – Southerwestern

St. Lawrence

01 2000EST

2230EST

A storm system off the Carolinas on

Monday, February 28th moved to the

Gulf of Maine the afternoon and

evening of Tuesday, March 1st. Snow

developed across the area during the

night of Feb 28th, and was heavy at

times during March 1st before it

tapered off the night of March 1st.

Snowfall was generally between 8

and 10 inches, except in Clinton

county where snowfall was between

9 and 14 inches. Locally higher

amounts fell in the higher peaks of

the Adirondacks.

NYZ028-034>035 Eastern Clinton – Western Essex –

Eastern Essex

11 1700EST

12 1700EST

An area of low pressure over the Ohio

valley on Friday, March 11th moved

east across southern New York and

reorganized south of Cape Cod early

Saturday, March 12th. The storm

system moved north through the Gulf

of Maine Saturday evening. Snow spread

across the area during the afternoon

of March 11th, and was steady later on

the night of March 11th into Saturday,

March 12th, before it tapered off

Saturday afternoon. General snow

accumulations were 3 to 5 inches.

NEW YORK, West

NYZ001>003- Niagara – Orleans – Monroe – Northern

010>011-014 Erie – Genesee – Ontario

01 0320EST

1400EST

An intensifying low over Indiana and

Ohio on February 28th lifted slowly

across Lake Erie. Snow overspread the

area during the late afternoon hours

of the 28th. It was generally light

at first, but became moderate to heavy

for a time across the Niagara Frontier

and northern Finger Lakes (including

Buffalo and Rochester) shortly after

midnight. The snow finally tapered

off during the morning and early

afternoon hours of March 1st.

Specific overnight snowfalls

included: 9″ at Clarence and

Alabama; 8″ at Medina and Victor;

and 7″ at Spencerport and Lewiston.

NYZ019>020-085 Chautauqua – Cattaraugus – Southern Erie

02 2015EST

03 1500EST

A northwest flow across Lake Eric

resulted in an intense lake effect

snow across the higher elevations

of the western southern tier of New

York during the evening of March 2nd

and continuing through the afternoon

of the 3rd. Specific snowfall reports

included: 14″ at Perrysburg; 13″ at

Cassadaga; 12″ at Stockton; and 10″

at East Aurora.

NYZ006 Oswego

04 1750EST

2300EST

A cold, westerly flow across Lake

Ontario established a narrow, intense

band of lake effect snow over Oswego

county. In Scriba ten inches of snow

fell while nine inches was reported

in Palermo and Volney.

NYZ006 Oswego

10 0530EST

1800EST

A band of lake effect snow began

to develop late in the afternoon of

March 9th in a northwest flow across

Lake Ontario. The band of snow

continued through the night and

morning hours, but broke apart

during the afternoon hours under

the strong March sun. Snowfall

reports included: 10″ at West

Monroe; 9″ at Constantia; and

7″ at Hannibal.

Number of Estimated

Persons Damage

Location Killed Injured Property Crops

MISSOURI, East

Cole County

Jefferson City 0 0

The ASOS at the Jefferson City airport

recorded a 58 mph wind gust.

MISSOURI, Lower

Pemiscot County

Hayti 0 0 0.01K

MISSOURI, Northeast

NONE REPORTED.

MISSOURI, Northwest

Bates County

2 NNW Amsterdam 0 0

Bates County

1 N Amsterdam 0 0

Bates County

4 S Butler 0 0

Cass County

Raymore 0 0

Clay County

Kearney 0 0

MOZ038 Lafayette

0 0

A peak wind gust of 61 mph was measured

at Higginsville by the Cooperative

Observer. Wind gusts from 40 to 55 mph

were common elsewhere across much of

west central Missouri.

Nodaway County

5 E Maryville 0 0

Thunderstorm winds broke off 18 to 24

inch tree limbs.

Nodaway County

2 E Maryville 0 0 10K

One barn had roof blown off. One

building suffered minor damage. Trees

had some damage and a few power lines

were downed.

Worth County

Denver 0 0 2K

Barn suffered some damage from strong

thunderstorm winds.

Mercer County

Princeton 0 0

Linn County

6 N Purdin 0 0

Six to ten inch tree limbs down.

Sullivan County

1 W Browning 0 0

Six to ten inch tree limbs down.

MISSOURI, Southeast

Ripley County

Fairdealing to 0 0

7 SE Doniphan

Dime to nickel-size hail was reported at

three places in eastern Ripley County.

Butler County

Poplar Bluff 0 0

Scott County

Scott City 0 0

One-inch hail occurred along Interstate

55.

Cape Girardeau

County

4 SW Cape Girardeau 0 0 1K

The tin roof was ripped off a barn on

Highway 74, about 2 miles west of

Interstate 55. The roof was blown into

some power lines, which were knocked

down. At the nearby Cape Girardeau

airport, the peak wind gust recorded by

the automated observing system was 54

MPH.

Cape Girardeau

County

Randles to 0 0

5 W Cape Girardeau

Dime to quarter-size hail fell in

extreme southern Cape Girardeau County.

The report of quarter-size hail was from

Randles.

Stoddard County

Acorn Ridge to 0 0

Dexter

Butler County

2 W Fisk 0 0

Scott County

Oran 0 0

Stoddard County

Advance 0 0

Scott County

2.5 N Sikeston to 0 0

Sikeston

One-inch hail fell just north of

Sikeston, while dime-size hail fell in

Sikeston.

Mississippi County

Charleston 0 0

A line of thunderstorms developed over

southeast Missouri, near a line from

Poplar Bluff to Cape Girardeau. As the

line moved east to the Mississippi

River, some storms along the line

produced large hail and an isolated

report of damaging winds. The most

severe storm along the line tracked

through northern Scott and southern Cape

Girardeau Counties, producing hail up to

golf ball size and minor wind damage.

MISSOURI, Southwest

Vernon County

Fair Haven 0 0

Vernon County

6 N Walker 0 0

Cedar County

El Dorado Spgs 0 0

St. Clair County

7 S Appleton City 0 0

Cedar County

Stockton 0 0

Polk County

Fair Play 0 0

Cedar County

Stockton 0 0

Polk County

Half Way 0 0

MONTANA, Central

MTZ009>011-013-

044>049

0 0

A deep low pressure system over central

Canada was responsible for a high wind

event along the Rocky Mountain Front and

adjacent plains on the 6th. Reported

wind speeds include: a gust to 73 mph at

East Glacier Park 11 SE; a gust to 54

mph at Harlem 16S and a gust to 46 mph

at Great Falls Airport. Additionally,

sustained winds of 40 mph were reported

for several hours at Oilmont 14E,

Fairfield 7NE, Cut Bank, Valier,

Blackleaf, Turner 6NW, Inverness 20N

and Loma 20N. The strong wind helped

spread a grass fire near Valier. Over

150 acres of grass burned from a fire

caused by exhaust from a vehicle.

MTZ012-050-054

0 0

Heavy snow fell across a portion of

North Central Montana during the

afternoon and early evening of the 14th.

Reported snow fall amounts include: 11

inches at Neihart 7NW, 8 inches at

Millegan 14SE and 6 inches at Hobson

20SW. The heavy snow created slick and

hazardous driving surfaces and

contributed to over 40 motor vehicle

accidents.

MTZ009-012>015-

044-046>047-051-

054>055

0 0

A Canadian cold front swept across a

broad area of North Central Montana on

the 17th bringing heavy snow and gusty

winds. Reported snow fall amounts

include: 14 inches at the Crystal Lake

SNOTEL site; 8 inches at Neihart 7S; 7

inches at Neihart, Gold Butte and

Conrad; 6 inches at Marias Pass 1 WNW,

Shonkin, Pony and Lewistown 25S and 5

inches at Bozeman 7SE and Chester.

MTZ009>014-044-

047>050

0 0

A vigorous spring storm brought heavy

snow to a wide area of North Central and

Southwest Montana on the 23rd. Reported

snow fall amounts include: 16 inches at

Holter Dam; 15 inches at Eden; 12 inches

at Shonkin 7S, Holter Dam 6S, Rogers

Pass, Heart Butte 6W; 10 inches at

Sunburst 6S, Gold Butte 7N; 8 inches at

Havre 25S, Hobson, Choteau, Stanford,

Millegan 14SE; 7 inches at Great Falls,

Cut Bank 25NW, Hogeland 2W, Babb,

Augusta 25NW, Neihart 7NNW, Great Falls

3SW; 6 inches at Grass Range and 5

inches at Martinsdale 3NNW and West

Yellowstone 9N.

MONTANA, East

MTZ016>017-

019>020-022>026-

059>062

0 0

Strong winds affected much of northeast

Montana during the morning and afternoon

hours of the 6th. The strong winds were

associated with a cold front and upper

level disturbance that crossed the area.

Sustained wind speeds of 40 to 45 mph

were common. A few locations had wind

gusts in the 58 to 69 mph range. A few

of the stronger wind gusts included:

King Coulee Raws Site (Valley County):

69 mph

Bluff Creek Raws Site (Valley County):

58 mph

Poplar Raws Site (Roosevelt County):

58 mph

MTZ017-017-022-059

0 0

An area of low pressure in Wyoming

brought heavy snow in narrow bands to a

portion of northeast Montana. The

heaviest snow fell in a 10 to 15 mile

band across northern Phillips county,

southwest Valley, and portions of

northern Garfield county. A few of the

heavier snow totals included:

3 miles south of Whitewater (Phillips

County): 6 inches

20 miles south/southwest of Glasgow

(Valley County): 12 inches

30 miles southwest of Glasgow (Valley

County): 6 inches

30 miles northeast of Jordan (Garfield

County): 6-8 inches

MTZ016-059>060

0 0

An area of low pressure that developed

in Wyoming brought heavy snow to much of

Phillips County late in the evening of

the 22nd through the pre-dawn hours of

the 23rd. Additional light snow

continued to fall through the evening

hours of the 23rd. In addition,

northeast winds of 15 to 25 mph with

high gusts produced areas of blowing and

drifting snow. A few of the more

impressive snowfall totals included:

Zortman: 9 inches

35 miles south of Malta: 7 inches, with

drifts of 3 to 4 feet

Whitewater: 6 inches

Malta: 5 inches

MONTANA, South

MTZ040-056-066>068

0 0

8 inches 4W Alpine Cole Creek Snotel; 8

inches 2S Red Lodge; 7 inches 13ENE

Wilsall South Fork of the Shields Snotel

in the Crazy Mountains; 7 inches 6S

Roscoe; 6 inches 5NW Alpine; 6 inches in

Mcleod; 6 inches in Clyde Park; 10

inches 5W Red Lodge

MTZ029-031-063

0 0

8 inches in Judith Gap; 11 inches LOSE

Roundup; 7 inches IOS Roundup; 6 inches

15S Colstrip.

MTZ029-031>032-

034>038-040-042-

056>058-067

0 0

An early Spring storm moved across South

Central Montana bringing heavy, wet snow

to portions of the Billings County

Warning Area. The following are some

totals from this storm:

8 inches 18NW Ryegate; 6 inches in

Forsyth, Huntley, Fort Smith, Roundup,

Broadview, Billings, and Birney; 9

inches in Crow Agency; 10 inches in

Rapelje; 8 inches 2E Ryegate, 8 inches

in Clyde Park, 8 inches 12E Ashland, 6

inches 10S Volborg, 9 inches 2S Red

Lodge, 6 inches 5SE Volborg, 6 inches

16W Alzada, 8 inches 60S Miles City, 8

inches at both Cole Creek and Burnt

Mountain Snotels

MONTANA, West

MTZ006>007-043

0 0

Vigorous late winter storm blanketed the

valleys of West Central Montana with 5

to 12 inches of new snow, with as much

as much as 14 inches of new snow

reported at Georgetown Lake.

MTZ002-004-006-

006-043

0 0

Late winter storm brought 8 to 13 inches

of new snow over the mountains of

Northwest Montana with 4 to 8 inches in

the valleys. Widespread west winds at 15

to 25 mph also caused drifting of snow.

Schools were closed in the northern

Flathead valley due to heavy snowfall.

Trees also snapped under the load from

heavy snow. Some trees fell onto power

lines causing outages across the

northern Flathead valley as well.

Several vehicle rollovers were also

reported.

NEBRASKA, Central

NEZ004>010-

022>029-035>038-

056>059-069>071-094

0 4 500K

A strong low pressure system moved

through Nebraska overnight with high

winds affecting the area behind the

passing cold front. Northwesterly winds

of 35-45 mph with gusts to 60 mph caused

low visibility due to blowing dust in

isolated areas. The low visibility

caused a multi-vehicle pile-up on

Interstate 80 about 6 miles west of

North Platte. The accident occurred at

2:05 pm and involved 5 semis and 3 cars.

Three semis and 2 cars were engulfed in

flames. The accident claimed 3 lives

(indirect fatalities) and injured 4

(indirect). West bound lanes on

Interstate 80 were closed for 4 hours

and cast bound lanes on Interstate 80

were closed for 10 hours.

NEZ005>006-

008>009-023>026-

035>037-094

0 0

A strong low pressure system moved out

of Eastern Colorado and into the Central

Plains dumping significant snow. Keya

Paha County received 6-8 inches of snow,

Blaine County received 9-12 inches, and

Eastern Cherry County received 12-16

inches. Breezy winds also created areas

of blowing and drifting snow across

roadways. A semi-trailer and truck

rolled over in the Long Pine Hills due

to the slick road conditions. No one was

injuried in the accident. Other cars

lost control on snow covered roads but

there were no injuries.

Logan County

9 N Stapleton 0 0

Custer County

2 NW Arnold 0 0

Lincoln County

North Platte 0 0

Custer County

13 SW Anselmo 0 0

Hail covered the ground.

Lincoln County

6 NNE North Platte 0 0

Custer County

Anselmo 0 0

Hail was 2 inches deep.

Blaine County

7 SSE Brewster 0 0

Hail covered the ground.

Loup County

15 W Taylor 0 0 5K

Loup County

Almeria 0 0

Loup County

10 NW Almeria 0 0

Frontier County

13 SE Stockville 0 0

Frontier County

6 S Eustis 0 0 8K

Holt County

18 SW Amelia 0 0 3K

Rock County

14 ESE Rose 0 0

Holt County

17 WSW Chambers 0 0 3K

Holt County

5 SW Amelia 0 0

NEBRASKA, East

Gage County

1 E Adams 0 0

Johnson County

2 W Sterling 0 0

NEZ011>012-

015>018-030>034-

042>045-050>053

0 1

Intense low pressure over the Great

Lakes region combined with high pressure

building east out of the Rockies and

provided a prolonged high wind event

over northeast and cast central Nebraska

and portions of western Iowa. Sustained

winds of 30 to 40 mph with gusts of 55

to a little over 60 mph were common

throughout the area. The strong winds

caused sporadic tree and roof damage,

and there were several reports across

the area of trees uprooted and a few

semi trucks were overturned. One person

was injured in Decatur Nebraska

(northern Burt county) when a roof of a

building under construction blew on top

of his house causing substantial damage.

Some of the higher gusts measured by

AWOS or ASOS sites included … 62 mph

in Fremont at 110 pm, 60 mph at Norfolk

at 247 pm, 59 mph in Albion at 1010 am,

59 mph at Columbus at 115 pm, 59 mph in

Tekamah at 119 pm, and 55 mph in Omaha

at 224 pm.

NEBRASKA, Extreme Northeast

NEZ013>014

0 0 20K

Sustained winds of 40 to 45 mph with

gusts around 60 mph persisted from late

morning until late afternoon. The winds

caused tree damage with a few branches

and smaller tree debris broken off.

There was minor damage to buildings,

mostly to shingles and gutters.

NEBRASKA, Extreme Southwest

NONE REPORTED.

NEBRASKA, South Central

NOT RECEIVED.

NEBRASKA, West

Scotts Bluff County

3 NE Scottsbluff 0 0

Very weak tornado over open country.

NEVADA, North

NVZ034

0 0

A winter storm brought 19 inches of snow

to the Dorsey Basin Snotel site in the

East Humboldt range and 15 inches to

Lamoille Canyon #3 Snotel.

NEVADA, South

NONE REPORTED.

NEVADA, West

NVZ003

0 0

A winter storm moved through northeast

California and western Nevada on the

19th and 20th. Two to three feet of snow

fell in the higher elevations of the

Sierra, with 6 to 8 inches reported in

areas to the lee of the Sierra.

Storm total snowfall amounts:

Virginia City (6340 ft.) 8 inches

Carson City (5400 ft.) 6 inches

NVZ002

0 0

A winter storm moved through northeast

California and western Nevada on the

19th and 20th. Two to three feet of snow

fell in the higher elevations of the

Sierra, with 6 to 8 inches reported in

areas to the lee of the Sierra.

Storm total snowfall amounts:

Mt. Rose Ski Resort (summit) 22 inches

(mid-mountain) 10 inches

5 ENE Incline Village

(7300 ft.) 20 inches

1 NE Incline Village

(6500 ft.) 15 inches

Spooner Summit 12 inches

NVZ001

0 0

Wind gust of 65 knots (75 mph) recorded

at the Walker Lake RAWS sensor.

NVZ002

0 0

Wind gust of 55 knots (63 mph) recorded

at the Galena Creek RAWS sensor.

NVZ003

0 0

Wind gust of 50 knots (58 mph) recorded

at DRI Sage building in Stead.

