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September 2004

Time Path Path

Local/ Length Width

Location Date Standard (Miles) (Yards)

TENNESSEE, Central

Davidson County

9.6 NE Nashville 2 1830CST

2030CST

NWS employee reported street flooding

near the intersection of Old Hicklory

Boulevard and Merritt Street in the Old

Hickory area of Davidson County.

Humphreys County

Mc Ewen 12 1250CST

1310CST

Law enforcment reported hail the size

of quarters during this 20 minute

period.

Benton County

Big Sandy 12 1410CST

Sheriffs office reported golf ball size

hail.

Perry County

Linden 12 1650CST

1945CST

U.S. Highway 412 E and Highway 100

intersection was flooded near the high

school.

Perry County

Linden 12 1745CST

Trees were blown down.

Wayne County

17 S Waynesboro 12 1845CST

Trees were blown down on Spain Rd.

Wayne County

10 SE Waynesboro 12 19000ST

2130CST

Shawnette Creek Road was flooded and

impassable.

TNZ011-033>034- Pickett–Overton–Fentress–Hickman–

057>062-066-075-077- Lewis–Williamson–Maury–Marshall–

079>080-093>095 Rutherford–Cumberland–Bedford–

Coffee–Grundy–Van Buren–Wayne–

Lawrence–Giles

16 1617CST

17 03000ST

Strong winds from the remains of

Hurricane Ivan blew down many trees and

power lines across Middle Tennessee

from Thursday evening into early Friday

morning. There were 30 incidents on

Thursday night where trees had fallen

across roadways or downed power lines

in Lawrence County alone. Many homes in

Lawrence County sustained damage from

fallen trees and tree limbs. U.S.

Highway 64 west and east was blocked

for a time in Lawrence County by fallen

trees. Lawrence County students enjoyed

a day off on Friday due to clean up

efforts. In the city of Loretto, a tree

fell on a building on Broad Street and

caused some structural damage. A pine

tree fell on a shed in Tullahoma. A

large oak tree in just off Ragsdale

Road in Manchester fell on 2 small

barns and a lawn tractor.

A 100-foot tree fell at the Salters

residence on Fuller Hollow Road in

Marshall County. Also, a large tree

fell on a pick up truck on Derry Street

in Shelbyville.

The 3 inches of rain on the night of

September 16th along with the gusty

winds destroyed the Amazing Corn Maize

at Rippavilla located in Spring Hill.

Damage was estimated to be $17,000.

Rippavilla was scheduled to open on

Thursday. The corn maize formed a

portrait of explorer Meriwether Lewis

at the historic Rippavilla Plantation.

About 7000 people lost power in Middle

Tennessee due to the remains of

Hurricane Ivan.

In Giles County alone, there was $1.7

million done to the white corn crop.

The winds blew down the corn stalks. A

business in Ardmore, also in Giles

County, lost a roof, and sustained

about $50,000 in damages. Also, there

was roof damage done to the Giles

County High School. The School Board

approved funds for a new roof costing

$74,619. These damage assessments were

from the Emergency Management Director

and newspaper clippings.

Total damage due to this storm in

Middle Tennessee was about $170,000 in

property damage and $1.7 million in

crop damage.

TNZ032>033-064- Putnam–Overton–Dekalb–Cumberland–

066-080 Van Buren

17 02000ST

09000ST

Street flooding was reported in

Monterey.

TENNESSEE, East

TNZ098 Marion

16 1500CST

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county from

500 pm through 1100 pm cdt.

TNZ099 Hamilton

16 1700EST

17 0100EST

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county from

600 pm on 09/16/04 through 200 am on

09/17/04.

TNZ081 Sequatchie

16 1708CST

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county.

TNZ082 Bledsoe

16 1708CST

Several trees were reported down across

the county.

TNZ099 Hamilton

16 1822EST

Numerous trees were reported down

mainly across the higher elevations in

the county.

TNZ083 Rhea

16 1824EST

Several trees were reported down mainly

across the higher elevations in the

county.

TNZ036 Anderson

16 1830EST

17 0400EST

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county from

730 pm on 9/16/04 through 500 am on

9/17/04.

TNZ100 Bradley

16 1855EST

Several trees and power lines were

reported down across the county.

TNZ067 Roane

16 2000EST

17 0400EST

Numerous trees were reported down

across the county from 900 pm on

9/16/04 through 500 am on 9/17/04 EDT.

TNZ067 Roane

16 2015EST

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county.

TNZ070 Jefferson

16 2100EST

2256EST

Several trees were reported down across

the county from 1000 pm through 1156 pm

EDT.

TNZ038 Grainger

16 2130EST

17 0400EST

Numerous trees were reported down

across the county from 1030 pm on

9/16/04 through 500 am on 9/17/04.

TNZ084 Meigs

16 2200EST

17 0400EST

Numerous trees were reported down

across the county from 1100 pm on

9/16/04 through 500 am on 9/17/04.

TNZ082 Bledsoe

16 22000ST

A tree fell onto and severely damaged a

home in Brayton.

TNZ085 Mcminn

16 2210EST

A few trees were reported down in

various spots around the county.

TNZ084 Meigs

16 2220EST

Several trees were reported down across

the county.

TNZ035 Morgan

16 2300EST

17 0900EST

Numerous trees were reported down

across the southern half of the county

from 1200 am through 1000 am EDT.

TNZ039 Hamblen

17 0100EST

0500EST

Several trees were reported down across

the county from 200 am through 600 am

EDT.

TNZ037 Union

17 0120EST

Numerous trees were reported down

across the county.

TNZ018 Johnson

17 0200EST

0800EST

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county from

300 am through 900 am EDT.

TNZ070 Jefferson

17 0250EST

A large tree was reported down at a

residence on Hebron Church Road five

miles SSE of Jefferson City.

TNZ070 Jefferson

17 0547EST

0959EST

Several trees were reported down across

the county from 647 am through 1059 am

EDT.

TENNESSEE, South Central

TNZ076-096>097 Moore–Lincoln–Franklin

16 13000ST

22000ST

Franklin County

Countywide 16 1905CST

17 03000ST

Widespread flash flooding was reported

throughout the county. Several roads

had at least 10 inches of water over

the road.

Lincoln County

Countywide 16 1905CST

17 03000ST

Widespread flash flooding was reported

throughout the county with several

roads with at least six to ten inches

of water over them.

Moore County

Countywide 16 1905CST

17 03000ST

Widespread flash flooding was reported

with many roads throughout the county

with several inches of water over the

roads.

TENNESSEE, West

Gibson County

Milan 12 1450CST

15000ST

Crockett County

2 N Alamo 12 1455CST

1500CST

Shelby County

Arlington 12 1500CST

1505CST

A man was killed by a lightning strike

while hunting in a field. M530U

Lauderdale County

Ripley 12 1505CST

1510CST

Shelby County

Arlington 12 1550CST

1555CST

Decatur County

Decaturville 12 1622CST

1630CST

Tipton County

Brighton 12 1630CST

1635CST

Tipton County

Brighton 12 1647CST

1655CST

TEXAS, Central

Tom Green County

San Angelo Mathis Fl 23 1908CST

Tom Green County

4 SW San Angelo 23 1940CST

2040CST

Heavy rains across the south and west

portions of San Angelo produced flash

flooding. As many as seven vehicles

stalled in high water near the

intersection of Sunset and College

Hills near the Red Arroyo. Four other

vehicles were stalled out near loop 306

and Southwest Blvd.

Tom Green County

5 E Wall 23 1940CST

Although hail up to golf ball size

occured, the hail was so soft that it

did not produce damage.

TEXAS, Central Southeast

Waller County

5 S Waller 4 1540CST

Wharton County

2 SE El Campo 14 1135CST

Wharton County

6 NW El Campo 14 1432CST

Spotted at FM 2546 and Hwy 71.

Washington County

Burton 14 1437CST

Houston County

Grapeland 14 1635CST

Lightning strike at Grapeland High

School during football practice.

Twenty-two kept overnight at hospital

for observation, all released the next

day. One fatality the following day.

M180U

TEXAS, Extreme West

Hudspeth County

7 NW Ft Hancock 24 2345MST

25 0015MST

El Paso County

Socorro 25 0000MST

0200MST

El Paso County

7 NNW El Paso Intl Ai 29 1718MST

El Paso County

Northwest Portion 29 1720MST

1830MST

El Paso County

8 NNW El Paso Intl Ai 29 1732MST

El Paso County

10 N El Paso Intl Arpt 29 1740MST

TEXAS, Mid-South

Nueces County

Corpus Christi 02 1530CST

1730CST

Heavy rainfall across the south side of

Corpus Christi led to flash flooding of

several city streets. Off duty NWS

employee measured 4.2 inches of

rainfall on the south side of Corpus

Christi in 1 hour and 45 minutes.

TEXAS, North

Denton County

Sanger 14 1530CST

A house under construction collapsed

from high winds, trapping a worker

inside. It took an hour to free him

from the debris before he could be

taken to a hospital. Some trees and

power lines were also blown down.

Cooke County

Gainesville 14 1630CST

A mobile home was unroofed in the FRF

Estates. A telephone pole was blown

down and the canopy over a rodeo arena

was blown off. A fence around the arena

was uprooted and blown away. Some trees

were also blown down.

Cooke County

Valley View 14 1630CST

Lightning caused two house fires with

minor damage to one and moderate damage

to the other.

Henderson County

Athens 14 1800CST

A large tree at the courthouse was

blown down.

TEXAS, North Panhandle

Deaf Smith County

9 WSW Hereford 22 1745CST

Hutchinson County

Borger to 22 1756CST

Bunavista 2300CST

Three to five homes in the towns of

Borger and Bunavista had to be

evacuated due to rapidly rising water

with another four to six homes

threatened by the flash flooding. The

flash flooding also closed down several

streets including Texas Highway 136.

Deaf Smith County

Hereford 22 1758CST

Potter County

Amarillo Intl Arpt 22 1821CST

Reported by the Science and Operations

Officer at the Amarillo National

Weather Service Office.

Potter County

10 E Amarillo 22 1825CST

Potter County

9 E Amarillo 22 1826CST

Severe thunderstorms during the early

evening hours produced large hail

across the southwest and south-central

Texas panhandle. No damage or injuries

were reported by the hail. In the

central Texas panhandle … thunder-

storms with very heavy rainfall

resulted in flash flooding in the towns

of Borger and Bunavista where several

homes were either evacuated or

threatened by the rapidly rising

waters. Several streets and highways

were closed due to the high water. No

injuries were reported from the flash

flooding.

Deaf Smith County

Hereford 27 0957CST

18000ST

Thunderstorms with very heavy rainfall

remained over the southwest Texas

panhandle from the late morning and

into the early evening hours. This led

to serious flooding in the town of

Hereford where parts of Hereford were

reported to be under water. The hardest

hit area was the San Jose community

which had damage to homes. Also … The

cotton and corn crops were reported

damaged by the flash flooding and some

young wheat crops drowned.

TEXAS, Northeast

Angelina County

Lufkin 24 1014CST

1315CST

Excessive heavy rainfall in town caused

severe street flooding. Some streets

were closed with cars becoming stalled

in high water.

TEXAS, South

Hidalgo County

6 N Mission 03 1811CST

1816CST

Numerous reports of funnel clouds were

received from trained spotters and the

local media, primarily north of Mission

and northwest of McAllen.

TEXAS, South Central

Frio County

Countywide 01 1000CST

12000ST

General 2 to 3 inch rainfall from near

Frio Town along FM140 into Pearsall and

then southeastward along FM 1582 to the

southeast corner of Frio County caused

widespread flash flooding. The worst

problems were in the city of Pearsall

near the noon hour.

Travis County

Austin 14 16000ST

1700CST

Thunderstorms moving over Austin

produced a general 1 inch rainfall with

parts of the city receiving almost 3

inches. Numerous low water crossings

were reported closed across the city

through the late afternoon, backing up

traffic for almost two hours during the

rush hour. One man attempting to cross

swollen Waller Creek on foot lost his

balance and was swept downstream.

Fortunately he was rescued safety.

Bexar County

San Antonio 22 2100CST

2130CST

A young girl drowned in a brief flash

flood event as she and her grandmother

were driving across a culvert that was

under construction. Although less than

2 inches of rain had fallen, water

swept quickly through the low area,

trapping the vehicle. The grandmother

left the car and was pulled to safety

by residents of the area. The young

girl was swept off her feet and washed

into a drainage pipe where she drowned.

F10VE

Val Verde County

Northeast Portion 23 0330CST

0630CST

Thunderstorms moving very slowly across

the northeast portion of Val Verde

County dropped between 2 and 3 inches

northeast of a line from Juno to Loma

Alta. The heaviest rainfall reported

was near 6 inches just north of Juno at

the intersections of SH163 and FM189.

Numerous low water crossings were

reported underwater through the early

morning hours.

Medina County

West Portion 23 1930CST

22000ST

Thunderstorms produced rainfall over

most of Medina County in the late

afternoon, with the western part of the

county receiving between 1 and 2

inches. The heaviest amount, between 3

and 4 inches, fell in a triangular area

from where FM1796 crosses the Uvalde

County line to where US90 touches the

Uvalde County line to Hondo. Flash

flooding closed sections of FM1796 and

FM2200 briefly during the evening.

De Witt County

Central Portion 25 2000CST

22000ST

Rainfall totals in showers and

thunderstorms averaged 1 inch with

isolated reports of up to 3 inches in

the area from Yorktown to Cuero to

Westhoff. Several roads were reported

under water and closed by the Sheriffs

Department through the evening.

Val Verde County

Countywide 26 1330CST

27 01000ST

Soils over Val Verde County, especially

the northern half of the county, had

been essentially saturated by the

rainfall on September 23. Storms formed

between Pandale, Comstock and Juno, in

the late morning of the 26th and flash

flooding began to cover low water

crossings by the early afternoon. As

the storms spread eastward and

southward through the afternoon and

evening, flash flooding continued. By

late evening, numerous roads were under

water and closed between Loma Alta and

Del Rio. In all, rain totals along and

east of a line from Pandale to Comstock

to Del Rio averaged between 1 and 2

inches, with widespread 3 inch amounts.

The highest accumulations were between

5 and 6 inches near Pandale.

Edwards County

West Portion 26 1900CST

27 01000ST

Thunderstorms continued to spread

eastward from Val Verde County on the

26th, moving into Edwards County in the

mid afternoon. They dropped between 1

and 2 inches of rain over the western

half of the county between 4 pm and 8

pm, with accumulations of up to 4

inches near where US277 crosses the Val

Verde County line and just south of

Carta Valley. Sections of US377, US277

and FM2523 were reported closed due to

high water.

Edwards County

Southwest Portion 27 15000ST

1630CST

Thunderstorms reformed during the early

afternoon of the 27th, re-developing

flash flooding over the western half of

the county very quickly. They continue

to spread slowly southeastward,

producing between 1 and 2 inches of

rain south and east of Carta Valley to

the Kinney County line. Once again,

portions of US377 and FM2523 were

reported to be briefly under water in

the late afternoon.

Kinney County

Countywide 27 17000ST

1900CST

The thunderstorms spread into Kinney

County during the late afternoon, with

rainfall totals over the county

averaging between 1 and 2 inches.

Highest amounts were near 4 inches

along FM674 from where it crosses the

Edwards County border to just north of

Brackettville. FM674 and FM334 were

reported under water in the early

evening.

Uvalde County

West Portion 27 1830CST

2030CST

The thunderstorms continued to spread

eastward from Kinney County into

western Uvalde County, with rain totals

between 1 and 2 inches over the area.

Highest totals were near 4 inches just

northwest of Concan. Brief flash

flooding closed portions of SH55 in the

northwest part of the county and

several roads north of Concan.

Val Verde County

Comstock 27 19000ST

2030CST

Very slow-moving thunderstorms formed

in the Comstock area in the late

afternoon and produced between 2 and 3

inches of rain around the town. The

Sheriffs Department reported portions

of FM1024 and SH163 briefly closed in

the Comstock area.

TEXAS, South Panhandle

Partner County

5 NE Black 22 1740CST

Castro County

Summerfield 22 1745CST

Bailey County

6 W Baileyboro 22 1908CST

Golfball sized hail was reported by the

Bailey County Sheriffs Office.

Bailey County

15 S Muleshoe 22 1930CST

Golfball sized hail was reported at the

Muleshoe Wildlife Refuge.

Bailey County

7 W Bula 22 2000CST

Floyd County

3 N Aiken 24 1640CST

Floyd County

Lockney 24 1644CST

1657CST

Penny to Golfball sized hail reported

by Sheriffs office in Lockney.

TEXAS, South Panhandle

Castro County

7 SW Dimmitt 26 1315CST

15000ST

Flood waters of 3-4 feet deep closed

Farm-to-Market Road 1055 between

Highway 86 and Farm-to-Market Road

1524.

Castro County

Dimmitt 26 1330CST

15000ST

Flood waters entered a home in Dimmitt

causing carpet and floor damage.

Cochran County

Morton 26 1521CST

16000ST

Flooding resulted in closure of Main St

in Morton.

Yoakum County

Denver City 26 1830CST

2345CST

Widespread flooding around Denver City

resulted in numerous road closures.

Bailey County

3 NW Muleshoe 26 2130CST

2230CST

Flooding was reported at Highway 84 and

Farm-to-Market Road 1760 near Muleshoe.

Cochran County

Morton 26 2142CST

2230CST

Morton police department reported Main

St. partially closed due to flooding.

Yoakum County

8 E Plains 27 0744CST

0830CST

Flooding resulted in the closure of

intersection Highway 214 and Farm-to-

Market Road 1939.

Terry County

3 N Brownfield 30 1728CST

Terry County

2 S Brownfield 30 1740CST

Texas Tech West Texas Mesonet station

measured a gust to 60 mph.

Terry County

Brownfield 30 1801CST

2000CST

Flooding in Brownfield closed several

streets.

Dickens County

Spur 30 1806CST

2000CST

Widespread flooding was reported in and

around Spur. A car was stranded in

town.

Lynn County

10 W Tahoka 30 1855CST

2300CST

Flood waters washed a car off the road

west of Tahoka on Highway 380.

Garza County

Southland 30 1904CST

2000CST

Flooding was reported in and around

Southland.

Lynn County

5 S Tahoka 30 1905CST

23000ST

Numerous reports of flooding was

reported in and around Tahoka.

Kent County

Jayton 30 1915CST

2015CST

Several reports of flooding occurred

in and near Jayton. A few roads were

briefly closed.

King County

7 S Guthrie 30 1915CST

Strong winds blew down trees south of

town.

Garza County

Post 30 1930CST

23000ST

Several vehicles were stranded to due

flood waters in and around Post.

Lynn County

Tahoka 30 1930CST

Dickens County

Dickens 30 2104CST

23000ST

Many county roads in and around Dickens

were flooded.

TEXAS, Southeast

Orange County

Vidor 18 1640CST

Jefferson County

Beaumont 18 1708CST

Jefferson County

Nederland 23 2050CST

22000ST

Heavy rains caused flood waters to

enter one home in Nederland.

Orange County

Bridge City 23 2050CST

22000ST

Heavy rains caused flood waters to

enter one home in Bridge City.

TEXAS, West

Ector County

Odessa 01 1450CST

1512CST

Several reports were received from the

public and a local newspaper reporter

of urban flooding in Odessa during the

afternoon of the 1st. Over six inches

of water was reported flowing through

the intersection of Second and Jackson

Streets in downtown, and more than a

foot of water crossed the intersection

of Sixteenth and Harless on the city’s

southwest side. The strong thunderstorm

that produced a burst of heavy rainfall

over the city quickly dissipated and

the flooding receded within half an

hour.

Ector County

1 ENE Gardendale to 01 1720CST

3 ENE Gardendale 1830CST

A second thunderstorm persisted for

nearly an hour over State Highway 158

in northeastern Ector County during the

evening of the 1st. Doppler radar

estimates indicated that up to two

inches of rain fell just northeast of

Gardendale. At least one foot of water

inundated several secondary roads.

Scattered convection develop over the

west Texas Upper Trans Pecos and the

western Permian Basin late on the 1st.

Two isolated strong thunderstorms

produced very heavy rainfall over Ector

County and resulted in localized flash

flooding.

Reeves County

1 S Saragosa to 21 1415CST

3 SE Saragosa 16000ST

Reeves County officials reported

extensive flash flooding along

Interstate 10 near mile marker 214. Low

spots along Texas Highway 17 were

inundated by flood waters between

Saragosa and the interstate. Both east

and west-bound service roads also were

flooded. High water threatened a Fina

Gas Station near the intersection of

Texas Highway 17 and Interstate 10. Up

to three feet of water flowed through

the business’s parking lot. The Texas

Department of Transportation deployed

sandbags around the structure to

protect it from the flood waters.

Gaines County

Higginbotham 21 15000ST

Gaines County

12 NW Seminole to 21 1730CST

Seagraves 2045CST

Strong to severe thunderstorms trained

over the northern half of Gaines County

and resulted in very heavy rainfall and

flash flooding. At 17:30 LST officials

reported that high water flowed over

Texas Highway 214 and swept a vehicle

off of the road northwest of Seminole.

Rescue crews had to remove the driver

from the vehicle in swiftly moving

flood waters. During the next three

hours numerous roadways and highways

also were flooded near Seagraves.

Heavy rainfall also produced flowing

flood waters that made U.S. Highway

385/62 impassable ten miles north of

Seminole.

Strong to severe thunderstorms

developed over the west Texas Upper

Trans Pecos and the western Permian

Basin during the late afternoon and

evening of the 21st. Extensive flash

flooding was reported in southern Pecos

County near Interstate 10. Additional

thunderstorm activity produced quarter

size hail and flash flooding in Gaines

County, where a motorist was swept off

of the road. No injuries were reported.

Midland County

6 SE Midland to 23 1825CST

12 W Midland 1923CST

A severe multicell thunderstorm erupted

over central Midland County during the

early evening of the 23rd and

propagated northwest over Midland

International Airport. At 18:25 CST,

nickel size hail and strong winds broke

small limbs off trees at several

residences six miles southeast of

Midland. At 18:53 CST nickel to quarter

size hail began to fall at the National

Weather Service Forecast Office near

Midland International Airport. The hail

persisted for ten minutes and covered

the ground. A resident on the Midland

/Ector County line reported nickel size

hail at 19:23 CST.

Midland County

1 ESE (Mat) Midland 1 23 1855CST

12 W Midland 1924CST

Several units at a trailer home

dealership suffered wind damage

southeast of Midland International

Airport. The Automated Surface

Observation System located at the

airport recorded severe thunderstorm

wind gusts up to 61 MPH. A large flag

pole also was broken by the winds near

the intersection of Midland County Road

60 and Farm to Market Road 1788.

Ector County

5 ESE Gardendale 23 1923CST

A resident on the Ector/Midland County

line reported nickel size hail.

Midland County

2 WSW Greenwood to 23 1940CST

2 NW Greenwood 21000ST

Storm spotters reported high water

flowing over several county and farm to

market roads between Interstate 20 and

Greenwood.

Midland County

1 S (Maf) Midland Intl 23 1955CST

2130CST

National Weather Service employees

encountered half a foot of running

water over the Interstate 20 service

road on the south side of Midland

International Airport.

An isolated severe multicell thunder-

storm produced large hail and damaging

thunderstorm winds as it propagated

northwest across Midland County. The

vicinity of Midland International

Airport was hardest hit by the storm

with quarter size hail and damaging

winds.

Ector County

Odessa 25 0910CST

12000ST

A broad complex of showers and

thunderstorms moved northeast over the

west Texas Permian Basin on the 25th.

As heavy rainfall from this activity

spread over Odessa, dangerous flash

flooding conditions developed rapidly

in the city streets. At 09:10 CST fire

department personnel conducted high

water rescues at the intersection of

Tanglewood and Pembrook. Numerous

roadways across the city were quickly

closed due to flood waters. Motorists

also were rescued from stalled vehicles

near the intersection of Tom Green and

University Avenue. No injuries were

reported.

Midland County

Midland to 25 0947CST

4 E Midland 1230CST

Storm spotters, law enforcement

officials, and the local media reported

several instances of flash flooding

across Midland. At 10:00 CST Texas

Department of Public Safety troopers

and Midland Fire Department personnel

rescued a woman and three children from

a vehicle submerged in three feet of

water near the intersection of West

Industrial Avenue and South Midland

Drive.

Shortly before 10:30 CST rescue crews

assisted stranded motorists on Illinois

Avenue and at the intersection of

Midkiff Road and Wadley Avenue. At

11:00 CST an elderly driver was rescued

from a vehicle submerged in six feet of

flowing water near Midland College.

Flood waters reportedly covered the

trunk and hood of the sports utility

vehicle and entered the cab. Fire crews

anchored a safety line across Wadley

Avenue to reach the distressed

motorist.

In addition, over a foot of water

covered the Loop 250 access road

between Thomason and State Highway 191

near Grandecom Stadium. Over two feet

of water covered the Interstate 20

access road at the intersection of Farm

to Market Road 1130. Two traffic

accidents on Interstate 20 in Midland

were indirectly related to the wet

weather when cars lost control on the

wet pavement. One such accident

resulted in an injured motorist. No

injuries or fatalities resulted from

the flash flooding.

Scurry County

Snyder 25 1439CST

1630CST

Local officials reported that flash

flooding resulted in high water running

down Avenue E in Snyder. The street was

closed to traffic.

Brewster County

Study Butte 25 1630CST

Isolated strong to severe thunderstorms

erupted over the mountainous terrain of

southwest Texas during the afternoon

hours of the 25th. The National Park

Service reported quarter size hail near

Study Butte.

Convection was widespread over west

Texas on the 25th. The initial activity

decreased from west to east during the

afternoon hours, but not before

resulting in very dangerous urban flash

flooding across portions of the Permian

Basin. Isolated strong to severe

thunderstorms erupted again by late

afternoon over the mountainous regions

of the state. One storm produced large

hail near the Big Bond National Park.

Jeff Davis County

10 WSW Ft Davis to 26 0755CST

16 W Ft Davis 27 05000ST

Very dangerous flash flooding

conditions developed rapidly on the

morning of the 26th across Jeff Davis

County. At 07:55 CST the Fort Davis

Fire Department reported two persons

stranded by flood waters in Short

Canyon, thirteen miles north-northeast

of Fort Davis. The fire department also

reported that work was underway to

rescue two additional stranded campers

in Madera Canyon, ten miles west-

southwest of the McDonald Observatory.

Rescue crews were able to bring the

campers in Madera Canyon to safety

shortly before noon CST. Additional

flash flooding was reported along

Olympia Creek, where water up to six

feet in depth inundated Texas Highway

118 for 200 yards between Fort Davis

and the Fort Davis State Park. The

intersection of Texas Highways 118 and

17 also was submerged by flowing flood

waters

Flooding along Olympia Creek was

reported to have receded by mid

afternoon. A second flood wave,

however, raged through the creek and

inundated the same portion of State

Highway 118 north of the Fort Davis

around 16:45 CST. The water again

receded making the highway passable by

19:35 CST.

Dangerous conditions persisted through

much of the night in rural Jeff Davis

County near Short Canyon. Two people

remained isolated at a deserted ranch

house near Wild Rose Pass by raging

flood waters. The individuals were

airlifted to safety via a helicopter

rescue just before dawn on the morning

of the 27th. No serious injuries or

damage was reported.

Brewster County

20 S Alpine to 26 0825CST

Terlingua 14000ST

A trained spotter reported flood waters

crossing State Highway 118 twenty miles

south of Alpine at 08:25 CST. Flash

flooding also inundated numerous rural

secondary roadways at Terlingua Ranch

near State Highway 118 in southern

Brewster County.

Before the heavy rainfall ended across

Brewster County during the late

afternoon, additional flash flooding

was reported near Terlingua. Law

enforcement officials reported that

several low water crossings there

flooded and several local highways were

impassable.

Reeves County

9 NNW Orla to 26 1030CST

Orla 1900CST

At 10:30 CST residents in Orla reported

high water that inundated yards and

threatened homes. Water in the streets

of Orla flowed one foot deep. No major

damage was reported.

A National Weather Service Cooperative

Observer west of Red Bluff Dam reported

flood waters crossing U.S. Highway 285

in northern Reeves County at 10:40 CST.

Five to six feet of water was reported

flowing over County Road 447 five miles

north of Orla at 15:45 CST. At that

time, the Red Bluff Dam Cooperative

Observer reported a forty-eight hour

rainfall total of five inches.

The heavy rainfall ended over most of

Reeves County by late afternoon. Runoff

continued to result in flash flooding

through mid evening. The last report

that was received indicated that three

feet of water continued to flow over

County Road 447 north of Orla at 18:00

CST.

TEXAS, West

Culberson County

Van Horn to 26 1041CST

Pine Spgs 1700CST

At 10:41 CST National Park Service

employees reported flash flooding that

resulted in high water over Texas

Highway 54 at several locations between

Van Horn and Pine Springs. A later

report from the National Park Service

indicated that the water was flowing up

to two feet deep at some locations by

15:15 CST.

Heavy rainfall exited Culberson County

by late afternoon. The flash flooding

quickly receded along Texas Highway 54,

but debris was reported covering

portions of the highway, where flooding

had occurred at 17:30 CST.

Loving County

19 NW Mentone to 26 1100CST

1 N Mentone 1415CST

Several public reports indicated flash

flooding across western Loving County.

At 11:00 CST, at least one foot of

water was reported flowing over Farm to

Market Road 652 in the northwestern

parts of the county. Additional

flooding was reported at 11:45 CST

along County Road 300 one mile north of

Mentone, where flowing water up to one

foot deep crossed the road.

Gaines County

14 W Seagraves 26 1455CST

27 0100CST

Flash flooding inundated Texas Highway

214 near the Gaines/Yoakam County line.

At 14:55 CST a car was washed off of

the highway just south of the county

line by flowing flood waters. Local

emergency officials closed the highway

after the driver of the vehicle was

brought to safety and it was not re-

opened until the water receded after

midnight CST.

Ector County

Odessa 26 1650CST

1930CST

Several city streets were inundated by

urban flash floods across the south

side of Odessa. More than two feet of

water flowed through portions of Tom

Green and Muskeegum Streets between 8th

and 15th Streets. Parts of 11th and

12th Streets were impassable with

nearly three feet of water. The

intersection of Meadow and Murphy also

was flooded with two feet of flowing

water.

Winkler County

1 SW Wink 26 1650CST

2100CST

Texas State Route 115 was barricaded

and closed to traffic through much of

the evening due to flash flooding

caused by a low water crossing that

flooded and inundated the highway near

Wink.

Andrews County

20 WNW Andrews to 26 1730CST

27 WNW Andrews 2000CST

Trained storm spotters reported that

flood waters intermittently covered

Texas Highway 176 in western Andrews

County. Half a foot of flowing water

crossed the highway at several

locations between twenty and twenty-

seven miles west-northwest of the city.

Ward County

Monahans 26 1734CST

1945CST

Multiple reports from Monahans

indicated that heavy rainfall produced

flash flooding that quickly inundated

city streets and threatened several

residences. Local law enforcement

officials reported that city streets

remained barricaded at 19:00 CST. Flood

waters in the city receded by late

evening. No major damage was reported.

Howard County

Big Spring 26 1745CST

1820CST

Heavy rainfall caused ponding of water

on many driving surfaces near Big

Spring. A semi-truck hydroplaned off of

Interstate 20 on the north side of the

city. A second semi-truck lost control

and jack-knifed when the driver tried

to avoid a collision with emergency

workers responding to the first

incident.

Howard County

Big Spring 26 1755CST

2000CST

The Big Spring Police Department

barricaded several city streets due to

flowing flood waters that resulted from

flash flooding. The most significant

flooding was reported in the city’s

northwest side. At 18:43 CST a motorist

was stranded in flood waters at the

1400th block of Sixth Street. Northwest

Second and Benton Streets also were

closed.

Gaines County

15 W Seminole to 26 1915CST

13 W Seminole 27 0030CST

Portions of U.S. Highway 62/180 were

impassable due to flowing flood waters

west of Seminole. Numerous secondary

roads also were inundated in the

immediate area.

Dawson County

Lamesa 26 1950CST

2300CST

Several locations were inundated by

flood waters in Lamesa. Flash flooding

caused high water to flow through

Forest Park and along North Main

Street.

Tropical-like rainfall occurred over

portions of west Texas during the last

weekend in September. On Sunday the

26th, widespread flash floods resulted

from heavy rains that accompanied a

complex of warm topped convection that

propagated slowly from the mountains of

southwest Texas and the Big Bend

northeast across the Permian Basin.

A sudden onset of dangerous flash

flooding conditions at sunrise caught

campers by surprise in the Davis

Mountains. At least four people were

isolated by raging flood waters at two

camp sites in rural portions of that

county. Campers at one site were

stranded for nearly twenty-four hours

before a rescue helicopter was used to

lift them to safety.

The threat of significant flash

flooding spread northeast across the

Upper Trans Pecos and the west Texas

Permian Basin through the afternoon and

evening hours. This resulted in

dangerous driving conditions across

portions of the area. A car was swept

off of a highway by flood waters in

Gaines County during the early evening

hours. Serious injuries or deaths were

narrowly avoided when two semi-trucks

lost control and hydroplaned off of a

rain soaked Interstate 20 in Howard

County. One truck barely missed

emergency workers who were attending to

the initial accident.

The heavy rainfall began to subside

across most of the region by late

evening on the 26th. Flash flooding

continued in some locations as runoff

persisted through much of the night. No

injuries were reported across the area.

Gaines County

8 W Seminole to 27 0600CST

8 E Seminole 1000CST

Before sunrise on Monday the 27th,

thunderstorms again initiated over the

Permian Basin. Heavy rainfall from this

activity quickly led to flash flooding

over saturated grounds. Local law

enforcement officials reported flash

flooding at several locations along

U.S. Highway 180 in the vicinity of

Seminole. Between one and two feet of

flowing water was reported over a half

mile stretch eight miles east of

Seminole. The intersection of Farm to

Market Road 1429 and U.S. Highway 180

also was inundated by flood waters six

miles east of the city. High water also

made a stretch of the same highway

impassable eight miles west of Seminole

during the late morning hours.

Gaines County

8 W Seagravesto 27 0640CST

Loop 1230CST

Texas Highway 83 also was affected by

flash flooding in northern Gaines

County. At 06:40 CST local officials

reported flowing flood waters over the

highway eight miles west of Seagraves.

Hazardous driving conditions spread

east along that route through the

morning hours as the heavy rainfall

slowly propagated east. Up to two feet

of water covered the intersection of

Texas Highway 83 and U.S. Highway 385

in Seagraves. Impassable conditions

also were reported east along Texas

Highway 83 near Loop.

Borden County

14 W Gail 27 1010CST

1130CST

The Dawson County Sheriffs Office

reported flash flooding along U.S.

Highway 180. Up to eight inches of

flowing flood waters covered the

highway on the Dawson/Borden County

line.

Dawson County

4 ESE Lamesa to 27 1010CST

16 E Lamesa 1130CST

The Dawson County Sheriffs Office

reported flash flooding along U.S.

Highway 180 from four miles east-

southeast of Lamesa to the Dawson/

Borden County line. Portions of the

highway were covered by up to eight

inches of flowing flood waters.

A pre-dawn round of thunderstorms

resulted in another round of flash

flooding across the northwestern

Permian Basin of west Texas. Several

major highways were closed due to high

water.

Andrews County

Andrews 27 1630CST

1900CST

Thunderstorms and heavy rain again

erupted over west Texas during the

afternoon of the 27th. Saturated ground

conditions were first aggravated by

downpours over Andrews. Urban flash

flooding quickly ensued and several

vehicles stalled in flooded city

streets. The Andrews Fire Department

conducted at least one high water

rescue. No injuries were reported.

Ward County

20 SSE Monahans to 27 2110CST

22 SSE Monahans 2330CST

Trained spotters reported high water

flowing over Farm to Market Road 871 in

southeast Ward County. Several

secondary roadways also were inundated

by flood waters.

Ector County

5 SSE West Odessa to 27 1925CST

West Odessa 28 1500CST

A small linear convective complex

developed over western Ector County

during the early evening hours. The

complex persisted and remained nearly

stationary for almost two hours. Very

intense rainfall fell over Monahans

Draw near West Odessa.

The first reports of flash flooding

indicated that high water rendered Farm

to Market Road 866, Texas Highway 302,

and Interstate 20 impassable. Up to six

feet of water was reported crossing low

lying areas of Farm to Market Road 866

just north of the Interstate 20

junction. Several vehicles became

stalled in high water flowing across

the interstate, resulting in high water

rescues of stranded motorists.

By late evening the swollen Monahans

Draw, usually a dry depression,

inundated residential areas in West

Odessa. The hardest hit areas were near

Third and Damascus Streets. The most

extensive damage occurred to several

trailer parks in the Westcliff, Knox

Village, and Manor subdivisions. Rescue

crews from three fire departments

worked well into the night to remove

distressed residents from homes and

vehicles that were threatened by high

water. One fire engine stalled in the

flood waters. Many families were

displaced to emergency shelters in

other portions of the city and in

Odessa. More than forty homes suffered

serious damage. Four trailer homes and

two permanent homes were destroyed.

Another fifteen single family homes

experienced major damage from the flood

waters.

Thunderstorms dissipated over Ector

County shortly before midnight CST.

This brought a temporary reprieve from

the excessive rainfall. Runoff,

however, continued to present a threat

of flash flooding through the nighttime

hours. As a result local emergency

management officials continued to

report major flash flooding along

Monahans Draw through the night.

During the pre-dawn hours of Tuesday

the 28th, another band of showers and

thunderstorms moved north across Ector

County. Brief heavy rainfall from this

activity aggravated the flash flood

situation. By 06:35 CST local officials

were again at work to evacuate

residents near the intersections of

Tripp and Twenty-Third Streets and

Tenth and Redondo Streets. Between two

and three feet of water was reported

rushing through those city streets and

threatened numerous homes. At least

three high water rescues also were

conducted to bring stranded motorists

to the safety of dry ground.

Rainfall ended over Ector County by

09:00 CST. Significant runoff and

associated flash flooding of low lying

areas prevented access to much of the

city through the early afternoon hours.

Ector County

Odessa 27 2000CST

28 1200CST

Heavy rainfall over Odessa during the

late evening and overnight hours Monday

the 27th and the early morning hours of

Tuesday the 28th caused the flat-topped

roof of a business to collapse in

downtown. Although extensive damage

occurred to the business, no injuries

were reported.

TXZ061 Ector

28 1500CST

1800CST

Despite an end of the thunderstorms and

heavy rainfall over Ector County during

the late morning hours, significant

flood waters remained in several West

Odessa neighborhoods. It took several

additional hours for flooding to

recede.

Scattered thunderstorms developed and

produced locally very heavy rainfall

over the western parts of the west

Texas Permian Basin during the late

afternoon and evening of the 27th. Many

West Odessa residents were displaced

from their homes during the late

evening hours when flash flooding along

Monahans Draw devastated parts of the

city. No casualties were reported, but

at least twenty families were left

homeless.

Howard County

3 NNW Knott to 28 0725CST

4 W Coahoma 1330CST

The Texas Department of Transportation

reported flash flooding along several

roadways in northwestern Howard County.

Between 07:25 and 07:50 CST local

officials and public reports indicated

that one mile of Farm to Market Road

2230 was inundated by flood waters near

the intersection of County Road 50

north of Knott.

The public also reported submerged

roadways west of Coahoma. Midway Road

and South Moss Lake Road were rendered

impassable due to high water. Local

highway officials closed the roadways

shortly afternoon CST.

Midland County

4 SW Midland to 28 0830CST

Midtnnd 1030CST

At 08:30 CST running water was reported

flowing over the intersection of Loop

250 and Business Interstate 20. The

local media reported a vehicle

submerged under an overpass at the

intersection of Midland Drive and

Industrial at 08:45 CST. Fire

department crews rescued a woman

trapped in a water stalled mini-van on

West Industrial Avenue. No injuries

were reported.

Flash flooding across the central

Permian Basin of west Texas resumed

during the mid to late morning hours

when a band of showers and

thunderstorms developed and propagated

across the area. Several rural and

secondary roadways were inundated by

flood waters in Howard County. In

addition, dangerous urban flash

flooding resulted in at least two

submerged vehicles in Midland.

Culberson County

4 S Pine Spgs 29 1922MST

1923MST

Reeves County

Orla 29 2320CST

Isolated strong to severe thunderstorms

developed over the west Texas Upper

Trans Pecos and in vicinity of the

Guadalupe Mountains during the late

evening hours of the 29th. One

thunderstorm produced severe wind gusts

near Guadalupe Mountains National Park.

An Automated Surface Observation System

located at Guadalupe Pass near U.S.

Highway 62/180 recorded a peak gust of

58 MPH. A second severe storm produced

hail up to the size of pennies in Orla.

Dawson County

10 NNE Lamesa 30 0825CST

1000CST

Convective activity lingered over the

northern Permian Basin into the morning

hours of the 30th. Local officials

reported that flash flooding briefly

resulted in over half a foot of water

flowing across a portion of U.S.

Highway 87 north of Lamesa.

Reeves County

2 S Saragosa to 30 1725CST

Saragosa 1726CST

A Texas Department of Public Safety

trooper reported penny to quarter size

hail and “high” winds from the

intersection of Interstate 10 and Texas

Highway 17 north to Saragosa.

Ward County

Grandfalls 30 1817CST

1821CST

Law enforcement officials reported

quarter to golfball size hail in

Grandfalls. Minor damage to vehicles

was reported.

Ward County

Grandfalls to 30 1820CST

2.5 ESE Grandfalls 1822CST

Strong to severe thunderstorms over

Pecos County spawned a left moving

(anticyclonic) severe storm that

rapidly propagated over the town of

Grandfalls. Quarter to golfball size

hail was reported in addition to

damaging winds. Five power poles were

snapped along State Route 11 just

southeast of town. In town, an abandon

mobile home was rolled by the winds and

destroyed while the roof of another

mobile home in the southwest portions

of the community was blown onto a

nearby pickup truck. Several trees were

uprooted and a historic church also

sustained serious roof damage.

A damage survey conducted by the

National Weather Service concluded that

the severe winds that produced the

damage was uniform in direction,

blowing debris from the southwest to

the northeast. The damage swath covered

an area three miles wide. These

observations were consistent with the

occurrence of a large downburst, or

macroburst.

Thunderstorms erupted along the Davis

Mountains in southwest Texas during the

afternoon and evening of the 30th.

Several of these thunderstorms became

severe as they propagated northeast

across the Trans Pecos and produced

large hail and damaging winds. The most

significant impacts from the storms

occurred in the community of

Grandfalls. Damaging winds destroyed

two trailer homes and partially removed

the roof on a historic church.

TEXAS, Western North

Hardeman County

Chillicothe 30 1947CST

A tree fell over a power line in town.

UTAH, East

UTZ022>025-027>029 Southeast Utah–Eastern Uinta Mountains

–Eastern Uinta Basin–Tavaputs Plateau

–Grand Flat And Arches–La Sal &

Abajo Mountains–Canyonlands / Natural

Bridges

01 0000MST

30 2359MST

Remnants of an eastern Pacific

Hurricane transported some moisture

across eastern Utah early in the month.

However, the precipitation was not

sufficient to alleviate the severe to

extreme drought conditions. Please see

the October 2004 Storm Data publication

for a continuation on this drought

situation.