NVZ002

0 0

The second winter storm in a week moved

through the Sierra Nevada and western

Nevada region. This storm, however, was

not as strong as the earlier one. From

late on the 21st through the 22nd up to

two feet of snow fell in the Sierra,

with rain falling western Nevada.

Storm total snowfall amounts:

Mt. Rose Ski Resort

(mid-mountain) 22 inches

NEW HAMPSHIRE, North and Central

NHZ001>010-

013>014

0 0

Low pressure developed off the southern

New England coast during the evening of

Monday, February 28, and intensified as

moved northeast into the Gulf of Maine

on Tuesday, March 1. Snow moved into New

Hampshire during the early morning hours

and dropped between 5 and 14 inches

across the entire state before ending

during the early morning hours of

March 2.

NHZ001>010-

013>014

0 0

Low pressure moved across southern New

England during the night of Monday,

March 7, and redeveloped off the New

England coast on Tuesday, March 8. Snow

spread into New Hampshire during the

early morning hours of Tuesday and

accumulated 5 to 12 inches before ending

during the morning on March 9.

NHZ001>002-

004>010-013>014

0 0

Low pressure moving out of the midwest

on Friday, March 11, redeveloped off the

New England coast Friday evening and

slowly moved through the Gulf of Maine

on Saturday, March 12. Snow accumulated

4 to 15 inches across most of the state

before ending during the early morning

hours of March 13.

NEW HAMPSHIRE, Southern

NHZ011>012

0 0

Heavy snow and gusty winds affected

southwest New Hampshire and all of

southern New England, as low pressure

reformed off the mid Atlantic coast and

tracked southeast of the region.

Snowfall totals of 4 to 8 inches were

widely observed.

Some specific snowfall totals, as

reported by trained spotters, included 9

inches in Marlow, East Alstead, and

Keene; 8 inches in Peterborough; 7

inches in Rindge, Hinsdale, and

Greenfield; and 6 inches in Francestown,

Manchester, Hudson, and Nashua.

NHZ011>012

0 0

Low pressure strengthened rapidly off

the Delaware coast and tracked southeast

of New England, bringing heavy snow to

southwest New Hampshire. Snowfall totals

of 4 to 8 inches were widely observed.

The snow and gusty winds made travel

difficult. Several roads around

Manchester were closed due to icy

conditions, and many spinouts were

reported throughout the region. Many

flights were delayed or canceled at

Manchester Airport.

Some specific snowfall totals, as

reported by trained spotters, included 9

inches in Manchester, 8 inches in Keene,

7 inches in Winchester and Hinsdale, and

6 inches in Stoddard, Bedford, Milford,

and Hillsborough.

NHZ011>012

0 0

Low pressure south of Long Island

strengthened rapidly as it headed to the

Canadian Maritimes, and brought heavy

snow to southwest New Hampshire and much

of interior southern New England.

Snowfall totals of 6 to 12 inches were

widely observed in Cheshire and

Hillsborough Counties.

State police reported numerous vehicles

off roads around the region, especially

on Interstate 93. A number of flights at

Manchester Airport were delayed or

canceled as a result of the storm.

Some specific snowfall totals, as

reported by trained spotters, included

14 inches in Francestown; 13 inches in

Alstead; 12 inches in Dublin, Marlow,

Stoddard, Keene, Peterborough, and

Wilton; 10 inches in Swanzey and South

Weare; 8 inches in Hinsdale and Nashua;

and 6 inches in Hudson and Manchester.

NEW JERSEY, Northeast

NJZ003-005>006-011

0 0

A weak high pressure ridge extended

southwest across the region from New

England as a low pressure system

intensified and moved northeast. This

strong low passed south of Long Island

Monday night and east of the New England

coast during Tuesday.

Light snow developed northeast across

the region between 1 and 3 pm Monday

afternoon. As the low rapidly

intensified and moved closer to the

region, narrow bands of heavy snow swept

northeast across the region. The last

band of heavy snow swept northeast

across the region between 5 am and 6:30

am Tuesday morning, March 1 st. Storm

Total Snowfall amounts ranged from 5

to 10 inches.

Here are selected snowfall totals for:

Bergen County – from 5.4 inches at River

Vale to 7.5 inches at Lodi.

Union County – from 6.3 inches at

Garwood to 7.6 inches at Elizabeth.

Essex County – from 6.0 inches at

Bloomfield to 9.5 inches at Newark

Airport.

Hudson County – from 5 .3 inches at

Bayonne to 8.0 inches at Harrison.

NJZ003>006-011 Bergen – Eastern Passaic – Essex –

Hudson – Union

08 0

A strong arctic cold front intensified

as it swept southeast across the region.

This caused rain to change to snow,

temperatures to fall from the 40s into

the 20s, and northwest winds that gusted

between 40 and 55 mph. Near blizzard

conditions occurred for a short time.

Storm total snowfalls ranged from around

2 to 4 inches.

Wet and mild antecedent conditions were

followed by more than a 20 degree drop

in temperature in 3 hours with strong

gusty winds. This resulted in a “flash”

freeze across roads that resulted in

hundreds of vehicle accidents.

NEW JERSEY, South and Northwest

NJZ001-007>010-

012>020-027

0 0

NJZ021>022-026

0 0

Heavy snow fell across northern and

southwestern New Jersey from the morning

of February 28th into the morning of the

1st. Across coastal Ocean County,

interior Atlantic County and Cumberland

County precipitation fell as snow, but

mixed with rain at times during the

daytime on February 28th. Temperatures

in these areas remained above freezing

until the evening of February 28th and

slowed the accumulations. Precipitation

fell as mainly rain in Cape May County

and coastal Atlantic County until the

rain changed to snow late in the evening

of February 28th. Snow began during the

morning of February 28th in the southern

half of the state and from around Noon

EST into the afternoon in the northern

half of the state. Heavier bands of

accumulating snow moved over the

southwestern and northern parts of the

state during the afternoon and evening

of February 28th. The snow ended across

the southern half of the state before

the sun rose on the 1st and ended during

the morning in the northern half of the

state. Accumulations averaged 4 to 8

inches, with some higher amounts in

Sussex and Warren Counties and lower

amounts in the southeastern part of the

state.

Many schools dismissed early on February

28th. Rutgers University cancelled all

its classes after 430 p.m. EST on

February 28th. Many after school

activities and classes as well as

municipal and school board meetings were

cancelled. Many minor accidents occurred.

In Burlington County, a 17-year-old boy,

a 17-year-old girl and their 41-year-old

bus driver were injured when two school

buses collided in Medford Township.

Specific accumulations included 9.6

inches in Barry Lakes (Sussex County),

9.1 inches in Belvidere (Warren County),

9.0 inches in Califon (Hunterdon County),

8.9 inches in Sparta (Sussex County),

8.6 inches in Stewartsville (Warren

County), 8.0 inches in Southampton

(Burlington County), Milton (morris

County) and Wrightstown (Burlington

County), 7.9 inches in West Windsor

(Mercer County), 7.8 inches in Marcella

(Morris County), 7.6 inches in Wertsville

(Hunterdon County), 7.5 inches in Butler

(Morris County) and Hackettstown (Warren

County), 7.2 inches in Pottersville

(Somerset County), 7.0 inches in

Lindenwold (Camden County) and Clarksboro

(Gloucester County), 6.8 inches in

Medford (Burlington County) and Metuchen

(Middlesex County), 6.7 inches in New

Brunswick (Middlesex County), Somerville

(Somerset County) and Cream Ridge

(Monmouth County), 6.3 inches in West

Windsor (Mercer County), 6.0 inches in

Pennsauken (Camden County), Whippany

(Morris County) and Flemington (Hunterdon

County), 5.8 inches in Manchester (Ocean

County), 5.5 inches in Verga (Gloucester

County) and Monroeville (Salem County),

5.0 inches in New Egypt (Ocean County),

4.4 inches in Hammonton (Atlantic

County), 3.8 inches in Seabrook

(Cumberland County), 1.3 inches at the

Atlantic City International Airport and

1.0 inch in Margate (Atlantic County)

and Brant Beach (Ocean County).

The wintry weather was caused by a true

northeaster. A low pressure system

developed in the Gulf of Mexico on

Sunday February 27th. It moved northeast

and already was a 995 millibar low

pressure system when it was near

Jacksonville, Florida at 7 p.m. EST on

February 27th. It moved northeast and

deepened to a 992 millibar low near

Charleston, South Carolina at 1 a.m. EST

on February 28th, a 990 millibar low

near Wilmington, North Carolina at 7

a.m. EST on February 28th, a 984

millibar low just east of Elizabeth City,

North Carolina at 1 p.m. EST on February

28th, a 980 millibar low about 150 miles

east of Fenwick Island, Delaware at 7

p.m. EST on February 28th and still a

980 millibar low about 250 miles east

of Long Beach Island, New Jersey at 1

a.m. EST on the 1st. The combination of

the low pressure system’s storm track

being fairly offshore, the lack of a

surface high pressure system to its

north and marginal surface temperatures

for snow kept accumulations from being

heavier.

NJZ014-024>026

0 0 0

NJZ014-024>026

0 0 0

Moderate beach erosion and minor tidal

flooding occurred with the northeaster

along the New Jersey Coast. The most

intense onshore flow occurred from mid

morning on February 28th into the early

morning of the 1st. Minor tidal flooding

occurred with the overnight high tide.

The intense and offshore storm track the

low pressure system took gave the New

Jersey coast about a 12 hour period of

intense northeast winds (25 to 35 mph)

and this led to the minor tidal flooding

and beach erosion. In Monmouth County, 2

to 3 foot vertical cuts were common from

Asbury Park south. In Ocean County, in

Harvey Cedars, a 5 foot vertical by 10

foot horizontal cut occurred to 800 feet

of dune from Bergen to Cumberland

Avenues. Two to four foot vertical cuts

were common from Ship Bottom additional

south. In Beach Haven, there was a

complete loss of berm protection and an

8 foot loss of sand at the Merivale

Avenue street end. One house was now

exposed to the ocean. In Atlantic

County, two to four foot vertical cuts

occurred, except in Ventnor where the

vertical cut reached five feet at the

south end of the city. Walkways and

fences were also damaged. Some walkways

now ended at the water’s edge. The

Ventnor Beach was just rebuilt in 2004.

In Cape May County, Ocean City was hit

the hardest with 3 to 4 foot vertical

cuts from the fishing to the amusement

pier and an 8 to 10 foot cut from 8th

Street to Seaspray Avenue with dune

fencing down in some areas. Elsewhere in

the county, vertical cuts averaged 1 to

3 feet. Sea Isle City reported loss of

dune fencing and rocks were exposed.

The overnight (February 28th) high tide

reached 6.78 feet above mean lower low

water at Sandy Hook (Monmouth County)

and 6.80 feet above mean lower low water

at Cape May (Cape May County). Minor

tidal flooding begins at 6.7 feet above

mean lower low water.

The minor tidal flooding and beach

erosion was caused by a northeaster. The

low pressure system developed in the

Gulf of Mexico on Sunday February 27th.

It moved northeast and was near

Jacksonville, Florida at 7 p.m. EST on

February 27th. It moved northeast and

deepened and was near Charleston, South

Carolina at 1 a.m. EST on February 28th,

just cast of Wilmington, North Carolina

at 7 a.m. EST on February 28th, just

east of Elizabeth City, North Carolina

at 1 p.m. EST on February 28th, and

deepened to a 980 millibar low about 150

miles east of Fenwick Island, Delaware

at 7 p.m. EST on February 28th. The low

remained about the same strength (980

millibar) as it passed about 250 miles

east of Long Beach Island, New Jersey

at 1 a.m. EST on the 1st. The lack of a

surface high pressure system to the

north of this system prevented the

pressure gradient and hence the winds,

heavy surf and tidal flooding from being

worse.

NJZ001-007>010-

120>027

0 0

The combination of a strong cold frontal

passage during the morning of the 8th

and a rapidly intensifying low pressure

system off the Middle Atlantic and New

England States brought snow and plunging

temperatures during the day on the 8th.

Actual accumulations averaged an inch or

two in the southern part of New Jersey

and 2 to 4 inches in the northern part

of the state. The snow combined with the

sharp drop in temperatures to bring

treacherous driving conditions on

untreated roadways during the afternoon

and evening and countless accidents

occurred, especially in the northern

half of the state.

Precipitation started as rain before

sunrise on the 8th. The cold front moved

through New Jersey between 7 a.m. and 10

a.m. EST (from northwest to southeast)

as a low pressure system on the front

was intensifying. Temperatures dropped

quickly behind this front both at the

surface and aloft. The rain changed to

snow between 8 a.m. (northwest areas

first) and Noon EST (southeast areas

last). About an hour after the

precipitation changed to snow,

temperatures dropped below freezing

as the snow continued to fall. The snow

ended during the mid and late afternoon

from west to east across the state. But,

its lingering effects lasted well into

the morning rush on the 9th as the wind

blew the snow back on the road.

Townships averaged about a dozen weather

related accidents, especially in the

northern half of the state. In Hunterdon

County, Interstate 78 was closed for

five miles because of more than twenty

accidents. About 75 accidents were

reported across northern New Jersey

on interstates 287, 78 and 80 and New

Jersey State Route 24. In Somerset

County, an accident on westbound

Interstate 78 that involved a tractor-

trailer and vehicle caused serious

injuries. In Monmouth County, a roadway

was closed in Holmdel Township after a

vehicle knocked down a pole. Problems in

Monmouth County persisted through the

next morning as multiple accidents in

the southbound lanes of New Jersey State

Route 18 in Colts Neck closed the road

for several hours. In Long Branch, nine

accidents occurred within 45 minutes.

Many after school activities and classes

were cancelled on the 8th. The regional

spelling bee in Monmouth County was

postponed.

Specific snow accumulations included 4.0

inches in Oakhurst (Monmouth County) and

Brick Township (Ocean County), 3.5 inches

in Manalapan (Monmouth County), 3.0

inches in Wantage (Sussex County), 2.8

inches in Marcella (Moms County) and

Stewartsville (Warren County), 2.5

inches in Florence (Burlington County)

and Skillman (Somerset County), 2.3

inches in Ewing (Mercer County), 2.0

inches in Metuchen (Middlesex County),

1.9 inches in Somerdale (Camden County),

1.5 inches in Tabernacle (Burlington

County) and East Amwell Township

(Hunterdon County), 1.4 inches in

Chatham (Morris County), 1.0 inch in

Seabrook (Cumberland County) and 0.3

inches at the Atlantic City

International Airport.

The snow was caused by the combination

of the cold frontal passage and the

rapidly intensifying low pressure system

that developed on the front during the

morning of the 8th. The low moved

northeast and was an already intense 986

mb near Danville, Virginia at 7 a.m. EST

on the 8th. From there it continued to

move northeast and deepened to a 978 mb

low just east of Long Beach Island, New

Jersey at 1 p.m. EST on the 8th, to a

970 mb low over Nantucket Island,

Massachusetts at 7 p.m. EST on the 8th

to a 964 mb low just southwest of

Yarmouth, Nova Scotia at 1 a.m. EST on

the 9th.

NJZ001-007>010-012-

014>023-025>027

0 0 25K

NJZ013-024

0 0 10K

In addition to the snow, strong gusty

northwest winds developed during the

afternoon and evening of the 8th as a

low pressure system intensified off the

Middle Atlantic and New England States.

Wind gusts reached around 70 mph in Cape

May County. The strong winds caused

isolated power outages throughout New

Jersey and hampered snow removal crews

as it blew snow back onto already

cleared or salted roads. Peak wind gusts

included 72 mph in Strathmere (Cape May

County), 70 mph in Cape May (Cape May

County), 64 mph in Keansburg (Monmouth

County), 63 mph at High Point (the

highest point in New Jersey in Sussex

County), 57 mph in Sandy Hook (Monmouth

County) and Bamegat Light (Ocean County),

50 mph in Atlantic City (Atlantic

County), 49 mph in Wrightstown

(Burlington County), 45 mph in Millville

(Cumberland County) and 44 mph in

Trenton (Mercer County).

The strong winds were caused by a

rapidly intensifying low pressure system

that developed on the cold front during

the morning of the 8th. The low moved

northeast and was an already intense 986

mb near Danville, Virginia at 7 a.m. EST

on the 8th. From there it continued to

move northeast and deepened to a 978 mb

low just east of Long Beach Island, New

Jersey at 1 p.m. EST on the 8th, to a

970 mb low over Nantucket Island,

Massachusetts at 7 p.m. EST on the 8th

to a 964 mb low just southwest of

Yarmouth, Nova Scotia at 1 a.m. EST on

the 9th.

NJZ001-007>008

0 0

Snow fell across northwest New Jersey

during the evening and overnight on the

11th and accumulated between two and

five inches in most areas with the

highest accumulations over the higher

terrain. Snow began in Sussex County

during the evening of the 11th and

spread into Morris and Warren Counties

by Midnight EST. The snow ended before

sunrise on the 12th. Untreated and less

traveled roads were treacherous. Specific

accumulations included 4.9 inches in

Marcella (Morris County), 2.5 inches in

Butler and Randolph (Morris County) and

2.0 inches in Wantage (Sussex County).

The snow was caused by an “Alberta type”

low pressure system that moved from

northern Minnesota on the morning of the

10th east into Lake Erie around sunrise

on the 11th. The low moved through

Northwest New Jersey during the evening

on the 11th and intensified as it moved

east reaching just south of Nantucket,

Massachusetts around sunrise on the

12th. Heavier snow fell farther to the

northeast.