UTZ023 Eastern Uinta Mountains

01 1300MST

05 1600MST

This fire was named the Mail Draw Fire

and occurred on BLM property 25 miles

northeast of Vernal. The fire consumed

2,800 acres of timber, pinyon pine,

juniper, and sage brush. The estimated

cost of fighting the fire was 915

thousand dollars.

San Juan County

Fry Canyon to 19 1600MST

21 NW Fry Canyon 1800MST

Heavy rainfall resulted in a wall of

water up to 6 feet deep roaring down

White Canyon. This flash flood was

observed by a number of back country

travelers, including trail guides.

UTZ023-028 Eastern Uinta Mountains–La Sal & Abajo

Mountains

20 1500MST

22 0500MST

An early season storm produced snowfall

amounts of 1 to 4 inches across the

mountains of northeast and southeast

Utah.

UTAH, West and Central

NOT RECEIVED.

VERMONT, North and Central

NONE REPORTED.

VERMONT, South

VTZ013 Bennington

18 1320EST

1531EST

The Walloomsac River exceeded its flood

stage of 7.0′, cresting at 7.21′ at

14:30 EST on 9/18/04 at the Bennington

gage.

VIRGIN ISLANDS

VIZ001>002 St. Thomas / St. John And Adjacent

Islands–St. Croix

14 0000AST

17 2359AST

Tropical Storm Jeanne affected the

territory with high winds and

torrential rains, leaving downed trees,

utility poles, power outages, and

widespread flooding in its wake. The

U.S. virgin Islands were declared a

major disaster area. Jeanne caused 6.4

million in damage to infra structure.

Jeanne dumped over 12 inches of rain in

St. Thomas during the three day period

from September 14-17. At the St. Croix

airport, 6.06 inches were recorded

during the same period, although a

spotter in a location north of

Fredericksted, at Butler Bay, recorded

8.73 inches for the 24 hour period

ending at 6 am on September 16. On St.

John, a spotter at Rainbow Hill, Cruz

Bay, recorded 10.39 inches for the

period from 630 am on Sep. 14th through

630 am on Sep. 17th. The maximum 24

hour rainfall at Charlotte Amalie of

9.25 inches has a return frequency of

25 years. The Turpentine Run at Mt.

Zion station in St. Tomas, set a new

record of 8.65 feet, which broke the

previous record of 7.28 feet set in

1995. On St. Thomas, about 20 people

had to be rescued early Thursday

morning when flood waters overtook

areas of Brockman Road, Estate

Nazareth, and Sanchez Town in Nadir.

Estate Nadir was hit the hardest when

the water swelled out of the runoff

channels and overtaxed drainage

ditches, causing widespread flooding

and erosion. On St Croix, flooding was

reported in Gallows Bay, Estate Ruby,

Estate Grove Place, Estate Whim, Tide

Village, Calquohoun, Midland Road,

Mon-Bijou and Frangipani. The rains

brought mudslides and forced large

rocks onto roadways on Queen Mary

Highway. On St John, downed trees,

mud and rock slides were reported. The

agricultural impact was significant in

St. Croix mainly were major flooding

occurred. Farmers experienced

significant damage and crop losses with

bananas, plantains, sugar cane,

vegetables and fruit trees. Plants that

were not destroyed by the winds

eventually overturned due to

waterlogged conditions. Winds reports

in the U.S. Virgin Islands varied, the

St Croix airport recorded sustained

winds of 52 mph with gusts to 62 mph.

The St Thomas airport recorded

sustained winds of 39 mph with gust to

51 mph. There was an unofficial wind

gust report of 96 mph recorded by a

spotter at Maria Hill in St. Croix.

VIRGINIA, East

Hanover County

Mabelton 08 1130EST

Trees down.

King William County

Aylett 08 1305EST 1 100

F0 tornado blew roof off a house near

King William Road.

Caroline County

1 S Bowling Green to 08 1425EST 10 300

1 W Moss Neck 1445EST

F1 tornado damaged or destroyed several

buildings. Also, numerous trees downed

or sheared.

Amelia County

Truxillo 08 1640EST 0.5 50

F0 tornado twisted off tree tops near

intersection of Routes 639 and 681.

Fluvanna County

3 W Palmyra 08 1640EST 1 100

F0 tornado demolished mobile home,

blew roof off house, and downed trees

at Route 693 and Longacre Road.

Chesterfield County

1 SW Midlothian 08 1815EST 0.5 50

F0 tornado produced minor damage to

trees near Route 288 and Woolridge

Road.

Henrico County

3 NW Varina 08 1920EST 0.5 50

F0 tornado produced structural damage

to outbuildings and storage facilities

at several businesses along Old Osborne

Turnpike.

Richmond (C)

Richmond 08 1922EST 0.2 50

F0 tornado produced minor damage to

businesses near Orleans Street.

Prince George County

3 NW Templeton 15 0750EST

0830EST

Over a foot of water was observed on

Fairwood Road.

Prince George County

Prince George to 15 0755EST

Disputanta 0830EST

Considerable water over Route 460 was

reported near Disputanta, with one of

the lanes blocked due to the high

water.

Prince Edward

County

Farmville to 17 1420EST

Tuggle

Trees and power lines down.

Amelia County

Mannboro 17 1508EST 1.5 60

1510EST

F1 tornado blew roof off garage and

lifted garage off foundation. Trees

down with some snapped off in wooded

area.

Caroline County

1 SW Guinea to 17 1515EST 1.5 200

Guinea 1520EST

F1 tornado downed numerous trees near

Cosbys Corner. Many trees snapped off

10 feet above ground level. Cinderblock

detached garage (30 x 32 foot) totally

destroyed. Two vehicles damaged, minor

damage to home, and mobile home

destroyed by falling tree.

Prince Edward

County

Prospect 17 1528EST

Trees down.

Chesterfield County

2 N Midlothian 17 1530EST 1 50

F0 tornado downed trees near Robius

Road.

Mecklenburg County

Chase City 17 1545EST

Trees down.

Goochland County

Manakin 17 1550EST 1 100

F1 tornado downed numerous trees.

Louisa County

5 NW Louisa 17 1556EST 1.5 50

1558EST

F1 tornado downed or snapped off

numerous trees. Two house trailers

blown into a creek.

Henrico County

Short Pump 17 1559EST 0.5 150

1602EST

F0 tornado damaged some homes in the

Hampshire Subdivision, off Nuckols

Road. Shingles were torn off of some

roofs and garage doors blown in. Also,

damage to homes in the Autumnwood

Subdivision off of Shady Grove Road.

Hanover County

Montpelier 17 1615EST

Trees down near Old Ridge Road and

Blunt Bridge.

Hanover County

Doswell 17 1620EST

Trees down.

Powhatan County

Powhatan 17 1630EST

1730EST

Portions of Highway 60 flooded. Route

711 closed due to high water.

Hanover County

1 N Hanover 17 1640EST 1 50

F0 tornado downed trees.

Caroline County

1 S Dawn 17 1642EST 1 50

F0 tornado downed trees.

Caroline County

2 S Golansville 17 1711EST 1.5 60

1713EST

F1 tornado downed numerous trees on

Friendship Road. Many trees snapped off

10 feet above ground level. One tree

fell on a house and caused significant

damage.

Prince Edward

County

Farmville 17 1715EST

1815EST

Street flooding in town. Routes 634 and

636 closed due to high water.

Caroline County

3 WNW Port Royal 17 1723EST 2 150

1725EST

F1 tornado downed numerous trees near

the intersection of Route 615 and Route

728 around Four Winds Golf Course. Many

trees snapped off about 10 feet above

ground level, and significant damage to

2 homes.

Cumberland County

3 SE Ranies Tavern 17 1730EST

1830EST

High water on River Road and Jamestown

Road.

Powhatan County

2 ESE Subletts 17 1730EST

Trees down at Junction of Routes 711

and 288.

Goochland County

1 W Oilville 17 1734EST 0.2 40

1736EST

F1 tornado damaged a home on Broad

Street in the Three Oaks Subdivision.

Numerous trees were snapped and blown

down. Roof partial blown off house.

Greensville County

3 WNW Kingsberry 17 1735EST 0.8 100

F0 tornado damaged a few homes and a

shed along Old Brunswick Road/Route

607. Trees down in different

directions.

Amelia County

2 W Mannboro 17 1830EST

1930EST

State Route 615 closed due to high

water. High water also on Routes 360

and 38.

Goochland County

Manakin 17 1830EST

1930EST

High water at Manakin and Hermitage

Streets, and on Broad Street Road in

town of Goochland.

Hanover County

3 SSW Ashland 17 1900EST

2000EST

High water reported on Greenwood Church

Road, Rosmarin Road, Mountain Road,

Auburn Mill Road, and Stone Horse Road.

Richmond (C)

Richmond 17 1930EST

2015EST

Flooding reported on New Kent Road,

Jennie Scher and Stoney Run Roads,

Fairmount Road, and Mechanicsville

Turnpike.

Mathews County

Peary 17 2130EST

An old barn and small shed destroyed by

straight-line winds. Winds estimated

between 60 and 70 mph.

VIRGINIA, Extreme Southwest

NONE REPORTED.

VIRGINIA, North

Fauquier County

2 S Bealeton to 08 1320EST 1.5 200

.5 S Bealeton 1325EST

A tornado touched down 2 miles south of

Bealeton and lifted a half mile south

of Bealeton. The storm was 200 yards

wide. The initial touchdown was near

Morgansburg Road. The storm tracked

north for 1.5 miles and produced

significant damage to at least 2 homes.

A roof was peeled off one home and some

of the outside walls showed signs of

bowing. At another dwelling, a garage

door was blown into the garage and out

of the sidewall. Several projectiles

were lodged in the south side of the

house. Three large green houses and

some portable outhouses were also

damaged. Two Ryder trucks were

overturned. One truck fell on a small

pickup, which sustained considerable

damage. Maximum wind speeds were 115 to

130 mph.

Fauquier County

5.5 S Warrenton to 08 1330EST 0.8 100

4.3 S Warrenton 1333EST

A tornado touched down a half mile

south of Hurlesville or almost 6 miles

south of Warrenton. The storm was on

the ground for three-quarters of a

mile. Not structural damage was

observed, but 20 to 30 mature trees

were uprooted or snapped. Maximum winds

were 60 to 70 mph.

Culpeper County

Elkwood to 08 1357EST 0.3 100

.3 N Elkwood 1359EST

A tornado briefly touched down in

Elkwood. The tornado caused damage to

the Willow Run Growers Greenhouse

Complex. A 20 foot square building with

a sturdy metal roof was completely

destroyed. Two cars in a parking lot

were moved and a pickup truck was

tipped over. Estimated winds were 75 to

90 mph.

King George County

1.5 S Sealston to 08 1457EST 2.3 200

.8 N Sealston 1459EST

A tornado moved from Caroline County

along the Stafford-King George County

line. Numerous large trees (up to 3

feet in diameter) were uprooted and

topped along Route 3 near Scalston. The

storm was rated an F1 due to the

extensive tree damage observed.

Stafford County

3.5 NE White Oak to 08 1500EST 5.5 100

5 S Aquia 1514EST

The thunderstorm which produced the

tornado near Scalston in King George

County, crossed into cast Stafford

County. A brief touch down occurred

near Belle Plain (almost 4 miles NE of

White Oak). Minor tree damage was noted

and later the same tornado cycled and

another brief touch down occurred near

Aquia Bay Marina at the end of Aquia

Creek Road (about 5 miles S of Aquia).

Minor tree damage was noted there and 3

boats in dry dock were displaced.

Stafford County

2 SE Garrisonville to 08 1518EST 5 150

3 NNE Garrisonville 1535EST

A tornado touched down in north

Stafford County near Boswells Corner

(near the intersection of U.S. Route 1

and Telegraph Road). Initially the

storm produced minor damage to trees,

and siding and shingles were torn from

a few homes. Minutes later the storm

produced extensive tree damage to the

Crystal Lakes neighborhood.

Prince William

County

2.5 S Triangle to 08 1536EST 0.5 75

2 S Triangle 1538EST

A tornado crossed into Prince William

County from Stafford County. Damage was

limited to a large, healthy stand of

trees.

Fauquier County

2 N Delaplane to 08 1605EST 0.3 100

4 N Delaplane 1607EST

A tornado touched down briefly in a

rural area 2 miles north of Delaplane.

Several trees were topped or uprooted.

The storm produced intermittent damage

as it tracked northeast toward Route

17. Maximum winds were estimated at 60

to 70 mph.

Charlottesville (C)

Charlottesville 08 1625EST

Trees down across the city.

Clarke County

2 N Berryville to 08 1630EST 0.3 50

2.3 N Berryville 1632EST

A weak tornado touched down briefly

just north of Berryville and the

intersection of Route 7 and U.S.

Highway 340. A few trees were snapped

off with a lot of shredded leaves on

the ground. Maximum winds were around

65 mph.

Albemarle County

Crozet 08 1700EST

2330EST

U.S. Route 810 under water.

Greene County

Ruckersville 08 1700EST

Trees down across the area.

Shenandoah County

5 E Orkney Spgs 08 1700EST

2200EST

U.S. Route 42 under water.

Orange County

Montpelier to 08 1740EST 0.3 50

.3 E Montpelier 1742EST

A tornado touched down near Montpelier

Station in central Orange County.

Damage was limited to a few trees and

downed wires. The storm was on the

ground for less than 1 minute, and

maximum winds were 50 mph.

Augusta County

Deerfield 08 1800EST

2330EST

Numerous roads closed in southwest

Augusta County due to water covering

the roads.

Madison County

Madison 08 1800EST

2230EST

Multiple road closures due to high

water.

Rockingham County

Mc Gaheysville 08 1800EST

2330EST

Numerous roads closed due to standing

water.

Greene County

Standardsville 08 1800EST

2200EST

Water over bridges.

Frederick County

Gore 08 1910EST

2100EST

Multiple roads closed throughout the

county.

The remnants of Hurricane Frances

brought flooding and tornadoes to

portions of northern Virginia on the

8th. The track of the storm kept most

of the flooding and tornadic activity

in the Central Foothills, the Northern

Piedmont, and northern Virginia

counties from Loudoun southward to

Culpeper. Emergency personnel reported

numerous car accidents in Augusta and

Rockingham counties. Augusta County

schools cancelled school sporting

events due to the conditions of the

roads. Rescue workers also performed a

few evacuations/water rescues. Flights

were delayed at Dulles International

Airport.

Albemarle County

Earlysville 17 1444EST 0.3 50

1446EST

Brief touch down of a weak tornado

recorded and reported by broadcast

media.

Fauquier County

1 S Remington to 17 1502EST 9 200

2 NW Opal 1515EST

A strong tornado touched down in

southern Fauquier County, near

Remington. A home was pushed off its

foundation. A new pickup truck was

lifted and hurled 75 yards over trees

and power lines. It crashed upside down

in a field.

Greene County

1 S Standardsville to 17 1505EST 5 100

3.5 S Standardsville 1512EST

A tornadic thunderstorm touched down

near Standardsville. A roof was torn

off a building just south of U.S.

Highway 33. The roof was also torn off

a house just north of U.S. Highway 33.

The most extensive damage occurred

around Highway 621. Four dwellings and

a mobile home were destroyed.

Approximately 50 other structures were

damaged, including a nearby country

club and a concrete block building. A

trailer filled with cattle gates was

also destroyed.

Warren County

2 N Front Royal to 17 1510EST 0.5 50

Front Royal 1512EST

A weak tornado produced minor damage to

some large trees near Front Royal.

Debris was thrown across several roads.

Fauquier County

.5 E Opal to 17 1512EST 8 150

1 NW Warrenton 1526EST

An F2 tornado touched down near Opal

and tracked north. The tornado produced

severe tree damage and some structural

damage to several dwellings before

dissipating near Warrenton. This is the

second tornado of three tornadoes in

Fauquicr County associated with the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan.

Madison County

.5 W Hood to 17 1512EST 8 400

5.5 NW Graves Mill 1522EST

A thunderstorm that moved into Madison

County from Greene County produced

tornado damage near Hood. A number of

homes were damaged. One aluminum garage

was destroyed and a rock chimney was

topped off. The tornado remained on the

ground for several miles and tracked

northward into the higher terrain of

western Madison County. Several large

areas of mature mixed forest were

almost completely leveled in the

Rapidan Wildlife Management Area and

the Shenandoah National Park.

Fauquier County

2 SE Warrenton to 17 1524EST 13 200

2 NE The Plains 1552EST

An F2 tornado produced widespread

structural damage to two subdivisions

in northern Fauquicr County. Some small

items were turned into projectiles by

this tornado and landed in trees and

the sides of homes and some vehicles.

There was substantial tree damage.

Numerous large, healthy trees were

uprooted and snapped. This is the third

tornado of this event in Fauquier.

Spotsylvania County

1 NE Massaponax to 17 1529EST 2 75

6 N Massaponax 1531EST

A weak tornado moved across eastern

Spotsylvania County, Virginia on the

19th. Emergency personnel witnessed a

tornado in the New Crest Area. Minor

damage to trees and a few homes were

reported.

Fredericksburg (C)

Fredericksburg to 17 1536EST 0.5 50

2 NW Fredericksburg 1537EST

A thunderstorm moved from Spotsylvania

County into the eastern portion of the

City of Fredericksburg. No property

damage was reported, with debris

scattered along Dixon Street.

Frederick County

1 NW Winchester Arp 17 1539EST 5 125

4 N Winchester Arpt 1544EST

An F2 tornado produced a nearly

continuous path of damage for 5 miles

in eastern Frederick County. It touched

down west of Millwood Pike near the

Winchester Airport. Three homes

suffered roof damage, a detached two

car garage was destroyed, a platform

deck was blown away, an office trailer

was overturned, and numerous trees

along the track of the storm were

uprooted or topped.

Stafford County

2.5 N White Oak to 17 1542EST 0.1 50

1 W Stafford 1610EST

A tornado touched down in central

Stafford County near Stones Corner. The

storm tracked north northeast and

lifted near Stafford. The damage was

mostly limited to mature trees and

large limbs. The tornado had a 6 mile

intermittent track, and the storm

continued on into Prince William County

Virginia.

Spotsylvania County

Holladay 17 1605EST 0.1 50

1606EST

A brief tornado touchdown was video

taped by a fire fighter. No damage or

injuries were reported.

Orange County

3.1 SE Lahore to 17 1615EST 3 100

2 E Lahore 1620EST

A tornado touched down in a heavily

forested area near the western end of

Lake Anna, southeast of Lahore. Several

trees were topped or uprooted and the

tornado significantly damaged two

homes.

Loudoun County

3 S Hamilton to 17 1620EST 12 200

Lovettsville 1650EST

A tornado touched down in western

Loudoun County. This storm was a

continuation of a track of the storm

that moved through Fauquier County

Virginia. The storm first touched down

south of Hamilton and, intermittent

damage was noted from Hamilton to

Lovettsville. A farm near Hamilton

suffered severe damage. The farmhouse,

horse barn and outbuildings were

severely damaged or demolished. Two

thoroughbred horses were cut by flying

debris. The tornado produced damage

along a 12 mile track. This storm

continued to travel north into Maryland

and produced damage in extreme

southwest Frederick and eastern

Washington Counties.

Prince William

County

6 W Dale City to 17 1626EST 4 250

3 S Manassas Afs 1635EST

A tornadic thunderstorm moved through

central Prince William County. This is

the same storm that produced damage

earlier in Stafford County. The initial

touchdown in Prince William County was

west of Dale City, near Independent

Hill and Dumfries Road. The storm

snapped or uprooted many large hardwood

trees. Some of the trees fell on houses

and other structures. The storm lifted

and then reformed for the second

touchdown in Manassas. Several homes

suffered roof and shingle damage. An

automobile was moved several feet.

Damaged also occurred in Manassas Park

and in Yorkshire Village. This tornado

continued north into Fairfax County.

Orange County

Rhoadesville to 17 1628EST 7 100

3 NW Burr Hill 1638EST

A thunderstorm produced a second

tornado in Rhodesville along Route 20

in eastern Orange County. A shed, a

horse trailer, and a two silos were

destroyed on one farm. A tree was

thrown onto a house and a mobile home

was demolished. The storm continued its

northward and produced sporadic and

less significant damage.

Culpeper County

Mitchells to 17 1636EST 0.5 75

.5 N Mitchells 1638EST

A tornado touched down in Mitchells

along Route 615. The tornado moved over

several out buildings and homes. At

least 12 homes sustained moderate to

severe damage. Numerous trees were

uprooted, and a shed was picked up off

its foundation by the storm.

Frederick County

1 E Middletown to 17 1637EST 9 250

1 E Opequon 1650EST

A tornado touched down in western

Frederick County, Virginia on the 17th.

The path of the storm was 9 miles long.

It touched down about one mile east of

Middletown and Interstate 81. Roof

damage was noted to many barns and

outbuildings. A large two story brick

garage was nearly destroyed when its

roof was blown off from strong F1

tornado winds. In the western end of

the Stonebrook Farm Subdivision, an

estimated 100 oak and other hardwood

trees ranging from 18 to 36 inches in

diameter topped or snapped 20 to 50

feet up from the base in roughly a 2

block area. One home was completely

destroyed and over 100 others damaged

due to falling trees.

Manassas (C)

Manassas to 17 1640EST 3.5 75

3.5 NE Manassas 1649EST

A tornado touched down on the eastside

of the City of Manassas. It produced

structural damage and tree damage and

then continued on to Manassas Park. The

tornado damaged several dwellings

before lifting in the Yorkshire

Subdivision.

Culpeper County

2 E Catalpa to 17 1650EST 0.1 75

2.1 NE Catalpa 1651EST

A tornado touched down north of

Culpeper near Catalpa. The tornado blew

down branches from several trees. It

blew in a garage door and the roof was

blown off the garage and off part of

the house.

Fairfax County

.5 NW Centreville to 17 1655EST 6 150

7 NW Centreville 1705EST

A tornadic thunderstorm entered western

Fairfax County from Prince William

County. The storm had a path of about 7

miles. Beginning on Old Centerville

Road, the storm produced scattered tree

damage along its path and minor roofing

damage to structures in the London Town

Area. A line of damage was carved from

Lee Highway northward into the

Centerville and Chantilly areas. The

tornado destroyed one estate and

damaged about 50 other dwellings. The

storm was also responsible for downed

trees and power lines. The tornado

lifted as it crossed Route 50.

Loudoun County

Dulles Intl Arpt to 17 1712EST 8 150

3 NE Ashburn 1728EST

A tornado moved into eastern Loudoun

County from Fairfax County near the

Dulles International Airport. The storm

produced a tornado which passed within

one half mile of the National Weather

Service Forecast Office in Sterling.

This prompted the staff on duty to seek

shelter in the office constructed

saferoom. As the storm traveled north

from the Dulles International Airport,

it produced minor tree damage. More

extensive damage occurred north of

Waxpool Road at the Beaumcde Corporate

Park. Seven buildings were damaged. A

wall collapsed in one of the buildings.

A tractor trailer was overturned. The

tornado also pushed two cars into the

side of a building. The tornado

weakened as it traveled north. The last

damage in Loudoun County was reported

just north of Route 7.

King George County

2 SW Comorn to 17 1725EST 7 250

Fairview Beach 1736EST

An F1 tornado crossed central King

George County on the 17th. The initial

touch down was near the intersection of

Route 3 and 607, near Popcastle. Frame

homes in the Lake Jefferson Subdivision

and nearby Igo Road areas were damaged

by topped or felled trees. Windy Hill

Farm also reported extensive damage to

the barn and two other out buildings.

The storm then jogged to the right and

crossed Comorn Road, just south of

Osso. The storm continued to produce

damage as it entered the Potomac River

at the end of Route 641. Trees fell on

a house at the end of Route 641.

Albemarle County

Crozet 17 1721EST

2012EST

Several low lying roads under water.

Frederick County

Stephens City 17 1900EST

2030EST

A few roads impassable due to high

water in Stephens City and Middletown.

Warren County

Front Royal 17 1915EST

2115EST

County Officials reported numerous

roads closed due to high water.

Fauquier County

Warrenton 17 1930EST

2115EST

Several roads closed across the county

due to high water.

Prince William

County

Dumfries to 17 2059EST

Woodbridge 2300EST

High water reported on roads in

Dumfries and Woodbridge.

Loudoun County

Leesburg 17 2100EST

2300EST

Several roads across the county flooded

due to high water.

Fairfax County

Annandale to 17 2140EST

Fairfax Park 2300EST

High water on roads in west Annandale

and west Fairfax.

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan affected

the Mid Atlantic States on the 17th and

18th. Tornadic thunderstorms produced

widespread, significant damage across

Northern Virginia. Flooding of small

streams, creeks, primary and secondary

roads were reported by emergency and

rescue personnel. In response, many

roads were closed through the late

evening hours as flood waters were slow

to recede. At least 10 homes were

destroyed and around 300 sustained

damage. Communities in Culpeper,

Frederick, Greene, Orange Counties and

Manassas Park City also reported some

agricultural damage. The remnants of

Hurricane Jeanne brought flooding to

Northern Virginia on the 28th. The

flooding lasted from mid morning at

some sites through the late evening

hours. Numerous primary and secondary

roads were washed out. Three to four

feet of standing water was observed by

law enforcement personnel in inundated

areas. Augusta and Fauquier Counties

reported the highest rainfall totals, 7

inches and 6 to 8 inches respectively.

Harrisonburg (C)

Harrisonburg 28 1045EST

1645EST

Several roads flooded.

Staunton(C)

Staunton 28 1045EST

1645EST

Several roads flooded.

Waynesboro (C)

Waynesboro 28 1045EST

1645EST

Several roads flooded.

Page County

Luray 28 1120EST

1720EST

A few back roads under water.

Winchester (C)

Winchester 28 1120EST

1720EST

Several roads flooded. 3.18 inches of

rain reported.

Loudoun County

Middleburg 28 1230EST

1830EST

U.S. Route 50 closed due to flooding

along the Middleburg to Aldie corridor.

Many secondary roads in the area area

partially flooded and reduced to one

lane or less.

Clarke County

Berryville 28 1400EST

2000EST

Roads closed due to flooding.

Frederick County

Gore 28 1400EST

1700EST

U.S. Route 50 west of Winchester

closed, 3 to 4 feet of standing water

on the road. Interstate 81 was also

blocked by high water.

Winchester (C)

Winchester 28 1400EST

1700EST

Water covered the roads in several

locations around the city.

Fauquier County

Bealeton 28 1430EST

2000EST

Numerous primary and secondary roads

closed due to high water. Two secondary

roads washed out.

Shenandoah County

Woodstock 28 1445EST

1945EST

Several roads covered by water.

Warren County

Front Royal 28 1445EST

1945EST

Roads and side streets under water.

Greene County

Standardsville 28 1500EST

2000EST

Numerous roads closed due to high

water.

Madison County

Madison 28 1500EST

2000EST

Many roads closures throughout the

county due to flooding.

Rappahannock

County

Sperryville 28 1500EST

2000EST

Several roads closed due to high water.

Prince William

County

Gainesville 28 1530EST

2000EST

Numerous roads closed in the west and

central sections of the county.

Fairfax County

Vienna 28 1600EST

2000EST

Roads closed due to high water,

including three intersections along Lee

Highway.

Manassas (C)

Manassas 28 1600EST

1930EST

Roads covered by water.

VAZ025>026- Augusta–Rockingham–Frederick–Page–

028>029-042 Loudoun

28 1645EST

2230EST

Several primary and secondary roads

under water.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

brought widespread flooding to Northern

Virginia on the 28th. The flooding

lasted from mid morning at some sites

through the late evening. Many primary

were under water and some secondary

roads were washed out. Three to four

feet of standing water on some major

roads were observed by law enforcement

personnel.

Albemarle County

1 E Howardsville 30 2215EST

2330EST

Water covering the roadway at the

intersection of Route 602 and Route

626.

VIRGINIA, Northwest

NONE REPORTED.

VIRGINIA, Southwest

VAZ022 Roanoke

08 0030EST

09 0200EST

At Roanoke, the Roanoke River rose

above the 10.5 foot flood stage and

crested at 12.72 feet at 02:15 am on

the 8th. This resulted in moderate

flooding.

VAZ012-022-024-033- Wythe–Roanoke–Rockbridge–Franklin–

043 Henry

08 0430EST

1815EST

The remnants of Tropical Depression

Frances brought flooding rains to

portions of Southwest Virginia

September 8th.

Across Henry County, numerous creeks

and streams flooded, leading to road

closures. Some roads were damaged as

well by the floodwaters. A few homes

had water damage in their basements.

In Rockbridge County, as much as 9

inches of rain led to flooding of

creeks and streams. Roads were closed

due to high water in the Collierstown

and Natural Bridge areas. In addition

… five homes had to be evacuated near

Cave Mountain Lake due to flooding.

Around Roanoke County, including the

cities of Roanoke and Salem, flooding

of creeks resulted in water covered

roads and road closures. Voluntary

evacuations occurred at a trailer park

in Salem.

In Franklin County, as much as 5 to 6

inches of rain in 10 hours led to

flooding of many streams and creeks,

with numerous road closures and

evacuations. Both the Callaway

Elementary School and Callaway Fire

Department had to be evacuated due to

flooding of Greens Creek.

In Wythe County, heavy rains brought

flooding to many parts of the county

resulting in road closures.

Franklin County

Rocky Mt 08 1023EST

Bedford County

Stewartsville 08 1200EST

1430EST

Campbell County

Evington 08 1315EST

Buckingham County

2 WNW Gold Hill 08 1530EST 0.8 33

The remnants of Tropical Depression

Frances brought a brief tornado, flash

flooding, and a few severe

thunderstorms to portions of Southwest

Virginia during the late morning and

early afternoon of the 8th.

In Buckingham County, an F0 tornado

briefly touched down 2 miles WNW of

Gold Hill, damaging and snapping

numerous trees.

In Bedford County, flash flooding near

Stewartsville closed Highway 619.

In Franklin County, a severe

thunderstorm brought down several trees

in Rocky Mount.

In Campbell County, a severe

thunderstorm downed trees across Route

683 near Evington.

VAZ044 Pittsylvania

09 0100EST

1500EST

At Danville, the Dan River rose above

the 17.0 foot flood stage at 01:00 am

on the 9th, and crested at 18.51 feet

at 15:00 pm on the 9th.

VAZ058 Halifax

10 OOOOEST

0700EST

At South Boston, the Dan River rose

above the 19 foot flood stage at 01:00

am on the 10th and crested at 07:00 am

on on the 10th.

At Paces, the Dan River rose above the

20 foot flood stage around Midnight on

the 10th and crest at 20:17 feet at

04:15 am on the morning on the 10th.

VAZ047 Buckingham

10 0500EST

1200EST

At Bremo Bluff, the James River rose

above the 19 foot flood stage at 05:00

am on the 10th, cresting at 19.2 feet

at 07:00 am on the 10th. The river fell

below flood stage at 12:00 pm on the

10th.

Henry County

1 N Fieldale to 17 1104EST 7.1 440

1 W Oak Level 1114EST

A tornado touched down near Fieldale at

1104 EST. The F1 tornado crossed U.S.

Highway 220 turning over 2 tractor-

trailer trucks and 2 passenger

vehicles. All 4 drivers suffered minor

injuries. The tornado damage patch

widened to a quarter mile, and

strengthened to F2 as it approached and

struck a factory. At this location,

around 40 vehicles were severely

damaged or destroyed. The factory

experienced significant damage. The

tornado then proceeded north and

entered a residential subdivision, but

only minor roof and tree damage

occurred here. The tornado path became

intermittent as it continued north and

the damage was limited to trees. The

tornado crossed into Franklin County at

1114 EST.

Franklin County

2.8 ENE Henry to 17 1114EST 1.7 25

2.5 NE Henry 1117EST

The remnants of the Henry County

tornado briefly touched down at F0

strength as it crossed into Franklin

County. Damage was restricted to

several large trees, one of which

landed on a residential garage.

Bedford County

1.5 SE Stewartsville to 17 1212EST 3 300

2 NE Stewartsville 1217EST

At 1212 EST, an F0 tornado touched down

near Dickerson Road, and the width was

less than 50 yards. The tornado damage

path widened and varied from 100 yards

to as much as 300 yards, as it did

moderate to strong F1 damage to trees.

A few homes suffered only minor damage

to shingles and roofs, mainly due to

trees falling on them. As the F1

tornado crossed Highway 24 at 1215 EST,

it continued to damage trees, and was

about 75 yards wide. A poorly

constructed building was demolished. As

the tornado moved north, it continued

to down trees. Also, a car was pivoted

in a driveway but undamaged. Minor

structural and roof damage to homes

occurred, as the tornado increased to a

weak F2. The tornado weakened to F0 by

1217 EST, downing more trees along

County Road 619.

Pittsylvania County

.5 WNW Straightstone 17 1324EST 0.3 25

.5 NW Straightstone 1326EST

A short lived F0 tornado touched down

1/2 mile WNW of Straightstone, in a hay

field. About a quarter mile path was

found. No damage occurred.

Campbell County

3 ENE Rustburg to 17 1354EST 1.9 100

3.5 NE Rustburg 1358EST

At 1354 EST, a tornado touched down

along Bear Creek Road, 3 miles ENE of

Rustburg, causing minor damage. At 1356

EST, the tornado crossed Highway 24,

causing extensive tree damage. One tree

crushed a small car in a driveway.

Minor damage to homes, mainly shingles

and eaves. On the north side of Highway

24, the tornado blew the roof off of a

detached garage.

Campbell County

3.5 WSW Concord to 17 1359EST 3 75

2.5 NW Concord 1405EST

A tornado touched down on the east edge

of Long Mountain just before crossing

County Road 660. Fairly large trees

were snapped off or uprooted, but only

minor damage occurred to sheds. The

tornado proceeded to cross County Road

757, when the damage path became

narrower. An aluminum roof of a medium

sized shed was torn off and blown about

200 yards. A trampoline was blown up

across the roof of a two story house

and dropped about 200 yards away. From

that point the tornado tracked NNE and

produced tree damage, before lifting as

it crossed U.S. Highway 460.

Appomattox County

5 S Appomattox 17 1312EST

Bedford County

7 NW Bedford City 17 1318EST

Appomattox County

Stonewall 17 1410EST

Campbell County

Rustburg 17 1410EST

In Campbell County, trees were downed

on 2 vehicles.

In Appomattox County, many trees were

downed.

In Bedford County, many large trees

were downed, near Peaks of Otter.

Many trees were downed in Galax.

VAZ032 Patrick

18 0025EST

High winds on the backside of the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan, downed many

trees across Patrick County early in

the morning of the 18th. Some of the

trees downed were up to 12 inches in

diameter.

Patrick County

Stuart 28 0025EST

0515EST

Floyd County

Floyd 28 0220EST

0800EST

Franklin County

Boones Mill 28 0510EST

0800EST

Roanoke County

Countywide 28 0640EST

0930EST

Patrick County

Woolwine 28 0645EST

0800EST

Salem (C)

Salem (C) 28 0730EST

0900EST

Patrick County

Stuart 28 0750EST

0800EST

Patrick County

7 SW Stuart to 28 0750EST

Stuart 0800EST

M?MH

Bedford County

Countywide 28 0818EST

1115EST

The Remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

resulted in heavy rains which created

widespread flash flooding on 28th of

September in Floyd, Franklin, Patrick,

Bedford and Roanoke counties and the

City of Salem. One Fatality occurred 7

miles southwest of Stuart in Patricky

county at Dry Pond near the North

Carolina border. A Mobile home washed

off it foundation, one building washed

about 150 yards downstream and vehiles

washed away. Several roads were closed

due to flooding in Floyd, Franklin,

Patrick, Bedford and Roanoke counties.

Numerous creeks and rivers out of their

banks. Mudslides were reporteed in

Boone Mill, Franklin county where

southbound Route 220 closed from

Magodde Creek.

Pittsylvania County

7 NE Cascade to 28 0358EST 12.4 100

4.5 S Callands 0417EST

WASHINGTON, Northeast

NONE REPORTED.

WASHINGTON, Northwest

Pierce County

Graham 01 120OPST

Lightning struck a chain link fence

outside a mobile home. The lightning

traveled through the metal skirting

beneath a mobile home, damaging it and

injuring the woman inside.

Snohomish County

Brier 01 140OPST

A lightning strike destroyed a tree and

fried the electrical system in the

nearby home.

WASHINGTON, Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

WASHINGTON, Southwest

Clark County

1 W Ridgefield 13 1040PST 1 30

A tornado ripped through the Ridgefield

Wildlife Refuge, lifting and damaging a

mobile home office, blowing down trees

and snapping large tree limbs. A tree

was blown down on top of a car.

Clark County

Ridgefield 13 1100PST

1130PST

Strong thunderstorms moved through

Clark county generating strong winds.

The Clark County Emergency Manager

reported numerous trees were blown down

at the Ridgefield Wildlife Refuge.

WEST VIRGINIA, East

Pendleton County

Central Portion 08 1535EST

2130EST

Several side roads covered by water.

Hampshire County

Southeast Portion 08 1825EST

2300EST

Many roads closed throughout the

county.

Hampshire County

Romney 08 1835EST

2330EST

Multiple road closured due to high

water.

Morgan County

Berkeley Spgs 08 1900EST

2330EST

Roads under water in Berkeley Springs.

The remnants of Hurricane Frances

brought flooding to the Panhandle of

West Virginia on the 8th. Several roads

in Pendleton, Hampshire, and Morgan

counties were under water.

Jefferson County

Middleway to 17 1840EST 2 100

2 N Middleway 1845EST

An F1 tornado touched down in western

Jefferson County. The tornado produced

intermittent owners reported moderate

roof and siding damage and several

large, healthy trees felled.

Berkeley County

Darkesville to 17 1850EST 2 100

1.5 N Darkesville 1855EST

A tornado touched down in Darkesville

in southern Berkeley County. The F2

tornado produced extensive structural

damage to homes and businesses in the

and vehicles on Interstate-81. At least

6 area. The storm traveled north and

toppled tractor trailers people were

injured from the automobile accidents.

Morgan County

Sleepy Creek to 17 1930EST 0.5 100

1 N Sleepy Creek 1931EST

A brief tornado touched down in the

were downed Sleepy Creek area of

northeast Morgan County. Trees and

a tree fell on a residence. The storm

was on the ground for one half mile.

Berkeley County

Martinsburg 17 1900EST

2200EST

Back Creek rose out of its bank.

Several roads closed due to water

covering the roads.

Hampshire County

Capon Bridge 17 1900EST

2030EST

Roads reported washed out in the

eastern sections of Hampshire.

Morgan County

Berkeley Spgs 17 1900EST

2200EST

Several roads under water.

WVZ051>052 Morgan–Berkeley

17 2200EST

18 0500EST

Several roads closed due to high water.

The remains of Hurricane Ivan brought

Counties. Widespread flooding of small

tornadoes across Jefferson, Berkeley,

and Morgan creeks/streams and primary

most of the West Virginia Panhandle. In

and secondary roads were reported by

emergency personnel for response, many

roads were closed through the late

evening hours.

Berkeley County

Inwood 28 1415EST

1930EST

Numerous roads flooded, including U.S.

Route 51 and U.S. Route 11.

Morgan County

Berkeley Spgs 28 1415EST

1930EST

Minor flooding of roadways.

Jefferson County

Charles Town 28 1430EST

1830EST

A few secondary roads flooded.

Hampshire County

Romney 28 1500EST

1800EST

Standing water on some secondary roads.

Hardy County

Moorefield 28 1500EST

1945EST

Several roads under water.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

brought widespread flooding to Eastern

West Virginia on the 28th. The flooding

lasted from mid morning at some sites

through late evening. Many secondary

and primary roads, including US Routes

51 and 11, were under water.

WEST VIRGINIA, North

WVZ002 Brooke

08 1600EST

09 0700EST

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Frances began early on the 8th and

ended early on the 9th. By 5 PM EDT on

8th, there was a mud slide on Pierce

Run Rd near Bethany; and Castlemans Run

Rd and Hukill Run Rd closed by

flooding. By 630 PM, widespread

flooding was reported, including Rte 2

in Beach Bottom, and Eldersville Rd in

McKinleyville. (FRANCES)

WVZ003 Ohio

08 1730EST

09 0700EST

At 630 PM EDT, roads were flooded in

West Liberty. By 9 PM, North Branch of

Short Creek had flooded 2 miles south

of Wheeling-Ohio County Airport (north

of Wheeling). Total rain: 4.5″ at

Wheeling. (FRANCES)

WVZ004 Marshall

08 1750EST

09 1400EST

At 650 PM EDT, Little Grave Creek

flooded Glenwood. By 750 PM, Boggs Run

Rd flooded in Benwood when a retaining

wall was washed out. By 922 PM, county

roads 34 and 54 were flooded near

Moundsville. (FRANCES)

WVZ001 Hancock

08 1830EST

09 0700EST

By 730 PM EDT, several basements were

flooded in Weirton near Kings Creek;

and Gas Valley Rd was closed by flood.

(FRANCES)

WVZ002 Brooke

17 1156EST

20 0100EST

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Ivan started the night of the 16th, and

ended just before midnight on the 17th.

At 1256 PM EDT, flooding was reported

at Bethany; several roads washed out.

At 130 PM, flooding began on Kings

Creek in Weirton. Force of water blew

out windows in the house nearest the

creek. Residents had never seen water

rise so fast before, nor flow so

swiftly. Citizen on personal water

craft rescued family from this house,

one at a time. At 330 PM on 17th, there

was mud slides and creek flooding in

Bethany. In Wellsburg, a mud slide

destroyed a house; water treatment

plant had major damage. About 11 PM EDT

on 17th, Buffalo Creek caused wide-

spread destruction in McKinleyville, a

town of 300. As of 9 AM on 18th,

several roads remained closed by flood.

In Brooke Co, total of 225 structures

damaged, mostly in Weirton. One school

and 2 fire departments had major

damage. Route 2 was closed by mud

slides, from Weirton to Wheeling. Other

roads flooded: Rte 67, Camp Run Rd, Pot

Rock Rd, Pierces Run, Grimms Lane,

Castlemans Run. Flooding on Ohio River:

Wellsburg rose to flood stage (36 ft)

at 3 AM EDT on 18th, crested 45.1 at

445 AM on 19th, and fell below flood

stage 2 AM EDT on 20th. Total rain:

about 7 inches. (IVAN)

WVZ001 Hancock

17 1157EST

19 1900EST

At 1257 PM EDT on 17th, Kings Creek

flooded in Weirton, where many

businesses wiped out by flooding on

Main St and Freedom Way. As of 9 AM EDT

on 18th, Rte 2 was still closed by mud

slides; several other roads remained

flooded. Total of 480 structures

damaged or destroyed. Route 2 closed by

mud slides from Weirton to Wheeling.