NJZ012

0 0 0

A brushfire with 30 to 40-foot-high

flames burned across 75 to 100 acres in

Raritan Center within Edison Township.

The fire could be seen from Rahway

(Union County) to East Brunswick (within

Middlesex County). The fire burned for

about six hours until firefighters

finished dousing the blaze. One dozen

municipalities, twenty-three fire

departments and one hundred and three

firefighters responded to the scene. The

brushfire began in an area with 10 to

12-foot-high reeds that were very dry.

Gusty northwest winds led to a longer

battle with the fire. The peak wind gust

at Newark International Airport for the

day was 30 mph and the average wind speed

of 16.1 mph was the fifth windiest day

of March 2005.

NJZ001

0 0

A high pressure ridge that extended from

James Bay, Canada to the Middle Atlantic

coastal waters left enough cold air in

place near the surface to cause a wintry

mix of precipitation to occur during the

first half of the day on the 20th.

Precipitation moved in aloft preceding a

warm front and fell as mainly freezing

rain over the higher terrain of Sussex

County between 3 a.m. and 11 a.m. EST.

Ice accretions were less than one-tenth

of an inch. Some snow and sleet mixed in

with any accumulations less than one-

quarter of an inch. By 11 a.m. EST

enough warm air moved in at the surface

to change the precipitation over to

plain rain in all areas. Untreated

roadways were hazardous before the

change to plain rain.

NJZ001

0 0

NJZ007>010

0 0

A low pressure system exiting the United

States from the Delmarva Peninsula

brought rain and then snow to Warren and

Moms Counties and heavy snow to Sussex

County. Accumulations averaged 2 to 5

inches in most of Warren and Morris

Counties and 5 to 8 inches across the

higher terrain of Warren and Morris

Counties and in Sussex County. Farther

south, about an inch or two of snow fell

in Somerset and Hunterdon Counties.

Following the pattern of other winter

storms this season, the accumulating

snow hit the evening commute the hardest

which was described as a nightmare.

Precipitation in northwest New Jersey

(except in Sussex County) started as rain

during the morning of the 23rd and

changed to snow during the afternoon.

The change to snow worked its way from

the higher terrain downward. Across

Sussex County, precipitation fell mainly

as snow. In all areas the snow continued

through the night and ended just before

sunrise on the 24th.

Numerous and mostly minor accidents

occurred mainly during the evening

commute. One fatal accident occurred in

White Township (Warren County) when a

61-year-old woman died. She lost control

of her vehicle on County Route 519 and

slid sideways into an oncoming van. The

vehicle then struck a guardrail. The

driver and passenger of the van suffered

minor injuries. The evening commute was

progressively worse on the Pennsylvania

side of the Delaware River.

Accumulations included 7.7 inches in

Wantage (Sussex County), 6.8 inches in

Barry Lakes (Sussex County), 6.7 inches

in Marcella (Morris County), 5.5 inches

in Blairstown (Warren County), 5.0

inches in Rockaway (Morris County), 3.0

inches in Chatham (Morris County), 2.5

inches in Hackettstown (Warren County)

and Morristown (Moms County), 2.0 inches

in Pottersville (Somerset County), 1.9

inches in Belvidere (Warren County) and

1.0 inch in Flemington (Hunterdon

County).

The late winter storm was caused by a

low pressure system that formed in the

Southern Plains States on the 21st and

moved east and reached Memphis, Tennessee

early in the evening on the 22nd, in

central Kentucky around sunrise on the

23rd, just west of Norfolk at 1 p.m. EST

on the 23rd, just east of Wallops Island,

Virginia at 7 p.m. EST on the 23rd and

about 200 miles cast of Cape May, New

Jersey at 1 a.m. EST on the 24th.

NJZ001

0 0

Pockets of freezing rain occurred across

Sussex County during the overnight of

March 27th. As rain moved into the

region on the evening of the 27th, some

surface temperatures cooled to or below

the freezing mark. Light freezing rain

fell through the night until temperatures

rose above freezing shortly after sunrise

on the 28th. Ice accretions were up to

two-tenths of an inch. Untreated roadways

and walkways were slippery.

The nearest surface high pressure system

at the onset of the rain was south of

Novas Scotia and could not lock in the

cold air near the surface. In addition,

the surface pressure difference (and thus

the wind) between the low pressure system

arriving from the Gulf Coast States and

the departing high pressure system

produced enough of a southeast wind to

scour away the cold air near the surface.

Burlington County

Countywide 0 0

Salem County

Countywide 0 0

Gloucester County

Countywide 0 0

Hunterdon County

Countywide 0 0

Sussex County

Countywide 0 0

Warren County

Countywide 0 0

Middlesex County

Countywide 0 0

Monmouth County

Countywide 0 0

Heavy rain caused poor drainage flooding

and left the region vulnerable to any

additional heavy rain as the ground was

saturated. Rain began falling during the

late evening on the 27th, but fell at its

heaviest during the afternoon and evening

of the 28th as scattered thunderstorms

occurred. The rain ended by late that

evening. The evening commute was more

difficult as usual as there was much

ponding of water in poor drainage

locations. Storm totals averaged around

two inches.

On the 30th, the combination of runoff

and melting snow led to isolated low-

lying area flooding along the Delaware

River in Warren County. In Harmony

Township, river flooding reached homes

on Riversedge Lane and River Road. The

Delaware River at Ricgelsville crested

at 21.3 feet that morning. Flood stage

at that location is 22 feet.

Storm totals included 2.65 in Freehold

(Monmouth County), 2.58 inches in Sussex

(Sussex County), 2.14 inches in Andover

(Sussex County), 2.10 inches in Newton

(Sussex County), 2.06 inches in Califon

(Hunterdon County), 2.04 inches in

Belvidere (Warren County), 2.02 inches

in Riegclsville (Warren County), 1.95

inches in New Lisbon (Burlington County),

1.88 inches in Bloomsbury (Hunterdon

County), 1.75 inches in West Deptford

(Gloucester County), 1.74 inches in

Mount Laurel (Burlington County), 1.72

inches in Columbia (Warren County), 1.65

inches in Willingboro (Burlington County)

and 1.60 inches in Mount Holly

(Burlington County).

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both

the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic

Ocean. The low pressure system moved

from western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on

the 27th northeast to eastern Tennessee

at 7 p.m. EST on the 27th and eastern

Kentucky at 7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A

secondary low pressure system formed

over North Carolina during the morning

of the 28th. It would become the main

low pressure system as it moved northeast

to near Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m.

EST on the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m.

EST on the 29th and about 100 miles east

of Atlantic City at 7 a.m. EST on the

29th.

NJZ018

0 0

The combination of heavy rain and

saturated ground from recent heavy rains

caused poor drainage and some river

flooding in Camden County. Rain began

falling during the late evening on the

27th, but fell at its heaviest during

the afternoon and evening of the 28th as

thunderstorms occurred. Storm totals

averaged between one and two inches.

The Cooper River at Haddonfield was above

its 2.8 foot flood stage from 529 p.m.

through 845 p.m. EST on the 28th. It

crested at 2.88 feet at 630 p.m. EST.

Storm totals included 1.91 inches in

Somerdale, 1.72 inches in Audubon, 1.66

inches in Pennsauken and 1.40 inches in

Cherry Hill.

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both the

Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean.

The low pressure system moved from

western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on the

27th northeast to eastern Tennessee at

7 p.m. EST on the 27th and eastern

Kentucky at 7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A

secondary low pressure system formed

over North Carolina during the morning

of the 28th. It would become the main

low pressure system as it moved northeast

to near Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m.

EST on the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m.

EST on the 29th and about 100 miles east

of Atlantic City at 7 a.m. EST on the

29th.

NJZ015

0 0

The combination of heavy rain and

saturated ground from recent heavy rains

caused poor drainage and some creek

flooding in Mercer County. Rain began

falling during the late evening on the

27th, but fell at its heaviest during

the afternoon and evening of the 28th as

thunderstorms occurred. Storm totals

averaged between one and two inches.

The Assunpink Creek at Trenton was above

its 7 foot flood stage from 609 p.m.

through 1118 p.m. EST on the 28th. It

crested at 7.33 feet at 9 p.m. EST.

Storm totals included 2.00 inches in

Windsor, 1.72 inches in Hightstown, 1.66

inches in Washington’s Crossing and 1.46

inches in Trenton.

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both

the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic

Ocean. The low pressure system moved from

western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on the

27th northeast to eastern Tennessee at

7 p.m. EST on the 27th and eastern

Kentucky at 7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A

secondary low pressure system formed

over North Carolina during the morning

of the 28th. It would become the main

low pressure system as it moved northeast

to near Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m. EST

on the 29th and about 100 miles east of

Atlantic City at 7 a.m. EST on the 29th.

NJZ010

0 0

The combination of heavy rain and

saturated ground caused poor drainage

and some river flooding in Somerset

County. Rain began falling during the

late evening on the 27th, but fell at

its heaviest during the afternoon and

evening of the 28th as thunderstorms

occurred. Storm totals averaged around

two inches.

The Millstone River at Griggstown was

above its 10 foot flood stage from 730

p.m. EST on the 28th through 1045 a.m.

EST on the 30th. It crested at 12.3 feet

at 8 a.m. EST on the 29th. The North

Branch of the Raritan River at South

Branch was above its 7 foot flood stage

from 640 p.m. EST on the 28th through

733 a.m. EST on the 29th. It crested at

8.7 feet at Midnight EST on the 29th.

Storm totals included 2.40 inches in

Basking Ridge, 2.12 inches in Far Hills,

1.96 inches in North Plainfield, 1.90

inches in Somerville and 1.44 inches in

Belle Mead.

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both the

Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean.

The low pressure system moved from

western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on the 27th

northeast to eastern Tennessee at 7 p.m.

EST on the 27th and eastern Kentucky at

7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A secondary low

pressure system formed over North

Carolina during the morning of the 28th.

It would become the main low pressure

system as it moved northeast to near

Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST on the

28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m. EST on

the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m. EST on

and about 100 miles cast of Atlantic

City at 7 a.m. EST on the 29th.

NJZ016>019

0 0 0

The combination of runoff from the heavy

rain, the funneling of water into Delaware

Bay and higher than normal astronomical

tides coming off the full moon produced

minor tidal flooding at the times of high

tide early in the morning on the 29th.

The high tide in Burlington reached 9.94

feet above mean lower low water. Minor

tidal flooding begins at 9.0 feet above

mean lower low water. The high tide at

Philadelphia Pier 12 reached 8.35 feet

above mean lower low water. Minor tidal

flooding begins there at 8.2 feet above

mean lower low water. Less widespread

minor tidal flooding occurred with the

early morning high tides on the 30th and

31st.

The onshore flow was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast from

western Alabama on the morning of the

27th. It reformed over North Carolina

during the morning of the 28th and become

the main low pressure system as it moved

northeast to near Norfolk, Virginia

during the afternoon on the 28th,

through Chesapeake Bay the evening on

the 28th, across Delaware Bay around

Midnight EST on the 29th and about then

cast of Atlantic City by sunrise on the

29th. The counterclockwise circulation

around this low helped push water into

Delaware Bay and slow the runoff from

the nearby heavy rain and the snowmelt

from the upper parts of the Delaware

River.

NJZ008

0 0

The combination of heavy rain and melting

snow produced poor drainage and river

flooding in Morris County that lasted

well into April. Rain began falling

during the late evening on the 27th, but

fell at its heaviest during the afternoon

and evening of the 28th as thunderstorms

occurred. Storm totals averaged around

three inches. Lincoln Park Borough was

one of the hardest hit municipalities

in the county as they received flooding

near the Pompton and Passaic River

confluence and the Beaver Brook. Several

roads were barricaded. In Denville, some

backyards were flooded by the Rockaway

River.

The Rockaway River above the Boonton

Reservoir was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 315 a.m. EST through 956 p.m.

EST on the 29th. It crested at 5.47 feet

at 10 a.m. EST. The Rockaway River below

the Boonton Reservoir was above its 5

foot flood stage from 307 a.m. EST on the

29th through 530 a.m. EST on the 31st.

It crested at 6.37 feet at 1045 a.m. EST

on the 29th. The Pequannock River at the

Macopin Intake Dam was above its 5.5 foot

flood stage from 445 a.m.EST on the 29th

through 2 a.m. EST on the 30th. It

crested at 5.59 feet at 1015 a.m. EST on

the 29th. The Passaic River at Pine Brook

was above its 19 foot flood stage from

1030 p.m. EST on the 29th through 515 p.m.

EST on April 1st. It crested at 19.41

feet at 645 p.m. EST on the 30th. Farther

downstream, the Passaic River at Two

Bridges was above its 9 foot flood stage

from 10 p.m. EST on the 29th through 4

p.m. EDT on April 9th. The March highest

crest was 10.26 feet at 3 a.m. EST on the

31st. Storm totals included 3.30 inches

in Milton, 2.88 inches in Pequannock,

2.70 inches in Boonton, 2.60 inches in

Lake Hopatcong and Morristown and 1.87

inches in Chatham.

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both

the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic

Ocean. The low pressure system moved

from western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on

the 27th northeast to eastern Tennessee

at 7 p.m. EST on the 27th and eastern

Kentucky at 7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A

secondary low pressure system formed

over North Carolina during the morning

of the 28th. It would become the main

low pressure system as it moved northeast

to near Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m.

EST on the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m.

EST on the 29th and about 100 miles east

of Atlantic City at 7 a.m. EST on the

29th.

NEW MEXICO, Central and North

NMZ002>006-008-

010>013

0 0

A storm which began with heavy snows

along the eastern slopes of the Sangre

de Cristo mountains and the Sandia

mountains pushed cold air through the

central valleys and covered the eastern

plains with cold readings. Amounts peaked

at near 17-19 inches at Chacon and Pecos

while 24-28 inches was measured near

Gascon. The Sandia Park area reported

15-22 inches. Snow eventually spread west

in the central valley with 4-8 inches

reported in Albuquerque metro area and

nearly 12 inches across the Jcmcz

Mountains and Los Alamos with 10 inches

reported cast and southeast of Cuba. The

storm dumped 4 to 9 inches across the

eastern plains as it finally moved east

out of the state, Mountain communities

northwest of Las Vegas had 48 hours

totals of 30-36 inches.

NMZ016

0 0

High winds reported at Sierra Blanca

Airport 15 NE of Ruidoso.

NMZ005-007

0 0

Heavy snow of 6-8 inches was reported

between Raton and Clayton with driving

winds.

NEW MEXICO, South Central and Southwest

NEW MEXICO, Southeast

NMZ028

0 0 0 0

Winter weather affected parts of New

Mexico during the day on the 15th. Light

snow accumulations up to one inch were

reported across the northwestern half of

the Eddy County plains.

NMZ029

0 0 0 0

More significant snowfall occurred over

northern Lea County on the 15th as a

winter storm affected portions of the

New Mexico plains. Between four and five

inch snow accumulations were reported

across northern Lea County from Caprock

to Crossroads.

NMZ028-033

0 0 55K 0

A potent storm system moved east over

the Southern Plains on the 29th and

caused severe non-thunderstorm winds over

southeastern New Mexico. Numerous reports

of downed power lines and poles were

received along with reports of blown down

trees. The roof was blown off of a

trailer home near Hobbs. Wind gusts to

58 MPH were recorded at both the

Carlsbad and Hobbs airports.

NEW YORK, Central

NYZ009-015>018-

022>025-036>037-

044>046-055>057-062

0 0 360K

A strong winter storm brought 8 to 14

inches of snow to all of central New

York. Isolated snow amounts were as much

as two feet. A Midwest storm slowly moved

east and combined with another storm

moving north along the east coast on

February 27th to bring copious moisture

to the region on February 28th. The snow

moved in from the south starting in the

afternoon and early evening on February

28th. The snow continued through the

night, heavy at times, before tapering

off to light snow and flurries late in

the morning on March 1st.

NYZ056>057-062

0 0 30K

An intensifying storm moved north along

the east coast on March 23rd and 24th.

Light snow, possibly mixed with rain,

moved into the region midday on the 23rd.

The snow became heavy at times late in

the afternoon and continued into the

evening. Snowfall amounts were 6 to 8

inches with some amounts up to a foot

mainly at higher elevations. Water

equivalents of the snow were between

half an inch and an inch.

Otsego County

Gilbertsville 0 0 5K

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches. A few locations received more

than 3 inches. In addition, snowmelt was

causing high stream flows before the

rain started late on the 27th. The

flooding caused Mill Street to be closed

in Gilbertsville.

Tioga County

Countywide 0 0 50K

State Route 96 in Owego closed due to

flooding of the Owego Creek. Several

other roads were closed in Tioga Center

and Berkshire. Most roads were closed due

to flooding with one road in Berkshire

closed due to a mudslide. A strong

Atlantic coast storm brought around 2

inches of rain that fell on wet or

frozen saturated ground. In addition to

the rain adding to the runoff there was

snowmelt, which could of added another

inch or 2 of water equivalent. Streams

and creeks were already running high due

to snowmelt before the rain came starting

late on the 27th.

NYZ055

0 0 20K

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Susquehanna River at Waverly,

NY / Sayre, PA rose above its flood stage

of 11 feet on the 28th, crested at 15.08

feet at 12 AM on the 30th, then fell

slowly but stayed over flood stage into

April. After the rainstorm, temperatures

were warm enough to cause additional

snowmelt.

NYZ057

0 0 10K

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Beaver Kill at Cooks Falls

went above its flood stage of 10 feet the

evening of the 28th. The river crested at

10.42 feet at 5:15 AM on the 29th, before

falling back below flood stage late

morning on the 29th.

NYZ045

0 0 10K

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Susquehanna River at

Bainbridge went above its flood stage of

13 feet late on the 28th, crested at 15.3

feet at 8 PM on the 29th, then fell below

flood stage on the 31 st. Additional

snowmelt after the rainstorm caused to

river to remain high.

Sullivan County

Bloomingburg 0 0 10K

Heavy rain washed out a road. A strong

Atlantic storm dropped 2 to 3 inches of

rain on an already saturated ground. Most

of the rain fell on the 28th. Also adding

to the runoff was several inches of water

equivalent from snowmelt.

NYZ056

0 0 20K

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Susquehanna River at Conklin

went above its flood stage of 11 feet

early on the 29th, crested at 15.09 feet

at 2:30 PM on the 29th. The river stayed

above flood stage into April due to

additional snowmelt.

NYZ056

0 0 20K

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Susquehanna River at Vestal

went above its flood stage of 18 feet

early on the 29th, crested at 20.80 feet

at 6:00 PM also on the 29th, then fell

back below flood stage on the 31st.

Additional snowmelt occurred after the

rainstorm keeping river levels high.

NYZ045

0 0 5K

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition snowmelt

before and after the rainstorm was

causing elevated river flows. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few

more inches. The Susquehanna River at

Bainbridge went briefly below its flood

stage of 13 feet on the 31st before

rising back over flood stage.

Temperatures in the 50s on the 31st

caused added snowmelt rising the river.

Another slow moving storm from the Ohio

Valley brought 2 to 3 inches of rain

on April 2nd and 3rd. By the time the

river fell below flood stage most of the

snow had melted. This additional rain

and snowmelt caused the river to rise

rapidly to a crest of 20.47 feet at 4:15

AM on April 4th. This was the 6th highest

crest at Bainbridge for almost the last

100 years. The river fell below flood

stage the morning of April 6th.

NYZ044

0 0 5K

The Tioughnioga River at Cortland rose

above its flood stage of 8 feet late on

March 31st. The rise was due to rain that

fell on March 28th and snowmelt during

the week leading up to the 31st. The

water equivalent of the snow amounted to

several inches. A slow moving storm from

the Ohio Valley brought 2 to 3 inches of

rain on April 2nd and 3rd. By the time

the river fell below flood stage most of

the snow had melted. This additional rain

and snowmelt caused the river to rise to

a crest of 14.07 feet at 2:00 PM EST on

April 3th. This was a record flood crest

at Cortland. The previous flood of record

was 13.82 feet in 1950.

NYZ045

0 0 5K

The Chenango River at Sherbume rose above

its flood stage of 8 feet late on the

31st. The rise was due to rain that fell

on the 28th and snowmelt during the week

leading up to the 31st. The water

equivalent of the snow amounted to

several inches. A slow moving storm from

the Ohio Valley brought 2 to 3 inches of

rain on April 2nd and 3rd. By the time

the river fell below flood stage most

of the snow had melted. This additional

rain and snowmelt caused the river to

rise to a crest of 10.78 feet at 2:30 AM

on April 3th. This was the 2nd highest

flood crest at Sherbume.

NEW YORK, Coastal

NYZ068>072-

074>076-078>079-081

0 0

A weak high pressure ridge extended

southwest across the region from New

England as a low pressure system

intensified and moved northeast. This

strong low passed south of Long Island

Monday night and cast of the New England

coast during Tuesday.

Light snow developed northeast across

the region between 1 and 4 pm Monday

afternoon. As the low rapidly intensified

and moved closer to the region, narrow

bands of heavy snow swept northeast

across the region. The last band of

heavy snow swept northeast across the

region between 7:30 am and 8:30 am

Tuesday morning, March 1st. Storm Total

Snowfall amounts ranged from 5 to 9

inches.

Here are selected snowfall totals for:

Rockland County – from 7.2 inches at New

City to 8.0 inches at Sloatsburg.

Westchester County – from 5.0 inches at

Scarsdale to 8.0 inches at Yorktown

Heights.

Putnam County – from 6.5 inches at Lake

Peekskill to 8.5 inches at Lake Carmel.

New York (Manhattan) – 7.5 inches was

measured at the Central Park Zoo.

Richmond (Staten Island) – from 6.1

inches at Bulls Head to 6.5 inches at

New Dorf.

Kings (Brooklyn) – from 5.0 inches at

Graves End to 6.0 inches at Shecpshead

Bay.

Queens County – from 5.0 inches at JFK

Airport to 7.0 inches at LaGuardia

Airport.

Suffolk County – from 5.5 inches at the

NWS Office in Upton, Sag Harbor,

Patchogue, and Deer Park to 7.2 inches

in Smithtown.

At Islip Airport, 6.6 inches was

measured.

NYZ069>081

0 0

NYZ076

0 0

A strong arctic cold front intensified

as it swept southeast across the region.

This caused rain to change to snow,

temperatures to fall from the 40s into

the 20s, and northwest winds that gusted

between 40 and 55 mph. A peak isolated

wind gust to 58 mph was measured by the

Automated Surface Observing System at

JFK Airport. Near blizzard conditions

occurred for a short time. Storm total

snowfalls ranged from around 2 to 4

inches.

Wet and mild antecedent conditions were

followed by more than a 20 degree drop

in temperature in 3 hours with strong

gusty winds. This resulted in a “flash”

freeze across roads that resulted in

hundreds of vehicle accidents.

NYZ078-080

0 0

A low pressure system developed southeast

of Long Island before sunrise on Saturday

March 12th. This low quickly intensified

as it moved northeast. It passed near

Nantucket during Saturday afternoon and

moved east of Cape Cod by Saturday

evening.

Light rain developed across the Atlantic

coastal waters just south of Long Island

between 1 am and 2 am. As the rainfall

intensity increased, it quickly changed

to heavy wet snow. The band of heavy snow

developed from western and central

Suffolk County north across New Haven

County CT. A few areas, mainly east of

Patchogue, experienced snowfall rates in

excess of 2 inches per hour.

Storm total snowfall amounts ranged from

around 5 to 8 inches. Here are selected

amounts of at least 6 inches:

Patchogue – 8 inches

Lake Ronkonkoma – 7.5 inches

Rocky Point – 6.8 inches

Mount Sinai – 6.7 inches

Sayville – 6.5 inches

Shoreham – 6.4 inches

Port Jefferson – 6.3 inches

Medford and North Patchogue – 6.0 inches

NYZ067>068

0 0

As a ridge of high pressure extended

southeast across New England, a low

pressure system moved northeast along

a warm front. The low quickly passed

southeast of Long Island early

Thursday morning on March 24th.

Snow quickly developed and spread

northeast across the region during

Wednesday afternoon. It became heavy

during Wednesday evening. Storm total

snowfall amounts ranged from around

6 to 10 inches. In Orange County,

snowfall accumulations ranged from

6.0 inches at Cornwall-On-Hudson to

10.0 inches at Circleville.

NEW YORK, East

NYZ066

0 0

NYZ065

0 0

The average total snowfall across

Dutchess County was 9 inches.

NYZ064

0 0

NYZ063

0 0

Average total snowfall across Ulster

County was 11 inches.

NYZ061

0 0

NYZ060

0 0

Average total snowfall across

Columbia County was 10 inches.

NYZ059

0 0

NYZ058

0 0

Average total snowfall across

Greene County was 11 inches.

NYZ052

0 0

NYZ051

0 0

Average total snowfall across

Albany County was 13 inches.

NYZ054

0 0

NYZ053

0 0

Average total snowfall across

Rensselaer County was 11 inches.

NYZ049

0 0

NYZ048

0 0

Average total snowfall across

Schenectady County was 11 inches.

NYZ047

0 0

Average total snowfall across

Schoharie County was 10 inches.

NYZ082

0 0

NYZ039

0 0

Average total snowfall across

Fulton County was 9 inches.

NYZ040

0 0

Average total snowfall across

Montgomery County was 9 inches.

NYZ041

0 0

NYZ050

0 0

Average total snowfall across

Saratoga County was 12 inches.

NYZ043

0 0

NYZ084

0 0

Average total snowfall across

Washington County was 11 inches.

NYZ033

0 0

Average total snowfall across

Hamilton County was 8 inches.

NYZ032

0 0

NYZ038

0 0

The average total snowfall across

Herkimer County was 8 inches.

NYZ042

0 0

NYZ083

0 0

The average total snowfall across

Warren County was 11 inches.

A surface low pressure was centered

along the mid-Atlantic Coast at the

beginning of March. This storm tracked

northeastward well off the eastern

seaboard, reaching southeast of Cape

Cod by midday on March 1. The storm

then moved into the Gulf of Maine

by late on March 1. At the same time,

another vertically stacked storm

moved slowly east from the Great

Lakes and interacted with the

low-level moisture from the surface

storm. The combination of the two

storms, along with a surface trough

anchored between them, resulted in a

significant snowstorm across much

of eastern New York and adjacent

western New England. Snowfall storm

totals across the region ranged

from 7 inches to a foot or more.

Officially, 11.7 inches of snow

fell at the National Weather Service

station in Albany. The heaviest

amount was reported in Bennington

County in Vermont, where 17.5 inches

of snow was reported in the Town

of Wadeford. Other than the usual

school and business closures, the

storm did not report any unusual

problems across the region.

NYZ053

0 0

NYZ054

0 0

The average snowfall across

Rensselaer County was 12 inches.

NYZ043

0 0

NYZ084

0 0

The average total snowfall across

Washington County was 9 inches.

A strong cold front moved across

eastern New York and adjacent western

New England on March 8th. As the

front slowed down across eastern New

England, a wave of low pressure

formed along it and eventually became

a closed storm system which

intensified as it moved into the

Canadian Maritimes. The front and

developing storm brought snow across

the region. A meso-scale band of

enhanced heavier snow and an upslope

wind component, resulted in heavy

snowfall across portions of the

Taconics and Berkshires. Gusty winds

also resulted in some blowing and

drifting of the snow, but not enough

to qualify as a blizzard. The

snowfall in these areas ranged from

7 inches to locally over a foot.

Seventeen inches was reported in

Averill Park, Rensselaer County, the

highest snowfall total. The snow and

blowing snow resulted minor traffic

accidents across the region.

NYZ051

0 0

The average snowfall total across

Western Albany County was 8.0 inches.

NYZ060

0 0

The average snowfall total across

Western Columbia County was 8.0 inches.

NYZ065

0 0

The average snowfall total across

Western Dutchess County was 8.0 inches.

NYZ059

0 0

NYZ058

0 0

The average snowfall total across

Greene County was 9.0 inches.

NYZ054

0 0

The average snowfall depth across

Eastern Rensselaer County was 7.0

inches.

NYZ064

0 0

NYZ063

0 0

The average snowfall depth across

Ulster County was 8.0 inches.

NYZ041

0 0

The average snowfall total across

Northern Saratoga County: 10.0

inches. Highest snowfall amount

reported in Gansevoort, 12 inches.

NYZ043

0 0

Average snowfall depth across

Northern Washington County: 10.0

inches. Highest snowfall amount in

Northern Washington County reported

in Cossayua, 12 inches.

The fourth coastal storm of the

month tracked from south of Long

Island to east of Cape Cod by early

March 24. This storm produced a

meso-scale band of heavy snow that

first fell to the south and west

of Albany. The band weakened as it

moved across the Greater Capital

District, but then strengthened as

it proceeded north in the Saratoga

region and Washington County. The

result was a significant snowfall

across portions of the Catskills,

Helderbergs, Saratoga region and

Taconics, while lesser amounts fell

across the remainder of the region.

A foot fell in two serperate spots,

Gansevoort, Saratoga County and

Cossayua, Washington County. No

unusual problems were reported with

this storm.

Montgomery County

Canajoharie 0 0

The Canajoharie Creek exceeded the

6.0-foot flood stage at the Canajoharie

Creek gage, cresting at 8.19 feet,

5:15PM on the 28th.

Schoharie County

Warnerville 0 0

The town of Warnerville was

impassable due to flooded roads.

Saratoga County

Bemis Hgts 0 0

Three roads closed, including Route

67 and Route 4, due to water coverage.

Washington County

Clarks Mills 0 0

County Route 113 closed due to

flooding.

Schenectady County

Glenville 0 0

Droms Road closed between Swaggertown

Road and Charlton Road due to flooding.

NYZ043

0 0

Metawee River over flood stage.

NYZ043

0 0

The Metawee River exceeded the

7.0-foot flood stage at the

Granville gage, cresting at 7.20

feet at 9:15 PM on the 28th.

NYZ064

0 0

Springtown Road flooded.

NYZ059

0 0

In Cairo, 15 County Roads closed

due to flooding. Eighteen Fire

companies pumped out basements

throughout county.

NYZ060

0 0

Every town in Columbia County

reported road closures due to

flooding.

NYZ050

0 0

The Mohawk River exceeded the

188.0-foot flood stage at the

Crescent Dam gage, cresting at

188.26 feet, at 3:OOAM on the 29th.

NYZ065

0 0

Due to tidal flooding as well as

locally heavy rain, the Hudson River

exceeded the 5.0-foot flood stage at

the Poughkeepsie gage, cresting at

5.05 feet, 2:30AM on the 29th.

NYZ066

0 0

In the Town of Northeast, Mill Road

closed due to flooding.

NYZ064

0 0

The Esopus Creek exceeded the

20.0-foot flood stage at the Mount

Marion gage, cresting at 20.54 feet,

8:OOAM on the 29th.

NYZ040

0 0

The Schoharie Creek exceeded the

6.0-foot flood stage at the

Burtonsville gage, cresting at 6.13

feet at 7:OOPM on the 29th.

NYZ065

0 0

Wappingers Creek exceeded the

8.0-foot flood stage at the

Wappingers Falls gage, cresting

at 8.09 feet, 4:30PM on the 29th.

NYZ038

0 0

The Mohawk River exceeded the

403.0-foot flood stage at the Utica

gage, cresting at 403.4 feet, 6:OOPM

on the 30th.

A potent area of low pressure and

its associated frontal systems,

moved northeast across the Ohio

and Saint Lawrence Valleys on the

28th of March, bringing with it a

significant amount of moisture.

Since it took a more western track

than previous storms earlier in the

month, almost all of the precipitation

fell as rain. Rainfall totals,

averaging 1-2 inches, but locally as

high as 4 inches, accumulated across

portions of the eastern New York and

adjacent western New England. This

rainfall, combined with snow melt,

produced significant runoff,

resulting in widespread flooding

across the region between March 28th

through 31st. Many streams and rivers

reached or exceed bankful, including

the Mettawee, Housatonic and Mohawk

Rivers, as well as the Esopus,

Wappingers and Schoharie Creeks.

Numerous houses in Columbia and

Greene Counties sustained damage

when their basements became flooded,

and there were many reports of road

closures across a large number of

counties. One Mechanicville man was

transported to a local hospital after

being swept away by floodwaters of

the Anthony Kill. In Columbia County,

every town reported at least one

road closed due to flooding.

NEW YORK, North

NYZ026>031-

034>035-087

0 0 90K

A storm system off the Carolinas on

Monday, February 28th moved to the

Gulf of Maine the afternoon and

evening of Tuesday, March 1st. Snow

developed across the area during the

night of Feb 28th, and was heavy at

times during March 1st before it

tapered off the night of March 1st.

Snowfall was generally between 8

and 10 inches, except in Clinton

county where snowfall was between

9 and 14 inches. Locally higher

amounts fell in the higher peaks of

the Adirondacks.

NYZ028-034>035

0 0 30K

An area of low pressure over the Ohio

valley on Friday, March 11th moved

east across southern New York and

reorganized south of Cape Cod early

Saturday, March 12th. The storm

system moved north through the Gulf

of Maine Saturday evening. Snow spread

across the area during the afternoon

of March 11th, and was steady later on

the night of March 11th into Saturday,

March 12th, before it tapered off

Saturday afternoon. General snow

accumulations were 3 to 5 inches.

NEW YORK, West

NYZ001>003-

010>011-014

0 0 60K

An intensifying low over Indiana and

Ohio on February 28th lifted slowly

across Lake Erie. Snow overspread the

area during the late afternoon hours

of the 28th. It was generally light

at first, but became moderate to heavy

for a time across the Niagara Frontier

and northern Finger Lakes (including

Buffalo and Rochester) shortly after

midnight. The snow finally tapered

off during the morning and early

afternoon hours of March 1st.

Specific overnight snowfalls

included: 9″ at Clarence and

Alabama; 8″ at Medina and Victor;

and 7″ at Spencerport and Lewiston.

NYZ019>020-085

0 0 45K

A northwest flow across Lake Eric

resulted in an intense lake effect

snow across the higher elevations

of the western southern tier of New

York during the evening of March 2nd

and continuing through the afternoon

of the 3rd. Specific snowfall reports

included: 14″ at Perrysburg; 13″ at

Cassadaga; 12″ at Stockton; and 10″

at East Aurora.

NYZ006

0 0 10K

A cold, westerly flow across Lake

Ontario established a narrow, intense

band of lake effect snow over Oswego

county. In Scriba ten inches of snow

fell while nine inches was reported

in Palermo and Volney.