Other roads flooded or closed: Route

30, Kings Creek Rd, Shady Glen Rd. Most

small stream flooded ended by 7 PM on

18th, the Ohio River flood continued:

Wellsville rose above flood stage (11

ft) at 5 AM EDT on 18th, crested 19.0

ft 2 AM on 19th, and fell below flood

stage 7 PM EDT on 19th. New Cumberland

WV rose above flood stage (36 ft) at

330 AM EDT on 18th, crested 44.5 at 930

PM on 18th, and fell below flood stage

8 PM EDT on 19th. Total rain: 7 inches.

(IVAN)

WVZ004 Marshall

17 1330EST

20 0800EST

At 230 PM EDT on 17th, Boggs Run

flooded Benwood. By 9 PM on 18th,

around Moundsville, 5 roads remained

closed because of mud slides; and

flooding from Grave Creek was keeping 1

road closed. 79 structures damaged or

destroyed, including $1 million damage

to a school. One man was swept away and

found in Fish Creek. Most small stream

flooding ended by mid afternoon of the

18th, but flooding on the Ohio River

continued: Moundsville rose to flood

stage 1 AM EDT on 18th, crested 47.0 at

8 AM 19th, and fell below flood stage 8

AM 20th. Powhatan Point (OH) rose above

flood stage 2 AM on 18th, crested 45.6

at 9 AM 19th, and fell below flood

stage 9 AM EDT on 20th. Both have

official flood stages of 37 ft. Total

rain: 8.8 inches in Benwood. (IVAN)

M45 VE

WVZ003 Ohio

17 1400EST

20 0400EST

At 3 PM EDT on 17th, a trailer court

was washed away, about 5 miles north of

Wheeling, where Short Creek meets the

Ohio River. By 4 PM, many roads were

closed by flood around Wheeling, after

7.3 inches of rain. By 9 AM on 18th,

major flooding continued on creeks

emptying into the Ohio River. A total

of 599 structures, were damaged or

destroyed, including 1 school. Route 2

was closed by mud slides. Several

businesses suffered major damage from

flooding of Wheeling Creek, along Route

40, east of downtown Wheeling. Many

homes in Wheeling Island were flooded

well up into the first floor. Major

business establishment on south end of

Wheeling Island had much damage. Most

small stream flooded ended the evening

of the 19th, but flooding on the Ohio

River continued: Pike Island rose above

flood stage (37 ft) at 1230 AM EDT on

18th, crested 46.3 at 5 AM on 19th, and

fell below flood stage 4 AM EDT on

20th. Wheeling rose above flood stage

(36 ft) 1230 AM on 18th, crested 45.3

at 5 AM on 19th, and fell below flood

stage 5 AM EDT on 20th. Total rain: 9.9

inches near Wheeling. (IVAN)

WVZ012 Wetzel

18 0000EST

20 0900EST

By 1 AM EDT on 18th, Rte 20 closed by

flood, from Reader to Folsom; and

intersection of Rtcs 7 and 20, south-

east of New Martinsville. Rte 2 closed

because of river flood. Entire 1st

floor of Valley High School damaged,

since it sits between 2 branches of

Fishing Creek. Several businesses in

New Martinsville suffered major damage.

Much flooding in southern half of

county. Total of 152 structures damaged

or destroyed. On the Ohio River,

Hannibal (OH) rose above flood stage

(35 ft) 4 AM EDT on 18th, crested at

41.1 at 9 AM on 19th, and fell below

flood stage 10 AM EDT on 20th. (IVAN)

WVZ021 Marion

18 0000EST

0600EST

By 158 AM EDT, many roads were closed

by flood in the Mannington area. Total

rain: 2.6 inches at Fairview. (IVAN)

WVZ022 Monongalia

18 0000EST

0600EST

By 2 AM EDT, numerous roads were closed

by flood from Wadestown to Blacksville.

Total rain: 3.5 inches at Jakes Run.

(IVAN)

WEST VIRGINIA, Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

WEST VIRGINIA, West

WVZ006>011-014 Cabell–Mason–Jackson–Wood–Pleasants

–Tyler–Putnam

08 0854EST

2100EST

Remnants of Hurricane Frances caused

about a 30 hour rainfall from the

afternoon of the 7th into the evening

of the 8th. The heaviest rains fell

along the Ohio River counties from dawn

to midday on the 8th. The low pressure

center passed from south to north,

through central West Virginia during

the late afternoon and early evening on

the 8th, before lifting into western

Pennsylvania.

Storm total rain amounts of 4 to 5

inches were common. A spotter in

Winfield reported a total of 5.6

inches. Cooperative observers at South-

side in Mason County, Pea Ridge in

Cabell County, and Ripley of Jackson

County all had 4.9 inches. Ripley

measured 4.8 inches. Middlebourne had

4.6 inches. Huntington airport had 4.5

inches, while the airport near

Parkersburg had 4.1 inches.

Since the ground was dry previous to

this event, small stream flooding was

mainly restricted to roads and the

usual lowest lying areas. In some urban

areas, the flooding was slightly more

significant. For example, Fourpole

Creek flooded Ritter Park and streets

in Huntington. Rivers remained within

their banks. However, this event set

the stage for more serious flooding, to

follow later in the month.

WVZ005>011-013- Wayne–Cabell–Mason–Jackson–Wood–

015>017-024-027>028 Pleasants–Tyler–Lincoln–Kanawha–

Roane–Wirt–Mingo–Clay–Braxton

17 1100EST

21 1200EST

As the weakening Hurricane Ivan moved

inland across Alabama, light rain began

in southern West Virginia on the

morning of the 16th. The rain shield

moved into northern counties overnight.

Heavy rain began before dawn on the

17th around Huntington. The heavier

rain moved up the Ohio River counties

and engulfed the Ravenswood,

Parkersburg, and Sistersville vicinity

during the mid morning on the 17th. The

heavy rain continue along the Ohio

River counties into the mid afternoon,

before lifting north and east. The more

significant rain rates pivoted through

central West Virginia during the late

afternoon hours on the 17th before

diminishing to drizzle after dark that

evening. The low pressure remains of

Ivan moved northeast through eastern

Tennessee that afternoon, then through

southwest Virginia during the evening.

The storm moved off the coast during

the 18th.

A 30 to 36 hour duration event dumped

3.5 to 6 inches of rain. The upper

range was concentrated along the Ohio

River counties from Huntington through

Parkersburg. A secondary maximum in the

rain ran south from Parkersburg into

northern Kanawha County. Preliminary

storm totals from cooperative observers

had R C Byrd Lock and Dam with 5.9

inches, Elizabeth 5.0 inches, Wayne 4.9

inches, Sandyville 4.8 inches, downtown

Huntington 4.7 inches, downtown

Parkersburg 4.6 inches, Ripley 4.5

inches, Charleston 4.2 inches,

Huntington and Parkersburg airports 4.1

inches, and Middlebourne with 3.8

inches.

Since the remains of Hurricane Frances

were just 8 days prior to this rain,

small stream flooding was more signifi-

cant with the remnants of Ivan. Some of

the same streams went higher than

earlier in the month. Residents of

Enslow Park in Huntington, for example,

were evacuated due to flooding from

Fourpole Creek. Many secondary roads

were blocked and closed by small stream

flooding during the afternoon and early

evening on the 17th. Kanawha Twomile

flooded Bonham Elementary School in

Kanawha County with 1 to 2.5 feet of

water. Maintenance men for the school

had to scramble up a ladder to the

school roof, to wait out the high

water. One of the workers said, “almost

like a flip of your finger, that’s how

fast it happened. It was unreal.”

During that Friday evening the 17th, a

32 year old male was walking west of

Harts in Lincoln County and fell into

swollen Frances Creek. He drowned and

his body was discovered the next day.

Preliminary findings from a state

police investigation indicated the man

was under the influence of either

alcohol or illegal drugs.

Most of the small stream flooding

receded by late Friday evening the

17th. However, even heavier rain fell

over the northern panhandle of West

Virginia into western Pennsylvania.

Rain amounts of 6 to 8 inches were more

common there. As a result, the main

stem of the Ohio River rose 1 to 2 feet

per hour during the evening of the 17th

in the Sistersville to Parkersburg

vicinity. For example, at Parkersburg

the Ohio River rose from 25.6 feet at

1600E to 33.0 feet at 2200E on the

17th. A slower but steady rise

continue into Saturday the 18th.

Moderate to major river flooding

occurred on the 18th and 19th from the

Sistersville vicinity on down through

Saint Marys, Williamstown, Vienna,

Parkersburg, Ravenswood, and Point

Pleasant. The flood wall protected the

city of Parkersburg. Backwater also

caused flooding, sometimes a few miles

from the Ohio River. One example, was

along the lower reaches of the Little

Kanawha River in Wood County. The crest

on the Ohio River dampened below the

mouth of the Kanawha River, with mostly

minor river flooding through Huntington

and Kenova.

Specific crests include Willow Island

Lock and Dam 44.8 feet, Marietta 2SW

42.4 feet, Parkersburg 43.7 feet,

Belleville Lock and Dam 45.8 feet,

Racine Lock and Dam 50.2 feet, Point

Pleasant 44.6 feet, R C Byrd Lock and

Dam 51 feet, and Huntington 51.3 feet.

At Parkersburg, the crest was the

highest level in 40 years. Back in

March 1964, the river reached 45.2 feet

at Parkersburg.

A FEMA disaster was declared. See

declaration 1558 for details. However,

the worst damage in West Virginia with

this disaster was in the northern pan-

handle counties, compared to further

south. In terms of damage to housing,

Tyler County had 5 destroyed and 19

with major damage. Pleasants County had

21 homes destroyed and 10 homes with

major damage. Wood County reported

several hundred homes affected. The Red

Cross reported 19 homes destroyed in

Wood County. Wirt County had 21 homes

destroyed and 10 with major damage.

Jackson County had 14 homes with major

damage. Mason County had no homes

destroyed, with around 50 dwellings

affected. Cabell County reported 5

homes with major damage. Wayne County

had 8 homes with major damage. Mingo

County saw 15 homes with major damage.

Kanawha County reported 8 homes des-

troyed and 12 homes with major damage.

Tyler County reported around 30 busi-

nesses destroyed and 8 with major

damage. Repairs to the Barboursville

sewage system were around $200,000.

M320U

WISCONSIN, Northeast

Oconto County

5 NNE Mountain 11 1530CST

Marinette County

Beaver to 11 1615CST

1 E Pound 1625CST

Marinette County

4 W Peshtigo to 11 1644CST

Peshtigo 1654CST

Oconto County

4 W Oconto 11 1738CST

Thunderstorms developed in unstable air

ahead of an approaching cold front.

These storms produced large hail as

they moved across northeast Wisconsin.

One of the storms dropped 2 inch

diameter hail as it passed through

Beaver (Marinette co.).

Brown County

Green Bay 14 1715CST

Lightning caused a fire that did signi-

ficant damage to a 70 foot tall church

steeple in Green Bay. A church official

declined to give a damage estimate when

contacted by the National Weather

Service.

WIZ005-010-038 Vilas–Oneida–Outagatnie

15 1450CST

2015CST

Strong winds, associated with an

intense low pressure system, downed

trees and power lines across parts of

north-central and east-central

Wisconsin. One of the downed trees

landed on a vehicle in Appleton

(Outagamie co.).

WISCONSIN, Northwest

WIZ001>004-006>009 Douglas–Bayfield–Ashland–Iron–

Burnett–Washburn–Sawyer–Price

15 19000ST

21000ST

Strong gradient winds toppled trees and

caused power outages across north-

western Wisconsin.

WISCONSIN, Southeast

WIZ052-059>060 Sheboygan–Washington–Ozaukee

04 0000CST

0800CST

Dense fog developed during the over-

night hours and lowered visibilities to

below 1/4 mile. At times, visibilities

were down to 50 feet in locations bet-

ween West Bend and Germantown in

Washington County. School bus rides and

local aviation traffic were delayed,

and travel on main roads and inter-

states slowed down considerably. Off

shore, the dense fog persisted over the

Lake Michigan waters until about

1300CST. Fair skies and a light south-

east wind off Lake Michigan were

factors in this dense fog event.

Sheboygan County

Plymouth 15 1535CST

A thunderstorm pulsed to minimal severe

weather limits and toppled some large

trees and power lines.

Lafayette County

Argyle 23 12000ST

An isolated severe storm, embedded in a

cluster of general thunderstorms,

generated locally powerful downburst

thunderstorm winds in the Arygle area.

About a dozen large trees and some

power lines were toppled. The time is

estimate, with the event taking place

sometime between 1100 and 1300CST.

WISCONSIN, Southwest

Juneau County

10 N Mauston 14 1844CST

Law enforcement officials reported

nickel size hail between Mauston and

Necedah.

Taylor County

Medford 15 1335CST

WISCONSIN, West

Dunn County

2 E Wheeler 05 1635CST

A funnel cloud was reported by a

trained spotter on Highway 170.

Polk County

1 SE Horse Creek 05 1735CST

Trees were downed on West Church Rd.

The time was estimated.

WISCONSIN, West

Pierce County

6 SSW Ellsworth to 05 1740CST 1 25

5 S Ellsworth 1742CST

A tornado touched down in an open

field, then moved into a wooded grove

where it broke a few trees, then

dissipated.

Polk County

2 NE Balsam Lake 05 1755CST

Trees were downed on 120th St. in

Milltown Township. The time was

estimated.

St. Croix County

1 NW Wilson to 05 1828CST

2 S Glenwood City 1832CST

A funnel cloud was reported by the fire

department near the intersection of

Highway 128 and Highway 12 just west of

Wilson. The same funnel was spotted by

the fire department 2 miles south of

Glenwood City.

Barron County

6 WNW Prairie Farm 05 1905CST 0.3 25

1906CST

A tornado touched down briefly,

breaking several trees and destroying a

shed.

St. Croix County

Hudson 23 1340CST

A tree was downed.

WYOMING, Central and West

WYZ017 Wind River Basin

18 1300MST

2000MST

A human caused fire was started near

Goes In Lodge Road on the Wind River

Indian Reservation south of Riverton

during the afternoon. The fire threat-

ened urban areas on the south side of

Riverton by late afternoon. The fire

was fueled by dry southwesterly wind

that gusted between 30 and 35 mph at

times. A total of nine people were

treated for minor injuries and smoke

inhalation. The fire claimed 300 acres,

four campers, 33 vehicles on a used car

lot, and a mobile home used for

storage. Damage totaled around one

million dollars before the fire was

extinguished.

Fremont County

Milford 30 1625MST 1 50

1635MST

WYOMING, Extreme Southwest

NOT RECEIVED.

WYOMING, North Central

NONE REPORTED.

WYOMING, Northeast

Weston County

16 SW Upton 14 1244MST 0.1 10

1315MST

A weak tornado reached the ground at

times over open land. No damage was

reported.

Weston County

8 NE Rochelle 14 1300MST 0.5 10

1310MST

Several reports of a weak tornado on

the ground between 1300 and 1310 LST.

The tornado remained over open areas

and caused no damage.

WYOMING, Southeast

Niobrara County

Lance Creek 03 1820MST

1823MST

Number of Estimated

Persons Damage

Location Killed Injured Property Crops

TENNESSEE, Central

Davidson County

9.6 NE Nashville 0 0 1K

NWS employee reported street flooding

near the intersection of Old Hicklory

Boulevard and Merritt Street in the Old

Hickory area of Davidson County.

Humphreys County

Mc Ewen 0 0

Law enforcment reported hail the size

of quarters during this 20 minute

period.

Benton County

Big Sandy 0 0

Sheriffs office reported golf ball size

hail.

Perry County

Linden 0 0 1K

U.S. Highway 412 E and Highway 100

intersection was flooded near the high

school.

Perry County

Linden 0 0

Trees were blown down.

Wayne County

17 S Waynesboro 0 0

Trees were blown down on Spain Rd.

Wayne County

10 SE Waynesboro 0 0 1K

Shawnette Creek Road was flooded and

impassable.

TNZ011-033>034-

057>062-066-075-077-

079>080-093>095

0 0 170K 1.7M

Strong winds from the remains of

Hurricane Ivan blew down many trees and

power lines across Middle Tennessee

from Thursday evening into early Friday

morning. There were 30 incidents on

Thursday night where trees had fallen

across roadways or downed power lines

in Lawrence County alone. Many homes in

Lawrence County sustained damage from

fallen trees and tree limbs. U.S.

Highway 64 west and east was blocked

for a time in Lawrence County by fallen

trees. Lawrence County students enjoyed

a day off on Friday due to clean up

efforts. In the city of Loretto, a tree

fell on a building on Broad Street and

caused some structural damage. A pine

tree fell on a shed in Tullahoma. A

large oak tree in just off Ragsdale

Road in Manchester fell on 2 small

barns and a lawn tractor.

A 100-foot tree fell at the Salters

residence on Fuller Hollow Road in

Marshall County. Also, a large tree

fell on a pick up truck on Derry Street

in Shelbyville.

The 3 inches of rain on the night of

September 16th along with the gusty

winds destroyed the Amazing Corn Maize

at Rippavilla located in Spring Hill.

Damage was estimated to be $17,000.

Rippavilla was scheduled to open on

Thursday. The corn maize formed a

portrait of explorer Meriwether Lewis

at the historic Rippavilla Plantation.

About 7000 people lost power in Middle

Tennessee due to the remains of

Hurricane Ivan.

In Giles County alone, there was $1.7

million done to the white corn crop.

The winds blew down the corn stalks. A

business in Ardmore, also in Giles

County, lost a roof, and sustained

about $50,000 in damages. Also, there

was roof damage done to the Giles

County High School. The School Board

approved funds for a new roof costing

$74,619. These damage assessments were

from the Emergency Management Director

and newspaper clippings.

Total damage due to this storm in

Middle Tennessee was about $170,000 in

property damage and $1.7 million in

crop damage.

TNZ032>033-064-

066-080 0 0 5K

Street flooding was reported in

Monterey.

TENNESSEE, East

TNZ098 0 0 15K

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county from

500 pm through 1100 pm cdt.

TNZ099 0 0 15K

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county from

600 pm on 09/16/04 through 200 am on

09/17/04.

TNZ081 0 0 15K

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county.

TNZ082 0 0 12K

Several trees were reported down across

the county.

TNZ099 0 0 15K

Numerous trees were reported down

mainly across the higher elevations in

the county.

TNZ083 0 0 12K

Several trees were reported down mainly

across the higher elevations in the

county.

TNZ036 0 0 15K

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county from

730 pm on 9/16/04 through 500 am on

9/17/04.

TNZ100 0 0 15K

Several trees and power lines were

reported down across the county.

TNZ067 0 0 15K

Numerous trees were reported down

across the county from 900 pm on

9/16/04 through 500 am on 9/17/04 EDT.

TNZ067 0 0 15K

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county.

TNZ070 0 0 12K

Several trees were reported down across

the county from 1000 pm through 1156 pm

EDT.

TNZ038 0 0 15K

Numerous trees were reported down

across the county from 1030 pm on

9/16/04 through 500 am on 9/17/04.

TNZ084 0 0 15K

Numerous trees were reported down

across the county from 1100 pm on

9/16/04 through 500 am on 9/17/04.

TNZ082 0 0 25K

A tree fell onto and severely damaged a

home in Brayton.

TNZ085 0 0 8K

A few trees were reported down in

various spots around the county.

TNZ084 0 0 12K

Several trees were reported down across

the county.

TNZ035 0 0 15K

Numerous trees were reported down

across the southern half of the county

from 1200 am through 1000 am EDT.

TNZ039 0 0 12K

Several trees were reported down across

the county from 200 am through 600 am

EDT.

TNZ037 0 0 15K

Numerous trees were reported down

across the county.

TNZ018 0 0 15K

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county from

300 am through 900 am EDT.

TNZ070 0 0 2K

A large tree was reported down at a

residence on Hebron Church Road five

miles SSE of Jefferson City.

TNZ070 0 0 15K

Several trees were reported down across

the county from 647 am through 1059 am

EDT.

TENNESSEE, South Central

TNZ076-096>097 0 0 350K

Franklin County

Countywide 0 0

Widespread flash flooding was reported

throughout the county. Several roads

had at least 10 inches of water over

the road.

Lincoln County

Countywide 0 0

Widespread flash flooding was reported

throughout the county with several

roads with at least six to ten inches

of water over them.

Moore County

Countywide 0 0

Widespread flash flooding was reported

with many roads throughout the county

with several inches of water over the

roads.

TENNESSEE, West

Gibson County

Milan 0 0 0.85K

Crockett County

2 N Alamo 0 0 0.01K

Shelby County

Arlington 1 0 0

A man was killed by a lightning strike

while hunting in a field. M530U

Lauderdale County

Ripley 0 0 0.75K

Shelby County

Arlington 0 0 0.01K

Decatur County

Decaturville 0 0 0.25K

Tipton County

Brighton 0 0 0.01K

Tipton County

Brighton 0 0 0.01K

TEXAS, Central

Tom Green County

San Angelo Mathis Fl 0 0

Tom Green County

4 SW San Angelo 0 0

Heavy rains across the south and west

portions of San Angelo produced flash

flooding. As many as seven vehicles

stalled in high water near the

intersection of Sunset and College

Hills near the Red Arroyo. Four other

vehicles were stalled out near loop 306

and Southwest Blvd.

Tom Green County

5 E Wall 0 0

Although hail up to golf ball size

occured, the hail was so soft that it

did not produce damage.

TEXAS, Central Southeast

Waller County

5 S Waller 0 0

Wharton County

2 SE El Campo 0 0

Wharton County

6 NW El Campo 0 0

Spotted at FM 2546 and Hwy 71.

Washington County

Burton 0 0

Houston County

Grapeland 1 40

Lightning strike at Grapeland High

School during football practice.

Twenty-two kept overnight at hospital

for observation, all released the next

day. One fatality the following day.

M180U

TEXAS, Extreme West

Hudspeth County

7 NW Ft Hancock 0 0

El Paso County

Socorro 0 0

El Paso County

7 NNW El Paso Intl Ai 0 0

El Paso County

Northwest Portion 0 0 5K

El Paso County

8 NNW El Paso Intl Ai 0 0

El Paso County

10 N El Paso Intl Arpt 0 0

TEXAS, Mid-South

Nueces County

Corpus Christi 0 0

Heavy rainfall across the south side of

Corpus Christi led to flash flooding of

several city streets. Off duty NWS

employee measured 4.2 inches of

rainfall on the south side of Corpus

Christi in 1 hour and 45 minutes.

TEXAS, North

Denton County

Sanger 0 1 25K

A house under construction collapsed

from high winds, trapping a worker

inside. It took an hour to free him

from the debris before he could be

taken to a hospital. Some trees and

power lines were also blown down.

Cooke County

Gainesville 0 0 25K

A mobile home was unroofed in the FRF

Estates. A telephone pole was blown

down and the canopy over a rodeo arena

was blown off. A fence around the arena

was uprooted and blown away. Some trees

were also blown down.

Cooke County

Valley View 0 0 30K

Lightning caused two house fires with

minor damage to one and moderate damage

to the other.

Henderson County

Athens 0 0

A large tree at the courthouse was

blown down.

TEXAS, North Panhandle

Deaf Smith County

9 WSW Hereford 0 0

Hutchinson County

Borger to 0 0

Bunavista

Three to five homes in the towns of

Borger and Bunavista had to be

evacuated due to rapidly rising water

with another four to six homes

threatened by the flash flooding. The

flash flooding also closed down several

streets including Texas Highway 136.

Deaf Smith County

Hereford 0 0

Potter County

Amarillo Intl Arpt 0 0

Reported by the Science and Operations

Officer at the Amarillo National

Weather Service Office.

Potter County

10 E Amarillo 0 0

Potter County

9 E Amarillo 0 0

Severe thunderstorms during the early

evening hours produced large hail

across the southwest and south-central

Texas panhandle. No damage or injuries

were reported by the hail. In the

central Texas panhandle … thunder-

storms with very heavy rainfall

resulted in flash flooding in the towns

of Borger and Bunavista where several

homes were either evacuated or

threatened by the rapidly rising

waters. Several streets and highways

were closed due to the high water. No

injuries were reported from the flash

flooding.

Deaf Smith County

Hereford 0 0 180K 90K

Thunderstorms with very heavy rainfall

remained over the southwest Texas

panhandle from the late morning and

into the early evening hours. This led

to serious flooding in the town of

Hereford where parts of Hereford were

reported to be under water. The hardest

hit area was the San Jose community

which had damage to homes. Also … The

cotton and corn crops were reported

damaged by the flash flooding and some

young wheat crops drowned.

TEXAS, Northeast

Angelina County

Lufkin 0 0

Excessive heavy rainfall in town caused

severe street flooding. Some streets

were closed with cars becoming stalled

in high water.

TEXAS, South

Hidalgo County

6 N Mission 0 0

Numerous reports of funnel clouds were

received from trained spotters and the

local media, primarily north of Mission

and northwest of McAllen.

TEXAS, South Central

Frio County

Countywide 0 0

General 2 to 3 inch rainfall from near

Frio Town along FM140 into Pearsall and

then southeastward along FM 1582 to the

southeast corner of Frio County caused

widespread flash flooding. The worst

problems were in the city of Pearsall

near the noon hour.

Travis County

Austin 0 0

Thunderstorms moving over Austin

produced a general 1 inch rainfall with

parts of the city receiving almost 3

inches. Numerous low water crossings

were reported closed across the city

through the late afternoon, backing up

traffic for almost two hours during the

rush hour. One man attempting to cross

swollen Waller Creek on foot lost his

balance and was swept downstream.

Fortunately he was rescued safety.

Bexar County

San Antonio 1 0

A young girl drowned in a brief flash

flood event as she and her grandmother

were driving across a culvert that was

under construction. Although less than

2 inches of rain had fallen, water

swept quickly through the low area,

trapping the vehicle. The grandmother

left the car and was pulled to safety

by residents of the area. The young

girl was swept off her feet and washed

into a drainage pipe where she drowned.

F10VE

Val Verde County

Northeast Portion 0 0

Thunderstorms moving very slowly across

the northeast portion of Val Verde

County dropped between 2 and 3 inches

northeast of a line from Juno to Loma

Alta. The heaviest rainfall reported

was near 6 inches just north of Juno at

the intersections of SH163 and FM189.

Numerous low water crossings were

reported underwater through the early

morning hours.

Medina County

West Portion 0 0

Thunderstorms produced rainfall over

most of Medina County in the late

afternoon, with the western part of the

county receiving between 1 and 2

inches. The heaviest amount, between 3

and 4 inches, fell in a triangular area

from where FM1796 crosses the Uvalde

County line to where US90 touches the

Uvalde County line to Hondo. Flash

flooding closed sections of FM1796 and

FM2200 briefly during the evening.

De Witt County

Central Portion 0 0

Rainfall totals in showers and

thunderstorms averaged 1 inch with

isolated reports of up to 3 inches in

the area from Yorktown to Cuero to

Westhoff. Several roads were reported

under water and closed by the Sheriffs

Department through the evening.

Val Verde County

Countywide 0 0

Soils over Val Verde County, especially

the northern half of the county, had

been essentially saturated by the

rainfall on September 23. Storms formed

between Pandale, Comstock and Juno, in

the late morning of the 26th and flash

flooding began to cover low water

crossings by the early afternoon. As

the storms spread eastward and

southward through the afternoon and

evening, flash flooding continued. By

late evening, numerous roads were under

water and closed between Loma Alta and

Del Rio. In all, rain totals along and

east of a line from Pandale to Comstock

to Del Rio averaged between 1 and 2

inches, with widespread 3 inch amounts.

The highest accumulations were between

5 and 6 inches near Pandale.

Edwards County

West Portion 0 0

Thunderstorms continued to spread

eastward from Val Verde County on the

26th, moving into Edwards County in the

mid afternoon. They dropped between 1

and 2 inches of rain over the western

half of the county between 4 pm and 8

pm, with accumulations of up to 4

inches near where US277 crosses the Val

Verde County line and just south of

Carta Valley. Sections of US377, US277

and FM2523 were reported closed due to

high water.

Edwards County

Southwest Portion 0 0

Thunderstorms reformed during the early

afternoon of the 27th, re-developing

flash flooding over the western half of

the county very quickly. They continue

to spread slowly southeastward,

producing between 1 and 2 inches of

rain south and east of Carta Valley to

the Kinney County line. Once again,

portions of US377 and FM2523 were

reported to be briefly under water in

the late afternoon.

Kinney County

Countywide 0 0

The thunderstorms spread into Kinney

County during the late afternoon, with

rainfall totals over the county

averaging between 1 and 2 inches.

Highest amounts were near 4 inches

along FM674 from where it crosses the

Edwards County border to just north of

Brackettville. FM674 and FM334 were

reported under water in the early

evening.

Uvalde County

West Portion 0 0

The thunderstorms continued to spread

eastward from Kinney County into

western Uvalde County, with rain totals

between 1 and 2 inches over the area.

Highest totals were near 4 inches just

northwest of Concan. Brief flash

flooding closed portions of SH55 in the

northwest part of the county and

several roads north of Concan.

Val Verde County

Comstock 0 0

Very slow-moving thunderstorms formed

in the Comstock area in the late

afternoon and produced between 2 and 3

inches of rain around the town. The

Sheriffs Department reported portions

of FM1024 and SH163 briefly closed in

the Comstock area.

TEXAS, South Panhandle

Partner County

5 NE Black 0 0 25K

Castro County

Summerfield 0 0 25K

Bailey County

6 W Baileyboro 0 0 50K

Golfball sized hail was reported by the

Bailey County Sheriffs Office.

Bailey County

15 S Muleshoe 0 0 25K

Golfball sized hail was reported at the

Muleshoe Wildlife Refuge.

Bailey County

7 W Bula 0 0 25K

Floyd County

3 N Aiken 0 0 25K

Floyd County

Lockney 0 0 10K 25K

Penny to Golfball sized hail reported

by Sheriffs office in Lockney.

TEXAS, South Panhandle

Castro County

7 SW Dimmitt 0 0

Flood waters of 3-4 feet deep closed

Farm-to-Market Road 1055 between

Highway 86 and Farm-to-Market Road

1524.

Castro County

Dimmitt 0 0 4K

Flood waters entered a home in Dimmitt

causing carpet and floor damage.

Cochran County

Morton 0 0

Flooding resulted in closure of Main St

in Morton.

Yoakum County

Denver City 0 0

Widespread flooding around Denver City

resulted in numerous road closures.

Bailey County

3 NW Muleshoe 0 0

Flooding was reported at Highway 84 and

Farm-to-Market Road 1760 near Muleshoe.

Cochran County

Morton 0 0

Morton police department reported Main

St. partially closed due to flooding.

Yoakum County

8 E Plains 0 0

Flooding resulted in the closure of

intersection Highway 214 and Farm-to-

Market Road 1939.

Terry County

3 N Brownfield 0 0 25K

Terry County

2 S Brownfield 0 0

Texas Tech West Texas Mesonet station

measured a gust to 60 mph.

Terry County

Brownfield 0 0

Flooding in Brownfield closed several

streets.

Dickens County

Spur 0 0

Widespread flooding was reported in and

around Spur. A car was stranded in

town.

Lynn County

10 W Tahoka 0 0

Flood waters washed a car off the road

west of Tahoka on Highway 380.

Garza County

Southland 0 0

Flooding was reported in and around

Southland.

Lynn County

5 S Tahoka 0 0

Numerous reports of flooding was

reported in and around Tahoka.

Kent County

Jayton 0 0

Several reports of flooding occurred

in and near Jayton. A few roads were

briefly closed.

King County

7 S Guthrie 0 0

Strong winds blew down trees south of

town.

Garza County

Post 0 0

Several vehicles were stranded to due

flood waters in and around Post.

Lynn County

Tahoka 0 0

Dickens County

Dickens 0 0

Many county roads in and around Dickens

were flooded.

TEXAS, Southeast

Orange County

Vidor 0 0

Jefferson County

Beaumont 0 0

Jefferson County

Nederland 0 0 10K

Heavy rains caused flood waters to

enter one home in Nederland.

Orange County

Bridge City 0 0 10K

Heavy rains caused flood waters to

enter one home in Bridge City.

TEXAS, West

Ector County

Odessa 0 0 0 0

Several reports were received from the

public and a local newspaper reporter

of urban flooding in Odessa during the

afternoon of the 1st. Over six inches

of water was reported flowing through

the intersection of Second and Jackson

Streets in downtown, and more than a

foot of water crossed the intersection

of Sixteenth and Harless on the city’s

southwest side. The strong thunderstorm

that produced a burst of heavy rainfall

over the city quickly dissipated and

the flooding receded within half an

hour.

Ector County

1 ENE Gardendale to 0 0 0 0

3 ENE Gardendale

A second thunderstorm persisted for

nearly an hour over State Highway 158

in northeastern Ector County during the

evening of the 1st. Doppler radar

estimates indicated that up to two

inches of rain fell just northeast of

Gardendale. At least one foot of water

inundated several secondary roads.

Scattered convection develop over the

west Texas Upper Trans Pecos and the

western Permian Basin late on the 1st.

Two isolated strong thunderstorms

produced very heavy rainfall over Ector

County and resulted in localized flash

flooding.

Reeves County

1 S Saragosa to 0 0 25K 0

3 SE Saragosa

Reeves County officials reported

extensive flash flooding along

Interstate 10 near mile marker 214. Low

spots along Texas Highway 17 were

inundated by flood waters between

Saragosa and the interstate. Both east

and west-bound service roads also were

flooded. High water threatened a Fina

Gas Station near the intersection of

Texas Highway 17 and Interstate 10. Up

to three feet of water flowed through

the business’s parking lot. The Texas

Department of Transportation deployed

sandbags around the structure to

protect it from the flood waters.

Gaines County

Higginbotham 0 0 0 0

Gaines County

12 NW Seminole to 0 0 20K 0

Seagraves

Strong to severe thunderstorms trained

over the northern half of Gaines County

and resulted in very heavy rainfall and

flash flooding. At 17:30 LST officials

reported that high water flowed over

Texas Highway 214 and swept a vehicle

off of the road northwest of Seminole.

Rescue crews had to remove the driver

from the vehicle in swiftly moving

flood waters. During the next three

hours numerous roadways and highways

also were flooded near Seagraves.

Heavy rainfall also produced flowing

flood waters that made U.S. Highway

385/62 impassable ten miles north of

Seminole.

Strong to severe thunderstorms

developed over the west Texas Upper

Trans Pecos and the western Permian

Basin during the late afternoon and

evening of the 21st. Extensive flash

flooding was reported in southern Pecos

County near Interstate 10. Additional

thunderstorm activity produced quarter

size hail and flash flooding in Gaines

County, where a motorist was swept off

of the road. No injuries were reported.

Midland County

6 SE Midland to 0 0 2K 0

12 W Midland

A severe multicell thunderstorm erupted

over central Midland County during the

early evening of the 23rd and

propagated northwest over Midland

International Airport. At 18:25 CST,

nickel size hail and strong winds broke

small limbs off trees at several

residences six miles southeast of

Midland. At 18:53 CST nickel to quarter

size hail began to fall at the National

Weather Service Forecast Office near

Midland International Airport. The hail

persisted for ten minutes and covered

the ground. A resident on the Midland

/Ector County line reported nickel size

hail at 19:23 CST.

Midland County

1 ESE (Mat) Midland 1 0 0 25K 0

12 W Midland

Several units at a trailer home

dealership suffered wind damage

southeast of Midland International

Airport. The Automated Surface

Observation System located at the

airport recorded severe thunderstorm

wind gusts up to 61 MPH. A large flag

pole also was broken by the winds near

the intersection of Midland County Road

60 and Farm to Market Road 1788.

Ector County

5 ESE Gardendale 0 0 0 0

A resident on the Ector/Midland County

line reported nickel size hail.

Midland County

2 WSW Greenwood to 0 0 0 0

2 NW Greenwood

Storm spotters reported high water

flowing over several county and farm to

market roads between Interstate 20 and

Greenwood.

Midland County

1 S (Maf) Midland Intl 0 0 0 0

National Weather Service employees

encountered half a foot of running

water over the Interstate 20 service

road on the south side of Midland

International Airport.

An isolated severe multicell thunder-

storm produced large hail and damaging

thunderstorm winds as it propagated

northwest across Midland County. The

vicinity of Midland International

Airport was hardest hit by the storm

with quarter size hail and damaging

winds.

Ector County

Odessa 0 0 30K 0

A broad complex of showers and

thunderstorms moved northeast over the

west Texas Permian Basin on the 25th.

As heavy rainfall from this activity

spread over Odessa, dangerous flash

flooding conditions developed rapidly

in the city streets. At 09:10 CST fire

department personnel conducted high

water rescues at the intersection of

Tanglewood and Pembrook. Numerous

roadways across the city were quickly

closed due to flood waters. Motorists

also were rescued from stalled vehicles

near the intersection of Tom Green and

University Avenue. No injuries were

reported.

Midland County

Midland to 0 0 100K 0

4 E Midland

Storm spotters, law enforcement

officials, and the local media reported

several instances of flash flooding

across Midland. At 10:00 CST Texas

Department of Public Safety troopers

and Midland Fire Department personnel

rescued a woman and three children from

a vehicle submerged in three feet of

water near the intersection of West

Industrial Avenue and South Midland

Drive.

Shortly before 10:30 CST rescue crews

assisted stranded motorists on Illinois

Avenue and at the intersection of

Midkiff Road and Wadley Avenue. At

11:00 CST an elderly driver was rescued

from a vehicle submerged in six feet of

flowing water near Midland College.

Flood waters reportedly covered the

trunk and hood of the sports utility

vehicle and entered the cab. Fire crews

anchored a safety line across Wadley

Avenue to reach the distressed

motorist.

In addition, over a foot of water

covered the Loop 250 access road

between Thomason and State Highway 191

near Grandecom Stadium. Over two feet

of water covered the Interstate 20

access road at the intersection of Farm

to Market Road 1130. Two traffic

accidents on Interstate 20 in Midland

were indirectly related to the wet

weather when cars lost control on the

wet pavement. One such accident

resulted in an injured motorist. No

injuries or fatalities resulted from

the flash flooding.

Scurry County

Snyder 0 0 0 0

Local officials reported that flash

flooding resulted in high water running

down Avenue E in Snyder. The street was

closed to traffic.

Brewster County

Study Butte 0 0 0 0

Isolated strong to severe thunderstorms

erupted over the mountainous terrain of

southwest Texas during the afternoon

hours of the 25th. The National Park

Service reported quarter size hail near

Study Butte.

Convection was widespread over west

Texas on the 25th. The initial activity

decreased from west to east during the

afternoon hours, but not before

resulting in very dangerous urban flash

flooding across portions of the Permian

Basin. Isolated strong to severe

thunderstorms erupted again by late

afternoon over the mountainous regions

of the state. One storm produced large

hail near the Big Bond National Park.

Jeff Davis County

10 WSW Ft Davis to 0 0 10K 0

16 W Ft Davis

Very dangerous flash flooding

conditions developed rapidly on the

morning of the 26th across Jeff Davis

County. At 07:55 CST the Fort Davis

Fire Department reported two persons

stranded by flood waters in Short

Canyon, thirteen miles north-northeast

of Fort Davis. The fire department also

reported that work was underway to

rescue two additional stranded campers

in Madera Canyon, ten miles west-

southwest of the McDonald Observatory.

Rescue crews were able to bring the

campers in Madera Canyon to safety

shortly before noon CST. Additional

flash flooding was reported along

Olympia Creek, where water up to six

feet in depth inundated Texas Highway

118 for 200 yards between Fort Davis

and the Fort Davis State Park. The

intersection of Texas Highways 118 and

17 also was submerged by flowing flood

waters

Flooding along Olympia Creek was

reported to have receded by mid

afternoon. A second flood wave,

however, raged through the creek and

inundated the same portion of State

Highway 118 north of the Fort Davis

around 16:45 CST. The water again

receded making the highway passable by

19:35 CST.

Dangerous conditions persisted through

much of the night in rural Jeff Davis

County near Short Canyon. Two people

remained isolated at a deserted ranch

house near Wild Rose Pass by raging

flood waters. The individuals were

airlifted to safety via a helicopter

rescue just before dawn on the morning

of the 27th. No serious injuries or

damage was reported.

Brewster County

20 S Alpine to 0 0 0 0

Terlingua

A trained spotter reported flood waters

crossing State Highway 118 twenty miles

south of Alpine at 08:25 CST. Flash

flooding also inundated numerous rural

secondary roadways at Terlingua Ranch

near State Highway 118 in southern

Brewster County.

Before the heavy rainfall ended across

Brewster County during the late

afternoon, additional flash flooding

was reported near Terlingua. Law

enforcement officials reported that

several low water crossings there

flooded and several local highways were

impassable.

Reeves County

9 NNW Orla to 0 0 25K 0

Orla

At 10:30 CST residents in Orla reported

high water that inundated yards and

threatened homes. Water in the streets

of Orla flowed one foot deep. No major

damage was reported.

A National Weather Service Cooperative

Observer west of Red Bluff Dam reported

flood waters crossing U.S. Highway 285

in northern Reeves County at 10:40 CST.

Five to six feet of water was reported

flowing over County Road 447 five miles

north of Orla at 15:45 CST. At that

time, the Red Bluff Dam Cooperative

Observer reported a forty-eight hour

rainfall total of five inches.

The heavy rainfall ended over most of

Reeves County by late afternoon. Runoff

continued to result in flash flooding

through mid evening. The last report

that was received indicated that three

feet of water continued to flow over

County Road 447 north of Orla at 18:00

CST.

TEXAS, West

Culberson County

Van Horn to 0 0 0 0

Pine Spgs

At 10:41 CST National Park Service

employees reported flash flooding that

resulted in high water over Texas

Highway 54 at several locations between

Van Horn and Pine Springs. A later

report from the National Park Service

indicated that the water was flowing up

to two feet deep at some locations by

15:15 CST.

Heavy rainfall exited Culberson County

by late afternoon. The flash flooding

quickly receded along Texas Highway 54,

but debris was reported covering

portions of the highway, where flooding

had occurred at 17:30 CST.

Loving County

19 NW Mentone to 0 0 0 0

1 N Mentone

Several public reports indicated flash

flooding across western Loving County.

At 11:00 CST, at least one foot of

water was reported flowing over Farm to

Market Road 652 in the northwestern

parts of the county. Additional

flooding was reported at 11:45 CST

along County Road 300 one mile north of

Mentone, where flowing water up to one

foot deep crossed the road.

Gaines County

14 W Seagraves 0 0 15K 0

Flash flooding inundated Texas Highway

214 near the Gaines/Yoakam County line.

At 14:55 CST a car was washed off of

the highway just south of the county

line by flowing flood waters. Local

emergency officials closed the highway

after the driver of the vehicle was

brought to safety and it was not re-

opened until the water receded after

midnight CST.

Ector County

Odessa 0 0 0 0

Several city streets were inundated by

urban flash floods across the south

side of Odessa. More than two feet of

water flowed through portions of Tom

Green and Muskeegum Streets between 8th

and 15th Streets. Parts of 11th and

12th Streets were impassable with

nearly three feet of water. The

intersection of Meadow and Murphy also

was flooded with two feet of flowing

water.

Winkler County

1 SW Wink 0 0 0 0

Texas State Route 115 was barricaded

and closed to traffic through much of

the evening due to flash flooding

caused by a low water crossing that

flooded and inundated the highway near

Wink.

Andrews County

20 WNW Andrews to 0 0 0 0

27 WNW Andrews

Trained storm spotters reported that

flood waters intermittently covered

Texas Highway 176 in western Andrews

County. Half a foot of flowing water

crossed the highway at several

locations between twenty and twenty-

seven miles west-northwest of the city.

Ward County

Monahans 0 0 25K 0

Multiple reports from Monahans

indicated that heavy rainfall produced

flash flooding that quickly inundated

city streets and threatened several

residences. Local law enforcement

officials reported that city streets

remained barricaded at 19:00 CST. Flood

waters in the city receded by late

evening. No major damage was reported.

Howard County

Big Spring 0 0 100K 0

Heavy rainfall caused ponding of water

on many driving surfaces near Big

Spring. A semi-truck hydroplaned off of

Interstate 20 on the north side of the

city. A second semi-truck lost control

and jack-knifed when the driver tried

to avoid a collision with emergency

workers responding to the first

incident.

Howard County

Big Spring 0 0 20K 0

The Big Spring Police Department

barricaded several city streets due to

flowing flood waters that resulted from

flash flooding. The most significant

flooding was reported in the city’s

northwest side. At 18:43 CST a motorist

was stranded in flood waters at the

1400th block of Sixth Street. Northwest

Second and Benton Streets also were

closed.

Gaines County

15 W Seminole to 0 0 0 0

13 W Seminole

Portions of U.S. Highway 62/180 were

impassable due to flowing flood waters

west of Seminole. Numerous secondary

roads also were inundated in the

immediate area.

Dawson County

Lamesa 0 0 0 0

Several locations were inundated by

flood waters in Lamesa. Flash flooding

caused high water to flow through

Forest Park and along North Main

Street.

Tropical-like rainfall occurred over

portions of west Texas during the last

weekend in September. On Sunday the

26th, widespread flash floods resulted

from heavy rains that accompanied a

complex of warm topped convection that

propagated slowly from the mountains of

southwest Texas and the Big Bend

northeast across the Permian Basin.

A sudden onset of dangerous flash

flooding conditions at sunrise caught

campers by surprise in the Davis

Mountains. At least four people were

isolated by raging flood waters at two

camp sites in rural portions of that

county. Campers at one site were

stranded for nearly twenty-four hours

before a rescue helicopter was used to

lift them to safety.

The threat of significant flash

flooding spread northeast across the

Upper Trans Pecos and the west Texas

Permian Basin through the afternoon and

evening hours. This resulted in

dangerous driving conditions across

portions of the area. A car was swept

off of a highway by flood waters in

Gaines County during the early evening

hours. Serious injuries or deaths were

narrowly avoided when two semi-trucks

lost control and hydroplaned off of a

rain soaked Interstate 20 in Howard

County. One truck barely missed

emergency workers who were attending to

the initial accident.

The heavy rainfall began to subside

across most of the region by late

evening on the 26th. Flash flooding

continued in some locations as runoff

persisted through much of the night. No

injuries were reported across the area.

Gaines County

8 W Seminole to 0 0 0 0

8 E Seminole

Before sunrise on Monday the 27th,

thunderstorms again initiated over the

Permian Basin. Heavy rainfall from this

activity quickly led to flash flooding

over saturated grounds. Local law

enforcement officials reported flash

flooding at several locations along

U.S. Highway 180 in the vicinity of

Seminole. Between one and two feet of

flowing water was reported over a half

mile stretch eight miles east of

Seminole. The intersection of Farm to

Market Road 1429 and U.S. Highway 180

also was inundated by flood waters six

miles east of the city. High water also

made a stretch of the same highway

impassable eight miles west of Seminole

during the late morning hours.

Gaines County

8 W Seagravesto 0 0 0 0

Loop

Texas Highway 83 also was affected by

flash flooding in northern Gaines

County. At 06:40 CST local officials

reported flowing flood waters over the

highway eight miles west of Seagraves.

Hazardous driving conditions spread

east along that route through the

morning hours as the heavy rainfall

slowly propagated east. Up to two feet

of water covered the intersection of

Texas Highway 83 and U.S. Highway 385

in Seagraves. Impassable conditions

also were reported east along Texas

Highway 83 near Loop.

Borden County

14 W Gail 0 0 0 0

The Dawson County Sheriffs Office

reported flash flooding along U.S.

Highway 180. Up to eight inches of

flowing flood waters covered the

highway on the Dawson/Borden County

line.

Dawson County

4 ESE Lamesa to 0 0 0 0

16 E Lamesa

The Dawson County Sheriffs Office

reported flash flooding along U.S.

Highway 180 from four miles east-

southeast of Lamesa to the Dawson/

Borden County line. Portions of the

highway were covered by up to eight

inches of flowing flood waters.

A pre-dawn round of thunderstorms

resulted in another round of flash

flooding across the northwestern

Permian Basin of west Texas. Several

major highways were closed due to high

water.

Andrews County

Andrews 0 0 25K 0

Thunderstorms and heavy rain again

erupted over west Texas during the

afternoon of the 27th. Saturated ground

conditions were first aggravated by

downpours over Andrews. Urban flash

flooding quickly ensued and several

vehicles stalled in flooded city

streets. The Andrews Fire Department

conducted at least one high water

rescue. No injuries were reported.

Ward County

20 SSE Monahans to 0 0 0 0

22 SSE Monahans

Trained spotters reported high water

flowing over Farm to Market Road 871 in

southeast Ward County. Several

secondary roadways also were inundated

by flood waters.

Ector County

5 SSE West Odessa to 0 0 2M 0

West Odessa

A small linear convective complex

developed over western Ector County

during the early evening hours. The

complex persisted and remained nearly

stationary for almost two hours. Very

intense rainfall fell over Monahans

Draw near West Odessa.

The first reports of flash flooding

indicated that high water rendered Farm

to Market Road 866, Texas Highway 302,

and Interstate 20 impassable. Up to six

feet of water was reported crossing low

lying areas of Farm to Market Road 866

just north of the Interstate 20

junction. Several vehicles became

stalled in high water flowing across

the interstate, resulting in high water

rescues of stranded motorists.

By late evening the swollen Monahans

Draw, usually a dry depression,

inundated residential areas in West

Odessa. The hardest hit areas were near

Third and Damascus Streets. The most

extensive damage occurred to several

trailer parks in the Westcliff, Knox

Village, and Manor subdivisions. Rescue

crews from three fire departments

worked well into the night to remove

distressed residents from homes and

vehicles that were threatened by high

water. One fire engine stalled in the

flood waters. Many families were

displaced to emergency shelters in

other portions of the city and in

Odessa. More than forty homes suffered

serious damage. Four trailer homes and

two permanent homes were destroyed.

Another fifteen single family homes

experienced major damage from the flood

waters.

Thunderstorms dissipated over Ector

County shortly before midnight CST.

This brought a temporary reprieve from

the excessive rainfall. Runoff,

however, continued to present a threat

of flash flooding through the nighttime

hours. As a result local emergency

management officials continued to

report major flash flooding along

Monahans Draw through the night.

During the pre-dawn hours of Tuesday

the 28th, another band of showers and

thunderstorms moved north across Ector

County. Brief heavy rainfall from this

activity aggravated the flash flood

situation. By 06:35 CST local officials

were again at work to evacuate

residents near the intersections of

Tripp and Twenty-Third Streets and

Tenth and Redondo Streets. Between two

and three feet of water was reported

rushing through those city streets and

threatened numerous homes. At least

three high water rescues also were

conducted to bring stranded motorists

to the safety of dry ground.

Rainfall ended over Ector County by

09:00 CST. Significant runoff and

associated flash flooding of low lying

areas prevented access to much of the

city through the early afternoon hours.

Ector County

Odessa 0 0 30K 0

Heavy rainfall over Odessa during the

late evening and overnight hours Monday

the 27th and the early morning hours of

Tuesday the 28th caused the flat-topped

roof of a business to collapse in

downtown. Although extensive damage

occurred to the business, no injuries

were reported.

TXZ061

0 0 250K 0

Despite an end of the thunderstorms and

heavy rainfall over Ector County during

the late morning hours, significant

flood waters remained in several West

Odessa neighborhoods. It took several

additional hours for flooding to

recede.

Scattered thunderstorms developed and

produced locally very heavy rainfall

over the western parts of the west

Texas Permian Basin during the late

afternoon and evening of the 27th. Many

West Odessa residents were displaced

from their homes during the late

evening hours when flash flooding along

Monahans Draw devastated parts of the

city. No casualties were reported, but

at least twenty families were left

homeless.

Howard County

3 NNW Knott to 0 0 0 0

4 W Coahoma

The Texas Department of Transportation

reported flash flooding along several

roadways in northwestern Howard County.

Between 07:25 and 07:50 CST local

officials and public reports indicated

that one mile of Farm to Market Road

2230 was inundated by flood waters near

the intersection of County Road 50

north of Knott.

The public also reported submerged

roadways west of Coahoma. Midway Road

and South Moss Lake Road were rendered

impassable due to high water. Local

highway officials closed the roadways

shortly afternoon CST.

Midland County

4 SW Midland to 0 0 20K 0

Midtnnd

At 08:30 CST running water was reported

flowing over the intersection of Loop

250 and Business Interstate 20. The

local media reported a vehicle

submerged under an overpass at the

intersection of Midland Drive and

Industrial at 08:45 CST. Fire

department crews rescued a woman

trapped in a water stalled mini-van on

West Industrial Avenue. No injuries

were reported.

Flash flooding across the central

Permian Basin of west Texas resumed

during the mid to late morning hours

when a band of showers and

thunderstorms developed and propagated

across the area. Several rural and

secondary roadways were inundated by

flood waters in Howard County. In

addition, dangerous urban flash

flooding resulted in at least two

submerged vehicles in Midland.

Culberson County

4 S Pine Spgs 0 0 0 0

Reeves County

Orla 0 0 0 0

Isolated strong to severe thunderstorms

developed over the west Texas Upper

Trans Pecos and in vicinity of the

Guadalupe Mountains during the late

evening hours of the 29th. One

thunderstorm produced severe wind gusts

near Guadalupe Mountains National Park.

An Automated Surface Observation System

located at Guadalupe Pass near U.S.

Highway 62/180 recorded a peak gust of

58 MPH. A second severe storm produced

hail up to the size of pennies in Orla.

Dawson County

10 NNE Lamesa 0 0 0 0

Convective activity lingered over the

northern Permian Basin into the morning

hours of the 30th. Local officials

reported that flash flooding briefly

resulted in over half a foot of water

flowing across a portion of U.S.

Highway 87 north of Lamesa.

Reeves County

2 S Saragosa to 0 0 0 0

Saragosa

A Texas Department of Public Safety

trooper reported penny to quarter size

hail and “high” winds from the

intersection of Interstate 10 and Texas

Highway 17 north to Saragosa.

Ward County

Grandfalls 0 0 25K 0

Law enforcement officials reported

quarter to golfball size hail in

Grandfalls. Minor damage to vehicles

was reported.

Ward County

Grandfalls to 0 0 75K 0

2.5 ESE Grandfalls

Strong to severe thunderstorms over

Pecos County spawned a left moving

(anticyclonic) severe storm that

rapidly propagated over the town of

Grandfalls. Quarter to golfball size

hail was reported in addition to

damaging winds. Five power poles were

snapped along State Route 11 just

southeast of town. In town, an abandon

mobile home was rolled by the winds and

destroyed while the roof of another

mobile home in the southwest portions

of the community was blown onto a

nearby pickup truck. Several trees were

uprooted and a historic church also

sustained serious roof damage.

A damage survey conducted by the

National Weather Service concluded that

the severe winds that produced the

damage was uniform in direction,

blowing debris from the southwest to

the northeast. The damage swath covered

an area three miles wide. These

observations were consistent with the

occurrence of a large downburst, or

macroburst.

Thunderstorms erupted along the Davis

Mountains in southwest Texas during the

afternoon and evening of the 30th.

Several of these thunderstorms became

severe as they propagated northeast

across the Trans Pecos and produced

large hail and damaging winds. The most

significant impacts from the storms

occurred in the community of

Grandfalls. Damaging winds destroyed

two trailer homes and partially removed

the roof on a historic church.

TEXAS, Western North

Hardeman County

Chillicothe 0 0 7.5K

A tree fell over a power line in town.

UTAH, East

UTZ022>025-027>029

0 0

Remnants of an eastern Pacific

Hurricane transported some moisture

across eastern Utah early in the month.

However, the precipitation was not

sufficient to alleviate the severe to

extreme drought conditions. Please see

the October 2004 Storm Data publication

for a continuation on this drought

situation.

UTZ023

0 0

This fire was named the Mail Draw Fire

and occurred on BLM property 25 miles

northeast of Vernal. The fire consumed

2,800 acres of timber, pinyon pine,

juniper, and sage brush. The estimated

cost of fighting the fire was 915

thousand dollars.

San Juan County

Fry Canyon to 0 0

21 NW Fry Canyon

Heavy rainfall resulted in a wall of

water up to 6 feet deep roaring down

White Canyon. This flash flood was

observed by a number of back country

travelers, including trail guides.

UTZ023-028

0 0

An early season storm produced snowfall

amounts of 1 to 4 inches across the

mountains of northeast and southeast

Utah.

UTAH, West and Central

NOT RECEIVED.

VERMONT, North and Central

NONE REPORTED.

VERMONT, South

VTZ013

0 0

The Walloomsac River exceeded its flood

stage of 7.0′, cresting at 7.21′ at

14:30 EST on 9/18/04 at the Bennington

gage.

VIRGIN ISLANDS

VIZ001>002

0 0 6.2M

Tropical Storm Jeanne affected the

territory with high winds and

torrential rains, leaving downed trees,

utility poles, power outages, and

widespread flooding in its wake. The

U.S. virgin Islands were declared a

major disaster area. Jeanne caused 6.4

million in damage to infra structure.

Jeanne dumped over 12 inches of rain in

St. Thomas during the three day period

from September 14-17. At the St. Croix

airport, 6.06 inches were recorded

during the same period, although a

spotter in a location north of

Fredericksted, at Butler Bay, recorded

8.73 inches for the 24 hour period

ending at 6 am on September 16. On St.

John, a spotter at Rainbow Hill, Cruz

Bay, recorded 10.39 inches for the

period from 630 am on Sep. 14th through

630 am on Sep. 17th. The maximum 24

hour rainfall at Charlotte Amalie of

9.25 inches has a return frequency of

25 years. The Turpentine Run at Mt.

Zion station in St. Tomas, set a new

record of 8.65 feet, which broke the

previous record of 7.28 feet set in

1995. On St. Thomas, about 20 people

had to be rescued early Thursday

morning when flood waters overtook

areas of Brockman Road, Estate

Nazareth, and Sanchez Town in Nadir.

Estate Nadir was hit the hardest when

the water swelled out of the runoff

channels and overtaxed drainage

ditches, causing widespread flooding

and erosion. On St Croix, flooding was

reported in Gallows Bay, Estate Ruby,

Estate Grove Place, Estate Whim, Tide

Village, Calquohoun, Midland Road,

Mon-Bijou and Frangipani. The rains

brought mudslides and forced large

rocks onto roadways on Queen Mary

Highway. On St John, downed trees,

mud and rock slides were reported. The

agricultural impact was significant in

St. Croix mainly were major flooding

occurred. Farmers experienced

significant damage and crop losses with

bananas, plantains, sugar cane,

vegetables and fruit trees. Plants that

were not destroyed by the winds

eventually overturned due to

waterlogged conditions. Winds reports

in the U.S. Virgin Islands varied, the

St Croix airport recorded sustained

winds of 52 mph with gusts to 62 mph.

The St Thomas airport recorded

sustained winds of 39 mph with gust to

51 mph. There was an unofficial wind

gust report of 96 mph recorded by a

spotter at Maria Hill in St. Croix.

VIRGINIA, East

Hanover County

Mabelton 0 0 2K

Trees down.

King William County

Aylett 0 0 10K

F0 tornado blew roof off a house near

King William Road.

Caroline County

1 S Bowling Green to 0 0 25K

1 W Moss Neck

F1 tornado damaged or destroyed several

buildings. Also, numerous trees downed

or sheared.

Amelia County

Truxillo 0 0 2K

F0 tornado twisted off tree tops near

intersection of Routes 639 and 681.

Fluvanna County

3 W Palmyra 0 0 15K

F0 tornado demolished mobile home,

blew roof off house, and downed trees

at Route 693 and Longacre Road.

Chesterfield County

1 SW Midlothian 0 0 2K

F0 tornado produced minor damage to

trees near Route 288 and Woolridge

Road.

Henrico County

3 NW Varina 0 0 5K

F0 tornado produced structural damage

to outbuildings and storage facilities

at several businesses along Old Osborne

Turnpike.

Richmond (C)

Richmond 0 0 2K

F0 tornado produced minor damage to

businesses near Orleans Street.

Prince George County

3 NW Templeton 0 0

Over a foot of water was observed on

Fairwood Road.

Prince George County

Prince George to 0 0

Disputanta

Considerable water over Route 460 was

reported near Disputanta, with one of

the lanes blocked due to the high

water.

Prince Edward

County

Farmville to 0 0 2K

Tuggle

Trees and power lines down.

Amelia County

Mannboro 0 0 10K

F1 tornado blew roof off garage and

lifted garage off foundation. Trees

down with some snapped off in wooded

area.

Caroline County

1 SW Guinea to 0 0 25K

Guinea

F1 tornado downed numerous trees near

Cosbys Corner. Many trees snapped off

10 feet above ground level. Cinderblock

detached garage (30 x 32 foot) totally

destroyed. Two vehicles damaged, minor

damage to home, and mobile home

destroyed by falling tree.

Prince Edward

County

Prospect 0 0 2K

Trees down.

Chesterfield County

2 N Midlothian 0 0 2K

F0 tornado downed trees near Robius

Road.

Mecklenburg County

Chase City 0 0 2K

Trees down.

Goochland County

Manakin 0 0 3K

F1 tornado downed numerous trees.

Louisa County

5 NW Louisa 0 0 20K

F1 tornado downed or snapped off

numerous trees. Two house trailers

blown into a creek.

Henrico County

Short Pump 0 0 15K

F0 tornado damaged some homes in the

Hampshire Subdivision, off Nuckols

Road. Shingles were torn off of some

roofs and garage doors blown in. Also,

damage to homes in the Autumnwood

Subdivision off of Shady Grove Road.

Hanover County

Montpelier 0 0 2K

Trees down near Old Ridge Road and

Blunt Bridge.

Hanover County

Doswell 0 0 2K

Trees down.

Powhatan County

Powhatan 0 0

Portions of Highway 60 flooded. Route

711 closed due to high water.

Hanover County

1 N Hanover 0 0 2K

F0 tornado downed trees.

Caroline County

1 S Dawn 0 0 2K

F0 tornado downed trees.

Caroline County

2 S Golansville 0 0 10K

F1 tornado downed numerous trees on

Friendship Road. Many trees snapped off

10 feet above ground level. One tree

fell on a house and caused significant

damage.

Prince Edward

County

Farmville 0 0

Street flooding in town. Routes 634 and

636 closed due to high water.

Caroline County

3 WNW Port Royal 0 0 15K

F1 tornado downed numerous trees near

the intersection of Route 615 and Route

728 around Four Winds Golf Course. Many

trees snapped off about 10 feet above

ground level, and significant damage to

2 homes.

Cumberland County

3 SE Ranies Tavern 0 0

High water on River Road and Jamestown

Road.

Powhatan County

2 ESE Subletts 0 0 2K

Trees down at Junction of Routes 711

and 288.

Goochland County

1 W Oilville 0 0 10K

F1 tornado damaged a home on Broad

Street in the Three Oaks Subdivision.

Numerous trees were snapped and blown

down. Roof partial blown off house.

Greensville County

3 WNW Kingsberry 0 0 5K

F0 tornado damaged a few homes and a

shed along Old Brunswick Road/Route

607. Trees down in different

directions.

Amelia County

2 W Mannboro 0 0

State Route 615 closed due to high

water. High water also on Routes 360

and 38.

Goochland County

Manakin 0 0

High water at Manakin and Hermitage

Streets, and on Broad Street Road in

town of Goochland.

Hanover County

3 SSW Ashland 0 0

High water reported on Greenwood Church

Road, Rosmarin Road, Mountain Road,

Auburn Mill Road, and Stone Horse Road.

Richmond (C)

Richmond 0 0

Flooding reported on New Kent Road,

Jennie Scher and Stoney Run Roads,

Fairmount Road, and Mechanicsville

Turnpike.

Mathews County

Peary 0 0 15K

An old barn and small shed destroyed by

straight-line winds. Winds estimated

between 60 and 70 mph.

VIRGINIA, Extreme Southwest

NONE REPORTED.

VIRGINIA, North

Fauquier County

2 S Bealeton to 0 0 500K

.5 S Bealeton

A tornado touched down 2 miles south of

Bealeton and lifted a half mile south

of Bealeton. The storm was 200 yards

wide. The initial touchdown was near

Morgansburg Road. The storm tracked

north for 1.5 miles and produced

significant damage to at least 2 homes.

A roof was peeled off one home and some

of the outside walls showed signs of

bowing. At another dwelling, a garage

door was blown into the garage and out

of the sidewall. Several projectiles

were lodged in the south side of the

house. Three large green houses and

some portable outhouses were also

damaged. Two Ryder trucks were

overturned. One truck fell on a small

pickup, which sustained considerable

damage. Maximum wind speeds were 115 to

130 mph.

Fauquier County

5.5 S Warrenton to 0 0 7K

4.3 S Warrenton

A tornado touched down a half mile

south of Hurlesville or almost 6 miles

south of Warrenton. The storm was on

the ground for three-quarters of a

mile. Not structural damage was

observed, but 20 to 30 mature trees

were uprooted or snapped. Maximum winds

were 60 to 70 mph.

Culpeper County

Elkwood to 0 0 50K

.3 N Elkwood

A tornado briefly touched down in

Elkwood. The tornado caused damage to

the Willow Run Growers Greenhouse

Complex. A 20 foot square building with

a sturdy metal roof was completely

destroyed. Two cars in a parking lot

were moved and a pickup truck was

tipped over. Estimated winds were 75 to

90 mph.

King George County

1.5 S Sealston to 0 0 7K

.8 N Sealston

A tornado moved from Caroline County

along the Stafford-King George County

line. Numerous large trees (up to 3

feet in diameter) were uprooted and

topped along Route 3 near Scalston. The

storm was rated an F1 due to the

extensive tree damage observed.

Stafford County

3.5 NE White Oak to 0 0 10K

5 S Aquia

The thunderstorm which produced the

tornado near Scalston in King George

County, crossed into cast Stafford

County. A brief touch down occurred

near Belle Plain (almost 4 miles NE of

White Oak). Minor tree damage was noted

and later the same tornado cycled and

another brief touch down occurred near

Aquia Bay Marina at the end of Aquia

Creek Road (about 5 miles S of Aquia).

Minor tree damage was noted there and 3

boats in dry dock were displaced.

Stafford County

2 SE Garrisonville to 0 0 50K

3 NNE Garrisonville

A tornado touched down in north

Stafford County near Boswells Corner

(near the intersection of U.S. Route 1

and Telegraph Road). Initially the

storm produced minor damage to trees,

and siding and shingles were torn from

a few homes. Minutes later the storm

produced extensive tree damage to the

Crystal Lakes neighborhood.

Prince William

County

2.5 S Triangle to 0 0 25K

2 S Triangle

A tornado crossed into Prince William

County from Stafford County. Damage was

limited to a large, healthy stand of

trees.

Fauquier County

2 N Delaplane to 0 0 2K

4 N Delaplane

A tornado touched down briefly in a

rural area 2 miles north of Delaplane.

Several trees were topped or uprooted.

The storm produced intermittent damage

as it tracked northeast toward Route

17. Maximum winds were estimated at 60

to 70 mph.

Charlottesville (C)

Charlottesville 0 0 6K

Trees down across the city.

Clarke County

2 N Berryville to 0 0 1K

2.3 N Berryville

A weak tornado touched down briefly

just north of Berryville and the

intersection of Route 7 and U.S.

Highway 340. A few trees were snapped

off with a lot of shredded leaves on

the ground. Maximum winds were around

65 mph.

Albemarle County

Crozet 0 0

U.S. Route 810 under water.

Greene County

Ruckersville 0 0 5K

Trees down across the area.

Shenandoah County

5 E Orkney Spgs 0 0

U.S. Route 42 under water.

Orange County

Montpelier to 0 0 5K

.3 E Montpelier

A tornado touched down near Montpelier

Station in central Orange County.

Damage was limited to a few trees and

downed wires. The storm was on the

ground for less than 1 minute, and

maximum winds were 50 mph.

Augusta County

Deerfield 0 0

Numerous roads closed in southwest

Augusta County due to water covering

the roads.

Madison County

Madison 0 0

Multiple road closures due to high

water.

Rockingham County

Mc Gaheysville 0 0

Numerous roads closed due to standing

water.

Greene County

Standardsville 0 0

Water over bridges.

Frederick County

Gore 0 0

Multiple roads closed throughout the

county.

The remnants of Hurricane Frances

brought flooding and tornadoes to

portions of northern Virginia on the

8th. The track of the storm kept most

of the flooding and tornadic activity

in the Central Foothills, the Northern

Piedmont, and northern Virginia

counties from Loudoun southward to

Culpeper. Emergency personnel reported

numerous car accidents in Augusta and

Rockingham counties. Augusta County

schools cancelled school sporting

events due to the conditions of the

roads. Rescue workers also performed a

few evacuations/water rescues. Flights

were delayed at Dulles International

Airport.

Albemarle County

Earlysville 0 0

Brief touch down of a weak tornado

recorded and reported by broadcast

media.

Fauquier County

1 S Remington to 0 2 250K

2 NW Opal

A strong tornado touched down in

southern Fauquier County, near

Remington. A home was pushed off its

foundation. A new pickup truck was

lifted and hurled 75 yards over trees

and power lines. It crashed upside down

in a field.

Greene County

1 S Standardsville to 0 3 3M

3.5 S Standardsville

A tornadic thunderstorm touched down

near Standardsville. A roof was torn

off a building just south of U.S.

Highway 33. The roof was also torn off

a house just north of U.S. Highway 33.

The most extensive damage occurred

around Highway 621. Four dwellings and

a mobile home were destroyed.

Approximately 50 other structures were

damaged, including a nearby country

club and a concrete block building. A

trailer filled with cattle gates was

also destroyed.

Warren County

2 N Front Royal to 0 0

Front Royal

A weak tornado produced minor damage to

some large trees near Front Royal.

Debris was thrown across several roads.

Fauquier County

.5 E Opal to 0 0 500K

1 NW Warrenton

An F2 tornado touched down near Opal

and tracked north. The tornado produced

severe tree damage and some structural

damage to several dwellings before

dissipating near Warrenton. This is the

second tornado of three tornadoes in

Fauquicr County associated with the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan.

Madison County

.5 W Hood to 0 0 200K

5.5 NW Graves Mill

A thunderstorm that moved into Madison

County from Greene County produced

tornado damage near Hood. A number of

homes were damaged. One aluminum garage

was destroyed and a rock chimney was

topped off. The tornado remained on the

ground for several miles and tracked

northward into the higher terrain of

western Madison County. Several large

areas of mature mixed forest were

almost completely leveled in the

Rapidan Wildlife Management Area and

the Shenandoah National Park.

Fauquier County

2 SE Warrenton to 0 0 750K

2 NE The Plains

An F2 tornado produced widespread

structural damage to two subdivisions

in northern Fauquicr County. Some small

items were turned into projectiles by

this tornado and landed in trees and

the sides of homes and some vehicles.

There was substantial tree damage.

Numerous large, healthy trees were

uprooted and snapped. This is the third

tornado of this event in Fauquier.

Spotsylvania County

1 NE Massaponax to 0 0

6 N Massaponax

A weak tornado moved across eastern

Spotsylvania County, Virginia on the

19th. Emergency personnel witnessed a

tornado in the New Crest Area. Minor

damage to trees and a few homes were

reported.

Fredericksburg (C)

Fredericksburg to 0 0

2 NW Fredericksburg

A thunderstorm moved from Spotsylvania

County into the eastern portion of the

City of Fredericksburg. No property

damage was reported, with debris

scattered along Dixon Street.

Frederick County

1 NW Winchester Arp 0 0 250K

4 N Winchester Arpt

An F2 tornado produced a nearly

continuous path of damage for 5 miles

in eastern Frederick County. It touched

down west of Millwood Pike near the

Winchester Airport. Three homes

suffered roof damage, a detached two

car garage was destroyed, a platform

deck was blown away, an office trailer

was overturned, and numerous trees

along the track of the storm were

uprooted or topped.

Stafford County

2.5 N White Oak to 0 0

1 W Stafford

A tornado touched down in central

Stafford County near Stones Corner. The

storm tracked north northeast and

lifted near Stafford. The damage was

mostly limited to mature trees and

large limbs. The tornado had a 6 mile

intermittent track, and the storm

continued on into Prince William County

Virginia.

Spotsylvania County

Holladay 0 0

A brief tornado touchdown was video

taped by a fire fighter. No damage or

injuries were reported.

Orange County

3.1 SE Lahore to 0 0 150K

2 E Lahore

A tornado touched down in a heavily

forested area near the western end of

Lake Anna, southeast of Lahore. Several

trees were topped or uprooted and the

tornado significantly damaged two

homes.

Loudoun County

3 S Hamilton to 0 0 500K

Lovettsville

A tornado touched down in western

Loudoun County. This storm was a

continuation of a track of the storm

that moved through Fauquier County

Virginia. The storm first touched down

south of Hamilton and, intermittent

damage was noted from Hamilton to

Lovettsville. A farm near Hamilton

suffered severe damage. The farmhouse,

horse barn and outbuildings were

severely damaged or demolished. Two

thoroughbred horses were cut by flying

debris. The tornado produced damage

along a 12 mile track. This storm

continued to travel north into Maryland

and produced damage in extreme

southwest Frederick and eastern

Washington Counties.

Prince William

County

6 W Dale City to 0 0 1M

3 S Manassas Afs

A tornadic thunderstorm moved through

central Prince William County. This is

the same storm that produced damage

earlier in Stafford County. The initial

touchdown in Prince William County was

west of Dale City, near Independent

Hill and Dumfries Road. The storm

snapped or uprooted many large hardwood

trees. Some of the trees fell on houses

and other structures. The storm lifted

and then reformed for the second

touchdown in Manassas. Several homes

suffered roof and shingle damage. An

automobile was moved several feet.

Damaged also occurred in Manassas Park

and in Yorkshire Village. This tornado

continued north into Fairfax County.

Orange County

Rhoadesville to 0 0 75K

3 NW Burr Hill

A thunderstorm produced a second

tornado in Rhodesville along Route 20

in eastern Orange County. A shed, a

horse trailer, and a two silos were

destroyed on one farm. A tree was

thrown onto a house and a mobile home

was demolished. The storm continued its

northward and produced sporadic and

less significant damage.

Culpeper County

Mitchells to 0 0 850K

.5 N Mitchells

A tornado touched down in Mitchells

along Route 615. The tornado moved over

several out buildings and homes. At

least 12 homes sustained moderate to

severe damage. Numerous trees were

uprooted, and a shed was picked up off

its foundation by the storm.

Frederick County

1 E Middletown to 0 2 1M

1 E Opequon

A tornado touched down in western

Frederick County, Virginia on the 17th.

The path of the storm was 9 miles long.

It touched down about one mile east of

Middletown and Interstate 81. Roof

damage was noted to many barns and

outbuildings. A large two story brick

garage was nearly destroyed when its

roof was blown off from strong F1

tornado winds. In the western end of

the Stonebrook Farm Subdivision, an

estimated 100 oak and other hardwood

trees ranging from 18 to 36 inches in

diameter topped or snapped 20 to 50

feet up from the base in roughly a 2

block area. One home was completely

destroyed and over 100 others damaged

due to falling trees.

Manassas (C)

Manassas to 0 0 500K

3.5 NE Manassas

A tornado touched down on the eastside

of the City of Manassas. It produced

structural damage and tree damage and

then continued on to Manassas Park. The

tornado damaged several dwellings

before lifting in the Yorkshire

Subdivision.

Culpeper County

2 E Catalpa to 0 0 150K

2.1 NE Catalpa

A tornado touched down north of

Culpeper near Catalpa. The tornado blew

down branches from several trees. It

blew in a garage door and the roof was

blown off the garage and off part of

the house.

Fairfax County

.5 NW Centreville to 0 1 2.5M

7 NW Centreville

A tornadic thunderstorm entered western

Fairfax County from Prince William

County. The storm had a path of about 7

miles. Beginning on Old Centerville

Road, the storm produced scattered tree

damage along its path and minor roofing

damage to structures in the London Town

Area. A line of damage was carved from

Lee Highway northward into the

Centerville and Chantilly areas. The

tornado destroyed one estate and

damaged about 50 other dwellings. The

storm was also responsible for downed

trees and power lines. The tornado

lifted as it crossed Route 50.

Loudoun County

Dulles Intl Arpt to 0 0 3M

3 NE Ashburn

A tornado moved into eastern Loudoun

County from Fairfax County near the

Dulles International Airport. The storm

produced a tornado which passed within

one half mile of the National Weather

Service Forecast Office in Sterling.

This prompted the staff on duty to seek

shelter in the office constructed

saferoom. As the storm traveled north

from the Dulles International Airport,

it produced minor tree damage. More

extensive damage occurred north of

Waxpool Road at the Beaumcde Corporate

Park. Seven buildings were damaged. A

wall collapsed in one of the buildings.

A tractor trailer was overturned. The

tornado also pushed two cars into the

side of a building. The tornado

weakened as it traveled north. The last

damage in Loudoun County was reported

just north of Route 7.

King George County

2 SW Comorn to 0 0 500K

Fairview Beach

An F1 tornado crossed central King

George County on the 17th. The initial

touch down was near the intersection of

Route 3 and 607, near Popcastle. Frame

homes in the Lake Jefferson Subdivision

and nearby Igo Road areas were damaged

by topped or felled trees. Windy Hill

Farm also reported extensive damage to

the barn and two other out buildings.

The storm then jogged to the right and

crossed Comorn Road, just south of

Osso. The storm continued to produce

damage as it entered the Potomac River

at the end of Route 641. Trees fell on

a house at the end of Route 641.

Albemarle County

Crozet 0 0

Several low lying roads under water.

Frederick County

Stephens City 0 0

A few roads impassable due to high

water in Stephens City and Middletown.

Warren County

Front Royal 0 0

County Officials reported numerous

roads closed due to high water.

Fauquier County

Warrenton 0 0

Several roads closed across the county

due to high water.

Prince William

County

Dumfries to 0 0

Woodbridge

High water reported on roads in

Dumfries and Woodbridge.

Loudoun County

Leesburg

Several roads across the county flooded

due to high water.

Fairfax County

Annandale to 0 0

Fairfax Park

High water on roads in west Annandale

and west Fairfax.

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan affected

the Mid Atlantic States on the 17th and

18th. Tornadic thunderstorms produced

widespread, significant damage across

Northern Virginia. Flooding of small

streams, creeks, primary and secondary

roads were reported by emergency and

rescue personnel. In response, many

roads were closed through the late

evening hours as flood waters were slow

to recede. At least 10 homes were

destroyed and around 300 sustained

damage. Communities in Culpeper,

Frederick, Greene, Orange Counties and

Manassas Park City also reported some

agricultural damage. The remnants of

Hurricane Jeanne brought flooding to

Northern Virginia on the 28th. The

flooding lasted from mid morning at

some sites through the late evening

hours. Numerous primary and secondary

roads were washed out. Three to four

feet of standing water was observed by

law enforcement personnel in inundated

areas. Augusta and Fauquier Counties

reported the highest rainfall totals, 7

inches and 6 to 8 inches respectively.

Harrisonburg (C)

Harrisonburg 0 0

Several roads flooded.

Staunton(C)

Staunton 0 0

Several roads flooded.

Waynesboro (C)

Waynesboro 0 0

Several roads flooded.

Page County

Luray 0 0

A few back roads under water.

Winchester (C)

Winchester 0 0

Several roads flooded. 3.18 inches of

rain reported.

Loudoun County

Middleburg 0 0

U.S. Route 50 closed due to flooding

along the Middleburg to Aldie corridor.

Many secondary roads in the area area

partially flooded and reduced to one

lane or less.

Clarke County

Berryville 0 0

Roads closed due to flooding.

Frederick County

Gore 0 0

U.S. Route 50 west of Winchester

closed, 3 to 4 feet of standing water

on the road. Interstate 81 was also

blocked by high water.

Winchester (C)

Winchester 0 0

Water covered the roads in several

locations around the city.

Fauquier County

Bealeton 0 0

Numerous primary and secondary roads

closed due to high water. Two secondary

roads washed out.

Shenandoah County

Woodstock 0 0

Several roads covered by water.

Warren County

Front Royal 0 0

Roads and side streets under water.

Greene County

Standardsville 0 0

Numerous roads closed due to high

water.

Madison County

Madison 0 0

Many roads closures throughout the

county due to flooding.

Rappahannock

County

Sperryville 0 0

Several roads closed due to high water.

Prince William

County

Gainesville 0 0

Numerous roads closed in the west and

central sections of the county.

Fairfax County

Vienna 0 0

Roads closed due to high water,

including three intersections along Lee

Highway.

Manassas (C)

Manassas 0 0

Roads covered by water.

VAZ025>026-

028>029-042

0 0

Several primary and secondary roads

under water.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

brought widespread flooding to Northern

Virginia on the 28th. The flooding

lasted from mid morning at some sites

through the late evening. Many primary

were under water and some secondary

roads were washed out. Three to four

feet of standing water on some major

roads were observed by law enforcement

personnel.

Albemarle County

1 E Howardsville 0 0

Water covering the roadway at the

intersection of Route 602 and Route

626.

VIRGINIA, Northwest

NONE REPORTED.

VIRGINIA, Southwest

VAZ022 0 0

At Roanoke, the Roanoke River rose

above the 10.5 foot flood stage and

crested at 12.72 feet at 02:15 am on

the 8th. This resulted in moderate

flooding.

VAZ012-022-024-033-

043 0 0

The remnants of Tropical Depression

Frances brought flooding rains to

portions of Southwest Virginia

September 8th.

Across Henry County, numerous creeks

and streams flooded, leading to road

closures. Some roads were damaged as

well by the floodwaters. A few homes

had water damage in their basements.

In Rockbridge County, as much as 9

inches of rain led to flooding of

creeks and streams. Roads were closed

due to high water in the Collierstown

and Natural Bridge areas. In addition

… five homes had to be evacuated near

Cave Mountain Lake due to flooding.

Around Roanoke County, including the

cities of Roanoke and Salem, flooding

of creeks resulted in water covered

roads and road closures. Voluntary

evacuations occurred at a trailer park

in Salem.

In Franklin County, as much as 5 to 6

inches of rain in 10 hours led to

flooding of many streams and creeks,

with numerous road closures and

evacuations. Both the Callaway

Elementary School and Callaway Fire

Department had to be evacuated due to

flooding of Greens Creek.

In Wythe County, heavy rains brought

flooding to many parts of the county

resulting in road closures.

Franklin County

Rocky Mt 0 0

Bedford County

Stewartsville 0 0

Campbell County

Evington

Buckingham County

2 WNW Gold Hill 0 0

The remnants of Tropical Depression

Frances brought a brief tornado, flash

flooding, and a few severe

thunderstorms to portions of Southwest

Virginia during the late morning and

early afternoon of the 8th.

In Buckingham County, an F0 tornado

briefly touched down 2 miles WNW of

Gold Hill, damaging and snapping

numerous trees.

In Bedford County, flash flooding near

Stewartsville closed Highway 619.

In Franklin County, a severe

thunderstorm brought down several trees

in Rocky Mount.

In Campbell County, a severe

thunderstorm downed trees across Route

683 near Evington.

VAZ044 0 0

At Danville, the Dan River rose above

the 17.0 foot flood stage at 01:00 am

on the 9th, and crested at 18.51 feet

at 15:00 pm on the 9th.

VAZ058 0 0

At South Boston, the Dan River rose

above the 19 foot flood stage at 01:00

am on the 10th and crested at 07:00 am

on on the 10th.

At Paces, the Dan River rose above the

20 foot flood stage around Midnight on

the 10th and crest at 20:17 feet at

04:15 am on the morning on the 10th.

VAZ047 0 0

At Bremo Bluff, the James River rose

above the 19 foot flood stage at 05:00

am on the 10th, cresting at 19.2 feet

at 07:00 am on the 10th. The river fell

below flood stage at 12:00 pm on the

10th.

Henry County

1 N Fieldale to 0 4

1 W Oak Level

A tornado touched down near Fieldale at

1104 EST. The F1 tornado crossed U.S.

Highway 220 turning over 2 tractor-

trailer trucks and 2 passenger

vehicles. All 4 drivers suffered minor

injuries. The tornado damage patch

widened to a quarter mile, and

strengthened to F2 as it approached and

struck a factory. At this location,

around 40 vehicles were severely

damaged or destroyed. The factory

experienced significant damage. The

tornado then proceeded north and

entered a residential subdivision, but

only minor roof and tree damage

occurred here. The tornado path became

intermittent as it continued north and

the damage was limited to trees. The

tornado crossed into Franklin County at

1114 EST.

Franklin County

2.8 ENE Henry to 0 0

2.5 NE Henry

The remnants of the Henry County

tornado briefly touched down at F0

strength as it crossed into Franklin

County. Damage was restricted to

several large trees, one of which

landed on a residential garage.

Bedford County

1.5 SE Stewartsville to 0 0

2 NE Stewartsville

At 1212 EST, an F0 tornado touched down

near Dickerson Road, and the width was

less than 50 yards. The tornado damage

path widened and varied from 100 yards

to as much as 300 yards, as it did

moderate to strong F1 damage to trees.

A few homes suffered only minor damage

to shingles and roofs, mainly due to

trees falling on them. As the F1

tornado crossed Highway 24 at 1215 EST,

it continued to damage trees, and was

about 75 yards wide. A poorly

constructed building was demolished. As

the tornado moved north, it continued

to down trees. Also, a car was pivoted

in a driveway but undamaged. Minor

structural and roof damage to homes

occurred, as the tornado increased to a

weak F2. The tornado weakened to F0 by

1217 EST, downing more trees along

County Road 619.

Pittsylvania County

.5 WNW Straightstone 0 0

.5 NW Straightstone

A short lived F0 tornado touched down

1/2 mile WNW of Straightstone, in a hay

field. About a quarter mile path was

found. No damage occurred.

Campbell County

3 ENE Rustburg to 0 0

3.5 NE Rustburg

At 1354 EST, a tornado touched down

along Bear Creek Road, 3 miles ENE of

Rustburg, causing minor damage. At 1356

EST, the tornado crossed Highway 24,

causing extensive tree damage. One tree

crushed a small car in a driveway.

Minor damage to homes, mainly shingles

and eaves. On the north side of Highway

24, the tornado blew the roof off of a

detached garage.

Campbell County

3.5 WSW Concord to 0 0

2.5 NW Concord

A tornado touched down on the east edge

of Long Mountain just before crossing

County Road 660. Fairly large trees

were snapped off or uprooted, but only

minor damage occurred to sheds. The

tornado proceeded to cross County Road

757, when the damage path became

narrower. An aluminum roof of a medium

sized shed was torn off and blown about

200 yards. A trampoline was blown up

across the roof of a two story house

and dropped about 200 yards away. From

that point the tornado tracked NNE and

produced tree damage, before lifting as

it crossed U.S. Highway 460.

Appomattox County

5 S Appomattox 0 0

Bedford County

7 NW Bedford City 0 0

Appomattox County

Stonewall 0 0

Campbell County

Rustburg 0 0

In Campbell County, trees were downed

on 2 vehicles.

In Appomattox County, many trees were

downed.