NYZ006

0 0 10K

A band of lake effect snow began

to develop late in the afternoon of

March 9th in a northwest flow across

Lake Ontario. The band of snow

continued through the night and

morning hours, but broke apart

during the afternoon hours under

the strong March sun. Snowfall

reports included: 10″ at West

Monroe; 9″ at Constantia; and

7″ at Hannibal.

Location Character of Storm

MISSOURI, East

Cole County

Jefferson City Thunderstorm Wind

The ASOS at the Jefferson City airport

recorded a 58 mph wind gust.

MISSOURI, Lower

Pemiscot County

Hayti Hail (0.75)

MISSOURI, Northeast

NONE REPORTED

MISSOURI, Northwest

Bates County

2 NNW Amsterdam Hail (1.00)

Bates County

1 N Amsterdam Hail (0.75)

Bates County

4 S Butler Hail (1.75)

Cass County

Raymore Hail (0.75)

Clay County

Kearney Hail (0.88)

MOZ038

High Wind (G53)

A peak wind gust of 61 mph was measured

at Higginsville by the Cooperative

Observer. Wind gusts from 40 to 55 mph

were common elsewhere across much of

west central Missouri.

Nodaway County

5 E Maryville Thunderstorm Wind

Thunderstorm winds broke off 18 to 24

inch tree limbs.

Nodaway County

2 E Maryville Thunderstorm Wind

One barn had roof blown off. One

building suffered minor damage. Trees

had some damage and a few power lines

were downed.

Worth County

Denver Thunderstorm Wind

Barn suffered some damage from strong

thunderstorm winds.

Mercer County

Princeton Hail (0.88)

Linn County

6 N Purdin Thunderstorm Wind

Six to ten inch tree limbs down.

Sullivan County

1 W Browning Thunderstorm Wind

Six to ten inch tree limbs down.

MISSOURI, Southeast

Ripley County

Fairdealing to Hail (0.88)

7 SE Doniphan

Dime to nickel-size hail was reported at

three places in eastern Ripley County.

Butler County

Poplar Bluff Hail (0.88)

Scott County

Scott City Hail (1.00)

One-inch hail occurred along Interstate

55.

Cape Girardeau

County

4 SW Cape Girardeau Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

The tin roof was ripped off a barn on

Highway 74, about 2 miles west of

Interstate 55. The roof was blown into

some power lines, which were knocked

down. At the nearby Cape Girardeau

airport, the peak wind gust recorded by

the automated observing system was 54

MPH.

Cape Girardeau

County

Randles to Hail (1.00)

5 W Cape Girardeau

Dime to quarter-size hail fell in

extreme southern Cape Girardeau County.

The report of quarter-size hail was from

Randles.

Stoddard County

Acorn Ridge to Hail (0.88)

Dexter

Butler County

2 W Fisk Hail (0.75)

Scott County

Oran Hail (1.75)

Stoddard County

Advance Hail (0.88)

Scott County

2.5 N Sikeston to Hail (1.00)

Sikeston

One-inch hail fell just north of

Sikeston, while dime-size hail fell in

Sikeston.

Mississippi County

Charleston Hail (0.75)

A line of thunderstorms developed over

southeast Missouri, near a line from

Poplar Bluff to Cape Girardeau. As the

line moved east to the Mississippi

River, some storms along the line

produced large hail and an isolated

report of damaging winds. The most

severe storm along the line tracked

through northern Scott and southern Cape

Girardeau Counties, producing hail up to

golf ball size and minor wind damage.

MISSOURI, Southwest

Vernon County

Fair Haven Hail (1.00)

Vernon County

6 N Walker Hail (1.75)

Cedar County

El Dorado Spgs Hail (0.88)

St. Clair County

7 S Appleton City Hail (0.75)

Cedar County

Stockton Hail (0.88)

Polk County

Fair Play Hail (1.00)

Cedar County

Stockton Hail (0.88)

Polk County

Half Way Hail (0.75)

MONTANA, Central

MTZ009>011-013-

044>049

High Wind (G63)

A deep low pressure system over central

Canada was responsible for a high wind

event along the Rocky Mountain Front and

adjacent plains on the 6th. Reported

wind speeds include: a gust to 73 mph at

East Glacier Park 11 SE; a gust to 54

mph at Harlem 16S and a gust to 46 mph

at Great Falls Airport. Additionally,

sustained winds of 40 mph were reported

for several hours at Oilmont 14E,

Fairfield 7NE, Cut Bank, Valier,

Blackleaf, Turner 6NW, Inverness 20N

and Loma 20N. The strong wind helped

spread a grass fire near Valier. Over

150 acres of grass burned from a fire

caused by exhaust from a vehicle.

MTZ012-050-054

Heavy Snow

Heavy snow fell across a portion of

North Central Montana during the

afternoon and early evening of the 14th.

Reported snow fall amounts include: 11

inches at Neihart 7NW, 8 inches at

Millegan 14SE and 6 inches at Hobson

20SW. The heavy snow created slick and

hazardous driving surfaces and

contributed to over 40 motor vehicle

accidents.

MTZ009-012>015-

044-046>047-051-

054>055

Winter Storm

A Canadian cold front swept across a

broad area of North Central Montana on

the 17th bringing heavy snow and gusty

winds. Reported snow fall amounts

include: 14 inches at the Crystal Lake

SNOTEL site; 8 inches at Neihart 7S; 7

inches at Neihart, Gold Butte and

Conrad; 6 inches at Marias Pass 1 WNW,

Shonkin, Pony and Lewistown 25S and 5

inches at Bozeman 7SE and Chester.

MTZ009>014-044-

047>050

Winter Storm

A vigorous spring storm brought heavy

snow to a wide area of North Central and

Southwest Montana on the 23rd. Reported

snow fall amounts include: 16 inches at

Holter Dam; 15 inches at Eden; 12 inches

at Shonkin 7S, Holter Dam 6S, Rogers

Pass, Heart Butte 6W; 10 inches at

Sunburst 6S, Gold Butte 7N; 8 inches at

Havre 25S, Hobson, Choteau, Stanford,

Millegan 14SE; 7 inches at Great Falls,

Cut Bank 25NW, Hogeland 2W, Babb,

Augusta 25NW, Neihart 7NNW, Great Falls

3SW; 6 inches at Grass Range and 5

inches at Martinsdale 3NNW and West

Yellowstone 9N.

MONTANA, East

MTZ016>017-

019>020-022>026-

059>062

High Wind (G60)

Strong winds affected much of northeast

Montana during the morning and afternoon

hours of the 6th. The strong winds were

associated with a cold front and upper

level disturbance that crossed the area.

Sustained wind speeds of 40 to 45 mph

were common. A few locations had wind

gusts in the 58 to 69 mph range. A few

of the stronger wind gusts included:

King Coulee Raws Site (Valley County):

69 mph

Bluff Creek Raws Site (Valley County):

58 mph

Poplar Raws Site (Roosevelt County):

58 mph

MTZ017-017-022-059

Heavy Snow

An area of low pressure in Wyoming

brought heavy snow in narrow bands to a

portion of northeast Montana. The

heaviest snow fell in a 10 to 15 mile

band across northern Phillips county,

southwest Valley, and portions of

northern Garfield county. A few of the

heavier snow totals included:

3 miles south of Whitewater (Phillips

County): 6 inches

20 miles south/southwest of Glasgow

(Valley County): 12 inches

30 miles southwest of Glasgow (Valley

County): 6 inches

30 miles northeast of Jordan (Garfield

County): 6-8 inches

MTZ016-059>060

Heavy Snow

An area of low pressure that developed

in Wyoming brought heavy snow to much of

Phillips County late in the evening of

the 22nd through the pre-dawn hours of

the 23rd. Additional light snow

continued to fall through the evening

hours of the 23rd. In addition,

northeast winds of 15 to 25 mph with

high gusts produced areas of blowing and

drifting snow. A few of the more

impressive snowfall totals included:

Zortman: 9 inches

35 miles south of Malta: 7 inches, with

drifts of 3 to 4 feet

Whitewater: 6 inches

Malta: 5 inches

MONTANA, South

MTZ040-056-066>068

Heavy Snow

8 inches 4W Alpine Cole Creek Snotel; 8

inches 2S Red Lodge; 7 inches 13ENE

Wilsall South Fork of the Shields Snotel

in the Crazy Mountains; 7 inches 6S

Roscoe; 6 inches 5NW Alpine; 6 inches in

Mcleod; 6 inches in Clyde Park; 10

inches 5W Red Lodge

MTZ029-031-063

Heavy Snow

8 inches in Judith Gap; 11 inches LOSE

Roundup; 7 inches IOS Roundup; 6 inches

15S Colstrip.

MTZ029-031>032-

034>038-040-042-

056>058-067

Heavy Snow

An early Spring storm moved across South

Central Montana bringing heavy, wet snow

to portions of the Billings County

Warning Area. The following are some

totals from this storm:

8 inches 18NW Ryegate; 6 inches in

Forsyth, Huntley, Fort Smith, Roundup,

Broadview, Billings, and Birney; 9

inches in Crow Agency; 10 inches in

Rapelje; 8 inches 2E Ryegate, 8 inches

in Clyde Park, 8 inches 12E Ashland, 6

inches 10S Volborg, 9 inches 2S Red

Lodge, 6 inches 5SE Volborg, 6 inches

16W Alzada, 8 inches 60S Miles City, 8

inches at both Cole Creek and Burnt

Mountain Snotels

MONTANA, West

MTZ006>007-043

Heavy Snow

Vigorous late winter storm blanketed the

valleys of West Central Montana with 5

to 12 inches of new snow, with as much

as much as 14 inches of new snow

reported at Georgetown Lake.

MTZ002-004-006-

006-043

Winter Storm

Late winter storm brought 8 to 13 inches

of new snow over the mountains of

Northwest Montana with 4 to 8 inches in

the valleys. Widespread west winds at 15

to 25 mph also caused drifting of snow.

Schools were closed in the northern

Flathead valley due to heavy snowfall.

Trees also snapped under the load from

heavy snow. Some trees fell onto power

lines causing outages across the

northern Flathead valley as well.

Several vehicle rollovers were also

reported.

NEBRASKA, Central

NEZ004>010-

022>029-035>038-

056>059-069>071-094

High Wind (G40)

A strong low pressure system moved

through Nebraska overnight with high

winds affecting the area behind the

passing cold front. Northwesterly winds

of 35-45 mph with gusts to 60 mph caused

low visibility due to blowing dust in

isolated areas. The low visibility

caused a multi-vehicle pile-up on

Interstate 80 about 6 miles west of

North Platte. The accident occurred at

2:05 pm and involved 5 semis and 3 cars.

Three semis and 2 cars were engulfed in

flames. The accident claimed 3 lives

(indirect fatalities) and injured 4

(indirect). West bound lanes on

Interstate 80 were closed for 4 hours

and cast bound lanes on Interstate 80

were closed for 10 hours.

NEZ005>006-

008>009-023>026-

035>037-094

Winter Storm

A strong low pressure system moved out

of Eastern Colorado and into the Central

Plains dumping significant snow. Keya

Paha County received 6-8 inches of snow,

Blaine County received 9-12 inches, and

Eastern Cherry County received 12-16

inches. Breezy winds also created areas

of blowing and drifting snow across

roadways. A semi-trailer and truck

rolled over in the Long Pine Hills due

to the slick road conditions. No one was

injuried in the accident. Other cars

lost control on snow covered roads but

there were no injuries.

Logan County

9 N Stapleton Hail (0.88)

Custer County

2 NW Arnold Hail (1.00)

Lincoln County

North Platte Hail (0.75)

Custer County

13 SW Anselmo Hail (0.75)

Hail covered the ground.

Lincoln County

6 NNE North Platte Hail (0.88)

Custer County

Anselmo Hail (0.88)

Hail was 2 inches deep.

Blaine County

7 SSE Brewster Hail (0.88)

Hail covered the ground.

Loup County

15 W Taylor Hail (1.25)

Loup County

Almeria Hail (0.75)

Loup County

10 NW Almeria Hail (0.75)

Frontier County

13 SE Stockville Hail (1.00)

Frontier County

6 S Eustis Hail (1.75)

Holt County

18 SW Amelia Hail (1.25)

Rock County

14 ESE Rose Hail (0.88)

Holt County

17 WSW Chambers Hail (1.25)

Holt County

5 SW Amelia Hail (0.75)

NEBRASKA, East

Gage County

1 E Adams Hail (0.75)

Johnson County

2 W Sterling Hail (0.75)

NEZ011>012-

015>018-030>034-

042>045-050>053

High Wind (G53)

Intense low pressure over the Great

Lakes region combined with high pressure

building east out of the Rockies and

provided a prolonged high wind event

over northeast and cast central Nebraska

and portions of western Iowa. Sustained

winds of 30 to 40 mph with gusts of 55

to a little over 60 mph were common

throughout the area. The strong winds

caused sporadic tree and roof damage,

and there were several reports across

the area of trees uprooted and a few

semi trucks were overturned. One person

was injured in Decatur Nebraska

(northern Burt county) when a roof of a

building under construction blew on top

of his house causing substantial damage.

Some of the higher gusts measured by

AWOS or ASOS sites included … 62 mph

in Fremont at 110 pm, 60 mph at Norfolk

at 247 pm, 59 mph in Albion at 1010 am,

59 mph at Columbus at 115 pm, 59 mph in

Tekamah at 119 pm, and 55 mph in Omaha

at 224 pm.

NEBRASKA, Extreme Northeast

NEZ013>014

High Wind (G53)

Sustained winds of 40 to 45 mph with

gusts around 60 mph persisted from late

morning until late afternoon. The winds

caused tree damage with a few branches

and smaller tree debris broken off.

There was minor damage to buildings,

mostly to shingles and gutters.

NEBRASKA, Extreme Southwest

NONE REPORTED.

NEBRASKA, South Central

NOT RECEIVED.

NEBRASKA, West

Scotts Bluff County

3 NE Scottsbluff Tornado (F0)

Very weak tornado over open country.

NEVADA, North

NVZ034

Heavy Snow

A winter storm brought 19 inches of snow

to the Dorsey Basin Snotel site in the

East Humboldt range and 15 inches to

Lamoille Canyon #3 Snotel.

NEVADA, South

NONE REPORTED.

NEVADA, West

NVZ003

Heavy Snow

A winter storm moved through northeast

California and western Nevada on the

19th and 20th. Two to three feet of snow

fell in the higher elevations of the

Sierra, with 6 to 8 inches reported in

areas to the lee of the Sierra.

Storm total snowfall amounts:

Virginia City (6340 ft.) 8 inches

Carson City (5400 ft.) 6 inches

NVZ002

Heavy Snow

A winter storm moved through northeast

California and western Nevada on the

19th and 20th. Two to three feet of snow

fell in the higher elevations of the

Sierra, with 6 to 8 inches reported in

areas to the lee of the Sierra.

Storm total snowfall amounts:

Mt. Rose Ski Resort (summit) 22 inches

(mid-mountain) 10 inches

5 ENE Incline Village

(7300 ft.) 20 inches

1 NE Incline Village

(6500 ft.) 15 inches

Spooner Summit 12 inches

NVZ001

High Wind (G56)

Wind gust of 65 knots (75 mph) recorded

at the Walker Lake RAWS sensor.

NVZ002

High Wind (G55)

Wind gust of 55 knots (63 mph) recorded

at the Galena Creek RAWS sensor.

NVZ003

High Wind (G50)

Wind gust of 50 knots (58 mph) recorded

at DRI Sage building in Stead.

NVZ002

Heavy Snow

The second winter storm in a week moved

through the Sierra Nevada and western

Nevada region. This storm, however, was

not as strong as the earlier one. From

late on the 21st through the 22nd up to

two feet of snow fell in the Sierra,

with rain falling western Nevada.

Storm total snowfall amounts:

Mt. Rose Ski Resort

(mid-mountain) 22 inches

NEW HAMPSHIRE, North and Central

NHZ001>010-

013>014

Heavy Snow

Low pressure developed off the southern

New England coast during the evening of

Monday, February 28, and intensified as

moved northeast into the Gulf of Maine

on Tuesday, March 1. Snow moved into New

Hampshire during the early morning hours

and dropped between 5 and 14 inches

across the entire state before ending

during the early morning hours of

March 2.

NHZ001>010-

013>014

Heavy Snow

Low pressure moved across southern New

England during the night of Monday,

March 7, and redeveloped off the New

England coast on Tuesday, March 8. Snow

spread into New Hampshire during the

early morning hours of Tuesday and

accumulated 5 to 12 inches before ending

during the morning on March 9.

NHZ001>002-

004>010-013>014

Heavy Snow

Low pressure moving out of the midwest

on Friday, March 11, redeveloped off the

New England coast Friday evening and

slowly moved through the Gulf of Maine

on Saturday, March 12. Snow accumulated

4 to 15 inches across most of the state

before ending during the early morning

hours of March 13.

NEW HAMPSHIRE, Southern

NHZ011>012

Winter Storm

Heavy snow and gusty winds affected

southwest New Hampshire and all of

southern New England, as low pressure

reformed off the mid Atlantic coast and

tracked southeast of the region.

Snowfall totals of 4 to 8 inches were

widely observed.

Some specific snowfall totals, as

reported by trained spotters, included 9

inches in Marlow, East Alstead, and

Keene; 8 inches in Peterborough; 7

inches in Rindge, Hinsdale, and

Greenfield; and 6 inches in Francestown,

Manchester, Hudson, and Nashua.