In Bedford County, many large trees

were downed, near Peaks of Otter.

Many trees were downed in Galax.

VAZ032 0 0

High winds on the backside of the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan, downed many

trees across Patrick County early in

the morning of the 18th. Some of the

trees downed were up to 12 inches in

diameter.

Patrick County

Stuart 0 0

Floyd County

Floyd 0 0

Franklin County

Boones Mill 0 0

Roanoke County

Countywide 0 0

Patrick County

Woolwine 0 0

Salem (C)

Salem (C) 0 0

Patrick County

Stuart 0 0

Patrick County

7 SW Stuart to 1 0

Stuart

M?MH

Bedford County

Countywide 0 0

The Remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

resulted in heavy rains which created

widespread flash flooding on 28th of

September in Floyd, Franklin, Patrick,

Bedford and Roanoke counties and the

City of Salem. One Fatality occurred 7

miles southwest of Stuart in Patricky

county at Dry Pond near the North

Carolina border. A Mobile home washed

off it foundation, one building washed

about 150 yards downstream and vehiles

washed away. Several roads were closed

due to flooding in Floyd, Franklin,

Patrick, Bedford and Roanoke counties.

Numerous creeks and rivers out of their

banks. Mudslides were reporteed in

Boone Mill, Franklin county where

southbound Route 220 closed from

Magodde Creek.

Pittsylvania County

7 NE Cascade to 0 1

4.5 S Callands

WASHINGTON, Northeast

NONE REPORTED.

WASHINGTON, Northwest

Pierce County

Graham 0 1 2K

Lightning struck a chain link fence

outside a mobile home. The lightning

traveled through the metal skirting

beneath a mobile home, damaging it and

injuring the woman inside.

Snohomish County

Brier 0 0 5K

A lightning strike destroyed a tree and

fried the electrical system in the

nearby home.

WASHINGTON, Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

WASHINGTON, Southwest

Clark County

1 W Ridgefield 0 0

A tornado ripped through the Ridgefield

Wildlife Refuge, lifting and damaging a

mobile home office, blowing down trees

and snapping large tree limbs. A tree

was blown down on top of a car.

Clark County

Ridgefield 0 0

Strong thunderstorms moved through

Clark county generating strong winds.

The Clark County Emergency Manager

reported numerous trees were blown down

at the Ridgefield Wildlife Refuge.

WEST VIRGINIA, East

Pendleton County

Central Portion 0 0

Several side roads covered by water.

Hampshire County

Southeast Portion 0 0

Many roads closed throughout the

county.

Hampshire County

Romney 0 0

Multiple road closured due to high

water.

Morgan County

Berkeley Spgs 0 0

Roads under water in Berkeley Springs.

The remnants of Hurricane Frances

brought flooding to the Panhandle of

West Virginia on the 8th. Several roads

in Pendleton, Hampshire, and Morgan

counties were under water.

Jefferson County

Middleway to 0 0 250K

2 N Middleway

An F1 tornado touched down in western

damage on a 2 mile stretch. Home

Jefferson County. The tornado produced

intermittent owners reported moderate

roof and siding damage and several

large, healthy trees felled.

Berkeley County

Darkesville to 0 6 25K

1.5 N Darkesville

A tornado touched down in Darkesville

in southern Berkeley County. The F2

tornado produced extensive structural

damage to homes and businesses in the

and vehicles on Interstate-81. At least

6 area. The storm traveled north and

toppled tractor trailers people were

injured from the automobile accidents.

Morgan County

Sleepy Creek to 0 0 25K

1 N Sleepy Creek

A brief tornado touched down in the

were downed Sleepy Creek area of

northeast Morgan County. Trees and

a tree fell on a residence. The storm

was on the ground for one half mile.

Berkeley County

Martinsburg 0 0

Back Creek rose out of its bank.

Several roads closed due to water

covering the roads.

Hampshire County

Capon Bridge 0 0

Roads reported washed out in the

eastern sections of Hampshire.

Morgan County

Berkeley Spgs 0 0

Several roads under water.

WVZ051>052 0 0

Several roads closed due to high water.

The remains of Hurricane Ivan brought

Counties. Widespread flooding of small

tornadoes across Jefferson, Berkeley,

and Morgan creeks/streams and primary

most of the West Virginia Panhandle. In

and secondary roads were reported by

emergency personnel for response, many

roads were closed through the late

evening hours.

Berkeley County

Inwood 0 0

Numerous roads flooded, including U.S.

Route 51 and U.S. Route 11.

Morgan County

Berkeley Spgs 0 0

Minor flooding of roadways.

Jefferson County

Charles Town 0 0

A few secondary roads flooded.

Hampshire County

Romney 0 0

Standing water on some secondary roads.

Hardy County

Moorefield 0 0

Several roads under water.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

brought widespread flooding to Eastern

West Virginia on the 28th. The flooding

lasted from mid morning at some sites

through late evening. Many secondary

and primary roads, including US Routes

51 and 11, were under water.

WEST VIRGINIA, North

WVZ002 0 0 15K

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Frances began early on the 8th and

ended early on the 9th. By 5 PM EDT on

8th, there was a mud slide on Pierce

Run Rd near Bethany; and Castlemans Run

Rd and Hukill Run Rd closed by

flooding. By 630 PM, widespread

flooding was reported, including Rte 2

in Beach Bottom, and Eldersville Rd in

McKinleyville. (FRANCES)

WVZ003 0 0 15K

At 630 PM EDT, roads were flooded in

West Liberty. By 9 PM, North Branch of

Short Creek had flooded 2 miles south

of Wheeling-Ohio County Airport (north

of Wheeling). Total rain: 4.5″ at

Wheeling. (FRANCES)

WVZ004 0 0 15K

At 650 PM EDT, Little Grave Creek

flooded Glenwood. By 750 PM, Boggs Run

Rd flooded in Benwood when a retaining

wall was washed out. By 922 PM, county

roads 34 and 54 were flooded near

Moundsville. (FRANCES)

WVZ001 0 0 20K

By 730 PM EDT, several basements were

flooded in Weirton near Kings Creek;

and Gas Valley Rd was closed by flood.

(FRANCES)

WVZ002 0 0 20M

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Ivan started the night of the 16th, and

ended just before midnight on the 17th.

At 1256 PM EDT, flooding was reported

at Bethany; several roads washed out.

At 130 PM, flooding began on Kings

Creek in Weirton. Force of water blew

out windows in the house nearest the

creek. Residents had never seen water

rise so fast before, nor flow so

swiftly. Citizen on personal water

craft rescued family from this house,

one at a time. At 330 PM on 17th, there

was mud slides and creek flooding in

Bethany. In Wellsburg, a mud slide

destroyed a house; water treatment

plant had major damage. About 11 PM EDT

on 17th, Buffalo Creek caused wide-

spread destruction in McKinleyville, a

town of 300. As of 9 AM on 18th,

several roads remained closed by flood.

In Brooke Co, total of 225 structures

damaged, mostly in Weirton. One school

and 2 fire departments had major

damage. Route 2 was closed by mud

slides, from Weirton to Wheeling. Other

roads flooded: Rte 67, Camp Run Rd, Pot

Rock Rd, Pierces Run, Grimms Lane,

Castlemans Run. Flooding on Ohio River:

Wellsburg rose to flood stage (36 ft)

at 3 AM EDT on 18th, crested 45.1 at

445 AM on 19th, and fell below flood

stage 2 AM EDT on 20th. Total rain:

about 7 inches. (IVAN)

WVZ001 0 0 36M

At 1257 PM EDT on 17th, Kings Creek

flooded in Weirton, where many

businesses wiped out by flooding on

Main St and Freedom Way. As of 9 AM EDT

on 18th, Rte 2 was still closed by mud

slides; several other roads remained

flooded. Total of 480 structures

damaged or destroyed. Route 2 closed by

mud slides from Weirton to Wheeling.

Other roads flooded or closed: Route

30, Kings Creek Rd, Shady Glen Rd. Most

small stream flooded ended by 7 PM on

18th, the Ohio River flood continued:

Wellsville rose above flood stage (11

ft) at 5 AM EDT on 18th, crested 19.0

ft 2 AM on 19th, and fell below flood

stage 7 PM EDT on 19th. New Cumberland

WV rose above flood stage (36 ft) at

330 AM EDT on 18th, crested 44.5 at 930

PM on 18th, and fell below flood stage

8 PM EDT on 19th. Total rain: 7 inches.

(IVAN)

WVZ004 1 0 4.7M

At 230 PM EDT on 17th, Boggs Run

flooded Benwood. By 9 PM on 18th,

around Moundsville, 5 roads remained

closed because of mud slides; and

flooding from Grave Creek was keeping 1

road closed. 79 structures damaged or

destroyed, including $1 million damage

to a school. One man was swept away and

found in Fish Creek. Most small stream

flooding ended by mid afternoon of the

18th, but flooding on the Ohio River

continued: Moundsville rose to flood

stage 1 AM EDT on 18th, crested 47.0 at

8 AM 19th, and fell below flood stage 8

AM 20th. Powhatan Point (OH) rose above

flood stage 2 AM on 18th, crested 45.6

at 9 AM 19th, and fell below flood

stage 9 AM EDT on 20th. Both have

official flood stages of 37 ft. Total

rain: 8.8 inches in Benwood. (IVAN)

M45 VE

WVZ003 0 0 40M

At 3 PM EDT on 17th, a trailer court

was washed away, about 5 miles north of

Wheeling, where Short Creek meets the

Ohio River. By 4 PM, many roads were

closed by flood around Wheeling, after

7.3 inches of rain. By 9 AM on 18th,

major flooding continued on creeks

emptying into the Ohio River. A total

of 599 structures, were damaged or

destroyed, including 1 school. Route 2

was closed by mud slides. Several

businesses suffered major damage from

flooding of Wheeling Creek, along Route

40, east of downtown Wheeling. Many

homes in Wheeling Island were flooded

well up into the first floor. Major

business establishment on south end of

Wheeling Island had much damage. Most

small stream flooded ended the evening

of the 19th, but flooding on the Ohio

River continued: Pike Island rose above

flood stage (37 ft) at 1230 AM EDT on

18th, crested 46.3 at 5 AM on 19th, and

fell below flood stage 4 AM EDT on

20th. Wheeling rose above flood stage

(36 ft) 1230 AM on 18th, crested 45.3

at 5 AM on 19th, and fell below flood

stage 5 AM EDT on 20th. Total rain: 9.9

inches near Wheeling. (IVAN)

WVZ012 0 0 7M

By 1 AM EDT on 18th, Rte 20 closed by

flood, from Reader to Folsom; and

intersection of Rtcs 7 and 20, south-

east of New Martinsville. Rte 2 closed

because of river flood. Entire 1st

floor of Valley High School damaged,

since it sits between 2 branches of

Fishing Creek. Several businesses in

New Martinsville suffered major damage.

Much flooding in southern half of

county. Total of 152 structures damaged

or destroyed. On the Ohio River,

Hannibal (OH) rose above flood stage

(35 ft) 4 AM EDT on 18th, crested at

41.1 at 9 AM on 19th, and fell below

flood stage 10 AM EDT on 20th. (IVAN)

WVZ021 0 0

By 158 AM EDT, many roads were closed

by flood in the Mannington area. Total

rain: 2.6 inches at Fairview. (IVAN)

WVZ022 0 0

By 2 AM EDT, numerous roads were closed

by flood from Wadestown to Blacksville.

Total rain: 3.5 inches at Jakes Run.

(IVAN)

WEST VIRGINIA, Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

WEST VIRGINIA, West

WVZ006>011-014 0 0 110K

Remnants of Hurricane Frances caused

about a 30 hour rainfall from the

afternoon of the 7th into the evening

of the 8th. The heaviest rains fell

along the Ohio River counties from dawn

to midday on the 8th. The low pressure

center passed from south to north,

through central West Virginia during

the late afternoon and early evening on

the 8th, before lifting into western

Pennsylvania.

Storm total rain amounts of 4 to 5

inches were common. A spotter in

Winfield reported a total of 5.6

inches. Cooperative observers at South-

side in Mason County, Pea Ridge in

Cabell County, and Ripley of Jackson

County all had 4.9 inches. Ripley

measured 4.8 inches. Middlebourne had

4.6 inches. Huntington airport had 4.5

inches, while the airport near

Parkersburg had 4.1 inches.

Since the ground was dry previous to

this event, small stream flooding was

mainly restricted to roads and the

usual lowest lying areas. In some urban

areas, the flooding was slightly more

significant. For example, Fourpole

Creek flooded Ritter Park and streets

in Huntington. Rivers remained within

their banks. However, this event set

the stage for more serious flooding, to

follow later in the month.

WVZ005>011-013-

015>017-024-027>028 0 0 110K

As the weakening Hurricane Ivan moved

inland across Alabama, light rain began

in southern West Virginia on the

morning of the 16th. The rain shield

moved into northern counties overnight.

Heavy rain began before dawn on the

17th around Huntington. The heavier

rain moved up the Ohio River counties

and engulfed the Ravenswood,

Parkersburg, and Sistersville vicinity

during the mid morning on the 17th. The

heavy rain continue along the Ohio

River counties into the mid afternoon,

before lifting north and east. The more

significant rain rates pivoted through

central West Virginia during the late

afternoon hours on the 17th before

diminishing to drizzle after dark that

evening. The low pressure remains of

Ivan moved northeast through eastern

Tennessee that afternoon, then through

southwest Virginia during the evening.

The storm moved off the coast during

the 18th.

A 30 to 36 hour duration event dumped

3.5 to 6 inches of rain. The upper

range was concentrated along the Ohio

River counties from Huntington through

Parkersburg. A secondary maximum in the

rain ran south from Parkersburg into

northern Kanawha County. Preliminary

storm totals from cooperative observers

had R C Byrd Lock and Dam with 5.9

inches, Elizabeth 5.0 inches, Wayne 4.9

inches, Sandyville 4.8 inches, downtown

Huntington 4.7 inches, downtown

Parkersburg 4.6 inches, Ripley 4.5

inches, Charleston 4.2 inches,

Huntington and Parkersburg airports 4.1

inches, and Middlebourne with 3.8

inches.

Since the remains of Hurricane Frances

were just 8 days prior to this rain,

small stream flooding was more signifi-

cant with the remnants of Ivan. Some of

the same streams went higher than

earlier in the month. Residents of

Enslow Park in Huntington, for example,

were evacuated due to flooding from

Fourpole Creek. Many secondary roads

were blocked and closed by small stream

flooding during the afternoon and early

evening on the 17th. Kanawha Twomile

flooded Bonham Elementary School in

Kanawha County with 1 to 2.5 feet of

water. Maintenance men for the school

had to scramble up a ladder to the

school roof, to wait out the high

water. One of the workers said, “almost

like a flip of your finger, that’s how

fast it happened. It was unreal.”

During that Friday evening the 17th, a

32 year old male was walking west of

Harts in Lincoln County and fell into

swollen Frances Creek. He drowned and

his body was discovered the next day.

Preliminary findings from a state

police investigation indicated the man

was under the influence of either

alcohol or illegal drugs.

Most of the small stream flooding

receded by late Friday evening the

17th. However, even heavier rain fell

over the northern panhandle of West

Virginia into western Pennsylvania.

Rain amounts of 6 to 8 inches were more

common there. As a result, the main

stem of the Ohio River rose 1 to 2 feet

per hour during the evening of the 17th

in the Sistersville to Parkersburg

vicinity. For example, at Parkersburg

the Ohio River rose from 25.6 feet at

1600E to 33.0 feet at 2200E on the

17th. A slower but steady rise

continue into Saturday the 18th.

Moderate to major river flooding

occurred on the 18th and 19th from the

Sistersville vicinity on down through

Saint Marys, Williamstown, Vienna,

Parkersburg, Ravenswood, and Point

Pleasant. The flood wall protected the

city of Parkersburg. Backwater also

caused flooding, sometimes a few miles

from the Ohio River. One example, was

along the lower reaches of the Little

Kanawha River in Wood County. The crest

on the Ohio River dampened below the

mouth of the Kanawha River, with mostly

minor river flooding through Huntington

and Kenova.

Specific crests include Willow Island

Lock and Dam 44.8 feet, Marietta 2SW

42.4 feet, Parkersburg 43.7 feet,

Belleville Lock and Dam 45.8 feet,

Racine Lock and Dam 50.2 feet, Point

Pleasant 44.6 feet, R C Byrd Lock and

Dam 51 feet, and Huntington 51.3 feet.

At Parkersburg, the crest was the

highest level in 40 years. Back in

March 1964, the river reached 45.2 feet

at Parkersburg.

A FEMA disaster was declared. See

declaration 1558 for details. However,

the worst damage in West Virginia with

this disaster was in the northern pan-

handle counties, compared to further

south. In terms of damage to housing,

Tyler County had 5 destroyed and 19

with major damage. Pleasants County had

21 homes destroyed and 10 homes with

major damage. Wood County reported

several hundred homes affected. The Red

Cross reported 19 homes destroyed in

Wood County. Wirt County had 21 homes

destroyed and 10 with major damage.

Jackson County had 14 homes with major

damage. Mason County had no homes

destroyed, with around 50 dwellings

affected. Cabell County reported 5

homes with major damage. Wayne County

had 8 homes with major damage. Mingo

County saw 15 homes with major damage.

Kanawha County reported 8 homes des-

troyed and 12 homes with major damage.

Tyler County reported around 30 busi-

nesses destroyed and 8 with major

damage. Repairs to the Barboursville

sewage system were around $200,000.

WISCONSIN, Northeast

Oconto County

5 NNE Mountain 0 0

Marinette County

Beaver to 0 0

1 E Pound

Marinette County

4 W Peshtigo to 0 0

Peshtigo

Oconto County

4 W Oconto 0 0

Thunderstorms developed in unstable air

ahead of an approaching cold front.

These storms produced large hail as

they moved across northeast Wisconsin.

One of the storms dropped 2 inch

diameter hail as it passed through

Beaver (Marinette co.).

Brown County

Green Bay 0 0

Lightning caused a fire that did signi-

ficant damage to a 70 foot tall church

steeple in Green Bay. A church official

declined to give a damage estimate when

contacted by the National Weather

Service.

WIZ005-010-038 0 0 3.3K

Strong winds, associated with an

intense low pressure system, downed

trees and power lines across parts of

north-central and east-central

Wisconsin. One of the downed trees

landed on a vehicle in Appleton

(Outagamie co.).

WISCONSIN, Northwest

WIZ001>004-006>009 0 0 8K

Strong gradient winds toppled trees and

caused power outages across north-

western Wisconsin.

WISCONSIN, Southeast

WIZ052-059>060 0 0

Dense fog developed during the over-

night hours and lowered visibilities to

below 1/4 mile. At times, visibilities

were down to 50 feet in locations bet-

ween West Bend and Germantown in

Washington County. School bus rides and

local aviation traffic were delayed,

and travel on main roads and inter-

states slowed down considerably. Off

shore, the dense fog persisted over the

Lake Michigan waters until about

1300CST. Fair skies and a light south-

east wind off Lake Michigan were

factors in this dense fog event.

Sheboygan County

Plymouth 0 0 5K

A thunderstorm pulsed to minimal severe

weather limits and toppled some large

trees and power lines.

Lafayette County

Argyle 0 0 10K

An isolated severe storm, embedded in a

cluster of general thunderstorms,

generated locally powerful downburst

thunderstorm winds in the Arygle area.

About a dozen large trees and some

power lines were toppled. The time is

estimate, with the event taking place

sometime between 1100 and 1300CST.

WISCONSIN, Southwest

Juneau County

10 N Mauston 0 0

Law enforcement officials reported

nickel size hail between Mauston and

Necedah.

Taylor County

Medford 0 0

WISCONSIN, West

Dunn County

2 E Wheeler 0 0

A funnel cloud was reported by a

trained spotter on Highway 170.

Polk County

1 SE Horse Creek 0 0

Trees were downed on West Church Rd.

The time was estimated.

WISCONSIN, West

Pierce County

6 SSW Ellsworth to 0 0

5 S Ellsworth

A tornado touched down in an open

field, then moved into a wooded grove

where it broke a few trees, then

dissipated.

Polk County

2 NE Balsam Lake 0 0

Trees were downed on 120th St. in

Milltown Township. The time was

estimated.

St. Croix County

1 NW Wilson to 0 0

2 S Glenwood City

A funnel cloud was reported by the fire

department near the intersection of

Highway 128 and Highway 12 just west of

Wilson. The same funnel was spotted by

the fire department 2 miles south of

Glenwood City.

Barron County

6 WNW Prairie Farm 0 0

A tornado touched down briefly,

breaking several trees and destroying a

shed.

St. Croix County

Hudson 0 0

WYOMING, Central and West

WYZ017

0 9 1M

A human caused fire was started near

Goes In Lodge Road on the Wind River

Indian Reservation south of Riverton

during the afternoon. The fire threat-

ened urban areas on the south side of

Riverton by late afternoon. The fire

was fueled by dry southwesterly wind

that gusted between 30 and 35 mph at

times. A total of nine people were

treated for minor injuries and smoke

inhalation. The fire claimed 300 acres,

four campers, 33 vehicles on a used car

lot, and a mobile home used for

storage. Damage totaled around one

million dollars before the fire was

extinguished.

Fremont County

Milford 0 0

WYOMING, Extreme Southwest

NOT RECEIVED.

WYOMING, North Central

NONE REPORTED.

WYOMING, Northeast

Weston County

16 SW Upton 0 0 0 0

A weak tornado reached the ground at

times over open land. No damage was

reported.

Weston County

8 NE Rochelle 0 0 0 0

Several reports of a weak tornado on

the ground between 1300 and 1310 LST.

The tornado remained over open areas

and caused no damage.

WYOMING, Southeast

Niobrara County

Lance Creek 0 0

Location Character of Storm

ALABAMA, Central

Pike County

Countywide Flash Flood

Slow moving thunderstorms dropped

several inches of rain across Pike

County in a short period of time. Major

street flooding was reported in the

city of Troy around 7 pm and continued

across the area for the next hour or

so.

ALZ046-048>050 Strong Wind

Remnants of Hurricane Frances moved

northward mainly along the Alabama and

Georgia state line Strong winds of 30

to 40 mph along with saturated ground

conditions allowed several trees and

power lines to be blown down.

ALZ021-036-045-047 Strong Wind

Remnants of Hurricane Frances moved

northward mainly across the eastern

counties of Central Alabama. Strong

winds of 30 to 40 mph along with

saturated ground conditions allowed

several trees and power lines to be

blown down.

ALZ020 Strong Wind

Remnants of Hurricane Frances moved

northward near the Alabama and Georgia

state line. Strong winds of 30 to 40

mph along with saturated ground

conditions allowed several trees and

power lines to be blown down.

ALZ028>029-037>038 Strong Wind

Remnants of Hurricane Frances moved

northward near the Alabama and Georgia

state line. Strong winds of 30 to 40

mph along with saturated ground

conditions allowed several trees and

power lines to be blown down.

ALZ043 Strong Wind

A few trees were downed from the

Remnants of Frances. One tree fell on

a vehicle injuring the occupant.

Lamar County

Millport Hail (0.88)

Nickel size hail was reported in the

city of Millport.

Jefferson County

Birmingham Arpt Heavy Rain

The daily rainfall associated with the

tropical system Ivan was 9.75 inches.

This broke the previous daily rainfall

record at the Birmingham International

Airport of 8.84 inches which was

established in 1916.

Montgomery County

(Mgm)Montgomery Arp Heavy Rain

The daily rainfall associated with the

tropical system Ivan was 5.07 inches.

This broke the previous daily rainfall

record at Dannelly Field of 2.18

inches which was established in 1971.

Pike County

1 E Troy Tornado (F0)

A brief weak tornado was reported just

east of Troy. Several trees were blown

down over a short distance. This weak

tornado was associated with an outer

rain band of the tropical system Ivan.

Approximate brief touchdown location

31.80N/85.97W.

Barbour County

2 S Clio Tornado (F0)

A brief weak tornado was reported

across the extreme southwest portion

of Barbour County. Several trees were

knocked down. This weak tornado was

associated with an outer rain band of

the tropical system Ivan. Approximate

brief touchdown location 31.71N/85.68W.

Pike County

13 E Troy Tornado (F0)

A brief weak tornado was reported cast

of Troy. Several trees were blown down

at the touchdown spot. This weak

tornado was associated with an outer

rain band of the tropical system Ivan.

Approximate location 31.78N/85.74W.

Montgomery County

5 E Snowdoun Tornado (F0)

A brief weak tornado was reported east

of Snowdoun. Several trees were blown

down. This weak tornado was associated

with an outer rain band of the tropical

system Ivan. Approximate location

32.23N/86.23W.

ALZ050 High Wind (G60)

Barbour County

Countywide Flash Flood

A few hundred trees and power lines

were knocked down or blown over

countywide. At least 200 residences

received varying degrees of roof

damage. Several homes were without

power three to four days. Maximum

wind gusts were estimated around 70

miles an hour within one of Ivan’s

outer-rainbands. Doppler radar

estimated 3 to 5 inches of rain across

the county associated with Ivan. A few

roads were covered with water in the

southwest part of the county and were

temporarily impassable.

ALZ046 High Wind (G70)

Bullock County

Countywide Flash Flood

Thousands of trees and power lines were

snapped off or blown down across the

county. Hundreds of homes suffered

varying degrees of wind damage. Maximum

wind gusts were estimated around 80

miles an hour within one of Ivan’s

outer rainbands. Doppler radar

estimated 3 to 5 inches of rain

associated with Ivan and a few roads

were flooded in western Bullock County.

ALZ042 High Wind (G77)

Thousands of trees and power lines

were snapped off or blown down

countywide. Utilities were not all

restored for at least a week. Several

dozen homes sustained varying degrees

of wind damage. Debris removal took

over a month in spots. Maximum wind

gusts were estimated around 90 miles

an hour.

ALZ044 High Wind (G65)

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

snapped off or blown down during Ivan.

At least 3300 homes sustained varying

degrees of wind damage. Power was not

fully restored for at least a week.

Maximum wind gusts were estimated

around 75 miles an hour. Three women

in Montgomery were killed due to carbon

monoxide poisoning after Ivan. The

women had a generator running in their

home because the power was out of

service.

ALZ049 High Wind (G65)

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

snapped off or blown down across the

entire county. Power remained out of

service for around one week in places.

At least 400 homes suffered some type

of wind damage. Maximum wind gusts

were estimated around 75 miles an hour.

ALZ048 High Wind (G56)

Russell County

Countywide Flash Flood

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

blown down across the county. Power was

not fully restored in some locations

for 4 days. At least 100 homes suffered

some form of wind damage, mainly roof

damage. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 65 miles an hour.

Doppler radar and ground observations

indicate up to 4 inches of rain fell

in a short period of time. This

produced temporary flooding of some

roadways. One road sustained major

damage as it was washed out.

Barbour County

8 E Clayton Tornado (F0)

A brief weak tornado was reported east

of Clayton. Several trees were knocked

down. This weak tornado was associated

with an outer rain band of the tropical

system Ivan. Approximate location

31.91N/85.30W.

Macon County

9 SE Tuskegee Tornado (F0)

A brief weak tornado was reported near

Tuskegee. Several trees were blown

down. This weak tornado was associated

with an outer rain band of the tropical

system Ivan. Approximate location

32.32N/85.52W.

ALZ041 High Wind (G71)

Autauga County

Countywide Flash Flood

Thousands of trees and power lines

were snapped off or blown down as

Hurricane Ivan moved Across Central

Alabama. Hundreds of homes suffered

varying degrees of roof and structural

damage. At least 800 households were

displaced for at least one night due

to hurricane damage. At least 8000

customers were without power at the

height of the storm. Several residences

were without power for up to 5 days.

At least 75 farming operations

requested aide due to wind damage.

Many roadways were impassable due to

fallen trees. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 80 miles an hour.

Doppler radar estimated 5 to 7 inches

of rain during the event which caused

a few roads to flood and become

temporarily impassable.

ALZ040 High Wind (G80)

Dallas County

Countywide Flash Flood

Thousands of trees and power lines

were blown down across the entire

county. At least 45,000 customers were

without power during the height of the

storm. Some locations did not have

power restored for a week and a half.

At least 10 homes were totally

destroyed and another 400 homes were

damaged. Fallen trees blocked every

roadway in the county. Maximum wind

gust were estimated around 90 miles an

hour. Doppler radar and ground

observations indicate 6 to 9 inches of

rain fell across Dallas County during

Ivan. One minor mudslide occurred due

to the heavy rain and a few roads were

temporarily impassable due to high

water. One relief worker suffered

minor injuries during the cleanup

operations.

ALZ043 High Wind (G62)

Elmore County

Countywide Flash Flood

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

knocked down across Elmore County.

Numerous homes sustained varying

degrees of roof damage. At least 8000

customers were without power during

the height of the storm. The power was

not fully restored for 7 days in some

locations. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 70 miles an hour.

Doppler radar estimated up to 5 inches

of rain during the tropical system. A

few creeks and roads were temporarily

impassable, but the trees blocking

roadways were much more significant.

ALZ047 High Wind (G60)

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

blown down across Lee County. At least

8000 customers were without power

during the height of the storm. Power

was not restored in all locations for

at least 3 days. At least 25 homes

suffered major damage and another

100 or more homes reported moderate

damage. Many more homes and structures

received minor damage. Maximum wind

gusts were estimated around 70 miles

an hour.

ALZ045 High Wind (G60)

Macon County

Countywide Flash Flood

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

blown down across the county. At least

300 homes suffered varying degrees of

wind damage. Power was restored to

most locations within two days. Debris

removal took up to two weeks. Doppler

radar and ground observations indicate

up to 5 inches of rain fell across

Macon County during Ivan. A few roads

and creeks were briefly flooded.

Maximum wind gusts were estimated

around 70 miles an hour.

ALZ039 High Wind (G80)

Thousands of trees and power lines

were blown down or snapped off during

Ivan. Several hundred homes or

structures received varying degrees of

wind damage. Numerous roadways were

blocked from fallen trees making them

temporarily impassable. Power was

was not fully restored for at least a

week in spots. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 90 miles an hour.

ALZ030 High Wind (G73)

Thousands of trees and power lines

were blown down with the most

significant damage in the southern

part of the county. At least 5500

customers were without power for up to

two weeks. Several hundred homes and

structures received varying degrees of

wind damage. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 85 miles an hour. One

man was killed by an allergic reaction

to bee stings. He was unable to phone

emergency personnel because the power

was out.

ALZ031 High Wind (G77)

Thousands of trees and power lines were

blown down countywide. At least 3300

customers were without power at the

height of the storm. Some locations

did not get power back for a week.

Twenty five to fifty homes suffered

significant damage and many more

sustained minor roof damage. Maximum

wind gusts were estimated around 90

miles an hour.

ALZ032 High Wind (G77)

Thousands of trees and power lines

were blown down or snapped off during

Ivan. Several hundred homes or

structures received varying degrees of

wind damage. At least 200 trees

blocked roadways making them

temporarily impassable. Power was not

fully restored for at least a week in

spots. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 90 miles an hour.

ALZ033 High Wind (G78)

Thousands of trees and power lines

were snapped off or blown down. At

least 1100 customers were without

power. Power was not completely

restored in some spots for two weeks.

Several hundred homes and mobile homes

were damaged. Many county roads were

blocked and impassable due to fallen

trees. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 90 miles an hour.

ALZ034 High Wind (G56)

Bibb County

Countywide Flash Flood

At least one hundred trees and power

lines were blown down across Bibb

County during Hurricane Ivan. At least

150 households were impacted with

varying degrees of wind damage. Three

homes suffered extensive damage.

Maximum wind gusts were estimated

around 65 miles an hour. Doppler radar

estimated 5 to 7 inches of rain during

Ivan which caused a few roads in

southern Bibb County to become

temporarily impassable.

ALZ038 High Wind (G52)

Chambers County

Countywide Flash Flood

Numerous trees and power lines were

blown down across the county. Maximum

wind gusts were estimated around 60

miles an hour within one of Ivan’s

outer rainbands. At least 8000

customers were without power during

the storm. J.P. Powell Middle School

had part of its roof blown off. Doppler

radar and ground observations indicate

3 to 5 inches of rain fell in

association with Ivan. A few roadways

became temporarily impassable due to

high water.

ALZ035

High Wind (G61)

Chilton County

Countywide Flash Flood

Thousands of trees were blown down

across Chilton County. Five structures

were heavily damaged and around

another 150 suffered minor roof damage.

At least 100 agricultural businesses

sustained damage. Maximum wind gusts

were estimated around 70 miles an

hour. Doppler radar and ground

observations indicate 6 to 9 inches of

rain fell across the county during

Ivan. Several roadways were temporarily

impassable due to high water but even

more roads were affected by fallen

trees.

ALZ037 High Wind (G60)

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

snapped off or blown down across the

county. The most significant damage

occurred across the southern and

eastern sides of the county. Power was

not fully restored for at least 3

days. At least 75 homes and structures

were damaged to some degree by Ivan.

Maximum wind gusts were estimated

around 70 miles an hour. In the

southern part of the county, a man was

seriously cut by a chain saw while

clearing debris.

ALZ036 High Wind (G54)

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

blown down across the area. At least

1000 customers were without power

during the tropical system. The power

was not restored in all locations for

at least 5 days. Two homes were totally

destroyed and at least 12 more homes

suffered varying degrees of wind

damage. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 65 miles an hour.

Doppler radar and ground observations

indicate as much as 4 to 5 inches of

rain fell across parts of Coosa

County, but no flooding was reported.

A woman, around the age of 40, died

when she fell into a well retrieving

water. She was at the well because the

utilities were out of service.

ALZ028 High Wind (G50)

Clay County

Countywide Flash Flood

Hundreds of trees were knocked down

countywide due to Ivan. Twenty to

thirty homes sustained varying degrees

of wind damage. Maximum wind gust were

estimated between 55 and 65 miles an

hour. Doppler radar and ground

observations indicate up to 5 inches

of rain fell during the tropical

system. At least 20 county roads were

temporarily impassable due to high

water.

ALZ024 High Wind (G60)

Jefferson County

Countywide Flash Flood

Hundreds of trees were blown down

across all of Jefferson County. The

power was not fully restored in all

locations for at least 7 days. Over

500 homes sustained varying degrees of

wind damage. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 70 miles an hour.

Doppler radar and ground observations

indicated 6 to 9 inches of rain fell

in association with Ivan. At least 250

homes suffered water damage due to

flooding. Many creeks and roadways

were flooded and were temporarily

impassable.

ALZ022 High Wind (G56)

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

knocked down in association with Ivan.

Power outages lasted as long as 5 days

in some locations. Hundreds of homes

suffered varying degrees of wind

damage. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 65 miles an hour.

ALZ029 High Wind (G56)

Randolph County

Countywide Flash Flood

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

knocked down across the county. At

least 5500 customers were without

power and the power was not fully

restored in a few places for 2 to 3

days. One home was totally destroyed

and 10 to 20 others received mainly

minor damage. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 65 miles an hour.

Doppler radar and ground observations

indicate as much as 5 inches of rain

fell during Ivan. A few homes received

minor water damage and one road was

washed out.

ALZ025 High Wind (G62)

Shelby County

Countywide Flash Flood

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

blown down across the county due to

the tropical system Ivan. Twenty to

thirty homes suffered varying degrees

of damage, mainly roof damage. Power

was not completely restored for at

least 4 days. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 70 miles an hour.

Doppler radar and ground observations

indicate up to 8 inches of rain fell

across Shelby County Associated with

Ivan. Several area roads and creeks

flooded and several homes sustained

flood damage. A male employee of

Alabama Power was killed during the

storm recovery efforts near Lay Dam.

ALZ027 High Wind (G60)

Talladega County

Countywide Flash Flood

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

blown down across the county. The most

significant damage occurred throughout

southern areas of the county. At least

12,000 customers were without power at

the height of the storm. It took at

least three days to restore all the

power. Thirty to fifty homes and

structures were damaged. In Talladega,

one woman injured her shoulder when a

tree fell through the roof of her home.

In Sylacauga, a man was injured when a

tree limb fell on his head. Maximum

wind gusts were estimated around 70

miles an hour. Doppler radar and ground

observations indicate up to 7 inches

of rain fell during Ivan. A few

roadways were covered with water and

temporarily impassable.

ALZ023 High Wind (G56)

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

blown down countywide. At least 28,000

customers were without power at the

height of the storm. Power was not

fully restored for at least 4 days.

Twenty to twenty five homes suffered

varying degrees of wind damage.

Thousands of homes sustained minor

damage. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 65 miles an hour.

ALZ017 High Wind (G50)

Blount County

Countywide Flash Flood

Numerous trees and power lines were

knocked down from Ivan’s high winds

across the county. Ten to twenty homes

suffered varying degrees of damage,

mainly minor roof damage. Maximum wind

gusts were estimated between 55 to 60

miles an hour. Doppler radar estimated

4 to 7 inches of rain during Ivan

which caused a few roads to become

temporarily impassable.

ALZ019 High Wind (G50)

Calhoun County

Countywide Flash Flood

Hundreds, if not thousands, of trees

and power lines were blown down

countywide. Only 3 or 4 homes suffered

significant damage, while 30 to 50

homes received mainly minor roof

damage. Maximum wind gust were

estimated between 55 and 65 miles an

hour. Doppler radar and ground

observations indicate 3 to 5 inches of

rain fell across the area associated

with Ivan. A few roadways became

temporarily impassable but more roads

were blocked by fallen trees.

ALZ020 High Wind (G52)

Cherokee County

Countywide Flash Flood

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

knocked down areawide. At least three

homes sustained significant damage and

many more suffered minor roof damage.

Maximum wind gust were estimated

around 60 miles an hour. At least 8000

customers were without power at the

height of the storm. Several roadways,

creeks, and homes were flooded due to

the torrential rain. Doppler radar and

ground observations indicate as much

as 6 inches of rain fell in association

with Ivan.

ALZ021 High Wind (G50)

Cleburne County

Countywide Flash Flood

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

blown down across the county. At least

10 homes suffered moderate damage with

many more reporting minor roof damage.

The debris removal took two weeks in

some locations. Power was restored to

most of the county in 24 hours.

Maximum wind gust were estimated

between 55 and 65 miles an hour.

Several roadways and creeks were

flooded due to the torrential rain.

One creek bridge suffered damage.

Doppler radar and ground observations

indicate as much as 6 inches of rain

fell in association with Ivan.

ALZ018 High Wind (G52)

Etowah County

Countywide Flash Flood

Numerous trees and power lines were

blown down across the county. Several

homes suffered mainly roof damage.

Power was not fully restored for at

least 2 days. The Etowah County

Emergency Management Agency recorded

a wind gust of 57 miles an hour

during Ivan. Peak wind gusts across

the county were around 60 miles an

hour. Doppler radar and ground

observations indicate up to 6 inches

of rain occurred during the tropical

system. A few roads were temporarily

impassable due to high water.

ALZ013 High Wind (G50)

At least one hundred trees and power

lines were blown down during the

tropical system. Utilities were not

restored for 5 to 6 days in places.

At least 5 homes sustained moderate

damage and several more suffered minor

damage. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated between 50 and 60 miles

an hour.

ALZ012 High Wind (G52)

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

blown down during the tropical system.

At least 64 roadways were blocked by

fallen trees and were temporarily

impassable. At least 22 homes were

damaged and 4 of those homes suffered

major damage. Most of the power outages

were restored within 12 hours, but a

few spots did not receive power back

for 4 days. One person was slightly

injured when their automobile ran into

a fallen tree. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 60 miles an hour.

ALZ011 High Wind (G65)

Marion County

Countywide Flash Flood

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

blown down areawide. At least 10 homes

were totally destroyed and another 50

homes were damaged. Power was not

restored in all areas for at least a

week and a half. Maximum wind gusts

were estimated around 65 miles an

Doppler radar and ground observations

indicate 4 to 5 inches of rain fell in

association with Ivan. Numerous roads

were flooded and were temporarily

impassable.

St. Clair County

Countywide Flash Flood

ALZ026 High Wind (G52)

Numerous trees and power lines were

blown down across St. Clair County.

Thirty to forty homes sustained mainly

minor roof damage. Power outages

affected some locations for 3 days.

Maximum wind gusts were estimated

around 60 miles an hour. Doppler radar

and ground observations indicate parts

of St. Clair received up to 7 inches

of rain. This heavy rainfall produced

flooding of several roadways and

flooded some businesses in Springville.

ALZ015 High Wind (G52)

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

blown down during Ivan. At least

28,000 customers were without power.

Power was not fully restored for three

or four days. Fifty to one hundred

homes suffered varying degrees of wind

damage. Maximum wind gusts were

estimated around 60 miles an hour.

ALZ014 High Wind (G52)

Hundreds of trees and power lines were

blown down during Ivan. Power was not

fully restored for three or four days.

Numerous homes suffered varying degrees

of wind damage. Maximum wind gusts

were estimated around 60 miles an hour.

ALABAMA, North

Colbert County

Muscle Shoals Flash Flood

Flash flooding was reported with

several inches of water over area

roads.

Lauderdale County

Florence Flash Flood

Flash flooding was reported in Florence

with several streets with several

inches of water over the roads.

ALZ001>010-016 High Wind (G50)

A tree fell on a truck and killed the

driver along Alabama Highway 207 at

Anderson in eastern Lauderdale county.

Cullman County

Countywide Flash Flood

Flash flooding was observed as several

low spots flooded on county road eight

and on county road 1718.

Madison County

Countywide Flash Flood

Flash flooding was reported across

much of the county with several roads

throughout the county with flooded

roads and several inches of water over

them.

Lawrence County

Countywide Flash Flood

Flooding was reported throughout the

county with several inches of water

reported over area roads.

Limestone County

Countywide Flash Flood

Flooding was reported throughout

the county.

Morgan County

Countywide Flash Flood

Numerous reports of flash flooding were

received throughout Morgan county.

Several roads had water at least six

to eight inches over them.

Marshall County

Countywide Flash Flood

Flash flooding was reported throughout

the county as several roads had several

inches of water over them.

Colbert County

Countywide Flash Flood

Widespread flash flooding was reported

throughout the county. Several inches

of water was reported over many roads

throughout the county.

Franklin County

Countywide Flash Flood

Widespread flash flooding was reported

countywide. Several inches of water

was reported over many county roads.

Lauderdale County

Countywide Flash Flood

Widespread flash flooding was reported

throughout the county. Several roads

had several inches of water over them.

Dekalb County

Countywide Flash Flood

Flash flooding was reported across the

county with several roads with several

inches of water standing.

Jackson County

Countywide Flash Flood

Numerous reports of flash flooding were

received with water over several roads

several inches in depth.

Dekalb County

5 N Ft Payne to Flash Flood

Ft Payne

Several inches of water was reported

across the road near Desoto State

Park.

ALABAMA, Southeast

ALZ065>069 Tropical Storm

Hurricane Ivan weakened to a tropical

storm as it moved north into southwest

Alabama on September 16. The maximum

sustained and peak wind gust recorded

was 44 and 54 knots, respectively, at

Dothan, AL. The lowest sea-level

pressure was 1000 mb at Dothan.

Rainfall amounts were quite heavy,

ranging from five to eight inches.

Minor flooding was reported in Coffee,

Geneva, and Houston counties. Schools

and many businesses were closed on

September 16 and 17. An estimated

50,000 customers were without power,

including 20 percent of Dothan. There

were numerous reports of roads closed

by fallen trees and power lines. In

Coffee County, many county roads were

closed and several trees fell on

houses and vehicles. Some businesses

were damaged in Enterprise. Several

trees fell on vehicles and houses, and

damaged two businesses in Dothan. In

Geneva County, several mobile homes

were destroyed in Hartford. Cotton

farmers suffered significant yield

losses, especially in Coffee and

Geneva counties, which will be

realized at the time of the autumn

harvest. Coffee and Geneva counties

were declared federal disaster areas.

ALABAMA, Southwest

ALZ051>064 Hurricane/Typhoon

Hurricane Ivan affected the region from

September 13 through the 16th. The

coastal areas were put under a

hurricane watch at 900 PM CST on

September 13. The area was put under a

hurricane warning at 300 PM CST on

September 14. The hurricane warning

was dropped at 900 AM CST on September

16 and we were put under a tropical

storm warning. The tropical storm

warning was dropped at 300 PM CST on

September 16.

Ivan made landfall around 100 AM CST

near Gulf Shores, Alabama on September

16. An interesting note, as Ivan

approached the Alabama coast during the

day on the 15th, a buoy just south of

the Alabama coastal waters recorded a

peak wave height of 52 feet, before

breaking loose of its mooring. This

was one of the highest wave heights

ever observed.

Some of the winds recorded across

Southwest Alabama were as

follows: Mobile Regional Airport,

sustained wind of 51 knots from the

north with a peak gust of 65 knots

from the north northeast. Dauphin

Island, sustained wind of 61 knots

from the cast with a gust of 89 knots

from the northeast. USS Alabama,

located off the Mobile Bay causeway,

peak gust 91 knots (site is more than

100 feet high). Fairhope, peak gust

63 knots. Semmes, peak gust 51 knots.

Grand Bay, peak gust 62 knots. WKRG in

Mobile, peak gust 64 knots. Wallace

Tunnel in Mobile, peak gust 51 knots.

Gulf Shores Airport, sustained winds

73 knots with a peak gust of 100 knots

(Doppler on Wheels site). Fairhope,

sustained wind 59 knots with a peak

gust of 77 knots (Doppler on wheels).

Some of the winds across Northwest

Florida were as follows: Pensacola

Naval Air Station, sustained wind of

76 knots from the southeast with a

gust of 93 knots from the southeast.

Pensacola Regional Airport, sustained

wind of 67 knots from the southeast

with a peak gust of 87 knots. West

Pensacola, peak gust 84 knots.

Pensacola, sustained wind 70 knots

with a peak gust of 92 knots

(Doppler on wheels). Pace, sustained

wind of 73 knots with a peak gust of

87 knots (Air Products location–about

160 feet high). Escambia county EMA

office peak gust 90 knots. Eglin Air

Force Base sites; 2 SW of Mary Esther,

peak gust 103 knots (200 feet high).

10 S Harold, peak gust 78 knots. 10 N

Mary Esther, peak gust 75 knots. 5 NE

Seminole, peak gust 75 knots.

ALABAMA, Southwest

Some of the lowest sea level pressures

were as follows: In Alabama: Fairhope

947.9 MB. Mobile Regional Airport

964.4 MB. Brookley Field (Mobile) 956.0

MB. Semmes 967.5 MB. Dauphin Island

952.7 MB.

In Florida: Pensacola Regional Airport

970.2 MB. Pensacola Naval Air Station

965.8 MB. 5 S Harold 981.4 MB.

Two day rainfall totals ending at

midnight on September 16 were as

follows: In Alabama: Mobile Regional

Airport (MOB) 5.56 inches. Coden 6.30

inches. Evergreen 7.25 inches. Alberta

6.85 inches. Semmes 5.00 inches.

Daphne 7.5 inches. Andalusia 9.96

inches. 2 S Mobile 9.90 inches.

Silverhill 10.16 inches. Robertsdale

9.35 inches. Spanish Fort 8.00 inches.

In Florida: Pensacola Naval Air Station

(NPA) 8.00 inches. Pensacola (WEAR TV)

15.79 inches. Crestview 8.40 inches.

Fort Walton Beach 6.06 inches. Munson

6.5 inches. Niceville 6.55 inches.

Eglin Air Force Base (VPS) 7.43 inches.

10 S Mossy Head 8.92 inches.

Storm surge values along the coast from

Baldwin county east to Santa Rosa

county were the highest observed in

over a hundred years of record keeping.

The high surge values of 10 to 14 feet

caused extensive damage to homes and

condos located along the Gulf

beachfront, as well as along the

shoreline of area inland waterways.

Dauphin Island had several areas that

were breached by the high surge. There

was less damage on Dauphin Island than

with Hurricane Frederic in 1979, even

with the extensive building that has

occurred on the island since 1979. In

Baldwin county, the coastal areas from

Fort Morgan to Gulf Shores to Orange

Beach saw the worst damage from a

hurricane in over a hundred years.

This area has seen rapid development

in the past 20 years and it seemed that

the homes and condo’s constructed in

the past five years held up better than

homes that were constructed earlier.

Surge values were estimated between

nine and twelve feet along the Baldwin

county coastline, and the beach was

breached at several locations. No one

died as a result of storm surge in

Baldwin county.

In Escambia county Florida, surge

values were estimated at ten to

fourteen feet. These coastal areas

were the hardest hit, with major

damage occurring from Perdido Key to

Pensacola Beach. Almost every structure

that was on the waterfront in Escambia

county suffered some degree of damage.

Generally, if the property elevation

was below fifteen feet, water flooded

the property. Property that was on

Perdido Bay, Big Lagoon, Bayou Grande,

Pensacola Bay and Escambia Bay suffered

major damage. Many homes were

completely washed away by the high

surge. Almost all of the deaths

directly attributed to Ivan in Escambia

County were surge related, and occurred

near Big Lagoon. The beach area from

Perdido Key to Pensacola Beach was

breached in several places. Fort

Pickens was cut off and isolated from

the rest of Pensacola Beach as a result

of several breaches. The highest surge

values observed during the storm were

in the upper reaches of Escambia Bay.

The surge, and accompanying wind waves,

damaged the I-10 bridge across Escambia

Bay. A trucker died on the bridge when

his truck plummeted off a bridge

section that had been displaced by the

surge. Pensacola Naval Air Station,

which is located on Pensacola Bay

across from Fort Pickens, suffered

major damage to structures that were

located on the water. Many of the

structures had been built in the late

1800’s, and had been through several

other hurricanes with only minor

damage. In Santa Rosa county, surge

values were between nine and twelve

feet. Navarre Beach had several

breaches, and major damage occurred

to almost all structures that were on

the Gulf front. Major damage also

occurred along the shores of Gulf

Breeze and along Blackwater Bay. Some

of the highest surge values in Santa

Rosa county were near Ward Basin. Surge

values across most locations east of

where the center of the hurricane

moved ashore were higher than those

of hurricane George in 1998. As in

Escambia county, almost every structure

that was on the water in Santa Rosa

county suffered some type of damage.

In Okaloosa county surge values were

six to nine feet. Structures that were

located on or near the beach suffered

major damage. Farther to the east,

storm surge values dropped off, but

the wave action essentially destroyed

the beach, with four to eight feet of

the sand eroded away. Low lying

structures on Choctawatchee Bay also

suffered major damage. US Highway 98

between Fort Walton and Destin was

again washed away. Structures near the

beach that were part of Eglin Air Force

Base also suffered major damage.

The following surge values were

measured in Alabama: Middle Gage at

Bayou LaBatre 4.66 feet. Mobile Bay at

Cedar Point 6.90 feet. Dauphin Island

Bay at Dauphin Island 7.80 feet.

Mobile Bay at Dauphin Island Coast

Guard 8.00 feet. Mobile River at

Mobile 4.87 feet. Mobile River at

Bucks 6.82 feet. Mobile Bay at Fort

Morgan Front Range 7.85 feet. Perdido

Pass at Orange Beach 8.81 feet.

The following surge values were

measured in Northwest Florida; Perdido

Bay near US Highway 98 estimated 10.00

feet. GIWW at Pensacola Gulf Beach

9.68 feet. Pensacola Bay at Fort McRee

9.70 feet. Pensacola Bay at Pensacola

10.20 feet. Escambia Bay West Bank at

Highway 90 12.92 feet. Escambia Bay

West Bank 1.5 miles north of I-10

12.12 feet. Escambia Bay near Pace

estimated 12.00 feet. GIWW at Gulf

Breeze 10.30 feet. Pensacola Beach Fire

Station estimated 12 feet. Yellow

River near Milton 9.66 feet. Fort

Walton Brooks Bridge 6.12 feet. Destin

at Choctawatchee Bay Coast Guard 5.39

feet.

As Ivan moved ashore during the morning

hours of September 16th, the winds

caused major damage to trees along and

east of the track of the storm.

Hurricane force winds were felt across

the entire area, including all inland

counties. Most of the area probably

had hurricane force winds for two to

four hours. This caused 100 year old

trees to break due to the constant

force from the strong winds. Many of

the trees fell on homes and vehicles

and damaged them. While some structural

wind damage would have been expected,

most of the major structural damage

that occurred over inland areas would

not have been as substantial if it had

not been for fallen trees. It was

estimated that in Alabama over

$500,000,000 damage was done to timber,

with an additional estimate of

$250,000,000 in Escambia, Santa Rosa

and Okaloosa counties in Florida. Power

was out for a week or more across the

inland areas due to trees across lines.

Along the immediate coast, power was

not restored for an additional several

weeks, until much of the infrastructure

was rebuilt. It was estimated that six

weak tornadoes occurred across the area

during the afternoon and early evening

of September 15th as Ivan neared the

coast. These weak tornadoes occurred in

Escambia and Santa Rosa counties in

Florida, and in Baldwin, Escambia and

Conecuh in Alabama and produced only

minor damages.

Eight deaths were directly related to

Ivan. Seven of these were in Escambia

county with one in Santa Rosa county.

In Escambia county Florida: Four people

(three women and one male) drowned at

different locations around Grand Lagoon

as the surge inundated the area. A male

drowned after his truck ran off the

damaged I-10 bridge. A female died of

a heart attack in a shelter just

before Ivan moved ashore. A male died

when a tree fell on him as Ivan was

moving ashore. In Santa Rosa county,

a young female died when a tree fell

on their manufactured home and killed

her.

Sixteen deaths were indirectly related

to Ivan. In Escambia county Florida:

A 7 year old boy was killed as he was

watching someone remove a tree and a

large limb fell on him. A 55 year old

male committed suicide when he became

depressed because of the damage his

home sustained as a result of Ivan. A

58 year old female died when she was

overcome by fumes from a generator

that was not properly ventilated. A 41

year old male died in a traffic

accident at an intersection with no

power and no stop lights. A 83 year

old male fell off a roof while

repairing damage from Ivan. A 63 year

old male fell out of a tree in Escambia

county Alabama and was taken to a

Pensacola hospital where he later died

from injuries sustained in the fall.

A 40 year old male died when a tree

fell on him. In Santa Rosa county: A

67 year old male died of a heart attack

preparing for Ivan. A 76 year old male

died of a heart attack. A 56 year old

male died of a heart attack cleaning

up days after the storm. In Okaloosa

county: A 54 year old female died of a

heart attack when emergency crews could

not get to her due to the storm. A 51

year old male died of a heart attack.

A 50 year old female died days after

Ivan from a drug overdose due to

depression cause by the storm.

In Covington county a 75 year old

female died from a fire caused by a

candle used for light after the storm.

In Conecuh county a 34 year old male

died from a car accident when he hit

debris still in the road from the

storm. In Mobile county a 59 year old

male died when a tree fell on him after

the storm.

Agriculture interests suffered a major

blow from Ivan with most of the soybean

and pecan crop destroyed. The cotton

crop also suffered damage but not as

bad as that of the soybean and pecan

crop.

Ivan will be remembered as being one

of the most damaging hurricanes to

affect the coastal counties of Baldwin,

Escambia and Santa Rosa in modern

history. It will also be remembered as

one of the most damaging hurricanes to

affect the inland counties of Escambia,

Clarke, Monroe, Conecuh and Butler in

southwest Alabama.

Baldwin County

3 SE Josephine to Tornado (F0)

1 SW Josephine

A weak tornado entered Baldwin county

from Escambia county in Florida near

Ono Island and moved rapidly west

northwest and dissipated just southwest

of Josephine. The weak tornado caused

minor damage. Most of the area had

been evacuated due to Hurricane Ivan.

Escambia County

1 W Dixie to Tornado (F0)

4 NW Dixie

A weak tornado developed ahead of

Hurricane Ivan just west of Dixie. The

weak tornado moved quickly west

northwest and dissipated about four

miles northwest of Dixie. The weak

tornado caused minor tree damage.

Conecuh County

2 S Castleberry to Tornado (F0)

2 SW Castleberry

A weak tornado developed about two

miles south of Castleberry and

dissipated just southwest of

Castleberry. The weak tornado caused

minor damage to timber.

Baldwin County

East Portion Flash Flood

As Hurricane Ivan was moving inland, a

band of very heavy rainfall developed

east of the center. Radar estimated

that five to seven inches of rain fell

in a two hour period across the area.

This caused most of the roads in the

east part of the county to flood. This

was in addition to the high winds that

were blowing trees down. As the storm

moved north, the water drained off the

roads.

Escambia County

West Portion Flash Flood

As Hurricane Ivan was moving inland, a

band of very heavy rainfall developed

near and east of the center. Radar

estimated that four to six inches of

rain fell in a one hour period across

the area. This caused most of the

roads in the west part of the county

to flood. This was in addition to the

high winds that were blowing trees

down. As the storm moved north, the

water drained off the roads.

Monroe County

South Portion Flash Flood

As Hurricane Ivan was moving inland,

a band of very heavy rainfall developed

near and east of the center. Radar

estimated that four to six inches of

rain fell in a one hour period across

the area. This caused most of the

roads in the south part of the county

to flood. This was in addition to the

high winds that were blowing trees

down. As the storm moved north, the

water drained off the roads.

ALZ063>064 Heavy Surf/High Surf

About a week after Hurricane Ivan

impacted the area on September 16th,

the remnants of the storm re-entered

the Gulf of Mexico after making a

large clockwise loop over the

southeastern United States.

As a result, high waves and surf action

again impacted already heavily eroded

area beaches. The high water hindered

clean up efforts along the coast. The

water also ended up under homes that

had severe erosion a week earlier.

Part of the causeway across Mobile Bay

had to be closed for several hours due

to high water. As the remnants of Ivan

slowly moved off to the northwest over

the western Gulf, the high surf

subsided.

ALASKA, Northern

AKZ207 Storm Surge

A low pressure center tracked northeast

over the southern Bering Sea on the

21st and then curved north over inland

western Alaska on the 22nd; and low

pressure remained over north interior

Alaska and the North Slope of Alaska

through the 25th. This set up northwest

flow over the southern Chukchi Sea

creating minor coastal flooding and

some shore erosion at Shishmaref About

1 foot of coastline was removed by the

erosion from waves. Though reported

wind speeds were not available, winds

of 30 to 40 mph were forecast during

the event.

AKZ226

High Wind (G52)

A weather front moved north from the

Gulf of Alaska on the afternoon of the

26th and brough south winds up over

the eastern Alaska Range. The Army’s

Mesonet station called Texas Range

reported a peak gust to 60 mph (52 kt).

AKZ226 High Wind (G52)

A cold front moving east across the

interior of Alaska created heavy

snowfall over the Isabel Pass region

of the Richardson Highway through the

Alaska Range. Twelve to 18 inches of

snow fell over the highway during the

period, as reported by the State of

Alaska Department of Transportation’s

Trims Camp foreman.

ALASKA, Southeast

AKZ017-020>021 Frost/Freeze

The growing season officially ended

due to a hard freeze on these dates in

these regions of Southeast Alaska. The

temperature in Yakutat was measured at

27 deg F, while Hoonah dipped to 28

deg F. Gustavus experienced 6 hours

with temperatures below freezing (the

other criteria for Freeze Warnings).

AKZ017 High Wind (G57)

A low lifted up into Cook Inlet from

the Aleutian chain on this date. High

easterly winds developed in

Southcentral Alaska out ahead of this

system. High winds were confined to the

extreme western portion of AOR, from

Icy Cape to Cape Suckling. Though

there is no way to verify in this

uninhabited region of the Alaska coast,

mariners confirmed conditions in the

region. The sensor on Middleton Island

measured a peak wind gust to 57 knots

(66 mph) from 120 degrees. Yakutat only

received a peak gust to 35 mph from

this storm.

ALASKA, Southern

AKZ155 Flood

A strong storm in the Bering Sea

created a long fetch with high wind.

This produced a coastal storm surge

resulting in minor coastal flodding

along the Kuskokwim Delta.

AKZ101 Heavy Snow

An unusually early and record breaking

heavy snow occurred over the Anchorage

bowl on Saturday, September 25th. A

low in the northern Pacific created a

strong moist southerly fetch over the

south central region Saturday. The

existing low level cold air held in

the area long enough to result in 6

inches of snow over most of the

Anchorage bowl north to Eagle River

before the warm air resulted in the

snow changing over to rain. This was

the record for most snow this early

Anchorage. The wet heavy snow

accumulated on the trees causing many

power outages.

AKZ141 Heavy Snow

A strong moist southerly flow into the

Copper River Basin resulted in heavy

snow along south facing up slope areas

of the Alaska Range. The Slana Ranger

Station reported 16 inches of snow

overnight September 28th to the

morning of the 29th.

AKZ145 Heavy Snow

A low moved from the southwest Gulf of

Alaska into the Susitna Valley Late

Wednesday into Thursday. This resulted

in a strong push of moisture into the

Susitna Valley over the colder air in

the northern Susima Valley. The

Orographic lift typical of the “bench”

near Chulitna resulted in heavy snow

beginning late Wednesday night that

continued until the snow changed over

to rain Thursday afternoon. The

cooperative observer reported that

12 inches of snow fell from 10 p.m.

Wednesday night through Thursday

morning.

AKZ145 Flood

A strong Bering Sea storm pushed

extremely moist air into the south

central region of Alaska beginning

Wednesday, September 29th. Heavy rain

and snow occurred over the previous

weekend resulting in saturated soil

throughout the region. Rainfall of

moderate to heavy rates was reported

by observation sites in the Susitna

Valley south to the Anchorage bowl

beginning late Wednesday through late

Thursday. Amounts of 2 to 3 inches were

observed across this region with higher

estimated amounts along the Chugach

and Talkeetna Mountains. This resulted

in the small streams in the Anchorage

Bowl and in the central Susitna Valley,

which were already elevated from the

weekend storm, to rise above bank full

stage and cause minor flooding.

AMERICAN SAMOA

ASZ002 Flood

Heavy rain caused street ponding and

flooding in some villages. An unstable

air mass aloft, well- associated with

a trough connected to a strong gale

low within 360 miles southwest of Pago

Pago, remained over the Samoan Islands

within 24 hours. No damages or

injuries reported.

Tutuila

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain caused stream overflow and

street flooding of over 2 feet across

Tutuila. The Tafuna Office recorded

about 3.30 inches of rain within the

24-hour period. Rocks and various

debris were spotted along the

main-road. No injury or damages

reported.

ASZ002 Heavy Surf/High Surf

Large south swells swept an alia to

shore, near the Malin Mai beach resort

at Fogagogo. 4 fishermen, ranging in

age from 17 to 40, were not seriouly

injured. “A huge wave turned their

vessel upside down and the engine

dropped off”, reported the Samoa News.

A high surf advisory was issued for

this date due to large south swells

produced by a strong area of high

pressure far south of the Islands.

ARIZONA, Central and Northeast

Gila County

Young Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down about 12 miles

northeast of Young along the

Young-Heber Highway near Forest

Service Road 188. Trees were sheared

off and the road was blocked.

Gila County

Jakes Corner to Flash Flood

Gisela

Heavy rainfall caused flash flooding,

mud slides, and road closures along

Beeline Highway (HWY 87) from SR 188

to the Bush Highway turnoff. There was

also flood damage along Tonto Creek

in Gisela. The flooding was compounded

in the Willow Fire burn area due to

little or no ground cover.

Yavapai County

Ashfork to Flash Flood

Seligman Arpt

Flooding was reported along Double A

Ranch Road north of Seligman. A patrol

car was stuck in the mud and flood

waters on Sierra Verde Ranch Road.

Coconino County

Gray Mtn to Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Cameron

Thunderstorm wind gusts (50 to 60 MPH)

and blowing dust were reported on

Highway 89 between Grey Mountain and

Cameron.

Yavapai County

Bagdad Flash Flood

Highway 97 near Bagdad was closed due

to flooded washes and debris.

ARIZONA, Central

Gila County

Jakes Corner Flash Flood

Flash flooding caused rock, mud, and

debris to cover Highway 87 (MP 231).

This was in the Willow Fire burn area.

Coconino County

Supai Flash Flood

Flash flodding washed out a bridge and

came within one foot of covering

another bridge in Supai Village.

People were evacuated from Supai

Canyon.

Yavapai County

Paulden Flash Flood

Water from Big Chino La Rita Road to a

depth of 3 feet just west of Paulden.

Coconino County

Leupp Corner to Flash Flood

Leupp

Flash flooding covered Highway 99 to a

depth of 18 inches halfway between

Leupp and Leupp Corner.

AZZ037 Flood

The Verde River rose 12 feet near

Bridgeport between 8:OOAM and 11:OOAM.

Some barns were flooded and several

homes were evacuated. Flood water

enetered two homes.

Navajo County

Jack Rabbit Tornado (F0)

ARIZONA, Northwest

Mohave County

Lake Havasu City Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Strong winds from a severe

thunderstorms pushed through Lake

Havasu City. Several trees were blown

over, one house received roof damage

and a construction trailer was

overturned.

ARIZONA, Northwest

Mohave County

10 SW Colorado City Funnel Cloud

There were 15 different reports of

funnel clouds southwest of Colorado

City.

Mohave County

Kingman Thunderstorm Wind (G57)

The Kingman ASOS reported a wind gust

of 66 mph.

ARIZONA, South

Pima County

Sells Flash Flood

Tohono O’ohdam sheriff dispatch

reported that Route 19 was closed due

to high water.

Pima County

6 ENE Tucson Flash Flood

Bear Canyon Road just north of Tanque

Verde Road was impassible due to high

flowing water.

Pima County

20 ENE Sells to Flash Flood

14 SSE Sells

Law Enforcement reported that several

washes were overflowing near milepost

21 and 22 of Indian Route 15.

Graham County

Safford Hail (0.75)

Significant hail damage was reported

in the Safford area. The hail fell for

about 30 minutes and stripped apples

off of trees in a local orchard.

Greenlee County

Duncan Flash Flood

Localized heavy rainfall caused several

streets to become flooded and required

closure. Mud and rocks covered U.S.

Route 70, after a reported 18 inches

of water ran across the road.

ARIZONA, Southwest

Maricopa County

Phoenix to Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Fountain Hills

Several lines or clusters of

thunderstorms developed along a

moisture boundary that extended from

near Gila Bend to Payson. Microburst

winds over 55 mph took down trees,

power lines, and damaged homes and

buildings over parts of eastern

Maricopa County. In Mesa, about 130

trees were blown down at a cemetery,

and a large funeral canopy was blown

200 feet onto a car at a neighboring

apartment.

Maricopa County

Chandler Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Pinal County

Florence to Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

2 N Apache Jet

Trees uprooted on the east side of

Florence, power poles blown down in

Apache Junction.

Gila County

10 ESE Roosevelt Heavy Rain

Up to 3/4 inch of rain in 20 minutes,

along with pea size hail and strong

winds were reported at Roosevelt

Estates.

Yuma County

Araby to Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Yuma

Thunderstorms moved westward across

parts of Yuma County after 6 pm.

Strong winds and dense blowing dust

resulted across much of Yuma, with

tree limbs blowing down onto power

lines. At the Yuma Proving Ground,

winds were clocked at 52 mph at 8 pm.

Pinal County

10 NW Florence to Flash Flood

Queen Vly

Local areas of heavy rainfall developed

within a tropical-like environment

across much of south-central Arizona.

Locally windy conditions preceded the

showers and thunderstorms during the

late afternoon hours. A rather narrow

band of heavy rain developed over

mainly rural areas of northern Pinal

County, which resulted in flooded homes

and roads. Three to 5 inches of rain

was reported in a 70 minute period in

one northern portion of Pinal County,

according to the county emergency

manager. The worst damage occurred in

the community of Queen Valley, where

the sewage treatment plant had an

initial damage estimate of $1.5

million. Gov. Napolitano declared an

emergency and designated $200,000 to

help repair roads and the sewage

treatment plant. Several water rescues

were made, and cars were washed out of

carports. Flood waters carried various

types of debris, and a propane tank

was found in a tree.

AZZ028 Dust Storm

Poor visibility due to blowing dust

was blamed on a multiple car pile-up

on Interstate 10 at Riggs Road. Two

people were seriously injured.

Maricopa County

Cave Creek Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Strong winds severely damaged a large

part of the Cave Creek Roadhouse in

Cave Creek.

La Paz County

Parker Flash Flood

Very heavy rain resulted in flooding

of homes and highways in the Parker

area. One gauge indicated 1.15 inches.

La Paz County

1 N Quartzsite Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Winds knocked down 3 power poles

resulting in a 12 hour power outage

for Quartzsite residents.

ARKANSAS, Central and North Central

Johnson County

Ludwig Flash Flood

Heavy rains caused flash flooding to

occur in the Ludwig area. Several

streets were flooded along Highway 292.

ARKANSAS, East

NONE REPORTED.

ARKANSAS, Northwest

NONE REPORTED.

ARKANSAS, Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

ARKANSAS, Southwest

NONE REPORTED.

ATLANTIC OCEAN

Great Egg Inlet To

Cp May Nj Out 20Nm

1 E Sea Isle City to Waterspout

.1 E Sea Isle City

A waterspout formed just off the coast

from Sea Isle City and dissipated as

it reached the shore.

Chesapeake Bay N

Beach To Drum Pt

Md

Cove Pt Waterspout

The U.S. Coast Guard and Calvert

County Emergency Officials reported

sightings of waterspouts just northeast

of Cove Point.

Cp Charles Lt Va To

Nc-Va Bdr Out 20Nm

Cape Charles Light to Marine Tstm Wind

Nc-Va Border

Wind gust of 34 knots measured at

CHLV2.

Chesapeake Bay New

Pt Comfort To Cp

Henry Va

Kiptopeke Marine Tstm Wind

Wind gust of 39 knots measured at

Kiptopeke.

Nc-Va Bdr To

Currituck Beach Lt

Out 20Nm

Nc-Va Border to Marine Tstm Wind

Currituck Beach Light

Wind gust of 40 knots measured at Duck,

North Carolina.

Currituck Sound

Currituck Marine Tstm Wind

Wind gust of 36 knots measured at ECG.

Cp Charles Lt Va To

Nc-Va Bdr Out 20Nm

Cape Charles Light to Marine Tstm Wind

Nc-Va Border

Wind gust of 38 knots measured at

CHLV2.

Chesapeake Bay

Smith Pt To Windmill

Pt Va

Smith Pt to Marine Tstm Wind

Windmill Point

Wind gust of 35 knots measured at

Lewisetta.

Nc-Va Bdr To

Currituck Beach Lt

Out 20Nm

Nc-Va Border to Marine Tstm Wind

Currituck Beach Light

Wind gust of 42 knots measured at Duck,

North Carolina.

Chesapeake Bay New

Pt Comfort To Cp

Henry Va

Kiptopeke Marine Tstm Wind

Wind gust of 43 knots measured at

Kiptopeke.

Tidal Potomac Cobb

Is Md To Smith Pt Va

Lewisetta Marine Tstm Wind

Long Island Sound E

Of New Haven Ct To

Port Jefferson Ny

5 W Fishers Island Marine Tstm Wind

Heavy rain bands with embedded

thunderstorms over Eastern Long Island

Sound produced wind gusts up to 43

knots. This resulted in a 31 foot boat

capsizing near Niantic Bay. Two men

were thrown into the water. One of

them was killed. The boat sustanied

significant structual damage.

M?IW

Chesapeake Bay

Smith Pt To Windmill

Pt Va

Smith Pt to Marine Tstm Wind

Windmill Point

Wind gust of 34 knots measured at

Lewisetta.

Chesapeake Bay New

Pt Comfort To Cp

Henry Va

New Point Comfort to Marine Tstm Wind

Cape Henry

Wind gust of 36 knots measured at the

Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel.

Cp Charles Lt Va To

Nc-Va Bdr Out 20Nm

Cape Charles Light to Marine Tstm Wind

Nc-Va Border

Wind gust of 37 knots measured at

CHLV2.

Chesapeake Bay

Drum Pt To Smith Pt

Va

Solomons Island Marine Tstm Wind

Chesapeake Bay N

Beach To Drum Pt

Md

1 W Drum Pt Waterspout

Chesapeake Bay

Drum Pt To Smith Pt

Va

16 SE Patuxent River P Marine Tstm Wind

CALIFORNIA, Extreme Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

CALIFORNIA, North Central

NONE REPORTED.

CALIFORNIA, Northeast

CAZ073

High Wind (G59)

A 59 kt (68 mph) wind gust was

reported at Mono Lake Visitors Center.

CALIFORNIA, Northwest

NONE REPORTED.

CALIFORNIA, South Central

CAZ090-095-097 Drought

The March through May 2004 time period

was the 2nd driest on record for the

South-Central portion of California as

determined by rainfall for the Kern

County Mountains and Tulare County

Mountains of the Southern Sierra

Nevada. Below normal for all of the

Southern Sierra Nevada rivers, the Kern

River April through July snow melt was

only 48% of normal determined by the

inflow to Lake Isabella Reservoir. The

previous six California Water Years

(July through June) have averaged only

81% of normal precipitation. The dry

conditions for the 6-year period were

actually much worse as 5 of the years

averaged approximately 70% of normal

normal rainfall.

CAZ093 Wildfire

The Bear Fire 5 miles south of Mariposa

burned 416 acres and 5 structures

(damage figure estimated). The cost to

suppress this human origin fire was

$1.4M. No fatalities or injuries

occurred.

CAZ089>092 Excessive Heat

One of the warmest spells of the dry

season occurred late between the 5th

and 11th of the month. The already dry

conditions of the area were intensified

by such a late hot spell as Central

and Southern San Joaquin Valley

temperatures climbed widespread to over

100 degrees F. The 8th and 9th of the

month were the warmest as Fresno

reached 105F on the 8th and both

Fresno and Bakersfield reported 103F

on the 9th.

CALIFORNIA, South Central

CAZ093 Wildfire

The Trimmer Fire burned 125 acres 25

miles northeast of Fresno. The fire

was human in origin. No fatalities,

injuries, or structures-lost occurred.

The cost to suppress was unknown.

CAZ095 Wildfire

The China Fire 15 miles southwest of

Lake Isabella in Kern County was of

suspicious origin. It burned 314 acres

but no fatalities, injuries, or

structures-lost occurred. The cost to

suppress was unknown.

CAZ096 Wildfire

The Nehouse Fire burned 204 acres 25

miles east of North Fork in Madera

County. Its cause was human in origin

but no fatalities, injuries, or

structures-lost occurred. The cost to

suppress was unknown.

CAZ093 Wildfire

The Old Highway Fire was a man-caused

fire that burned 1347 acres in the

S.Sierra Nevada Foothills at Mariposa.

There were no fatalities, injuries, or

structures lost. The cost to suppress

the fire was $3M.

Merced County

25 NNW (Mer)Castle A Lightning

A rather significant trof and

associated front swung through the

North San Joaquin Valley affecting

Merced County and points northward on

the 19th. Some embedded convection

occurred with the front as lightning

occurred in the Oakdale area just

north of the Merced County Line at

6 PM PDT. More importantly,

temperatures dipped significantly below

normal in a pattern more closely

resembling a winter-type weather

pattern than that of the warm season.

The Merced Airport reported 1/10th of

an inch of rain and lead to some local

field flooding and other inconveniences

for agricultural operations in the

Merced County area.

CALIFORNIA, Southeast

San Bernardino

County

Nipton Flash Flood

Flash flooding near Nipton caused

Nipton Rd to be completely washed out

and impassable.

San Bernardino

County

Nipton Flash Flood

Flash flooding caused several roads to

be closed near the town of Nipton.

Rocks and debris covered the road in

several locations.

San Bernardino

County

5 E Twenty Nine Palm, Flash Flood

6 E Twenty Nine

Palms

Several swift water rescues along with

several vehicles underwaterjust east

of Twentynine Palms.

San Bernardino

County

10 E San Bernardino Flash Flood

Law enforcement reported Amboy Rd. was

closed from Twcntynine Palms to Sheep

Hole Pass. Power lines were also down

along with debris in the roadway.

San Bernardino

County

5 S Nipton Flash Flood

Law enforcement reported Ivanpah and

Nipton roads were closed due to flash

flooding.

San Bernardino

County

20 E Twenty Nine Palm Flash Flood

Law enforcement reported several feet

of water over State Rte 62 just east

of Iron Age Rd.

CALIFORNIA, Southeast

San Bernardino

County

Lenwood Lightning

A tow truck driver was in the process

of hooking up a winch to a stalled

vehicle when lightning struck. The

driver of the stalled car was killed

and the tow truck driver was taken to

the hospital.

M?OU

San Bernardino

County

15 NE Barstow Flash Flood

A 10 mile stretch of Fort Irwin Rd was

under 12 to 14 inches of water. Huge

boulders and mud all over the road and

is completely impassable.

Inyo County

Death Vly Flash Flood

Flash flooding occurred over Highway

178 in Death Valley between Mormon

Point and Jublice Pass. Reports said

several hundred feet of roadway were

washed away and many points along the

road were impassable with rocks and

debris.

CALIFORNIA, Southwest

CAZ056

Wildfire

A small brush fire burned 2 to 4 acres

on the west side of Hwy. 371 near

Aguanga.

CAZ049 Wildfire

Named the Morales Fire, this fire

consumed 250 acres southeast of

Temecula, and destroyed 2 trailers,

3 abandoned vehicles, 3 outbuildings,

and 2 ATVs. The wind at about the time

of the fire was between 5 and 15 mph,

with an air temperature in the 90s and

relative humidity of less than 20%.

CAZ049 Wildfire

Named the Ruby Fire, this fire consumed

1 acre near the Redhawk Golf Course in

Temecula.

CAZ042 Heavy Surf/High Surf

Powerful surf ranging in size from 6 to

12 ft generated by Hurricane Howard

resulted in over 1000 rescues during

the hottest day of the year at Orange

County beaches. 25 people were rescued

in one incident alone at Main Beach in

Laguna when a dozen 8-10 ft waves

overpowered a group of swimmers. The

combination of widespread 100 degree

temperatures and 72 degree water

temperatures drove an estimated 575,000

people to Orange County beaches over

the Labor Day weekend.

San Diego County

Vista Dust Devil

A strong dust devil ripped a sign off a

fence and threw it 40 feet away over a

house. Other debris was seen flying

through the air around the dust devil.

CAZ050 Wildfire

This fire burned 65 acres of brush two

miles south of the San Diego Wild

Animal Park in the San Pascual Valley.

It was started by a boy playing with

fireworks.

CAZ050 Wildfire

This fire burned 15 acres about 3 miles

north of Valley Center near Lilac

Knolls Road.

CAZ050 Wildfire

This fire burned 5 acres east of Chula

Vista near Proctor Valley Rd.

CAZ055 Wildfire

Named the Runway Fire, it burned 1,007

acres of brush on the desert slopes of

the San Bernardino National Forest near

the Cajon Pass. The fire forced the

closure of a seven mile stretch of Hwy

138. One home in the Baldy Mesa area

sustained minor heatdamage. The fire

was started by a car accident.

Riverside County

10 S Idyllwild Flash Flood

A thunderstorm dropped 1.15″ of rain in

one hour in the Pine Cove area. Some

sheet flow and rock slides were

observed along Hwy 74 east of Lake

Hemet.

Riverside County

Pine Cove Hail (0.75)

Hail 3/4 inch in diameter fell on Pine

Cove during a heavy monsoon

thunderstorm.

San Diego County

Borrego Spgs Flash Flood

Flash flooding began around 4:30 PM in

Borrego Palm Canyon and rushed into

Borrego Springs. Flash Flooding also

occurred in Coyote Canyon. An empty

campground was obliterated by a wall of

mud and water. An estimated 70 to 90

homes were damaged when the flash flood

tore into the Sun Gold and De Anza

areas of town. In the Sun Gold

community, some residents had as much

as 2′ of mud rush into their homes. The

wall of water and mud was observed to

be 8-10′ high and 150 yards wide at

times as it came down Borrego Palm

Canyon.

San Bernardino

County

10 E Lucerne Vly to Flash Flood

15 ESE Lucerne Vly

Heavy thunderstroms trained over the

Johnson Valley area most of the

afternoon which resulted in severe

flash flooding. Many roads were

completely washed out including

multiple sections of Hwy 247 between

Camp Rock Rd and Hacienda Rd. Boulders

were left in the middle of most roads

and washes experienced severe erosion

from the flood waters. Up to a dozen

vehicles were either trapped in mud and

high water or were stranded between

flooded washes which inundated the Hwy.

Some homes experienced minor damage

from the rushing torrent. Small hail

and frequent lightning were also

observed during the storm.

San Diego County

2 W Borrego Spgs to Flash Flood

Borrego Spgs

Flash flooding was observed for the

second straight day in Borrego Springs.

Sheet flooding was widespread across

town and it was reported that a river

of water 2′ deep rushed across Palm

Canyon Dr. Additional flooding occurred

in the Sun Gold community.

San Diego County

1 S Borrego Spgs Hail (1.00)

A severe thunderstorm which also

produced flash flooding dropped hail

ranging in size from one quarter inch

to one inch in diameter. The hail was

large enough to break a window in the

town of Borrego Springs.

San Diego County

1 S Borrego Spgs Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

An anemometer in Borrego Springs

recorded a wind gust over 60 mph before

it was blown over during a severe

thunderstorm. Six power poles were also

blown down by the thunderstorm wind

gusts.

Riverside County

La Quinta Thunderstorm Wind (G39)

Thunderstorm wind gusts toppled at

least 138 trees at “The Palms”

golfcourse in La Quinta. One tree

caused damage when it fell into a

maintenance building. Other area

golfcourses also reported downed trees.

A building at Avenue 58 and Madison

Street had its roof tiles blown off

which resulted in some minor water

damage to the interior. Nine utility

poles were blown over and four

transformers were lost as a result of

the winds. At around the same time,

nearby Thermal Airport reported a gust

of 46 mph, but it is possible that

winds were gusting to around 70 mph or

greater in the La Quinta area.

CAZ058 Wildfire

Named the Border Fire, it consumed 965

acres on the U.S. side of the border

and over 1,000 acres in Mexico. The

blaze started in Mexico and quickly

moved north over the border near Campo,

forcing the closure of Route 94. One

structure was destroyed by the fire.

CAZ057 High Wind (G69)

Fremont Canyon RAWS measured sustained

winds over 40 mph for 2 hours and gusts

over 60 mph for 3 hours. Gusty winds

resulted in blown down tree branches

all across the inland empire.

CALIFORNIA, Southwest

CAZ043 Wildfire

A fire near Rattlesnake Canyon at Camp

Pendleton burned approximately 120

acres of brush.

CALIFORNIA, Upper

CAZ084>085 Frost/Freeze

See below.

A Freeze Warning was issued for the

above listed zones, effective at the

above listed times. Reported low

temperatures in the area ranged from

22 to 31 degrees, so the warning

verified well.

CALIFORNIA, West South Central

NONE REPORTED.

CALIFORNIA, Western

NONE REPORTED.

CARIBBEAN SEA AND TROPICAL ATLANTIC

Deerfield Beach To

Ocean Reef Fl

6 SE Government Cut Marine Tstm Wind

A thunderstorm wind gust of 48 knots

was observed at the C-MAN at Fowey

Rocks Light.

S Santee R To Edisto

Beach Sc Out 20Nm

Folly Beach Marine Tstm Wind

Savannah Ga To

Altamaha Sd Ga Out

20Nm

19 E Sapelo Island Marine Tstm Wind

Deerfield Beach To

Ocean Reef Fl

6 SE Government Cut Marine Tstm Wind

A thunderstorm wind gust of 36 knots

was measured at the C-MAN at Fowey

Rocks Light.

Edisto Beach Sc To

Savannah Ga Out

20Nm

1 E Fripp Island Waterspout

Deerfield Beach To

Ocean Reef Fl

6 SE Government Cut Marine Tstm Wind

A thunderstorm produced a wind gust of

37 knots at Fowey Rocks Light.

Atl Nearshore Waters

Rio Guajataca Pr

Ewd Thru Usvi

Red Hook St Thomas Waterspout

A large waterspout was reported between

Big Thatch and Jost Van Dyke in the

British Virgin Islands.

Charleston Harbor

5 NE The Charleston E Marine Tstm Wind

The Charleston Battry

Thunderstorm winds gusted to 43 kt at

the Wando port terminal.

Charleston Harbor

The Charleston Battry Marine Tstm Wind

CARIBBEAN SEA AND TROPICAL ATLANTIC

Little R Inlet Nc To

Murrells Inlet Sc Out

20Nm

Myrtle Beach Marine Tstm Wind

Springmaid Pier recorded a 38 kt wind

gust.

Cp Fear To Little R

Inlet Nc Out 20Nm

Little River Inlet Marine Tstm Wind

A measured 40 kt gust was recorded by

National Ocean Service equipment.

Surf City To Cp Fear

Nc Out 20Nm

Masonboro Inlet Marine Tstm Wind

National Ocean Service equipment

located on Johnny Mercer Pier recorded

a 36 kt wind gust. Gusts of 35 kt or

higher continued intermittently for the

next couple of hours.

Deerfield Beach To

Ocean Reef FI

1 E Port Everglades Waterspout

A waterspout was seen in the Atlantic

offshore Fort Lauderdale Beach.

Deerfield Beach To

Ocean Reef Fl

2 E Miami Beach Waterspout

A waterspout was seen in the Atlantic.

Deerfield Beach To

Ocean Reef Fl

6 SE Government Cut Marine Tstm Wind

The C-MAN station at Fowey Rocks Light

reported a thunderstorm wind gust of

36 knots.

Savannah Ga To

Altamaha Sd Ga Out

20Nm

19 E Sapelo Island Marine Tstm Wind

The buoy at Grays Reef gusted to 37 kt

associated with Tropical Storm Jeanne.

COLORADO, Central and Northeast

COZ035 Winter Weather/Mix

A hiker froze to death on the summit of

Longs Peak as an early season

snowstorm, accompanied by strong winds

and freezing temperatures, moved

through the region. The hiker was found

wearing only tennis shoes, jeans and a

hooded sweatshirt.