NHZ011>012

Heavy Snow

Low pressure strengthened rapidly off

the Delaware coast and tracked southeast

of New England, bringing heavy snow to

southwest New Hampshire. Snowfall totals

of 4 to 8 inches were widely observed.

The snow and gusty winds made travel

difficult. Several roads around

Manchester were closed due to icy

conditions, and many spinouts were

reported throughout the region. Many

flights were delayed or canceled at

Manchester Airport.

Some specific snowfall totals, as

reported by trained spotters, included 9

inches in Manchester, 8 inches in Keene,

7 inches in Winchester and Hinsdale, and

6 inches in Stoddard, Bedford, Milford,

and Hillsborough.

NHZ011>012

Heavy Snow

Low pressure south of Long Island

strengthened rapidly as it headed to the

Canadian Maritimes, and brought heavy

snow to southwest New Hampshire and much

of interior southern New England.

Snowfall totals of 6 to 12 inches were

widely observed in Cheshire and

Hillsborough Counties.

State police reported numerous vehicles

off roads around the region, especially

on Interstate 93. A number of flights at

Manchester Airport were delayed or

canceled as a result of the storm.

Some specific snowfall totals, as

reported by trained spotters, included

14 inches in Francestown; 13 inches in

Alstead; 12 inches in Dublin, Marlow,

Stoddard, Keene, Peterborough, and

Wilton; 10 inches in Swanzey and South

Weare; 8 inches in Hinsdale and Nashua;

and 6 inches in Hudson and Manchester.

NEW JERSEY, Northeast

NJZ003-005>006-011

Heavy Snow

A weak high pressure ridge extended

southwest across the region from New

England as a low pressure system

intensified and moved northeast. This

strong low passed south of Long Island

Monday night and east of the New England

coast during Tuesday.

Light snow developed northeast across

the region between 1 and 3 pm Monday

afternoon. As the low rapidly

intensified and moved closer to the

region, narrow bands of heavy snow swept

northeast across the region. The last

band of heavy snow swept northeast

across the region between 5 am and 6:30

am Tuesday morning, March 1 st. Storm

Total Snowfall amounts ranged from 5

to 10 inches.

Here are selected snowfall totals for:

Bergen County – from 5.4 inches at River

Vale to 7.5 inches at Lodi.

Union County – from 6.3 inches at

Garwood to 7.6 inches at Elizabeth.

Essex County – from 6.0 inches at

Bloomfield to 9.5 inches at Newark

Airport.

Hudson County – from 5 .3 inches at

Bayonne to 8.0 inches at Harrison.

NJZ003>006-011 Bergen – Eastern Passaic – Essex –

Hudson – Union

08

A strong arctic cold front intensified

as it swept southeast across the region.

This caused rain to change to snow,

temperatures to fall from the 40s into

the 20s, and northwest winds that gusted

between 40 and 55 mph. Near blizzard

conditions occurred for a short time.

Storm total snowfalls ranged from around

2 to 4 inches.

Wet and mild antecedent conditions were

followed by more than a 20 degree drop

in temperature in 3 hours with strong

gusty winds. This resulted in a “flash”

freeze across roads that resulted in

hundreds of vehicle accidents.

NEW JERSEY, South and Northwest

NJZ001-007>010-

012>020-027

Heavy Snow

NJZ021>022-026

Winter Weather/Mix

Heavy snow fell across northern and

southwestern New Jersey from the morning

of February 28th into the morning of the

1st. Across coastal Ocean County,

interior Atlantic County and Cumberland

County precipitation fell as snow, but

mixed with rain at times during the

daytime on February 28th. Temperatures

in these areas remained above freezing

until the evening of February 28th and

slowed the accumulations. Precipitation

fell as mainly rain in Cape May County

and coastal Atlantic County until the

rain changed to snow late in the evening

of February 28th. Snow began during the

morning of February 28th in the southern

half of the state and from around Noon

EST into the afternoon in the northern

half of the state. Heavier bands of

accumulating snow moved over the

southwestern and northern parts of the

state during the afternoon and evening

of February 28th. The snow ended across

the southern half of the state before

the sun rose on the 1st and ended during

the morning in the northern half of the

state. Accumulations averaged 4 to 8

inches, with some higher amounts in

Sussex and Warren Counties and lower

amounts in the southeastern part of the

state.

Many schools dismissed early on February

28th. Rutgers University cancelled all

its classes after 430 p.m. EST on

February 28th. Many after school

activities and classes as well as

municipal and school board meetings were

cancelled. Many minor accidents occurred.

In Burlington County, a 17-year-old boy,

a 17-year-old girl and their 41-year-old

bus driver were injured when two school

buses collided in Medford Township.

Specific accumulations included 9.6

inches in Barry Lakes (Sussex County),

9.1 inches in Belvidere (Warren County),

9.0 inches in Califon (Hunterdon County),

8.9 inches in Sparta (Sussex County),

8.6 inches in Stewartsville (Warren

County), 8.0 inches in Southampton

(Burlington County), Milton (morris

County) and Wrightstown (Burlington

County), 7.9 inches in West Windsor

(Mercer County), 7.8 inches in Marcella

(Morris County), 7.6 inches in Wertsville

(Hunterdon County), 7.5 inches in Butler

(Morris County) and Hackettstown (Warren

County), 7.2 inches in Pottersville

(Somerset County), 7.0 inches in

Lindenwold (Camden County) and Clarksboro

(Gloucester County), 6.8 inches in

Medford (Burlington County) and Metuchen

(Middlesex County), 6.7 inches in New

Brunswick (Middlesex County), Somerville

(Somerset County) and Cream Ridge

(Monmouth County), 6.3 inches in West

Windsor (Mercer County), 6.0 inches in

Pennsauken (Camden County), Whippany

(Morris County) and Flemington (Hunterdon

County), 5.8 inches in Manchester (Ocean

County), 5.5 inches in Verga (Gloucester

County) and Monroeville (Salem County),

5.0 inches in New Egypt (Ocean County),

4.4 inches in Hammonton (Atlantic

County), 3.8 inches in Seabrook

(Cumberland County), 1.3 inches at the

Atlantic City International Airport and

1.0 inch in Margate (Atlantic County)

and Brant Beach (Ocean County).

The wintry weather was caused by a true

northeaster. A low pressure system

developed in the Gulf of Mexico on

Sunday February 27th. It moved northeast

and already was a 995 millibar low

pressure system when it was near

Jacksonville, Florida at 7 p.m. EST on

February 27th. It moved northeast and

deepened to a 992 millibar low near

Charleston, South Carolina at 1 a.m. EST

on February 28th, a 990 millibar low

near Wilmington, North Carolina at 7

a.m. EST on February 28th, a 984

millibar low just east of Elizabeth City,

North Carolina at 1 p.m. EST on February

28th, a 980 millibar low about 150 miles

east of Fenwick Island, Delaware at 7

p.m. EST on February 28th and still a

980 millibar low about 250 miles east

of Long Beach Island, New Jersey at 1

a.m. EST on the 1st. The combination of

the low pressure system’s storm track

being fairly offshore, the lack of a

surface high pressure system to its

north and marginal surface temperatures

for snow kept accumulations from being

heavier.

NJZ014-024>026

Astronomical High Tide

NJZ014-024>026

Heavy Surf/High Surf

Moderate beach erosion and minor tidal

flooding occurred with the northeaster

along the New Jersey Coast. The most

intense onshore flow occurred from mid

morning on February 28th into the early

morning of the 1st. Minor tidal flooding

occurred with the overnight high tide.

The intense and offshore storm track the

low pressure system took gave the New

Jersey coast about a 12 hour period of

intense northeast winds (25 to 35 mph)

and this led to the minor tidal flooding

and beach erosion. In Monmouth County, 2

to 3 foot vertical cuts were common from

Asbury Park south. In Ocean County, in

Harvey Cedars, a 5 foot vertical by 10

foot horizontal cut occurred to 800 feet

of dune from Bergen to Cumberland

Avenues. Two to four foot vertical cuts

were common from Ship Bottom additional

south. In Beach Haven, there was a

complete loss of berm protection and an

8 foot loss of sand at the Merivale

Avenue street end. One house was now

exposed to the ocean. In Atlantic

County, two to four foot vertical cuts

occurred, except in Ventnor where the

vertical cut reached five feet at the

south end of the city. Walkways and

fences were also damaged. Some walkways

now ended at the water’s edge. The

Ventnor Beach was just rebuilt in 2004.

In Cape May County, Ocean City was hit

the hardest with 3 to 4 foot vertical

cuts from the fishing to the amusement

pier and an 8 to 10 foot cut from 8th

Street to Seaspray Avenue with dune

fencing down in some areas. Elsewhere in

the county, vertical cuts averaged 1 to

3 feet. Sea Isle City reported loss of

dune fencing and rocks were exposed.

The overnight (February 28th) high tide

reached 6.78 feet above mean lower low

water at Sandy Hook (Monmouth County)

and 6.80 feet above mean lower low water

at Cape May (Cape May County). Minor

tidal flooding begins at 6.7 feet above

mean lower low water.

The minor tidal flooding and beach

erosion was caused by a northeaster. The

low pressure system developed in the

Gulf of Mexico on Sunday February 27th.

It moved northeast and was near

Jacksonville, Florida at 7 p.m. EST on

February 27th. It moved northeast and

deepened and was near Charleston, South

Carolina at 1 a.m. EST on February 28th,

just cast of Wilmington, North Carolina

at 7 a.m. EST on February 28th, just

east of Elizabeth City, North Carolina

at 1 p.m. EST on February 28th, and

deepened to a 980 millibar low about 150

miles east of Fenwick Island, Delaware

at 7 p.m. EST on February 28th. The low

remained about the same strength (980

millibar) as it passed about 250 miles

east of Long Beach Island, New Jersey

at 1 a.m. EST on the 1st. The lack of a

surface high pressure system to the

north of this system prevented the

pressure gradient and hence the winds,

heavy surf and tidal flooding from being

worse.

NJZ001-007>010-

120>027

Winter Weather/Mix

The combination of a strong cold frontal

passage during the morning of the 8th

and a rapidly intensifying low pressure

system off the Middle Atlantic and New

England States brought snow and plunging

temperatures during the day on the 8th.

Actual accumulations averaged an inch or

two in the southern part of New Jersey

and 2 to 4 inches in the northern part

of the state. The snow combined with the

sharp drop in temperatures to bring

treacherous driving conditions on

untreated roadways during the afternoon

and evening and countless accidents

occurred, especially in the northern

half of the state.

Precipitation started as rain before

sunrise on the 8th. The cold front moved

through New Jersey between 7 a.m. and 10

a.m. EST (from northwest to southeast)

as a low pressure system on the front

was intensifying. Temperatures dropped

quickly behind this front both at the

surface and aloft. The rain changed to

snow between 8 a.m. (northwest areas

first) and Noon EST (southeast areas

last). About an hour after the

precipitation changed to snow,

temperatures dropped below freezing

as the snow continued to fall. The snow

ended during the mid and late afternoon

from west to east across the state. But,

its lingering effects lasted well into

the morning rush on the 9th as the wind

blew the snow back on the road.

Townships averaged about a dozen weather

related accidents, especially in the

northern half of the state. In Hunterdon

County, Interstate 78 was closed for

five miles because of more than twenty

accidents. About 75 accidents were

reported across northern New Jersey

on interstates 287, 78 and 80 and New

Jersey State Route 24. In Somerset

County, an accident on westbound

Interstate 78 that involved a tractor-

trailer and vehicle caused serious

injuries. In Monmouth County, a roadway

was closed in Holmdel Township after a

vehicle knocked down a pole. Problems in

Monmouth County persisted through the

next morning as multiple accidents in

the southbound lanes of New Jersey State

Route 18 in Colts Neck closed the road

for several hours. In Long Branch, nine

accidents occurred within 45 minutes.

Many after school activities and classes

were cancelled on the 8th. The regional

spelling bee in Monmouth County was

postponed.

Specific snow accumulations included 4.0

inches in Oakhurst (Monmouth County) and

Brick Township (Ocean County), 3.5 inches

in Manalapan (Monmouth County), 3.0

inches in Wantage (Sussex County), 2.8

inches in Marcella (Moms County) and

Stewartsville (Warren County), 2.5

inches in Florence (Burlington County)

and Skillman (Somerset County), 2.3

inches in Ewing (Mercer County), 2.0

inches in Metuchen (Middlesex County),

1.9 inches in Somerdale (Camden County),

1.5 inches in Tabernacle (Burlington

County) and East Amwell Township

(Hunterdon County), 1.4 inches in

Chatham (Morris County), 1.0 inch in

Seabrook (Cumberland County) and 0.3

inches at the Atlantic City

International Airport.

The snow was caused by the combination

of the cold frontal passage and the

rapidly intensifying low pressure system

that developed on the front during the

morning of the 8th. The low moved

northeast and was an already intense 986

mb near Danville, Virginia at 7 a.m. EST

on the 8th. From there it continued to

move northeast and deepened to a 978 mb

low just east of Long Beach Island, New

Jersey at 1 p.m. EST on the 8th, to a

970 mb low over Nantucket Island,

Massachusetts at 7 p.m. EST on the 8th

to a 964 mb low just southwest of

Yarmouth, Nova Scotia at 1 a.m. EST on

the 9th.

NJZ001-007>010-012-

014>023-025>027

Strong Wind

NJZ013-024

High Wind (G63)

In addition to the snow, strong gusty

northwest winds developed during the

afternoon and evening of the 8th as a

low pressure system intensified off the

Middle Atlantic and New England States.

Wind gusts reached around 70 mph in Cape

May County. The strong winds caused

isolated power outages throughout New

Jersey and hampered snow removal crews

as it blew snow back onto already

cleared or salted roads. Peak wind gusts

included 72 mph in Strathmere (Cape May

County), 70 mph in Cape May (Cape May

County), 64 mph in Keansburg (Monmouth

County), 63 mph at High Point (the

highest point in New Jersey in Sussex

County), 57 mph in Sandy Hook (Monmouth

County) and Bamegat Light (Ocean County),

50 mph in Atlantic City (Atlantic

County), 49 mph in Wrightstown

(Burlington County), 45 mph in Millville

(Cumberland County) and 44 mph in

Trenton (Mercer County).

The strong winds were caused by a

rapidly intensifying low pressure system

that developed on the cold front during

the morning of the 8th. The low moved

northeast and was an already intense 986

mb near Danville, Virginia at 7 a.m. EST

on the 8th. From there it continued to

move northeast and deepened to a 978 mb

low just east of Long Beach Island, New

Jersey at 1 p.m. EST on the 8th, to a

970 mb low over Nantucket Island,

Massachusetts at 7 p.m. EST on the 8th

to a 964 mb low just southwest of

Yarmouth, Nova Scotia at 1 a.m. EST on

the 9th.

NJZ001-007>008

Winter Weather/Mix

Snow fell across northwest New Jersey

during the evening and overnight on the

11th and accumulated between two and

five inches in most areas with the

highest accumulations over the higher

terrain. Snow began in Sussex County

during the evening of the 11th and

spread into Morris and Warren Counties

by Midnight EST. The snow ended before

sunrise on the 12th. Untreated and less

traveled roads were treacherous. Specific

accumulations included 4.9 inches in

Marcella (Morris County), 2.5 inches in

Butler and Randolph (Morris County) and

2.0 inches in Wantage (Sussex County).

The snow was caused by an “Alberta type”

low pressure system that moved from

northern Minnesota on the morning of the

10th east into Lake Erie around sunrise

on the 11th. The low moved through

Northwest New Jersey during the evening

on the 11th and intensified as it moved

east reaching just south of Nantucket,

Massachusetts around sunrise on the

12th. Heavier snow fell farther to the

northeast.

NJZ012

Wildfire

A brushfire with 30 to 40-foot-high

flames burned across 75 to 100 acres in

Raritan Center within Edison Township.

The fire could be seen from Rahway

(Union County) to East Brunswick (within

Middlesex County). The fire burned for

about six hours until firefighters

finished dousing the blaze. One dozen

municipalities, twenty-three fire

departments and one hundred and three

firefighters responded to the scene. The

brushfire began in an area with 10 to

12-foot-high reeds that were very dry.

Gusty northwest winds led to a longer

battle with the fire. The peak wind gust

at Newark International Airport for the

day was 30 mph and the average wind speed

of 16.1 mph was the fifth windiest day

of March 2005.

NJZ001

Winter Weather/Mix

A high pressure ridge that extended from

James Bay, Canada to the Middle Atlantic

coastal waters left enough cold air in

place near the surface to cause a wintry

mix of precipitation to occur during the

first half of the day on the 20th.

Precipitation moved in aloft preceding a

warm front and fell as mainly freezing

rain over the higher terrain of Sussex

County between 3 a.m. and 11 a.m. EST.

Ice accretions were less than one-tenth

of an inch. Some snow and sleet mixed in

with any accumulations less than one-

quarter of an inch. By 11 a.m. EST

enough warm air moved in at the surface

to change the precipitation over to

plain rain in all areas. Untreated

roadways were hazardous before the

change to plain rain.