M260U

Larimer County

Ft Collins Hail (0.88)

Larimer County

Ft Collins Hail (1.00)

Washington County

3 SSW Woodrow Hail (0.88)

Washington County

1 SE Woodrow Hail (0.88)

Weld County

3 N Galeton Hail (0.88)

Washington County

9 SSW Akron Hail (0.88)

Washington County

7 S Akron Hail (1.00)

Washington County

7 S Platner Hail (1.00)

Washington County

9 S Otis Hail (1.75)

COLORADO, Central and Northeast

Washington County

Akron Hail (1.00)

Washington County

1 NE Otis Hail (0.75)

Park County

Bailey Hail (1.00)

Weld County

14 SE Greeley Hail (0.75)

Arapahoe County

Littleton Hail (0.75)

Douglas County

14 NW Castle Rock Hail (0.75)

Larimer County

34 W Virginia Dale Hail (1.00)

Lincoln County

25 WSW Karval Hail (1.75)

COLORADO, East Central

Yuma County

4 SSE Vernon Thunderstorm Wind (G65)

Four sections of irrigation pivot

blown over.

Yuma County

8 SSW Yuma Hail (0.88)

Yuma County

3 SE Yuma Hail (0.88)

Yuma County

4 S Yuma Hail (1.00)

Yuma County

Eckley Hail (0.75)

Yuma County

Vernon Hail (1.75)

Yuma County

7 W Wray Hail (0.75)

Yuma County

5 NW Wray Hail (0.88)

Yuma County

Wray Hail (1.00)

Yuma County

10 S Wray Hail (1.75)

Windows broken out of vehicle on

highway.

Yuma County

Wray Hail (0.88)

Yuma County

12 SE Wray Hail (2.00)

One window on west side of house

broken.

COZ091 High Wind (G63)

Cheyenne County

2 S Arapahoe Hail (0.75)

Cheyenne County

5 ESE Cheyenne Wells Hail (0.88)

Cheyenne County

Cheyenne Wells Hail (1.00)

Cheyenne County

Cheyenne Wells Hail (0.75)

Cheyenne County

Cheyenne Wells Hail (0.88)

Cheyenne County

Cheyenne Wells Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

COLORADO, South Central and Southeast

Prowers County

14 N Holly Hail (1.00)

Hail occurred for 45 minutes and

completely covered the ground several

inches deep.

Baca County

Springfield Hail (1.75)

Hail occurred for nearly an hour,

ranging from one inch to 1.75 inches

in diameter.

Prowers County

13 N Holly Flash Flood

Prowers County

Lamar Hail (0.88)

Prowers County

Lamar Hail (1.00)

Teller County

Woodland Park Hail (1.00)

Custer County

Silver Cliff Hail (0.75)

El Paso County

1 NE Black Forest Tornado (F0)

A short lived tornado one mile

northeast of the intersection of Volmer

Road and Black Forest Road caused no

known damage. It passed through open

country in a construction area.

El Paso County

3 S Falcon Hail (0.75)

COLORADO, West

COZ001>014-

017>023 Drought

Remnants of an eastern Pacific

Hurricane transported moisture across

western Colorado and resulted in areas

of heavy rain early in the month.

Unseasonably cold temperatures also

brought significant snow accumulations

to portions of the mountains. Because

of this precipitation, there was a

slight decrease in the areal extent of

severe to extreme drought conditions

across western Colorado. Otherwise,

abnormally dry to severe drought

conditions persisted. Please see the

October 2004 Storm Data publication for

a continuation on this drought

situation.

COZ022 Wildfire

This fire was named the Well Fire and

occurred 10 miles southeast of Redmesa

in La Plata County. This fire began at

the end of August and consumed 1,117

acres of pinyon pine, juniper, sage

brush, and grass before being

extinguished. The estimated cost of

fighting the fire was 390 thousand

dollars

Dolores County

2 WNW Dove Creek to 2K Dust Devil

1 ESE Dove Creek

A strong dust devil peeled a large

section of corrugated metal roofing off

a commercial building, as well as a

section of the plywood underlayment.

Packing material and insulation were

blown hundreds of yards away from the

building, while a 4 foot by 8 foot

section of plywood landed on

Highway 491.

COZ002 Wildfire

This wildfire was named the Sheep Ranch

Fire and occurred 6 miles east-

northeast of Elk Springs in Moffat

County. The fire consumed 100 acres of

pinyon juniper, sage, and grass.

Evacuations were put into effect for

local residences.

COZ004-009>010-

012>013-018>019 Winter Weather/Mix

An unseasonably cold storm system

brought the first accumulating snowfall

of the season to the mountains of

western Colorado. Snowfall amounts

generally ranged from 2 to 6 inches.

Local amounts up to 1 foot occurred

across some of the mountains above

10,000 feet.

COZ003 Wildfire

This fire was named the Deer Park Fire

and occurred 26 miles west of Debeque

in Garfield County. The fire consumed

476 acres of ponderosa pine.

COZ005-014 Frost/Freeze

Minimum temperatures ranged from the

upper teens to the upper 20s.

La Plata County

12 N Bayfield Flash Flood

Water and debris flowed around a foot

deep across County Road 501, midway up

the west side of Vallecito Reservoir.

Some rock and mud slides were also

reported in the area, as well as a few

logs mixed in with the debris flows.

Routt County

Steamboat Spgs 40K Thunderstorm Wind (G53)

Strong thunderstorm outflow winds

totally destroyed a 12 foot by 60 foot

Civil Air Patrol trailer at the

airport. The trailer had rooms for

office space, training, and briefing.

A section of chain link fence at the

airport was also destroyed when the

trailer was blown through it. Numerous

large trees were blown over or snapped

off throughout the town, with at least

one vehicle crushed and a mobile home

damaged by falling trees.

Archuleta County

1 W Arboles Heavy Rain

Heavy rainfall resulted in minor

flooding of many creeks and normally

dry washes, with at least one creek

over bankfull. The official cooperative

weather observer near Arboles measure

1.73 inches of rain during this event.

Archuleta County

20 E Pagosa Spgs Heavy Rain

Minor flooding and debris flows were

reported along the upper Blanco Basin

Road and near Opal Lake.

La Plata County

17 N Bayfield to Heavy Rain

15 N Bayfield

Heavy rainfall caused Vallecito Creek

to run bankfull for several hours which

threatened 30 homes in the Mountain

River Subdivision north of Vallecito

Reservoir.

COZ003>005-

009>010-012>013-

17018 Winter Weather/Mix

A cold early season storm produced

widespread snowfall amounts from 3 to 5

inches across the mountains of western

Colorado. High valleys in the Steamboat

Springs area also received significant

snowfall, with up to 8 inches in some

locations. Local amounts from 10 to 12

inches fell across the central and

northern mountains, with new snowfall

up to 17 inches measured in the higher

elevations of Routt County. Icy and

snowpacked roads resulted in many

accidents, including a tanker truck

rollover on Rabbit Ears Pass where 15

inches of snow was measured.

COZ021>023 Frost/Freeze

Early morning low temperatures ranged

from the mid 20s to 32 degrees across

most lower elevation areas in southwest

Colorado.

COZ018 Winter Weather/Mix

2 to 5 inches of snow fell above the

9000 foot level in the northwest San

Juan Mountains from this cold early

season storm. Locally heavier amounts

were reported, including 12 inches at

Silverton.

CONNECTICUT, Northeast

CONNECTICUT, Northwest

CTZ013 Flood

At 08:12 EST on 9/18/04, the Housatonic

River was at its bankful and rising at

Veterans Plaza, and the East Aspetuck

River was over its banks at Wells Road

in New Milford. The Housatonic River

exceeded its flood stage of 11.0′,

cresting at 11.82′ at 13:15 EST on

9/18/04 at the Stevenson Dam. The

Housatonic River then exceeded its

flood stage of 12.0′, cresting at

13.33′ at 19:45 EST on 9/19/04 at the

Brookfield gage. Additional flooding

was reported when the Housatonic River

exceeded its flood stage of 7.0′,

cresting at 7.4′ at 12:30 EST on

9/19/04 at the Falls Village gage.

CONNECTICUT, Southern

Fairfield County

Ridgefield Flash Flood

A spotter in Ridgefield reported that

the rainfall rate was up to 1.9 inches

per hour in torrential downpours. Many

streets in Ridgefield experienced

flash flooding.

Fairfield County

Wilton Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

of streets in Wilton. The remnants of

Hurricane Frances produced torrential

rainfall across Western Connecticut on

September 8th. Storm total rainfall

amounts ranging from an inch to up to

6 inches were common across the area.

This caused extensive flash flooding

of mainly roads.

Fairfield County

Stratford Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

of roads.

New Haven County

New Haven Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

on 1-95. Water was reportedly up to

winshields on vehicles. Parts of the

interstate were closed. Flash flooding

also occured in West Haven at the same

time. Rescues had to be performed on

people trapped in their vehicles.

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan produced

torrential rains across Southern

Connecticut. Storm total rainfall

amounts added up to around 5 inches in

spots. This caused extensive roadway

flash flooding.

DELAWARE

Sussex County

Rehoboth Beach to Rip Current

Fenwick Is

The combination of swells from

Hurricane Frances and a high pressure

system that built into New England and

the Canadian Maritimes caused rip

currents to occur throughout the Labor

Day weekend. Bathing restrictions were

in place throughout the weekend and

water rescues were performed. No deaths

were reported.

New Castle County

North Portion Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from around 9 a.m. EDT until

around 2 p.m. EDT on the 18th. This

caused poor drainage, creek and river

flooding in the northern part of New

Castle County. The Christina River at

Coochs Bridge was above its 10.5 foot

flood stage from 1016 a.m. EDT through

516 p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

11.32 feet at 217 p.m. EDT. The White

Clay Creek at Newark was above its 13

foot flood stage from 313 p.m. EDT

through 953 p.m. EDT on the 18th. It

crested at 13.58 feet at 532 p.m. EDT.

The Red Clay Creek at Wooddale was

above its 5.5 foot flood stage from

Noon EDT through 7 p.m. EDT on the

18th. It crested at 7.05 feet at 245

p.m. EDT. Storm totals included 2.54

inches at the New Castle County

Airport, 2.17 inches in Newark and

1.99 inches in Bear.

New Castle County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the afternoon

and evening of the 28th. Doppler Radar

storm total estimates ranged between 4

and 8 inches with the highest amounts

toward the Pennsylvania border.

Widespread poor drainage, stream and

creek flooding occurred. Many roads

were flooded and closed and numerous

water rescues were performed.

Evacuations occurred in Glenville along

the Red Clay Creek. Forty people were

also rescued from a bus that became

stranded along the White Clay Creek.

The White Clay Creek at Newark was

above its 13 foot flood stage from

447 p.m. EDT on the 28th through 911

a.m. EDT on the 29th. It crested at

13.59 feet at 930 p.m. EDT on the 28th.

The Red Clay Creek at Wooddale was

above its 5.5 foot flood stage from

4 p.m. EDT on the 28th through 7 a.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 13.53

feet at 1145 p.m. EDT on the 28th. As

of October 1st, 2004 the flood stage of

the creek at this site will be raised

to 7.0 feet. Farther downstream the

Red Clay Creek at Stanton was above

its 15 foot flood stage from 434 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 901 a.m. EDT

on the 29th. It crested at 23.44 feet

at 130 a.m. EDT on the 29th. The

Christina River at Coochs Bridge was

above its 10.5 foot flood stage from

416 p.m. EDT on the 28th through 633

a.m. EDT on the 29th. It crested at

13.43 feet at 1147 p.m. EDT on the

28th. The Brandywine Creek at

Wilmington was above its 11 foot flood

stage from 1022 p.m. EDT on the 28th

through 326 p.m. EDT on the 29th. It

crested at 13.51 feet at 615 a.m. EDT

on the 29th.

Storm totals included 8.01 inches in

Newark, 7.31 inches in Bear, 5.79

inches at the New Castle County

Airport, 5.40 inches in Christina

Hundred, 4.69 inches in Wilmington and

2.63 inches in Blackbird Hundred.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

New Castle County

(Ilg)Wilmington Arpt to Tornado (F2)

Elsmere Jet

An F2 (on the Fujita scale) tornado

touched down in northern New Castle

County with maximum winds estimated at

130 mph. The path length was 5.0 miles

long with a maximum path width of 150

yards. The tornado touched down near

and was observed at the New Castle

County Airport. The northern end of the

tornado track was in Elsmere.

Significant damage did occur along the

path of this tornado, particularly to

some of the planes at the airport and

industrial buildings near the airport.

In addition, five persons were injured.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

FLORIDA, East Central

Osceola County

3 E St Cloud Tornado (F0)

An Osceola County Sheriffs vehicle was

pushed off the road as an F0 tornado

from a rain band in Hurricane Frances

touched down briefly along Highway 192,

just east of St. Cloud.

FLZ041-047-054-059-

64 Hurricane/Typhoon

The center of category 2 Hurricane

Frances reached the Florida east coast

near Sewall’s Point in Martin County

early on September 5th. Frances was

moving to the west northwest at 7 mph

and maintained hurricane strength as it

crossed the east half of the Florida

Peninsula. Frances was downgraded to a

tropical storm in the afternoon on the

5th when it was about 50 miles east of

Tampa Bay.

In Martin, St. Lucie and Indian River

counties, the slow moving storm

produced wind gusts to hurricane

strength for about 19 hours, producing

an estimated 4.5 billion dollars in

damage. Wind gusts well over 100 mph

destroyed coastal structures, marinas,

and vessels. Farther inland, hundreds

of homes, mobile homes, and businesses

were destroyed, and thousands were

damaged. Highest recorded winds for

Martin county were 91 knots (105 mph)

at Port St. Lucie Inlet. The highest

wind gust in St. Lucie County, was 94

knots (108 mph) at Ft. Pierce and in

Indian River County, 70 knots (81 mph)

in Vero Beach.

Brevard and Volusia counties also

recorded hours of hurricane force wind

gusts from the north side of the storm.

Thousands of homes and businesses were

destroyed and damaged, with hundreds of

thousands of residences with out power.

Brevard was hit with an estimated

amage of 90 million dollars. Damage in

Volusia County was close to 240 million

dollars. Most official NWS surface wind

equipment failed prior to the max wind

of the storm when power was knocked

out. Highest recorded surface winds

gust was 78 knots (90 mph) from Merritt

Island Airport, although a wind tower

at NASA report gusts to 82 knots

(94 mph). These winds were likely

representative of what most of the

beach front areas were hit with.

Daytona Beach International Airport

recorded a wind gust to 65 knots

(75 mph) prior to the power outage.

Lowest recorded pressures for Hurricane

Frances were, 994.9 mb at Daytona Beach

Airport, 995.9 mb at NWS Melbourne,

962.1 at St. Lucie Lock, and 964.7 at

Port Mayaca Lock.

Beach errosion was moderate to severe

from Cocoa Beach to Ft. Pierce, ranging

from 5 to 6 feet from south Brevard

County to up to 12 feet near Vero Beach

where a large section of a beach road

was washed out. A storm surge of 5.89

feet MSL was recorded at the St. Lucie

Lock. A surge near 6 feet occured near

Cocoa Beach ranging to near 8 feet

around Vero Beach where onshore winds

were the strongest.

Radar estimates show as much as 13

inches of rain fell in Volusia County

with a range of 6 to 10 inches of rain

in the remaining counties. The worst

flooding from Hurricane Frances was in

Volusia, Seminole, Orange and Osceola

counties. Significant inland flodding

flooding was reported in Martin, St.

Lucie, Indian River and Brevard

counties.

FLZ044>046-053-058 High Wind (G61)

The center of category 2 Hurricane

Frances reached the Florida East near

Sewall’s point in Martin County early

on September 5th but began spreading

hurricane force wind gusts across most

of Central Florida by 11 pm on

September 4th. Frances entered Central

Florida moving west northwest at 7 mph

and maintained hurricane strength as it

crossed the east half of the Florida

Peninsula. Frances was downgraded to a

tropical storm in the afternoon on the

5th when it was about 50 miles east of

Tampa Bay.

In Okeechobee County, little direct

observational wind data is available,

but wind estimates from the Hurricane

Research Division show sustained

hurricane force winds over most of the

county as Frances crossed the county

from east to west. Almost 700

residences were destroyed, with damage

to 22,688 residences.

Osccola County also suffered extensive

wind damage to homes, mobile homes and

businesses. Again, little wind data was

available after the storm, but

hurricane force wind gusts were

estimated to have occurred over all of

the county.

Lake, Orange and Seminole counties were

also hit hard by the rain bands on the

north side of Hurricane Frances.

Extensive damage to residences,

businesses and public buildings were

reported across the counties. It is

difficult to assess damage amounts

since the areas was swept by Hurricane

Jeanne a few weeks later. The Lake

County damage estimate was over 6

million dollars. Orlando International

Airport reported a gust to 60 kts

(69 mph). Sanford reported a gust to

61 kts (70 mph), and a home weather

station in Clermont reported a gust to

56 kts (64 mph). Widespread damage in

all the counties suggests that the area

was swept by hurricane force wind

gusts. Significant damage was done to

the area landscape industry around

Apopka.

Indian River County

East Portion Flash Flood

From 4 to 8 inches of heavy rain from

Hurricane Frances produced widespread

flooding of roads, residences and

businesses mainly in the coastal

communities.

Martin County

East Portion Flash Flood

From 4 to 8 inches of heavy rain from

Hurricane Frances produced widespread

flooding of roads, residences and

businesses mainly in the coastal

communities.

FLORIDA, East Central

St. Lucie County

East Portion Flash Flood

From 4 to 8 inches of heavy rain from

Hurricane Frances produced widespread

flooding of roads, residences and

businesses mainly in the coastal

communities.

Brevard County

Countywide Flash Flood

From 4 to 8 inches of heavy rain from

Hurricane Frances produced widespread

flooding of roads, residences and

businesses.

Lake County

Northeast Portion Flash Flood

An estimated 8 to 10 inches of rain

from Hurricane Frances fell across the

central and northern part of Lake

County, flooding roads and a few homes.

Okeechobee County

Northeast Portion Flash Flood

From 4 to 6 inches of heavy rain from

Hurricane Frances produced widespread

flooding of roads, and residences.

Orange County

West Portion Flash Flood

From 8 to 10 inches of rain from

Hurricane Frances fell across north

and west Orange County, flooding homes

and roads in the Orlando metropolitan

area.

Osceola County

North Portion Flash Flood

From 8 to 10 inches of heavy rain from

Hurricane Frances produced widespread

flooding of roads, residences and

businesses mainly in Kissimmee and

St. Cloud.

Seminole County

Countywide Flash Flood

From 8 to 10 inches of rain from

Hurricane Frances fell across much of

Seminole County, flooding homes and

roads.

Volusia County

Countywide Flash Flood

From 10 to 12 inches of rain from the

northern rainbands of Hurricane Frances

produced widespread flooding of homes,

businesses and roads across most of the

coastal communities as well as in

Deltona, and Deland.

FLZ041-047-054-059-

064 Storm Surge

Hurricane Frances made landfall at

about high tide, after midnight on the

5th. The highest surges occurred south

of Ft. Pierce Inlet. This was

associated with the inner eye wall

band as it was blowing normal to the

coast. Surge levels ran from 3 to

4 feet from Cape Canaveral, north

through Volusia County. Surge levels

ran from near 6 feet south of Cape

Canaveral to near 8 feet in Ft. Pierce.

The surge was less over Martin County,

although there was a strong longshore

current and considerable beech erosion.

FLZ041-044-046 Flood

Hurricane Frances produced 6 to 10

inches of heavy rain over much of the

middle and upper St. Johns River Basin.

Beginning around September 9th, water

levels began to reach flood stage on

the middle basin mainly around Geneva,

and Sanford. Levels continued to rise

well above flood stage and began to

fall slightly untill Hurricane Jeanne

followed the same track across the

state. Significant flooding followed

with a record crest of 10.1 feet being

reached at the Lake Harney Gage. In

Volusia County many roads and dozens of

homes were flooded, mainly in the

Stone Island and surrounding

communities. In Seminole County near

Geneva, roads, nurseries and homes

along Lake Harney were flooded. Water

came over the seawall in Sanford and

flooded numerous structures along the

south shore of Lake Monroe. In Lake

County … a few buildings and roads

were flooded near Astor. River levels

remained above flood stage through the

remainder of the month.

FLZ041-047-054-059-

064 Hurricane/Typhoon

The center of category 3 Hurricane

Jeanne reached the Florida east coast

near Sewall’s Point in Martin County

shortly after midnight on September

26th. Remarkably, this is in the same

location where Hurricane Frances came

ashore on September 5th. Jeanne was

moving to the west northwest at 12 mph

and maintained hurricane strength as it

crossed most of the Florida Peninsula.

Jeanne was downgraded to a tropical

storm in the afternoon of September

26th when it was about 40 miles

northeast of Tampa Bay. In Volusia

County, hurricane force wind gusts

began with the rain bands on the north

side of Jeanne as they moved on shore.

The county, already battered by

Hurricane Frances suffered extensive

additional damage. Fresh water flooding

from local heavy rain, and Flooding of

the St. Johns River affected more than

200 residences and business properties.

Total damage estimates were near $60

million. Hurricane winds damaged or

destroyed thousands of homes and

businesses. Hundreds of thousands of

residences were with out power. Most

official NWS surface wind equipment

failed prior to the max wind of the

storm when power was knocked out. The

highest recorded wind was only 55 knots

(63 mph), but wind damage suggest

numerous gusts in excess of hurricane

strength. The lowest recorded pressure

was 993.6 mb. In Brevard County, the

strongest winds swept across the coast

south of Cape Canaveral and the

southern coastal communities. Grant,

Micco and the south part of Palm Bay

were hit much harder than the northern

locations. County wide damages were

reported at $320 million. Especially

hard hit was the mobile home community

of Barefoot Bay. A Palm Bay man drowned

when his pickup truck ran off a road

into a deep flooded ditch. Highest wind

gusts in the county were, 79 knots

(91 mph) at the NWS Melbourne office.

Based on radar information, it is

estimated that wind gusts over 100 kts

(115 mph) swept across the southern

coastal areas. The lowest recorded

pressure for the storm was 986.8 mb at

Melbourne. Total damage estimates for

the county were near $320 million.

Indian River County was hit hard by

Jeanne being to the right of the land

falling eye. 8,300 residences were

damaged or destroyed and over 41,000

residences were damaged. Total wind

damage for the county was over $2

billion. Highest wind gusts in the

county were, 106 knots (122 mph) at

Vero Beach and 101 knots (116 mph) at

Sebastian. The lowest recorded pressure

for the county was 965.5 mb at Vero

Beach.

The north part of the hurricane eye

passed over St. Lucie County producing

$1.2 billion in wind damage. The

marinas along Ft. Pierce inlet were hit

destroying dozens of boats. A 34 year

old man was electrocuted when his truck

ran into a power line. Thousands of

homes and business were damaged and

destroyed by the wind. Especially hard

hit were the dozens of mobile home

communities. Highest wind gusts in the

county were, 111 knots (128 mph) from a

private residence just north of Ft.

Pierce inlet. The lowest recorded

pressure for the county was 952.9 mb at

Ft. Pierce.

The eye of Hurricane Jeanne passed over

the community of Sewell’ Point in

Martin County. Over 180 residences were

destroyed with about 4000 residences

either damaged or destroyed. The

highest wind speed recorded was 91 kts

(105 mph) in Jensen Beach. No pressure

data was recorded for Martin County.

Severe beach erosion occurred

compounding the damage from Hurricane

Frances just 3 weeks earlier.

FLZ041-047-054-059-

064 Storm Surge

The greatest storm tides occurred

between Brevard and St. Lucie Counties,

to the right of the landfalling eye

wall. Initial estimates of storm tides

range from 6 feet in Volusia County to

around 10 feet in St Lucie county, and

about 8 feet in Martin County. Damage

would have been greater except that

Jeanne came ashore mainly during a low

tide. At the next high tide strong wind

and rain bands were still hitting

Volusia County from the cast. Hardest

hit was the town of New Smyma Beach

where much of the sand cast of the

town’s seawall was removed.

Indian River County

2 W Vero Beach to Tornado (F1)

5 W Vero Beach

As the main eye wall of Hurricane

Jeanne crossed the coast, an F1

strength tornado-like event moved

through the northeast corner of the

intersection of Interstate 95 and

Highway 60, west of Vero Beach. In this

area there was a path of blown down

trees surrounded by trees with little

damage. The size of the area was about

.5 miles by 30 yards.

Brevard County

1 N Micco Tornado (F1)

As the center of Hurricane Jeanne was

coming on shore to the south, an F1

tornado-like event moved through the

mobile home community of Barefoot Bay

blowing down trees along a narrow well

defined area surrounded by undamaged

trees and mobile homes.

Brevard County

1 N Micco Tornado (F1)

As the center of Hurricane Jeanne was

coming on shore to the south, an F1

tornado-like event moved through the

mobile home community of Barefoot Bay,

severey damaging about a dozen mobile

homes. The damage path moved from east

to west, skipping over the residences

near the Intracoastal Waterway and

damaging the ones on the west side of

the community.

FLZ044>046-053-058 Strong Wind

As the center of Hurricane Jeanne

crossed Okeechobee County and moved

into west Central Florida, wind gusts

to near 80 mph crossed the county. No

direct wind or pressure observations

were available in the county from

Jeanne. Winds gusting to hurricane

force damaged and destroyed residences

and mobile homes, damaged roofs and out

buildings. Damage estimates were near

$10 million.

In Osceola County gusts to hurricane

strength damaged and destroyed

residences with an estimated $11

million in damage. Agricultural damage,

mainly to citrus, was $8 million.

Orange County was also hit hard by the

rain bands on the north side of

Hurricane Jeanne. Extensive damage to

residences, businesses and public

buildings were reported across the

county. Damage estimates were over $40

million. The highest wind was 60 knots

(76 mph) at Orlando International

Airport. The lowest pressure was

985.1 mb also at Orlando International

Airport.

Seminole County suffered around $4

million in damage to residences, mobile

homes, roofs pool enclosures fences and

out buildings. Agriculture damage was

near $3.6 million to citrus and the

nursery industry. Highest wind in the

county was 60 knots (69 mph) at

Sanford. The lowest pressure was

988.8 mb.

Lake County suffered around $8 million

in damage. Over 2800 residences were

damaged, with 111 destroyed. A 91 year

old woman died in a fire started by a

candle. Agriculture damage was near

$8.2 million to citrus and the nursery

industry. Highest wind in the county

was 41 knots (47 mph) at Leesburg but

estimated wind gusts of hurricane force

extended over the south half of the

county. The lowest recorded pressure

was 982.1 at Leesburg.

F91PH

Brevard County

South Portion Flash Flood

As the center of Hurricane Jeanne move

on shore to the south of Brevard County

continuous heavy tropical rain fell

across central and southern Brevard

County. Rainfall amounts of 6 to 8

inches flooded streets and roads over

Palm Bay and surrounding areas. A Palm

Palm Bay man drowned when he drove his

truck into a flooded ditch on the side

of a road. M66VE

Indian River County

Countywide Flash Flood

As the center of Hurricane Jeanne move

on shore to the south over Martin

County, continuous heavy tropical rain

fell across much of Indian River

County. Rainfall amounts of 6 to 8

inches flooded streets and roads over

Vero Beach and inland roadways.

Osceola County

Countywide Flash Flood

As the center of Hurricane Jeanne move

on shore to the south of, and then over

Osceola County, continuous heavy

tropical rain fell across central

Osceola County. Rainfall amounts of 6

to 8 inches flooded streets and roads

over communities along Highway 192 to

near St. Cloud.

FLORIDA, Extreme Southern

FLZ076>078 Hurricane/Typhoon

As Hurricane Frances tracked from the

northwest Bahamas through the central

Florida peninsula, several outer rain

bands crossed the Florida Keys

producing short episodes of strong wind

gusts. A peak wind gust of 81 knots

(93 mph) was measured at the Sombrero

Key Light C-MAN station, at an

elevation of over 150 feet above mean

sea level. Other notable wind gusts

included 55 knots (63 mph) at Sand Key

C-MAN and 59 knots (68 mph) at Molasses

Reef C-MAN. Over land, peak wind gusts

included 47 knots (54 mph) at the U.S.

Coast Guard Group Key West, and 44

knots (51 mph) at the Key West Harbor.

Stronger wind gusts were estimated

along the south side of Marathon …

near Flamingo Island … in the squall

that produced the extreme winds at

Sombrero Key Light. These winds tore

screens in porches in isolated fashion

from Big Pine Key through Grassy Key,

and blew out plastic or vinyl panels of

commercial signs in Marathon.

Otherwise, damage was limited to downed

tree limbs and minor power outages. As

Frances passed to the north, strong

northwest and west winds drove waters

higher than normal along the Florida

Bay shoreline … up to 1.0 foot above

normal at Vaca Key, and estimated to

near 2.5 feet above normal along the

bayside of North Key Largo and Jewfish

Creek. These tides produced minor

flooding of sidestreets and a parking

lot near Mile Marker 106 of the

Overseas Highway.

FLZ076>078 Hurricane/Typhoon

Hurricane Ivan tracked through the

central Gulf of Mexico after crossing

the extreme western tip of Cuba. A few

outer rain bands affected the Lower

Keys on September 14, producing wind

gusts to 46 knots (53 mph) at Key West

International Airport, and to 42 knots

(48 mph) at the Sand Key C-MAN station.

Storm tides were estimated at 1 foot

above normal … which in concert with

higher-than-usual astronomical tides

produced water levels up to 2 feet

above normal. These values were similar

to what was achieved during Hurricane

Charley. Wind damage was limited to

downed tree limbs in the Keys between

the Seven Mile Bridge and Key West.

With two previous tropical cyclone

events, the measured winds were not

enough to produce additional

significant tree damage.

Most significant was the mandatory

evacuation order of all Keys residents

and visitors beginning on September 9.

Newspapers reported up to 50 percent of

all Monroe County residents evacuated

the islands. The prolongued labor

shortages and discontinuation of

delivered goods from September 9

through September 12 caused widespread

fuel and food shortages at commercial

establishments.

FLZ076>078 Hurricane/Typhoon

Hurricane Jeanne passed from the

northwest Bahamas through the central

Florida peninsula. Unlike with

Hurricane Frances, Jeanne did not

spread widespread convective bands

through the island chain. Rainfall was

limited to the outer edge of the

stratiform rain shield … which

clipped the Upper Keys and Florida Bay.

Peak wind gusts included 44 knots

(51 mph) at Sombrero Key Light C-MAN

station, and 43 knots (49 mph) at

Molasses Reef C-MAN station. Storm

tides were once again measured at 1.0

feet above normal at Vaca Key, and

estimated at 2.5 feet above normal in

far eastern Florida Bay near North Key

Largo and Jewfish Creek. Tidal flooding

inundated a parking lot at the Jewfish

Creek bridge, similar to what was

experience with Hurricane Frances.

Spring tides in combination with the

elevated Florida Bay waters caused some

shallow tidal flooding of airport

grounds at Key West International

Airport, as the interior tidal salt

ponds rose. Westerly winds prevented

wave action from overwashing low-lying

coastal roads, however.

A voluntary evacuation of mobile homes

and special needs residents was

recommended by Monroe County Emergency

Management, with two shelters opened.

FLORIDA, Northeastern

FLZ020>025-

030>033-035>038-040 Tropical Storm

Hurricane “Frances”

Hurricane “Frances” made landfall along

the central Florida coast and, as a

weakening system, moved west-northwest

across central Florida and then

northwestwards into southwest Georgia.

This motion brought the area into the

periphery of the storm and north

Florida experienced sustained tropical

storm force winds with gusts to near

hurricane force. Across the Suwannee

Valley heavy rainfall resulted in

extensive flooding in many locations.

The lowest north Florida Mean Sea Level

Pressure (MSLP) of 987.8/29.16 in Hg

was recorded in Ocala as the center

moved to the southwest of the city. The

lowest MSLP readings across north

Florida ranged from 987.8/29.16 in HG

at Ocala Airport (KOCF) to 1002.7

mb/29.61 in Hg at the National Ocean

Systems (NOS) Tide Gage in Fernandina

Beach, Florida.

Maximum sustained winds recorded were

56 knots/64 mph at the St. Augustine

CMAN site (SAUF1) at the St. Augustine

Pier. The peak gust was also recorded

at SAUF1 with 71 knots/82 mph reported

on the evening of the 5th. Generally

inland stations (ASOS, AWOS III and

mesonet stations) reported sustained

winds of 30 to 50 mph with gusts of 40

to 65 mph. Extensive tree blow down

occurred in bands with roof and some

structural damage. Most structural

damage was associated with mobile homes

and generally weakly constructed

permanent structures. Several cases of

large trees destroying manufactured

homes were observed, especially across

Clay, Flagler, Putnam and St. Johns

Counties.

Wave heights of 10 to 20 feet were

recorded across the coastal waters with

tides running one to two feet above

astronomical tide levels. Extensive

beach erosion occurred due to long

duration of onshore winds due both to

Frances and a period of onshore flow

preceding the event.

Rainfall totals across north Florida

generally ranged from 5 to 15 inches.

The heaviest rainfall was associated

with a rainband which moved out of

Apalachee Bay across north Florida and

the Suwannee Valley. This band dropped

between 10 and 16 inches of rain from

near Ocala through the Suwannee Valley.

Peak Rainfall reports with this band

are 15.84 inches in High Springs,

Florida; 14.84 at Lake Butler, Florida;

and 13.63 inches at Orange Springs,

Florida. Extensive sheet flooding,

river flooding and road washouts

occurred with this band. Numerous homes

were flooded across the entire region

with the Trenton and Lake City areas

especially hard hit. Most rivers in the

region were pushed to flood stage with

several approaching record flood.

Portions of Interstate 10 were closed

due to flooding.

Tornadoes occurred across the region

with over 20 confirmed touchdowns. The

banded nature of the Tropical Storm

wind damage made it very difficult to

differentiate between wind damage and

tornado damage in subsequent storm

damage surveys. No fatalities or

injuries occurred due to tornado

touchdowns.

Overall extensive tree blow down, power

outages and roadways blocked by trees

were reported in all areas. In the

heavy rainfall areas many dirt and

secondary roads were left impassable

for up to a week.

Fatalities all occurred in Alachua

County, Florida. 09/05/04, 1100 EST a

28 year old male lost control of his

vehicle while northbound on Interstate

75 near Micanopy. The Vehicle

hydroplaned and skidded into a wooded

area wrapping the vehicle around trees.

KGNV observation at 1100 EST, winds 050

degrees 24 mph (21 knots) with gusts to

43 mph (37 knots). Visibility was 7

miles in light rain. 09/05/04, 1815

EST A 61 year old woman was killed when

a tree toppled onto her mobile home.

4 persons were in the home when the

tree fell. Alachua County Emergency

Management received the report at 1819

EST. KGNV observation at 1909 EST,

winds 060 degrees 37 mph (32 knots)

with gusts to 47 mph (41 knots).

09/06/04 1825 EST, An 86 year old woman

died in a house fire related to the

storm. Due to power outages she was

using candles for lighting, fell asleep

and the smoldering candles ignited a

fire in her home killing her.

M21VE, F61MH, F86PH

St. Johns County

5 E Fruit Cove to Tornado (F0)

Fruit Cove

Hurricane “Frances”

F0 tornado damage was observed along

Race Track Road. St. Johns EMA assisted

with storm damage assessment.

Marion County

Citra Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

0605 EDT

Possible tornado reported by EMA in

Citra. Roof damage occurred.

0610 EDT

General public reported a possible

tornado and roof damage on NE 168th

Street in Citra.

FLORIDA, Northeastern

Clay County

Orange Park Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

Trained spotter reported a tornado in

Orange Park. Widespread damage occurred

to trees and the power went out.

Flagler County

Mantanzas Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

F0 tornado damage to homes along Bud

Hallow Drive and Burnell Place in

Matanzas Woods.

St. Johns County

8 SSW Dupont Centre Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

F0 tornado damage to homes along

highway 13 vicinity in Flagler Estates

in southern St. Johns county. St. Johns

EMA assisted with damage assessment.

Suwannee County

Wellborn Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

NWS employee reported F0 tornado damage

along interstate 10 near the exit for

Wellborn. Trees were snapped on both

sides of the road.

Putnam County

Crescent City Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

Tornado touchdown reported by police

officers in Crescent City. Property and

tree damage was reported but a dollar

estimate was not given.

St. Johns County

2 N Bakersville Funnel Cloud

Hurricane “Frances”

Funnel cloud in Mill Creek area.

Putnam County

4 W Palatka to Tornado (F0)

Interlachen

Hurricane “Frances”

0630 EDT:

Tornado picked up trampoline 4 miles

west of Palatka. 0650 EDT:

EMA reported a tornado on the ground

near Interlachen.

Alachua County

High Spgs Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

Large trees were down in a lawn and

others were snapped off across the

road several hundred feet down highway

236 just outside of High Springs.

St. Johns County

Durbin Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

F0 tornado damage to homes near State

Road 13 North between Roberts Road and

Greenbriar Road. Dollar damage estimate

from St. Johns County EMA.

Clay County

Green Cove Spgs Tornado (F1)

Hurricane “Frances”

NWS Storm Survey found 7 power boats,

6 sailboats and 1 houseboat destroyed

and sunk by a F1 tornado. A 32 ft. boat

was picked up and put on top of a

houseboat on the other side of the

pier. The tornado crossed Black Creek

and entered the woods across U.S.

highway 17 and damaged trees.

FLORIDA, Northeastern

Putnam County

Palatka Funnel Cloud

Hurricane “Frances”

1855 EDT reported by Law Enforement:

Funnel cloud east of State

Road 19 near Palatka.

1856 EDT reported by Fire Dept/Rescue:

Funnel cloud in western

Palatka.

St. Johns County

Fruit Cove Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

F0 tornado damage along Highway 16A

southeast Fruit Cove. Dollar damage

estimate from St. Johns EMA.

St. Johns County

Fruit Cove Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

F0 tornado damage in Fruit Cove near

Shards Bridge. Dollar damage estimate

from St. Johns EMA.

Union County

5 N Raiford Funnel Cloud

Hurricane “Frances”

2 separte public reports of funnel

clouds reported by Union County

Emergency Management to State Warning

Point in northern Union county. Storms

moving NE toward Bradford County.

Marion County

Candler Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

Trained spotter reported a tornado on

the ground near Candler Hills Golf

Course. No damage was reported.

Duval County

5 E Jacksonville Intl A Funnel Cloud

Hurricane “Frances”

Occasional funnel clouds seen 5 miles

east of the Jacksonville International

Airport.

Putnam County

Interlachen Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

Public report of tornado and tree

damage in Interlachen.

St. Johns County

Durbin Funnel Cloud

Hurricane “Frances.”

St. Johns County

Durbin Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

Public report of a tornado and shingles

blown off of a roof.

Duval County

Arlington Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

F0 tornado damage extended from Fulton

Road and Fort Caroline, across Chaz

Benett to the end of Bluff Avenue. A

large oak tree was down on a home,

another down on a car and two other oak

trees greater than 12 inches in

diameter were snapped off about 25

feet in the air. People in the area

reported a roaring noise around the

time of the damage.

St. Johns County

2 W St Augustine Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Frances”

NWS storm survey and St. John’s County

EMA determined that a F0 tornado caused

damage to homes just cast of interstate

95 and south of state road 16. The

location is just a couple miles west of

St. Augustine city limits.

St. Johns County

St Augustine Hail (1.00)

Alachua County

Hawthorne Funnel Cloud

Hurricane “Frances”

Funnel clouds 8-10 miles north of

Hawthorne near U.S. 301 moving east.

Duval County

Neptune Beach Tornado (F0)

FLORIDA, Northeastern

Hurricane “Frances”

Three homes were damaged by large oak

trees and 15-20 oaks were down west of

Penman and Florida Boulevards.

FLZ022 Flood

Extensive flooding was occurring in

Lake City due to sheet flow. Numerous

roads including Interstate 10 were

flooded. Some roads were under 20 feet

of water, and the weight of the water

was pushing air out of the aquifer.

FLZ024 Flood

Numerous roads were closed due to

flooding across the county, including

bypass roads in Callahan, Griffin Road

in Callahan and Old Dixie Highway in

Callahan.

FLZ024 Flood

7 NW of Hilliard

Home in Bolougne along the St. Marys

River has 3 inches of water in the

garage.

FLZ021

Flood

15 to 20 roads remain closed countywide

due to flooding.

FLZ022

Flood

Widespread flooding continues

countywide. Numerous roads and bridges

are washed out. Rose Creek has risen

over bankfull.

FLZ035 Flood

Several houses flooded by 2 to 3 feet

of water in Trenton. Several highways

north of Trenton remain under water and

are closed.

FLZ030 Flood

Numerous roads remain underwater

countywide. County Rd. 18 East bridge

at New River is closed due to high

water.

Columbia County

Lake City Heavy Rain

Local broadcast media relayed a public

report of 2.3 inches of rainfall

occurred in 20 minutes from -1830-1850

EDT in Lake City.

St. Johns County

St Augustine Rip Current

51 year old male drowned in a rip

current.

Marion County

Dunnellon to Tornado (F1)

4 NNE Dunnellon

Hurricane “Ivan” outer rainband.

2145 EDT: Report of one home destroyed

on S W 93rd road in Dunnellon. Storm

Survey indicated F1 strength.

2145 EDT: General Public reported trees

down and roof material in road in

Rainbow Springs.

Duval County

1 S Mayport Funnel Cloud

Naval Base Mayport observed a funnel

cloud.

FLORIDA, Northeastern

FLZ020>025-

030>033-035>038-040 Tropical Storm

Hurricane “Jeanne”

Hurricane “Jeanne” made landfall along

the central Florida east coast, very

near the location of Hurricane

“Frances” some two weeks earlier. Like

Frances this system moved west-

northwest across central Florida and

then northwestwards into southern

Georgia. This motion once again brought

the area into the periphery of the

storm as north Florida and southeast

Georgia experienced sustained tropical

storm force winds with gusts to near

hurricane force along the coast. Across

the Suwannee Valley and portions of

southeast Georgia sustained winds were

higher than during “Frances” and rain

once again resulted in flooding of

many locations.

The lowest local barometric pressure of

980.0 mb/28.94 in Hg was recorded in

Ocala, Florida as the center moved to

near the city.

The lowest pressure readings across

north Florida ranged from 980.0/28.94

in HG at Ocala Airport (KOCF) to 999.4

mb/29.51 in Hg at the National Ocean

Systems (NOS) Tide Gage in Fernandina

Beach, Florida. The lowest pressure

readings across southeast Georgia

ranged from 993.9 mb/29.35 in Hg at

Douglas airport (KDQH) to 1001.4

mb/29.57 in Hg at Brunswick, Glynnco

Airport (KBQK).

Maximum sustained winds recorded were

48 knots/55 mph at the St. Augustine

CMAN site (SAUFI) on the St. Augustine

Pier.

The peak gust was also recorded at

SAUFI with 65 knots/75 mph occurring on

the 26th. Generally land stations

(ASOS, AWOS III and mesonet stations)

reported sustained winds of 30 to

50 mph with gusts of 40 to 60 mph. Tree

blow down once again occurred in bands

with roof and some structural damage

with the most pronounced damage over

the Suwannee Valley and southeast

Georgia where “Frances” was not quite

as severe. Most structural damage was

associated with mobile homes and

generally weakly constructed permanent

structures. Several cases of large

trees destroying manufactured homes

were once again observed. One child

was killed due to a tree fall.

Wave heights of 20 feet were recorded

across the coastal waters with tides

running one to two and a half feet

above astronomical tide levels on the

open ocean. Tides three to four feet

above astronomical occurred on the

St. Johns River causing flooding in low

lying areas. Extensive beach erosion

once again occurred due to long

duration of onshore winds both from

“Jeanne” as well as a period of onshore

flow preceding the event.