NJZ001

Winter Storm

NJZ007>010

Winter Weather/Mix

A low pressure system exiting the United

States from the Delmarva Peninsula

brought rain and then snow to Warren and

Moms Counties and heavy snow to Sussex

County. Accumulations averaged 2 to 5

inches in most of Warren and Morris

Counties and 5 to 8 inches across the

higher terrain of Warren and Morris

Counties and in Sussex County. Farther

south, about an inch or two of snow fell

in Somerset and Hunterdon Counties.

Following the pattern of other winter

storms this season, the accumulating

snow hit the evening commute the hardest

which was described as a nightmare.

Precipitation in northwest New Jersey

(except in Sussex County) started as rain

during the morning of the 23rd and

changed to snow during the afternoon.

The change to snow worked its way from

the higher terrain downward. Across

Sussex County, precipitation fell mainly

as snow. In all areas the snow continued

through the night and ended just before

sunrise on the 24th.

Numerous and mostly minor accidents

occurred mainly during the evening

commute. One fatal accident occurred in

White Township (Warren County) when a

61-year-old woman died. She lost control

of her vehicle on County Route 519 and

slid sideways into an oncoming van. The

vehicle then struck a guardrail. The

driver and passenger of the van suffered

minor injuries. The evening commute was

progressively worse on the Pennsylvania

side of the Delaware River.

Accumulations included 7.7 inches in

Wantage (Sussex County), 6.8 inches in

Barry Lakes (Sussex County), 6.7 inches

in Marcella (Morris County), 5.5 inches

in Blairstown (Warren County), 5.0

inches in Rockaway (Morris County), 3.0

inches in Chatham (Morris County), 2.5

inches in Hackettstown (Warren County)

and Morristown (Moms County), 2.0 inches

in Pottersville (Somerset County), 1.9

inches in Belvidere (Warren County) and

1.0 inch in Flemington (Hunterdon

County).

The late winter storm was caused by a

low pressure system that formed in the

Southern Plains States on the 21st and

moved east and reached Memphis, Tennessee

early in the evening on the 22nd, in

central Kentucky around sunrise on the

23rd, just west of Norfolk at 1 p.m. EST

on the 23rd, just east of Wallops Island,

Virginia at 7 p.m. EST on the 23rd and

about 200 miles cast of Cape May, New

Jersey at 1 a.m. EST on the 24th.

NJZ001

Winter Weather/Mix

Pockets of freezing rain occurred across

Sussex County during the overnight of

March 27th. As rain moved into the

region on the evening of the 27th, some

surface temperatures cooled to or below

the freezing mark. Light freezing rain

fell through the night until temperatures

rose above freezing shortly after sunrise

on the 28th. Ice accretions were up to

two-tenths of an inch. Untreated roadways

and walkways were slippery.

The nearest surface high pressure system

at the onset of the rain was south of

Novas Scotia and could not lock in the

cold air near the surface. In addition,

the surface pressure difference (and thus

the wind) between the low pressure system

arriving from the Gulf Coast States and

the departing high pressure system

produced enough of a southeast wind to

scour away the cold air near the surface.

Burlington County

Countywide Heavy Rain

Salem County

Countywide Heavy Rain

Gloucester County

Countywide Heavy Rain

Hunterdon County

Countywide Heavy Rain

Sussex County

Countywide Heavy Rain

Warren County

Countywide Heavy Rain

Middlesex County

Countywide Heavy Rain

Monmouth County

Countywide Heavy Rain

Heavy rain caused poor drainage flooding

and left the region vulnerable to any

additional heavy rain as the ground was

saturated. Rain began falling during the

late evening on the 27th, but fell at its

heaviest during the afternoon and evening

of the 28th as scattered thunderstorms

occurred. The rain ended by late that

evening. The evening commute was more

difficult as usual as there was much

ponding of water in poor drainage

locations. Storm totals averaged around

two inches.

On the 30th, the combination of runoff

and melting snow led to isolated low-

lying area flooding along the Delaware

River in Warren County. In Harmony

Township, river flooding reached homes

on Riversedge Lane and River Road. The

Delaware River at Ricgelsville crested

at 21.3 feet that morning. Flood stage

at that location is 22 feet.

Storm totals included 2.65 in Freehold

(Monmouth County), 2.58 inches in Sussex

(Sussex County), 2.14 inches in Andover

(Sussex County), 2.10 inches in Newton

(Sussex County), 2.06 inches in Califon

(Hunterdon County), 2.04 inches in

Belvidere (Warren County), 2.02 inches

in Riegclsville (Warren County), 1.95

inches in New Lisbon (Burlington County),

1.88 inches in Bloomsbury (Hunterdon

County), 1.75 inches in West Deptford

(Gloucester County), 1.74 inches in

Mount Laurel (Burlington County), 1.72

inches in Columbia (Warren County), 1.65

inches in Willingboro (Burlington County)

and 1.60 inches in Mount Holly

(Burlington County).

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both

the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic

Ocean. The low pressure system moved

from western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on

the 27th northeast to eastern Tennessee

at 7 p.m. EST on the 27th and eastern

Kentucky at 7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A

secondary low pressure system formed

over North Carolina during the morning

of the 28th. It would become the main

low pressure system as it moved northeast

to near Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m.

EST on the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m.

EST on the 29th and about 100 miles east

of Atlantic City at 7 a.m. EST on the

29th.

NJZ018

Flood

The combination of heavy rain and

saturated ground from recent heavy rains

caused poor drainage and some river

flooding in Camden County. Rain began

falling during the late evening on the

27th, but fell at its heaviest during

the afternoon and evening of the 28th as

thunderstorms occurred. Storm totals

averaged between one and two inches.

The Cooper River at Haddonfield was above

its 2.8 foot flood stage from 529 p.m.

through 845 p.m. EST on the 28th. It

crested at 2.88 feet at 630 p.m. EST.

Storm totals included 1.91 inches in

Somerdale, 1.72 inches in Audubon, 1.66

inches in Pennsauken and 1.40 inches in

Cherry Hill.

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both the

Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean.

The low pressure system moved from

western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on the

27th northeast to eastern Tennessee at

7 p.m. EST on the 27th and eastern

Kentucky at 7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A

secondary low pressure system formed

over North Carolina during the morning

of the 28th. It would become the main

low pressure system as it moved northeast

to near Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m.

EST on the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m.

EST on the 29th and about 100 miles east

of Atlantic City at 7 a.m. EST on the

29th.

NJZ015

Flood

The combination of heavy rain and

saturated ground from recent heavy rains

caused poor drainage and some creek

flooding in Mercer County. Rain began

falling during the late evening on the

27th, but fell at its heaviest during

the afternoon and evening of the 28th as

thunderstorms occurred. Storm totals

averaged between one and two inches.

The Assunpink Creek at Trenton was above

its 7 foot flood stage from 609 p.m.

through 1118 p.m. EST on the 28th. It

crested at 7.33 feet at 9 p.m. EST.

Storm totals included 2.00 inches in

Windsor, 1.72 inches in Hightstown, 1.66

inches in Washington’s Crossing and 1.46

inches in Trenton.

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both

the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic

Ocean. The low pressure system moved from

western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on the

27th northeast to eastern Tennessee at

7 p.m. EST on the 27th and eastern

Kentucky at 7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A

secondary low pressure system formed

over North Carolina during the morning

of the 28th. It would become the main

low pressure system as it moved northeast

to near Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m. EST

on the 29th and about 100 miles east of

Atlantic City at 7 a.m. EST on the 29th.

NJZ010

Flood

The combination of heavy rain and

saturated ground caused poor drainage

and some river flooding in Somerset

County. Rain began falling during the

late evening on the 27th, but fell at

its heaviest during the afternoon and

evening of the 28th as thunderstorms

occurred. Storm totals averaged around

two inches.

The Millstone River at Griggstown was

above its 10 foot flood stage from 730

p.m. EST on the 28th through 1045 a.m.

EST on the 30th. It crested at 12.3 feet

at 8 a.m. EST on the 29th. The North

Branch of the Raritan River at South

Branch was above its 7 foot flood stage

from 640 p.m. EST on the 28th through

733 a.m. EST on the 29th. It crested at

8.7 feet at Midnight EST on the 29th.

Storm totals included 2.40 inches in

Basking Ridge, 2.12 inches in Far Hills,

1.96 inches in North Plainfield, 1.90

inches in Somerville and 1.44 inches in

Belle Mead.

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both the

Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean.

The low pressure system moved from

western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on the 27th

northeast to eastern Tennessee at 7 p.m.

EST on the 27th and eastern Kentucky at

7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A secondary low

pressure system formed over North

Carolina during the morning of the 28th.

It would become the main low pressure

system as it moved northeast to near

Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST on the

28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m. EST on

the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m. EST on

and about 100 miles cast of Atlantic

City at 7 a.m. EST on the 29th.

NJZ016>019

Astronomical High Tide

The combination of runoff from the heavy

rain, the funneling of water into Delaware

Bay and higher than normal astronomical

tides coming off the full moon produced

minor tidal flooding at the times of high

tide early in the morning on the 29th.

The high tide in Burlington reached 9.94

feet above mean lower low water. Minor

tidal flooding begins at 9.0 feet above

mean lower low water. The high tide at

Philadelphia Pier 12 reached 8.35 feet

above mean lower low water. Minor tidal

flooding begins there at 8.2 feet above

mean lower low water. Less widespread

minor tidal flooding occurred with the

early morning high tides on the 30th and

31st.

The onshore flow was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast from

western Alabama on the morning of the

27th. It reformed over North Carolina

during the morning of the 28th and become

the main low pressure system as it moved

northeast to near Norfolk, Virginia

during the afternoon on the 28th,

through Chesapeake Bay the evening on

the 28th, across Delaware Bay around

Midnight EST on the 29th and about then

cast of Atlantic City by sunrise on the

29th. The counterclockwise circulation

around this low helped push water into

Delaware Bay and slow the runoff from

the nearby heavy rain and the snowmelt

from the upper parts of the Delaware

River.

NJZ008

Flood

The combination of heavy rain and melting

snow produced poor drainage and river

flooding in Morris County that lasted

well into April. Rain began falling

during the late evening on the 27th, but

fell at its heaviest during the afternoon

and evening of the 28th as thunderstorms

occurred. Storm totals averaged around

three inches. Lincoln Park Borough was

one of the hardest hit municipalities

in the county as they received flooding

near the Pompton and Passaic River

confluence and the Beaver Brook. Several

roads were barricaded. In Denville, some

backyards were flooded by the Rockaway

River.

The Rockaway River above the Boonton

Reservoir was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 315 a.m. EST through 956 p.m.

EST on the 29th. It crested at 5.47 feet

at 10 a.m. EST. The Rockaway River below

the Boonton Reservoir was above its 5

foot flood stage from 307 a.m. EST on the

29th through 530 a.m. EST on the 31st.

It crested at 6.37 feet at 1045 a.m. EST

on the 29th. The Pequannock River at the

Macopin Intake Dam was above its 5.5 foot

flood stage from 445 a.m.EST on the 29th

through 2 a.m. EST on the 30th. It

crested at 5.59 feet at 1015 a.m. EST on

the 29th. The Passaic River at Pine Brook

was above its 19 foot flood stage from

1030 p.m. EST on the 29th through 515 p.m.

EST on April 1st. It crested at 19.41

feet at 645 p.m. EST on the 30th. Farther

downstream, the Passaic River at Two

Bridges was above its 9 foot flood stage

from 10 p.m. EST on the 29th through 4

p.m. EDT on April 9th. The March highest

crest was 10.26 feet at 3 a.m. EST on the

31st. Storm totals included 3.30 inches

in Milton, 2.88 inches in Pequannock,

2.70 inches in Boonton, 2.60 inches in

Lake Hopatcong and Morristown and 1.87

inches in Chatham.

The heavy rain was caused by a low

pressure system that formed along the

Gulf Coast States. This low pressure

system was captured by its support aloft

and thus moved only slowly northeast as

it tapped abundant moisture from both

the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic

Ocean. The low pressure system moved

from western Alabama at 7 a.m. EST on

the 27th northeast to eastern Tennessee

at 7 p.m. EST on the 27th and eastern

Kentucky at 7 a.m. EST on the 28th. A

secondary low pressure system formed

over North Carolina during the morning

of the 28th. It would become the main

low pressure system as it moved northeast

to near Norfolk, Virginia at 1 p.m. EST

on the 28th, Chesapeake Bay at 7 p.m.

EST on the 28th, Delaware Bay at 1 a.m.

EST on the 29th and about 100 miles east

of Atlantic City at 7 a.m. EST on the

29th.

NEW MEXICO, Central and North

NMZ002>006-008-

010>013

Heavy Snow

A storm which began with heavy snows

along the eastern slopes of the Sangre

de Cristo mountains and the Sandia

mountains pushed cold air through the

central valleys and covered the eastern

plains with cold readings. Amounts peaked

at near 17-19 inches at Chacon and Pecos

while 24-28 inches was measured near

Gascon. The Sandia Park area reported

15-22 inches. Snow eventually spread west

in the central valley with 4-8 inches

reported in Albuquerque metro area and

nearly 12 inches across the Jcmcz

Mountains and Los Alamos with 10 inches

reported cast and southeast of Cuba. The

storm dumped 4 to 9 inches across the

eastern plains as it finally moved east

out of the state, Mountain communities

northwest of Las Vegas had 48 hours

totals of 30-36 inches.

NMZ016

High Wind (G57)

High winds reported at Sierra Blanca

Airport 15 NE of Ruidoso.

NMZ005-007

Heavy Snow

Heavy snow of 6-8 inches was reported

between Raton and Clayton with driving

winds.

NEW MEXICO, South Central and Southwest

NEW MEXICO, Southeast

NMZ028

Winter Weather/Mix

Winter weather affected parts of New

Mexico during the day on the 15th. Light

snow accumulations up to one inch were

reported across the northwestern half of

the Eddy County plains.

NMZ029

Winter Storm

More significant snowfall occurred over

northern Lea County on the 15th as a

winter storm affected portions of the

New Mexico plains. Between four and five

inch snow accumulations were reported

across northern Lea County from Caprock

to Crossroads.

NMZ028-033

High Wind (G50)

A potent storm system moved east over

the Southern Plains on the 29th and

caused severe non-thunderstorm winds over

southeastern New Mexico. Numerous reports

of downed power lines and poles were

received along with reports of blown down

trees. The roof was blown off of a

trailer home near Hobbs. Wind gusts to

58 MPH were recorded at both the

Carlsbad and Hobbs airports.

NEW YORK, Central

NYZ009-015>018-

022>025-036>037-

044>046-055>057-062

Heavy Snow

A strong winter storm brought 8 to 14

inches of snow to all of central New

York. Isolated snow amounts were as much

as two feet. A Midwest storm slowly moved

east and combined with another storm

moving north along the east coast on

February 27th to bring copious moisture

to the region on February 28th. The snow

moved in from the south starting in the

afternoon and early evening on February

28th. The snow continued through the

night, heavy at times, before tapering

off to light snow and flurries late in

the morning on March 1st.

NYZ056>057-062

Heavy Snow

An intensifying storm moved north along

the east coast on March 23rd and 24th.

Light snow, possibly mixed with rain,

moved into the region midday on the 23rd.

The snow became heavy at times late in

the afternoon and continued into the

evening. Snowfall amounts were 6 to 8

inches with some amounts up to a foot

mainly at higher elevations. Water

equivalents of the snow were between

half an inch and an inch.

Otsego County

Gilbertsville Flash Flood

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches. A few locations received more

than 3 inches. In addition, snowmelt was

causing high stream flows before the

rain started late on the 27th. The

flooding caused Mill Street to be closed

in Gilbertsville.

Tioga County

Countywide Flash Flood

State Route 96 in Owego closed due to

flooding of the Owego Creek. Several

other roads were closed in Tioga Center

and Berkshire. Most roads were closed due

to flooding with one road in Berkshire

closed due to a mudslide. A strong

Atlantic coast storm brought around 2

inches of rain that fell on wet or

frozen saturated ground. In addition to

the rain adding to the runoff there was

snowmelt, which could of added another

inch or 2 of water equivalent. Streams

and creeks were already running high due

to snowmelt before the rain came starting

late on the 27th.

NYZ055

Flood

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Susquehanna River at Waverly,

NY / Sayre, PA rose above its flood stage

of 11 feet on the 28th, crested at 15.08

feet at 12 AM on the 30th, then fell

slowly but stayed over flood stage into

April. After the rainstorm, temperatures

were warm enough to cause additional

snowmelt.

NYZ057

Flood

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Beaver Kill at Cooks Falls

went above its flood stage of 10 feet the

evening of the 28th. The river crested at

10.42 feet at 5:15 AM on the 29th, before

falling back below flood stage late

morning on the 29th.

NYZ045

Flood

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Susquehanna River at

Bainbridge went above its flood stage of

13 feet late on the 28th, crested at 15.3

feet at 8 PM on the 29th, then fell below

flood stage on the 31 st. Additional

snowmelt after the rainstorm caused to

river to remain high.

Sullivan County

Bloomingburg Flash Flood

Heavy rain washed out a road. A strong

Atlantic storm dropped 2 to 3 inches of

rain on an already saturated ground. Most

of the rain fell on the 28th. Also adding

to the runoff was several inches of water

equivalent from snowmelt.

NYZ056

Flood

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Susquehanna River at Conklin

went above its flood stage of 11 feet

early on the 29th, crested at 15.09 feet

at 2:30 PM on the 29th. The river stayed

above flood stage into April due to

additional snowmelt.

NYZ056

Flood

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition, snowmelt

was causing elevated river flows before

the rain started late on the 27th. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few more

inches. The Susquehanna River at Vestal

went above its flood stage of 18 feet

early on the 29th, crested at 20.80 feet

at 6:00 PM also on the 29th, then fell

back below flood stage on the 31st.

Additional snowmelt occurred after the

rainstorm keeping river levels high.

NYZ045

Flood

A strong Atlantic coast storm brought

heavy rain with amounts between 1 and 3

inches on the 28th. In addition snowmelt

before and after the rainstorm was

causing elevated river flows. Water

equivalent of the snowmelt was a few

more inches. The Susquehanna River at

Bainbridge went briefly below its flood

stage of 13 feet on the 31st before

rising back over flood stage.

Temperatures in the 50s on the 31st

caused added snowmelt rising the river.

Another slow moving storm from the Ohio

Valley brought 2 to 3 inches of rain

on April 2nd and 3rd. By the time the

river fell below flood stage most of the

snow had melted. This additional rain

and snowmelt caused the river to rise

rapidly to a crest of 20.47 feet at 4:15

AM on April 4th. This was the 6th highest

crest at Bainbridge for almost the last

100 years. The river fell below flood

stage the morning of April 6th.

NYZ044

Flood

The Tioughnioga River at Cortland rose

above its flood stage of 8 feet late on

March 31st. The rise was due to rain that

fell on March 28th and snowmelt during

the week leading up to the 31st. The

water equivalent of the snow amounted to

several inches. A slow moving storm from

the Ohio Valley brought 2 to 3 inches of

rain on April 2nd and 3rd. By the time

the river fell below flood stage most of

the snow had melted. This additional rain

and snowmelt caused the river to rise to

a crest of 14.07 feet at 2:00 PM EST on

April 3th. This was a record flood crest

at Cortland. The previous flood of record

was 13.82 feet in 1950.

NYZ045

Flood

The Chenango River at Sherbume rose above

its flood stage of 8 feet late on the

31st. The rise was due to rain that fell

on the 28th and snowmelt during the week

leading up to the 31st. The water

equivalent of the snow amounted to

several inches. A slow moving storm from

the Ohio Valley brought 2 to 3 inches of

rain on April 2nd and 3rd. By the time

the river fell below flood stage most

of the snow had melted. This additional

rain and snowmelt caused the river to

rise to a crest of 10.78 feet at 2:30 AM

on April 3th. This was the 2nd highest

flood crest at Sherbume.

NEW YORK, Coastal

NYZ068>072-

074>076-078>079-081

Heavy Snow

A weak high pressure ridge extended

southwest across the region from New

England as a low pressure system

intensified and moved northeast. This

strong low passed south of Long Island

Monday night and cast of the New England

coast during Tuesday.

Light snow developed northeast across

the region between 1 and 4 pm Monday

afternoon. As the low rapidly intensified

and moved closer to the region, narrow

bands of heavy snow swept northeast

across the region. The last band of

heavy snow swept northeast across the

region between 7:30 am and 8:30 am

Tuesday morning, March 1st. Storm Total

Snowfall amounts ranged from 5 to 9

inches.

Here are selected snowfall totals for:

Rockland County – from 7.2 inches at New

City to 8.0 inches at Sloatsburg.

Westchester County – from 5.0 inches at

Scarsdale to 8.0 inches at Yorktown

Heights.

Putnam County – from 6.5 inches at Lake

Peekskill to 8.5 inches at Lake Carmel.

New York (Manhattan) – 7.5 inches was

measured at the Central Park Zoo.

Richmond (Staten Island) – from 6.1

inches at Bulls Head to 6.5 inches at

New Dorf.

Kings (Brooklyn) – from 5.0 inches at

Graves End to 6.0 inches at Shecpshead

Bay.

Queens County – from 5.0 inches at JFK

Airport to 7.0 inches at LaGuardia

Airport.

Suffolk County – from 5.5 inches at the

NWS Office in Upton, Sag Harbor,

Patchogue, and Deer Park to 7.2 inches

in Smithtown.

At Islip Airport, 6.6 inches was

measured.

NYZ069>081

Winter Weather/Mix

NYZ076

High Wind (G50)

A strong arctic cold front intensified

as it swept southeast across the region.

This caused rain to change to snow,

temperatures to fall from the 40s into

the 20s, and northwest winds that gusted

between 40 and 55 mph. A peak isolated

wind gust to 58 mph was measured by the

Automated Surface Observing System at

JFK Airport. Near blizzard conditions

occurred for a short time. Storm total

snowfalls ranged from around 2 to 4

inches.

Wet and mild antecedent conditions were

followed by more than a 20 degree drop

in temperature in 3 hours with strong

gusty winds. This resulted in a “flash”

freeze across roads that resulted in

hundreds of vehicle accidents.

NYZ078-080

Heavy Snow

A low pressure system developed southeast

of Long Island before sunrise on Saturday

March 12th. This low quickly intensified

as it moved northeast. It passed near

Nantucket during Saturday afternoon and

moved east of Cape Cod by Saturday

evening.

Light rain developed across the Atlantic

coastal waters just south of Long Island

between 1 am and 2 am. As the rainfall

intensity increased, it quickly changed

to heavy wet snow. The band of heavy snow

developed from western and central

Suffolk County north across New Haven

County CT. A few areas, mainly east of

Patchogue, experienced snowfall rates in

excess of 2 inches per hour.

Storm total snowfall amounts ranged from

around 5 to 8 inches. Here are selected

amounts of at least 6 inches:

Patchogue – 8 inches

Lake Ronkonkoma – 7.5 inches

Rocky Point – 6.8 inches

Mount Sinai – 6.7 inches

Sayville – 6.5 inches

Shoreham – 6.4 inches

Port Jefferson – 6.3 inches

Medford and North Patchogue – 6.0 inches

NYZ067>068

Heavy Snow

As a ridge of high pressure extended

southeast across New England, a low

pressure system moved northeast along

a warm front. The low quickly passed

southeast of Long Island early

Thursday morning on March 24th.

Snow quickly developed and spread

northeast across the region during

Wednesday afternoon. It became heavy

during Wednesday evening. Storm total

snowfall amounts ranged from around

6 to 10 inches. In Orange County,

snowfall accumulations ranged from

6.0 inches at Cornwall-On-Hudson to

10.0 inches at Circleville.

NEW YORK, East

NYZ066

Heavy Snow

NYZ065

Heavy Snow

The average total snowfall across

Dutchess County was 9 inches.

NYZ064

Heavy Snow

NYZ063

Heavy Snow

Average total snowfall across Ulster

County was 11 inches.

NYZ061

Heavy Snow

NYZ060

Heavy Snow

Average total snowfall across

Columbia County was 10 inches.

NYZ059

Heavy Snow

NYZ058

Heavy Snow

Average total snowfall across

Greene County was 11 inches.

NYZ052

Heavy Snow

NYZ051

Heavy Snow

Average total snowfall across

Albany County was 13 inches.

NYZ054

Heavy Snow

NYZ053

Heavy Snow

Average total snowfall across

Rensselaer County was 11 inches.

NYZ049

Heavy Snow

NYZ048

Heavy Snow

Average total snowfall across

Schenectady County was 11 inches.

NYZ047

Heavy Snow

Average total snowfall across

Schoharie County was 10 inches.

NYZ082

Heavy Snow

NYZ039

Heavy Snow

Average total snowfall across

Fulton County was 9 inches.

NYZ040

Heavy Snow

Average total snowfall across

Montgomery County was 9 inches.

NYZ041

Heavy Snow

NYZ050

Heavy Snow

Average total snowfall across

Saratoga County was 12 inches.

NYZ043

Heavy Snow

NYZ084

Heavy Snow

Average total snowfall across

Washington County was 11 inches.

NYZ033

Heavy Snow

Average total snowfall across

Hamilton County was 8 inches.

NYZ032

Heavy Snow

NYZ038

Heavy Snow

The average total snowfall across

Herkimer County was 8 inches.

NYZ042

Heavy Snow

NYZ083

Heavy Snow

The average total snowfall across

Warren County was 11 inches.

A surface low pressure was centered

along the mid-Atlantic Coast at the

beginning of March. This storm tracked

northeastward well off the eastern

seaboard, reaching southeast of Cape

Cod by midday on March 1. The storm

then moved into the Gulf of Maine

by late on March 1. At the same time,

another vertically stacked storm

moved slowly east from the Great

Lakes and interacted with the

low-level moisture from the surface

storm. The combination of the two

storms, along with a surface trough

anchored between them, resulted in a

significant snowstorm across much

of eastern New York and adjacent

western New England. Snowfall storm

totals across the region ranged

from 7 inches to a foot or more.

Officially, 11.7 inches of snow

fell at the National Weather Service

station in Albany. The heaviest

amount was reported in Bennington

County in Vermont, where 17.5 inches

of snow was reported in the Town

of Wadeford. Other than the usual

school and business closures, the

storm did not report any unusual

problems across the region.

NYZ053

Heavy Snow

NYZ054

Heavy Snow

The average snowfall across

Rensselaer County was 12 inches.

NYZ043

Heavy Snow

NYZ084

Heavy Snow

The average total snowfall across

Washington County was 9 inches.

A strong cold front moved across

eastern New York and adjacent western

New England on March 8th. As the

front slowed down across eastern New

England, a wave of low pressure

formed along it and eventually became

a closed storm system which

intensified as it moved into the

Canadian Maritimes. The front and

developing storm brought snow across

the region. A meso-scale band of

enhanced heavier snow and an upslope

wind component, resulted in heavy

snowfall across portions of the

Taconics and Berkshires. Gusty winds

also resulted in some blowing and

drifting of the snow, but not enough

to qualify as a blizzard. The

snowfall in these areas ranged from

7 inches to locally over a foot.

Seventeen inches was reported in

Averill Park, Rensselaer County, the

highest snowfall total. The snow and

blowing snow resulted minor traffic

accidents across the region.

NYZ051

Winter Storm

The average snowfall total across

Western Albany County was 8.0 inches.

NYZ060

Winter Storm

The average snowfall total across

Western Columbia County was 8.0 inches.

NYZ065

Heavy Snow

The average snowfall total across

Western Dutchess County was 8.0 inches.

NYZ059

Winter Storm

NYZ058

Winter Storm

The average snowfall total across

Greene County was 9.0 inches.

NYZ054

Winter Storm

The average snowfall depth across

Eastern Rensselaer County was 7.0

inches.

NYZ064

Winter Storm

NYZ063

Heavy Snow

The average snowfall depth across

Ulster County was 8.0 inches.

NYZ041

Winter Storm

The average snowfall total across

Northern Saratoga County: 10.0

inches. Highest snowfall amount

reported in Gansevoort, 12 inches.

NYZ043

Winter Storm

Average snowfall depth across

Northern Washington County: 10.0

inches. Highest snowfall amount in

Northern Washington County reported

in Cossayua, 12 inches.

The fourth coastal storm of the

month tracked from south of Long

Island to east of Cape Cod by early

March 24. This storm produced a

meso-scale band of heavy snow that

first fell to the south and west

of Albany. The band weakened as it

moved across the Greater Capital

District, but then strengthened as

it proceeded north in the Saratoga

region and Washington County. The

result was a significant snowfall

across portions of the Catskills,

Helderbergs, Saratoga region and

Taconics, while lesser amounts fell

across the remainder of the region.

A foot fell in two serperate spots,

Gansevoort, Saratoga County and

Cossayua, Washington County. No

unusual problems were reported with

this storm.

Montgomery County

Canajoharie Flash Flood

The Canajoharie Creek exceeded the

6.0-foot flood stage at the Canajoharie

Creek gage, cresting at 8.19 feet,

5:15PM on the 28th.

Schoharie County

Warnerville Flash Flood

The town of Warnerville was

impassable due to flooded roads.

Saratoga County

Bemis Hgts Flash Flood

Three roads closed, including Route

67 and Route 4, due to water coverage.

Washington County

Clarks Mills Flash Flood

County Route 113 closed due to

flooding.

Schenectady County

Glenville Flash Flood

Droms Road closed between Swaggertown

Road and Charlton Road due to flooding.

NYZ043

Flood

Metawee River over flood stage.

NYZ043

Flood

The Metawee River exceeded the

7.0-foot flood stage at the

Granville gage, cresting at 7.20

feet at 9:15 PM on the 28th.

NYZ064

Flood

Springtown Road flooded.

NYZ059

Flood

In Cairo, 15 County Roads closed

due to flooding. Eighteen Fire

companies pumped out basements

throughout county.

NYZ060

Flood

Every town in Columbia County

reported road closures due to

flooding.

NYZ050

Flood

The Mohawk River exceeded the

188.0-foot flood stage at the

Crescent Dam gage, cresting at

188.26 feet, at 3:OOAM on the 29th.

NYZ065

Flood

Due to tidal flooding as well as

locally heavy rain, the Hudson River

exceeded the 5.0-foot flood stage at

the Poughkeepsie gage, cresting at

5.05 feet, 2:30AM on the 29th.

NYZ066

Flood

In the Town of Northeast, Mill Road

closed due to flooding.

NYZ064

Flood

The Esopus Creek exceeded the

20.0-foot flood stage at the Mount

Marion gage, cresting at 20.54 feet,

8:OOAM on the 29th.

NYZ040

Flood

The Schoharie Creek exceeded the

6.0-foot flood stage at the

Burtonsville gage, cresting at 6.13

feet at 7:OOPM on the 29th.

NYZ065

Flood

Wappingers Creek exceeded the

8.0-foot flood stage at the

Wappingers Falls gage, cresting

at 8.09 feet, 4:30PM on the 29th.

NYZ038

Flood

The Mohawk River exceeded the

403.0-foot flood stage at the Utica

gage, cresting at 403.4 feet, 6:OOPM

on the 30th.

A potent area of low pressure and

its associated frontal systems,

moved northeast across the Ohio

and Saint Lawrence Valleys on the

28th of March, bringing with it a

significant amount of moisture.

Since it took a more western track

than previous storms earlier in the

month, almost all of the precipitation

fell as rain. Rainfall totals,

averaging 1-2 inches, but locally as

high as 4 inches, accumulated across

portions of the eastern New York and

adjacent western New England. This

rainfall, combined with snow melt,

produced significant runoff,

resulting in widespread flooding

across the region between March 28th

through 31st. Many streams and rivers

reached or exceed bankful, including

the Mettawee, Housatonic and Mohawk

Rivers, as well as the Esopus,

Wappingers and Schoharie Creeks.

Numerous houses in Columbia and

Greene Counties sustained damage

when their basements became flooded,

and there were many reports of road

closures across a large number of

counties. One Mechanicville man was

transported to a local hospital after

being swept away by floodwaters of

the Anthony Kill. In Columbia County,

every town reported at least one

road closed due to flooding.

NEW YORK, North

NYZ026>031-

034>035-087

Winter Storm

A storm system off the Carolinas on

Monday, February 28th moved to the

Gulf of Maine the afternoon and

evening of Tuesday, March 1st. Snow

developed across the area during the

night of Feb 28th, and was heavy at

times during March 1st before it

tapered off the night of March 1st.

Snowfall was generally between 8

and 10 inches, except in Clinton

county where snowfall was between

9 and 14 inches. Locally higher

amounts fell in the higher peaks of

the Adirondacks.

NYZ028-034>035

Winter Weather/Mix

An area of low pressure over the Ohio

valley on Friday, March 11th moved

east across southern New York and

reorganized south of Cape Cod early

Saturday, March 12th. The storm

system moved north through the Gulf

of Maine Saturday evening. Snow spread

across the area during the afternoon

of March 11th, and was steady later on

the night of March 11th into Saturday,

March 12th, before it tapered off

Saturday afternoon. General snow

accumulations were 3 to 5 inches.

NEW YORK, West

NYZ001>003-

010>011-014

Heavy Snow

An intensifying low over Indiana and

Ohio on February 28th lifted slowly

across Lake Erie. Snow overspread the

area during the late afternoon hours

of the 28th. It was generally light

at first, but became moderate to heavy

for a time across the Niagara Frontier

and northern Finger Lakes (including

Buffalo and Rochester) shortly after

midnight. The snow finally tapered

off during the morning and early

afternoon hours of March 1st.

Specific overnight snowfalls

included: 9″ at Clarence and

Alabama; 8″ at Medina and Victor;

and 7″ at Spencerport and Lewiston.

NYZ019>020-085

Heavy Snow

A northwest flow across Lake Eric

resulted in an intense lake effect

snow across the higher elevations

of the western southern tier of New

York during the evening of March 2nd

and continuing through the afternoon

of the 3rd. Specific snowfall reports

included: 14″ at Perrysburg; 13″ at

Cassadaga; 12″ at Stockton; and 10″

at East Aurora.

NYZ006

Heavy Snow

A cold, westerly flow across Lake

Ontario established a narrow, intense

band of lake effect snow over Oswego

county. In Scriba ten inches of snow

fell while nine inches was reported

in Palermo and Volney.

NYZ006

Heavy Snow

A band of lake effect snow began

to develop late in the afternoon of

March 9th in a northwest flow across

Lake Ontario. The band of snow

continued through the night and

morning hours, but broke apart

during the afternoon hours under

the strong March sun. Snowfall

reports included: 10″ at West

Monroe; 9″ at Constantia; and

7″ at Hannibal.

COPYRIGHT 2005 World Meteorological Organization

COPYRIGHT 2005 Gale Group