Rainfall totals across north Florida

and southeast Georgia generally ranged

from 3 to 7 inches. The heaviest

rainfall was once again over the

Suwannee Valley and southeast georgia

with Live Oak, Florida experiencing

10.88 inches of rain. Due to the

already saturated conditions, sheet

flooding, river flooding and road

washouts again occurred with this

event with Live Oak and southeast

Georgia hard hit. Most rivers in the

region returned to to flood stage and

portions of Interstate 10 were again

closed due to flooding. Tornadoes

occurred across the coastal region;

however, the tornado outbreak was not

as extensive as with “Frances.” The

banded nature of the Tropical Storm

wind damage again made it very

difficult to differentiate between wind

damage and tornado damage in subsequent

storm damage surveys. No fatalities or

injuries are believed to have occurred

due to tornado touchdowns. Overall tree

blow down, power outages and roadways

blocked by trees were reported in most

areas. In the heavy rainfall areas many

dirt and secondary roads were once

again left impassable. M 150U

Flagler County

Flagler Beach Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Jeanne”

An F0 tornado ripped communications

antennas from the roof of Aliki Tower

Condominiums in Flagler Beach.

FLZ033 Heavy Surf/High Surf

Significant beach erosion occurred

along the St. Johns county coastline.

Many places had 14-20 feet of shoreline

lost and some areas had up to 30 feet

of shorelines lost.

Flagler County

Codys Corner to Tornado (F0)

21 NW Codys Corner

Hurricane “Jeanne”

Trees and powerlines were down along a

path from Cody’s Corner toward the

Flalger and St. Johns County line,

south of Hastings. Florida Power and

Light damage maps and an aerial storm

survey were used to determine the

damage path.

St. Johns County

8 W Crescent Beach to Tornado (F0)

2 S Dupont Centre

1455 EDT: A 911 operator relayed a

public report of a tornado touchdown

near U.S. 1 South, about a mile and a

half south of State Road 206. Numerous

trees and powerlines were blown down,

and damage occurred to at least one

home in the area.

1500 EDT: County EM reported up to 5

mobile homes were damaged, including

ones located at 7616 and 7625 U.S. 1

South. Numerous trees and powerlines

were down in the area as well.

Nassau County

American Beach Funnel Cloud

Hurricane “Jeanne”

A funnel cloud was moving onshore near

American Beach. Reported by Nancy

Freeman (Nassau EM).

FLZ025 Flood

At 1833 EDT, the public reported

flooding at 105 and Blanding Blvd in

the Ortega area. Ocean waters were also

coming inland through beach access

areas at this time.

St. Johns County

Fruit Cove Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Jeanne”

Residential damage occurred in extreme

NW St. Johns county from an F0 tornado.

St. Johns EMA damage reports and logs,

as well as a storm survey were used to

determine it was indeed tornado damage.

St. Johns County

Palm Vly Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Jeanne”

Residential damage occurred on Bumham

Circle and Timberlake Point in

northeast St. Johns county. St. Johns

EMA damage reports and logs were used

to diagnose that is was indeed tomadic

damage.

St. Johns County

Bakersville Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Jeanne”

F0 tornado damage occurred along County

Road 13 N in St. Johns County. St.

Johns EMA damage reports and logs were

used to determine that the damage was

from a tornado.

FLZ022 Flood

NWS Storm Survey revealed widespread

flooding throughout the county. Several

homes were flooded from rising waters

of the Same Fe and Suwannee rivers due

to tropical rainfall from Jeanne.

FLORIDA, Northwest

FLZ010>012-

014>019-026>029-034 Tropical Storm

Hurricane Frances came ashore on the

east coast of Florida near Sewall’s

Point during the early morning hours

of September 5. Frances weakened as it

crossed the central peninsula, and

reemerged over the northeast Gulf of

Mexico 24 hours later as a tropical

storm. Frances made its second landfall

near St. Marks, FL, around mid-

afternoon on September 6. A maximum

sustained wind of 53 knots was

recorded at the USAF C-Tower, 20 miles

southeast of Apalachicola, FL. A peak

wind gust of 63 knots was recorded at

Buoy 42036, 80 miles southeast of

Apalachicola. The lowest sea-level

pressure was 984.4 mb at Tallahassee,

FL. Rainfall from Frances ranged from

a half inch at Panama City, FL, to 4.5

inches at Madison, FL. Storm tides

along the northeast Gulf coast ranged

from three to five feet. There were

widespread reports of downed trees and

power lines in the Florida Big Bend,

with more scattered reports in the

Florida Panhandle. Several homes were

damaged by fallen trees. An estimated

70,000 customers were without power.

90 percent of Jefferson County was

powerless for four days. A state of

emergency was declared for the affected

areas.

FLZ007>019-

026>029-034 Hurricane/Typhoon

Hurricane Ivan made landfall near Gulf

Shores, AL, during the predawn hours of

September 16. Maximum sustained winds

reached 50 knots, with gusts to 62

knots at Buoy 42039, 80 miles south of

Panama City, FL. The lowest sea-level

pressure was 999.6 mb at Panama City.

Rainfall totals ranged from 9.26 inches

at Mossy Head, FL, to 0.15 inches at

Cross City, FL. Storm tides along the

Gulf coast varied from ten feet in Bay

and Walton counties to four feet in

Taylor and Dixie counties. Large swells

from Ivan began to the affect the Gulf

coast from the St. Joseph Peninsula to

the Suwannee River on September 14.

Storm surges continued for several

hours after landfall. Beach erosion

varied from extreme (20 to 40 feet) in

Walton County to minor at St. George

Island. Minor areal flooding affected

much of the Florida Panhandle,

including Walton, Bay, Holmes,

Calhoun, Jackson and Gulf counties.

Sharp Choctawhatchee River at

Caryville, the Apalachicola River at

Blountstown, and the Shoal River at

Mossy Head. An estimated 165,000

customers were without power. There

were widespread reports of downed trees

and power lines. The hardest hit areas

were Gulf, Bay, and Walton counties,

where more than 50 percent of homes and

businesses were damaged or destroyed.

Numerous roads in the Panhandle coastal

counties were flooded or washed out.

Intense outer rain bands from Ivan

spawned numerous tornadoes over

portions of the Florida Panhandle and

Big Bend. The hardest hit counties were

Bay, Calhoun, and Jackson counties,

which accounted for six deaths and 16

injuries. Mandatory evacuations of low

lying, coastal, and mobile home

residents was ordered by officials in

Bay, Walton, Jackson, Holmes, Jackson,

Franklin, and Taylor counties. A state

of emergency and presidential request

for federal assistance were declared

for the affected counties. F77PH,

M84BU, M55PH, F35PH, M41PH, F37PH

Gulf County

Beacon Hill to Tornado (F0)

3 NW Beacon Hill

A tornado touched down in Beacon Hill.

Minor damage to a few homes, as well as

downed trees and power lines occurred

along its path. Reported by the Gulf

County EMA.

Bay County

7 SW Panama City to Tornado (F1)

4 W Panama City

A strong F1 tornado touched down near

the St Andrews recreation area. It

damaged dozens of restaurants, stores

and shops as it moved north along

Thomas Drive. Seven persons were

injured at a seafood restaurant near

Grand Lagoon. An elderly man was killed

when the tornado destroyed a real

estate office. The tornado moved across

St Andrews Bay near the Hathaway Bridge

and then 100 yards south of the WJHG-TV

station before dissipating. Reported by

the Bay County EMA and WJHG-TV

meteorologist.

Bay County

5 SE Allanton to Tornado (F1)

Allanton

A wood-frame house was lifted 60 feet

off its foundation and thrown into a

field. Of the seven family members

inside, one was killed and another

injured. Several other homes were

damaged. Reported by a HAM radio

operator. F77PH

Bay County

2 SE Calloway to Tornado (F1)

Cedar Grove

A tornado touched down just southeast

of Calloway and lifted just north of

Panama City. It destroyed several homes

in Calloway, Parker and Cedar Grove,

and downed numerous trees and power

lines. Reported by a HAM radio operator

and the Bay County EMA.

Bay County

3 SE Youngstown to Tornado (F0)

4 NW Youngstown

A tornado toppled numerous trees and

power lines along its path. Reported by

a HAM radio operator.

Washington County

2 NE Gilberts Mill to Tornado (F0)

2 NW Chipley

A tornado caused minor damage to

several homes, and downed trees and

power lines. Reported by the Washington

County EMA.

Holmes County

5 NE Bonifay to Tornado (F1)

6 N Bonifay

A tornado destroyed one home and

damaged several others. Scattered trees

and power lines were down. Reported by

the Holmes County EMA.

FLZ008-012-014

Storm Surge

Storm surges of eight to ten feet

caused extreme beach erosion along the

coast. Many beach structures were

damaged or undermined, and many sand

dunes were lost. Reported by the Walton

County EMA.

Franklin County

5 NW Carrabelle to Tornado (F0)

10 NW Carrabelle

A tornado uprooted numerous trees along

its path between Carrabelle and Morgan

Place. Reported by the Franklin County

EMA.

Liberty County

10 SE Wilma to Tornado (F1)

5 NE Wilma

A tornado uprooted hundreds of trees

along its path through the Apalachicola

National Forest. Reported by the

Liberty County EMA.

FLORIDA, Northwest

Calhoun County

4 N Blountstown to Tornado (F2)

1 E Altha

The supercell thunderstorm which

spawned tornadoes in Franklin and

Liberty counties, produced a strong F2

tornado, which touched down just

southeast of Van Lierop Road, a few

miles east of Highway 69. It crossed

Highway 69 near the Stafford Creek

Bridge, and peeled roofs from dozens of

homes, uprooted trees, and scattered

debris. The tornado then struck the

Macedonia Community at Highway 69-A and

Parrish Lake Road. It demolished three

trailers and damaged 30 homes. The

tornado picked up two neighboring

mobile homes. One was thrown across a

road and killed its two occupants.

Another was slammed into a neighbor’s

house, which killed its two occupants

and injured five others. Reported by

the Calhoun County EMA. M55PH, F35PH,

M41PH, F37PH

Jackson County

6 SE Marianna to Tornado (F2)

6 N Marianna

A strong F2 tornado touched down about

four miles west of Cypress. It damaged

10 mobile homes and destroyed 25 others

in the Gold Drive Trailer Park. Three

occupants were injured. The tornado

moved northwest and damaged 10 mobile

homes in the Brogdon Lane Trailer Park

on U.S. Highway 90 just east of

Marianna. It caused significant damage

to the Federal Correctional Institution

and destroyed eight vehicles. Before

lifting, the tornado destroyed the

Sykes Enterprise facility and some

vehicles near the Marianna Municipal

Airport. Reported by the Jackson County

EMA.

Jefferson County

4 NE Lloyd to Tornado (F0)

5 N Lloyd

A weak tornado touched down just south

of Lake Miccosukee. It caused minor

damage to a home, and downed numerous

trees and power lines along its

northeast Leon County. Reported by a

NWS employee and the Jefferson County

EMA.

Leon County

4.5 SE Miccosukee to Tornado (F0)

3 S Miccosukee

The weak tornado moved from northwest

Jefferson County into adjacent

northeast Leon County. It destroyed a

shed and caused minor damage to a home.

Some trees were uprooted. Reported by a

NWS employee and the Leon County EMA.

Taylor County

Steinhatchee Tornado (F0)

A waterspout moved onshore and caused

minor damage to several homes, as well

as downed trees and power lines.

Reported by the Taylor County EMA.

FLZ015-017>019-

027>029-034

Tropical Storm

Hurricane Jeanne made landfall on the

east coast of Florida near Stuart on

the evening of September 25. Jeanne

weakened to a tropical storm over

central and northwest Florida on

September 26. Maximum sustained winds

reached 42 knots at the USAF C-Tower in

the northeast Gulf of Mexico. The peak

wind gust and lowest sea-level pressure

were 54 knots and 982.1 mb,

respectively, at Cross City, FL.

Rainfall totals varied from 0.89 inches

at Apalachicola, FL, to 7.60 inches at

Mayo, FL. Storm surges along the

northeast Gulf coast ranged from two to

four feet. Areal flooding was reported

in portions of the eastern Florida Big

Bend. Schools and several local

businesses were closed on September 27.

Nearly 90,000 customers were without

power. There were widespread reports of

downed trees and power lines. 215 homes

were damaged and 18 destroyed in Dixie

County. A state of emergency was

declared for the affected counties.

Federal assistance was granted for

Jefferson, Madison, Lafayette, Taylor,

and Dixie counties.

FLZ034

Flood

Torrential rainfall from Tropical Storm

Jeanne washed out 30 county roads and

isolated 300 homes by high water.

Reported by the Dixie County EMA.

FLZ029

Flood

A half foot of water closed several

county roads around State Road 349 and

U.S. Highway 27. Reported by the

Lafayette County EMA.

FLORIDA, Southern

FLZ063-066>070-072-

074

Hurricane/Typhoon

Hurricane Frances formed from a

tropical depression in the deep

tropical Atlantic on August 25 about

1400 miles east of the Lesser Antilles

and reached hurricane strength on

August 26. Frances became a Category 4

Hurricane on August 28 while about 700

miles east of the Lesser Antilles.

Frances then moved generally west

northwest and weakened to a Category 2

hurricane while crossing the northwest

Bahamas. After stalling for about 12

hours on September 4 in the Florida

Straits between Grand Bahama Island and

the southeast Florida coast, the center

of the nearly 70-mile diameter eye

crossed the Florida coast near Sewalls

Point, at 1 A.M. EDT, September 5, 2004

with the southern eyewall affecting the

extreme northeast portion of Palm Beach

County. Frances moved farther inland

just north of Lake Okeechobee and

weakened to a tropical storm before

crossing the entire Florida Peninsula

and exiting into the Gulf of Mexico

just north of Tampa late on September

5. It made a second landfall as a

tropical storm in the eastern Florida

Panhandle.

Sustained tropical storm-force winds

likely occurred in all six south

Florida counties. Although no sustained

hurricane-force winds were officially

observed in any of the six south

Florida counties, an NWS instrument on

the eastern shore of Lake Okeechobee at

Port Mayaca, just across the Palm Beach

County border, measured a sustained

wind of 85 mph. At West Palm Beach

International Airport the highest

sustained wind was 64 mph with a peak

gust of 82 mph and the lowest observed

barometric pressure was 972 mb. A South

Florida Water Management District

instrument measured a peak wind gust of

92 mph over the eastern portion of Lake

Okeechobee. The estimated peak wind

gust in the Palm Beach metro area was

91 mph at Jupiter Inlet with a peak

wind gust of 87 mph measured by a C-MAN

station at Lake Worth Pier. In Glades

County near the western shore of Lake

Okeechobee the highest measured

sustained wind was 60 mph with a peak

gust of 90 mph. In Clewiston, a

sustained wind of 60 mph with a gust of

80 mph was estimated. The highest

measured sustained wind at Fort

Lauderdale-Hollywood International

Airport was 41 mph with a peak gust of

55 mph. In Miami-Dade County a maximum

sustained wind of 62 mph with a peak

gust of 78 mph was measured at the

C-MAN station at Fowey Rocks Light with

sustained winds of 42 mph and a peak

gust of 59 mph at Miami International

Airport. At the Naples Municipal

Airport the ASOS measured a maximum

sustained wind of 38 mph with a peak

gust of 54 mph.

A maximum storm-total rainfall amount

of 13.56 inches was measured at West

Palm Beach International Airport with

10.36 inches of that occurring in a

24-hour period. Unofficial storm-total

rainfalls included 9.56 inches at

Boynton Beach, 8 inches at Deerfield

Beach and 7.18 inches at Hillsboro

Canal. Widespread storm-total amounts

of 3 to 5 inches occurred in southeast

and interior south Florida with

southwest Florida averaging 1 to 3

inches. Rainfall flooding was mostly

minor except for a few locations in

Palm Beach County which had up to 3

feet of standing water. A section of

1-95 in Palm Beach County was closed

due to a large sinkhole.

The maximum storm surge was estimated

to have ranged from 2 to 4 feet along

the northeast Palm Beach Coast to 1 to

2 feet along the northeast Broward

Coast. Within the confines of the

Herbert Hoover Dike, water levels on

Lake Okeechobee fluctuated up to 5

feet above and below normal. Coastal

beach erosion was moderate in Palm

Beach and portions of Broward counties

and was minor in Miami-Dade and Collier

counties.

There were no confirmed tornadoes.

There were no known direct deaths, but

at least 9 people died in the

aftermath. Six of these deaths occurred

in Palm Beach County, mainly as the

result of vehicle-related accidents or

from drownings. Two vehicle-related

deaths were reported in Broward County

and one person died in Collier County

while clearing debris. An unknown

number of injuries occurred.

Property damage at the coast occurred

mainly to marinas, piers, seawalls,

bridges and docks, as well as to boats.

Inland structure damage included 15,000

houses and 2,400 businesses in Palm

Beach County. Wind damage to house

roofs, mobile homes, trees, power

lines, signs, screened enclosures and

outbuildings occurred over much of

southeast Florida including areas near

Lake Okeechobee, but was greatest in

Palm Beach County.

A preliminary damage estimate for

Frances in south Florida is $620

million, including $500 million in Palm

Beach, $80 million in Broward, and $34

million in Miami-Dade. Crop damage in

Palm Beach County was estimated at an

additional $70 million to sugar cane

vegetables and additional heavy losses

occurred to nurseries.

Florida Power and Light reported power

outages occurred to 659,000 customer in

Palm Beach, 590,000 in Broward, 423,000

Miami-Dade, 39,200 in Collier, 2,500 in

Hendry and 1,700 in Collier. An

estimated 17,000 persons sought refuge

in public shelters in Palm Beach County

and nearly 7,000 in Broward County.

Palm Beach

Jupiter Tornado (F0)

A tornado briefly touched down near

Central Boulevard and 1-95.

Palm Beach

Jupiter Funnel Cloud

A SKYWARN spotter saw a funnel cloud

that quickly dissipated.

FLORIDA, Southern

FLZ063

Flood

Rain from Hurricane Frances caused

minor flooding on Fisheating Creek with

a maximum water level of 7.5 feet or

0.5 feet above flood stage.

Collier County

East Naples Tornado (F1)

A tornado touched down in a vacant

construction site just south of the

Imperial Wilderness Mobile Home Park

then moved northwest through the MHP.

Damage was sustained to twenty homes

with six suffering major damage.

Collier County

East Naples Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down 5 miles east of

SR 951 south of U.S> 41 doing damage to

trees and minor damage to a few mobile

homes.

Palm Beach County

Boynton Beach Hail (0.75)

A SKYWARN spotter reported hail

three-quarter of and inch in diameter.

Palm Beach County

Belle Glade Funnel Cloud

A funnel cloud was seen by Police.

FLZ063-066>068-072-

74

Hurricane/Typhoon

Hurricane Jeanne formed from a tropical

depression just east of the Leeward

Islands on September 13. She moved

across Puerto Rico and Hispaniola then

turned north into the Atlantic and

became a hurricane on September 20.

Jeanne made a clockwise loop for three

days in the Atlantic north of

Hispaniola before moving west

northwest. It strengthened to a

Category 3 Hurricane while over the

northwest Bahamas and then make

landfall around 11 P.M., September 25

near the south end of Hutchinson

Island, nearly coincident with the

landfall point of Hurricane Frances

nearly three week before. The 40-mile

diameter eye was not quite as large as

Frances, but the southern eyewall again

affected northeast Palm Beach County.

After landfall Jeanne initially moved

along a track similar to Frances, just

north of Lake Okeechobee as it weakened

to a tropical storm then it turned to

the northwest and moved over the

northwest Florida Peninsula.

Although slightly smaller and stronger

then Hurricane Frances, winds and

pressures over southeast Florida were

remarkably similar to Frances.

Unfortunately, the ASOS at West Palm

Beach International Airport quit

sending data during the height of the

hurricane. Sustained tropical

storm-force winds likely occurred over

most of Palm Beach and northeast Glades

counties and portions of Broward,

Hendry and Collier counties. Although

no sustained hurricane-force winds were

officially observed in any of the six

south Florida counties, portions of

northern Palm Beach County mostly

likely experienced them. A South

Florida Water Management District

(SFWMD) instrument in the Martin County

portion of Lake Okeechobee measured a

15-minute sustained wind of 79 mph with

a peak gust of 105 mph. In metropolitan

Palm Beach the highest official

sustained wind speed was 60 mph with a

peak gust of 94 mph from the C-MAN

station at Lake Worth Pier. An

unofficial peak wind gust of 125 mph

was measured in West Palm Beach at the

Solid Waste Treatment Plant. In Glades

County near the western shore of Lake

Okeechobee the highest sustained wind

measured at a SFWMD instrument was 68

mph with a peak gust of 94 mph. Near

Clewiston the highest measured

sustained wind was 31 mph with a peak

wind gust of 72 mph from a SFWMD

instrument. The highest measured

sustained wind in Broward County was 46

mph with a peak wind gust of 67 mph

from the ASOS site at Pompano Beach

Airpark. At Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood

International Airport the ASOS site

measured a maximum sustained wind of 40

mph with a peak gust of 56 mph. In

Miami-Dade County a maximum sustained

wind of 49 mph with a peak gust of 59

59 mph was measured at the C-MAN

station at Fowey Rocks Light with

sustained winds of 26 mph and gusts to

36 mph at Miami International Airport

ASOS. At the Naples Municipal Airport,

the ASOS maximum sustained wind was

measured at 33 mph with a peak gust of

45 mph. The lowest barometric pressure

of 960.4 mb was measured at a SFWMD

site in the Martin County portion of

Lake Okeechobee.

A SFWMD gage measured a maximum

storm-total rainfall amount of 10.22

inches over the eastern portion of Lake

Okeechobee. A SFWMD gage about four

miles west of West Palm Beach

International Airport measured 9.10

inches with 8.79 inches of that

occurring in a 24-hour period. At Moore

Haven, 5.99 inches of rain was

measured. Widespread storm-total

amounts of one to four inches occurred.

in most of southeast and interior south

Florida with Miami-Dade County and

Collier County averaging one half to

one inch. Mostly minor rainfall

flooding was observed except locally

severe in Palm Beach Gardens, Jupiter

and in the farmlands of western Palm

Beach County.

The estimated maximum storm surge

ranged from two to four feet along the

northeast Palm Beach Coast to one to

to feet along the northeast Broward

Coast. Within the confines of the

Herbert Hoover Dike, water levels on

Lake Okeechobee fluctuated up to seven

feet above and below normal causing

severe flooding of some marinas. Beach

erosion was moderate in Palm Beach and

minor in Broward and Miami-Dade

counties.

There were no confirmed tornadoes.

There were no known direct deaths but

four persons died in the aftermath. An

unknown number of injuries occurred.

Property damage from storm surge and

winds at the coast occurred to condos,

marinas, piers, seawalls, bridges and

docks, as well as to boats and a few

coastal roadways. Inland wind damage to

building roofs, mobile homes, trees,

power lines, signs, and outbuildings

occurred over mainly over Palm Beach

County and portions of eastern Glades

and Hendry counties.

A preliminary damage estimate for

Jeanne in southeast Florida is $330

million, including $260 million in Palm

Beach, $50 million in Broward and $10

million in Miami-Dade. Agricultural

Damage in Palm Beach County was

estimated at $30 million.

Florida Power and Light reported

outages occurred to 591,300 customers

in Palm Beach, 165,900 in Broward,

25,100 in Miami-Dade, 5,200 in Collier,

3,000 in Hendry and 1,500 in Glades. An

estimated 12,534 persons sought refuge

in public shelters in Palm Beach

County..

FLZ063

Flood

Heavy rain from Hurricane Jeanne caused

moderate flooding on Fisheating Creek.

The highest observed height was 8.3

feet which was 1.3 feet above flood

stage.

Miami–Dade County

Kendall Flash Flood

Extensive street flooding was observed

with depths up to eighteen inches. Some

minor flooding of residences occurred.

FLORIDA, West Central

Citrus County

1 E Chassahowitzka Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer one

mile east of Chassahowitzka recorded

15.81″ and another observer six miles

north of Hernado recorded 10.55″.

Hardee County

1 S Gardner Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer

one mile south of Gardner recorded

8.57″.

Hernando County

Brooksville Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer in

Brooksville recorded 10.82″.

Highlands County

2 E Avon Park Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer two

miles east of Avon Park recorded 6.37″.

Hillsborough County

3 N Thonotosassa Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer

three miles north of Thonotosassa

recorded 11.07″.

Levy County

15 SE Chiefland to Heavy Rain

6 NE Chiefland

A National Weather Service observer six

miles northeast of Suwannee recorded

15.44″ and another observer recorded

Yankeetown 11.02

Manatee County

3 SE Ellenton Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer

three miles southeast of Ellenton

recorded 6.16″.

Pasco County

1.8 S Land O Lakes Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer

three miles north of Lutz recorded

8.71″.

Pinellas County

5 E Tarpon Spgs Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer

five miles east of Tarpon Springs

recorded 7.59″.

Polk County

3 E Lakeland Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer

three miles east of Lakeland recorded

8.70″.

Sumter County

5 NW Lake Panasoffke Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer

five miles northwest of Lake

Panasoffkce recorded 8.67″. The

relatively slow moving Hurricane

Frances produced rainfall of 10 to 16

inches along the track of the eyewall

in west central Florida. Further south,

the counties of Sarasota, DeSoto,

Charlotte and Lee all recorded three

day rainfall totals mostly between 2 to

4 inches.

Polk County

2 E Kathleen to Tornado (F0)

3 S Kathleen

A tornado was reported by the public

near Kathleen. The location and time of

this tornado were based on radar.

FLZ039-042-048>051-

055-061>062-065 Tropical Storm

Hurricane Frances made landfall just

after midnight on September 5th near

Vero Beach as a Category 2 storm. The

hurricane continued to move slowly west

northwestward across central Florida to

near Bartow by 2 pm, and just northeast

of Tampa by 8 pm, when it was down-

graded to a tropical storm. It then

emerged back into Gulf of Mexico near

Hudson shortly before midnight.

Hurricane Frances took almost 24 hours

to move through the Florida peninsula.

Frances continued northwestward through

the northern gulf of Mexico, making a

second landfall on the afternoon of

September 6th in the Florida big bend

near Tallahasse as a tropical storm.

In Lee County the observation at Big

Carlos Pass recorded a gust to 51 knots

(59 MPH) from the west at 12:18 AM EST

on 09/05/2004. One direct death was

reported when an elderly man was blown

over by a wind gust while walking his

dog 10 feet outside of his home. He hit

his head on the sidewalk and died from

blunt force trauma. Fourteen homes were

destroyed by the wind.

In Sarasota and Manatee Counties the

maximum wind recorded at the Sarasota-

Bradenton Airport was 46 knots (53 MPH)

from the northwest at 12:07 PM EST on

09/05/2004.

In Charlotte County there was was a

foot of water in Downtown Punta Gorda

due to a “back door” storm surge of 5

ft into Charlotte Harbor. Tarps on

roofs from Hurricane Charley were blown

off of many roofs during Hurricane

Frances. The observation from the Punta

Gorda Airport recorded a maximum wind

of 50 knots (58 MPH) from the southwest

at 12:21 AM on 09/06/2004.

In Hillsborough County most of the

damage was a result of trees falling on

homes, businesses, and power lines.

Debris removal alone was $24 million

(not included in damage estimate

above). The observation from the

Sunshine Skyway Bridge recorded 55

knots (63 MPH) from the north at 9:18

AM EST on 09/05/2004. Two indirect

deaths were reported; one was a man who

hit a pole while driving in the rain,

the other was a Utility Repair

Supervisor who was hit by a falling

branch while removing tree debris.

In Pasco County there was major damage

to 114 homes, minor damage to 782

homes, and 459 reports of flood damage.

The observation from Anclote Key

recorded a wind gust of 61 knots (70

mph) from the north late on the

09/04/2004.

In Hernando County there were numerous

reports of flooded streets and homes.

Other reports included trees on homes,

shingles off roofs, mobile home and

fascia damage, and pool enclosures with

moderate damage. The observation from

the Brooksville airport

recorded a maximum wind of 47 knots

(54 MPH) from the north at 1:02 PM EST

on 09/05/2004.

In Citrus County a wind instrument at

the Crystal River Power Plant recorded

a gust to 45 knots (52 MPH) around 4

PM EST on 09/06/2004.

In Levy County the observation at Cedar

Key recorded a gust to 51 knots (59

MPH) from the south at 2 PM EST on

09/06/2004.

The damage total listed was estimated

by doubling the insured losses unless

otherwise noted. The doubling accounted

for uninsured losses and damge to the

public infrastructure. Flood damage was

included within these totals because it

was not possible to extract the flood

damage information from the available

data. M81PH

FLZ043-052-056>057 High Wind (G60)

Hurricane Frances made landfall just

after midnight on September 5th near

Vero Beach as a Category 2 storm. The

hurricane continued to move slowly west

northwestward across central Florida to

near Bartow by 2 pm, and just northeast

of Tampa by 8 pm, when it was down-

graded to a tropical storm. It then

emerged back into the Gulf of Mexico

near Hudson shortly before midnight.

Hurricane Frances took almost 24 hours

to move through the Florida peninsula.

Frances continued northwestward through

the northern gulf of Mexico, making a

second landfall on the afternoon of

September 6th in the Florida big bend

near Tallahassee as a tropical storm.

The damage totals listed were caused by

trees downed on homes and overland and

river flooding.

In Polk County there were four indirect

deaths reported; two were separate

incidents of people falling off of a

roof while cleaning storm debris and

two FEMA contract employees were killed

when their aircraft clipped a tower and

crashed while they were spraying for

mosquitoes due to excessive standing

water from Hurricane Frances.

In Highlands County there was one

indirect death of a man falling off his

roof while cleaning storm debris.

In Sumter County there was one indirect

death of a man by carbon monoxide

poisoning from a generator running

inside his home.

The damage total listed was estimated

by doubling the insured losses unless

otherwise noted. The doubling accounts

for uninsured losses and damage to the

public infrastructure. Flood damage was

included within these totals because it

was not possible to extract the infor-

mation from the available data.

FLZ049>051-055-062 Astronomical High Tide

Tropical storm force winds from the

southwest produced tides one to five

feet above normal from New Port Richey

south to Punta Gorda as Hurricane

Frances moved northwest just north of

downtown Tampa. One foot of water was

found in downtown Punta Gorda as tides

in Charlotte Harbor reached five feet

above normal. Tides were two to three

feet above normal elsewhere and

produced moderate beach erosion from

Venice to Clearwater and flooding low

lying homes near downtown Saint

Petersburg.

Polk County

3 SW Bartow to Tornado (F0)

2.7 SW Bartow

A feeder band behind Hurricane Frances

produced a brief tornado. Radar

estimated the storm’s movement to be

northeast at 45 mph.

FLZ049-051>052-

055>056-061 Flood

Widespread heavy rain associated with

Hurricane Frances across west central

Florida lead to record flooding on many

of the rivers.

In Pasco County, Cypress Creek at

Worthington Gardens (flood stage 8

feet) reached it’s all time high of

13.78 feet on the 11th and the Anclote

River at Elfers (flood stage 20 feet)

reached the 7th highest stage ever at

24.44 feet on the 7th.

In Hillsborough County, The Hills-

borough River at the Morris Bridge

(flood stage 32 feet) reached it’s all

time high of 34.38 feet on the 8th, the

Alafia River at Lithia (flood stage 13

feet) reached the 5th highest stage at

22.33 feet on the 7th, and the Little

Manatee River at Wiamauma (flood stage

11 feet) reach 17.09 feet on the 7th.

The Peace River at Bartow in Polk

County (flood stage 8 feet) reached

it’s all time high of 17.21 feet on the

11th.

The Peace River in Zolfo Springs in

Hardee County (flood stage 16 feet)

reached the 5th highest stage of 22.42

feet on the 8th.

Finally, the Manatee River at Myakka

Head in Manatee County (flood stage 11

feet) reached 15.94 feet on the 11th.

Damage estimates were included in the

hurricane report because it was not

possible to extract the flood damage

information from the available data.

Pasco County

3 SSW Aripeka Tornado (F0)

The broadcast media relayed a report of

a tornado in Sea Pines with several

trees down, including a 60 foot tall

tree across the road.

FLZ039-050>051-055-

60 Astronomical High Tide

Hurricane Ivan moved north through the

eastern Gulf of Mexico and produced

tides one to four feet above normal

along the Gulf Coast of Florida. The

higher than normal tides combined with

a pounding surf to cause moderate to

major beach erosion along Florida’s

Gulf Coast. Sarasota County reported

moderate beach erosion at Turtle Beach

on Siesta Key. Manatee County reported

moderate beach erosion at Bradenton

Beach. In Tampa Bay tides were 1.26

feet above normal at Port Manatee, 3.50

feet above normal in Hillsborough Bay,

and 1.34 feet above normal at the St.

Pete Pier. Clearwater recorded tides

1.51 feet above normal and tides at

Cedar Key were 1.91 feet above normal.

Levy County

Williston Tornado (F0)

Emergency Management reported a brief

tornado touchdown in the city of

Williston.

Levy County

Bronson Tornado (F0)

Emergency Management reported a brief

tornado touchdown in the city of

Bronson.

Lee County

1 WSW Cape Coral Tornado (F0)

The Cape Coral Fire Chief reported a

brief tornado with damage limited to

lanai and roof fascia at 15 homes near

the water on the corner of Southwest

25th Place and Beach Parkway West.

Lee County

5 NNW Captiva Tornado (F0)

A waterspout over Pine Island Sound

moved west across Pine Island then into

the Gulf of Mexico.

FLZ043-056 Strong Wind

FLZ052-057 High Wind (G61)

Hurricane Jeanne followed the nearly

the same path across Florida as

Hurricane Frances three weeks earlier

and was the unprecedented fourth

hurricane to damage Florida during the

2004 hurricane season. The hurricane

moved ashore along the east coast of

Florida near Stuart late on September

25th with an eye 30 to 40 miles across.

Joanne took a course north of Lake

Okeechobee and decreased to a tropical

storm in eastern Polk County around 9

AM EDT on the 26th. The center of

Jeanne curved north of Tampa Bay during

the afternoon and travelled north along

the coastal counties before exiting

north through Levy County around 10 PM.

In Highlands County there were 140

homes destroyed and 2,000 homes with

major damage. Emergency Management

estimated the total damage to be $452

million. A peak wind of 82 knots

(94 MPH) was recorded in Sebring at 3

AM EST on 09/26/2004.

In Polk County a peak wind gust of 67

knots (77 MPH) was recorded in both

Frostproof and Bartow between 5-6 AM

EST on 09/26/2004.

In Hardee and Sumter Counties the

damage was limited to trees falling on

homes, vehicles, and power lines.

The damage total was estimated by

doubling the insured losses unless

otherwise noted. The doubling accounted

for uninsured losses and damge to the

public infrastructure. Flood damage was

included within these totals because it

was not possible to extract the flood

damage information from the available

data.

FLZ039-042-048>051-

055-060>062-065 Tropical Storm

Hurricane Joanne followed the nearly

the same path across Florida as

Hurricane Frances three weeks earlier

and was the unprecedented fourth

hurricane to damage Florida during the

2004 hurricane season. The hurricane

moved ashore along the east coast of

Florida near Stuart late on September

25th with an eye 30 to 40 miles across.

Jeanne took a course north of Lake

Okeechobee and decreased to a tropical

storm in caster Polk County around 9 AM

EDT on the 26th. The center of Jeanne

curved north of Tampa Bay during the

afternoon and traveled north along the

coastal counties before exiting north

through Levy County around 10 PM.

In Hillsborough County the observation

from the Vandenburg airport recorded a

maximum wind gust of 58 knots (67 MPH)

from the north at 8:58 AM EST on

09/26/2004.

In Pasco County the COMPS Fred Howard

Park Coastal Station recorded a wind

gust of 66 knots (76 mph) from the

northwest at 12:54 PM EST on

09/26/2004.

In Hernando County the observation from

the Brooksville airport recorded a

maximum wind of 54 knots (62 MPH) from

the north at 11:26 AM EST on

09/26/2004.

In Levy County the observation from

Cedar Key recorded a gust to 40 knots

(46 MPH) from the northeast at 5 PM EST

on 09/26/2004.

In Sarasota County the maximum wind

recorded at the Sarasota-Bradenton

Airport was 55 knots (63 MPH) from the

northwest at 10:04 AM EST on

09/26/2004.

In Charlotte there was was 1.5 feet of

water in downtown Punta Gorda due to a

back doorstorm surge of 5.5 ft into

Charlotte Harbor. Tarps on roofs from

Hurricane Charley were blown off of

many roofs during Hurricane Jeanne. The

observation from the Punta Gorda

Airport recorded a maximum wind of 53

knots (61 MPH) from the west at 7:17 AM

EST on 09/26/2004.

In Lee County the Big Carlos Pass

observation recorded a gust to 49 knots

(56 MPH) from the west southwest at

7:42 AM EST on 09/26/2004.

The damage total was estimated by

doubling the insured losses unless

otherwise noted. The doubling accounted

for uninsured losses and damage to the

public infrastructure. Flood damage was

included within these totals because it

was not possible to extract the flood

damage information from the available

data.

Polk County

Lakeland Flash Flood

Heavy rains from Hurricane Jeanne

caused a retention pond to overflow and

eroded the foundation of a strip mall

on South Florida Avenue. One third of

the strip mall collapsed into the pond.

Emergency Management officials reported

water in homes in and said many areas

in the city looked like a lake.

FLZ049>051-055-060-

62 Astronomical High Tide

Tides mostly one to three feet above

normal caused minor flooding and minor

beach erosion along the Gulf Coast of

Florida from Lee County north through

Levy County. Downtown Punta Gorda was

inundated with 1.5 feet of water due to

tides 5.5 feet above normal in

Charlotte Harbor. In Tampa Bay tides

were 2.0 feet above normal at Port

Manatee, 1.3 feet above normal at St

Petersburg, and 3.5 feet above normal

in McKay Bay.

Citrus County

Floral City Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer

recorded 6.66″ of rain.

Hardee County

2 N Gardner Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer

recorded 6.33″ of rain.

Hernando County

2 SE Ridge Manor Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer

recorded 7.19″ of rain.

Highlands County

2 E Avon Park Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer

recorded 5.97″ of rain.

Polk County

3 SW Haines City Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer

recorded 9.76″ of rain.

Sumter County

5 NW Lake Panasoffke Heavy Rain

A National Weather Service observer

recorded 6.48″ of rain.

Hurricane Jeanne caused heavy rains of

6 to 10 inches along the path of the

eyewall. Areas to the north and south

of the eyewall generally received 2 to

5 inches of rain over a 24 hour period.

FLZ042-048-051-

055>056 Flood

Widespread heavy rain combined with

saturated ground and swollen rivers to

cause river flooding across west

central Florida and lead to record

flooding on one of those rivers.

In Citrus County, the Withlacoochee

River at Holder (flood stage 8 feet)

reached an all time high of 10.86 feet

on the 30th and the Withlacoochee River

at Dunnellon (flood stage 29 feet)

reach 30.41 feet on the 27th.

In Hernando County, the Withlacoochee

River at Trilby (flood stage 12 feet)

reached 16.55 feet on the 29th and the

Withlacoochee River at Croom (flood

stage 8 feet) reach 11.64 feet on the

30th.

In Hillsborough County, the Alafia

River at Lithia (flood stage 13 feet)

reached 19.19 feet on the 28th, and the

Little Manatee River at Wiamauma (flood

stage 11 feet) reach 14.60 feet on the

28th.

In Hardee County the Peace River at

Zolfo Springs (flood stage 16 feet)

reached 21.19 feet on the 29th.

In Manatee County the Manatee River at

Myakka Head (flood stage 7 feet)

reached 14.54 feet on the 27th.

Damage estimates were included in the

hurricane report because it was not

possible to extract the flood damage

information from the available data.

FLORIDA, West Panhandle

FLZ001>006 Hurricane/Typhoon

See the narrative on Hurricane Ivan

under Alabama, Southwest, September

13-16, 2004. Ivan will be remembered as

one of the most damaging hurricanes to

affect the extreme western Florida

panhandle in modern history. The $4

billion in property damage is an

estimate, but the final figure could be

as low as $2.5 billion or as high as

$7 billion. F780T, F60PH, M60PH, F52PH,

F87PH, M46VE, M60OU, F8MH

Escambia County

3 W Gulf Beach to Tornado (F0)

2 S Inerarity Pt

A fast moving weak tornado developed

ahead of Hurricane Ivan. The tornado

moved ashore about two miles west of

Perdido Key and moved into Baldwin

county near Ono Island. Only minor

damage occurred with the weak tornado.

Most people had already evacuated the

area due to Ivan.

Escambia County

8 E Pensacola Beach to Tornado (F0)

2 NE Pensacola Beach

A fast moving tornado moved in from the

Gulf of Mexico about eight miles cast

of Pensacola Beach. The weak tornado

remained over isolated areas and thus

caused only minor damage. The weak

tornado moved into Santa Rosa county

southeast of Gulf Breeze.

Santa Rosa County

2 SE Gulf Breeze to Tornado (F0)

2 W Gulf Breeze

A fast moving tornado moved into Santa

Rosa county from Escambia county. The

weak tornado entered the county

southeast of Gulf Breeze and moved

rapidly west northwest before

dissipating just west of Gulf Breeze.

The tornado caused minor damage. The

area had been evacuated due to

Hurricane Ivan.

Escambia County

West Portion Flash Flood

As Hurricane Ivan was moving inland,

a band of very heavy rainfall developed

east of the center. Radar estimated

that five to seven inches of rain fell

in a two hour period across the area.

This caused most of the roads in the

west part of the county to flood. This

was in addition to the surge and high

winds that were blowing trees down. As

the storm moved north, the water

drained off the roads.

FLZ002 Heavy Surf/High Surf

About a week after Hurricane Ivan

impacted the area on September 16th,

the remnants of the storm re-entered

the Gulf of Mexico after making a large

clockwise loop over the southeastern

United States.

As a result, high waves and surf action

again impacted already heavily eroded

area beaches. Pensacola Beach was still

closed, but the high water hindered

clean up efforts along the beach. The

water also ended up under homes that

had severe erosion a week earlier. As

the remnants of Ivan slowly moved off

to the northwest over the western Gulf,

the high surf subsided.

GEORGIA, East Central

Columbia County

Countywide Flash Flood

Flash flooding along several small

streams sent water into a few homes.

GEORGIA, Lower

GAZ132>136-

149>154-162>166 Tropical Storm

Hurricane “Frances”

Hurricane “Frances” made landfall along

the central Florida coast and, as a

weakening system, moved west-northwest

across central Florida and then

northwestwards into southwest Georgia.

This motion brought the area into the

periphery of the storm and southeast

Georgia experienced sustained tropical

storm force winds with higher gusts.

Across portions of southeast Georgia

heavy rainfall resulted in extensive

flooding in many locations.

The lowest Mean Sea Level Pressure

readings across southeast Georgia

ranged from 995.2 mb/29.39 in Hg at

Douglas Airport (KDQH) to 1002.3 mb/

29.60 in Hg at Brunswick, Glynnco

Airport (KBQK).

Maximum sustained winds recorded in

southeast Georgia were 35 knots/40 mph

at the Alma Airport. The peak recorded

gusts were 39 knots/45 mph at both Alma

and Waycross Airports. Unofficial gusts

of 55 to 60 mph occurred along the

immediate coast at St. Simons Island.

Some tree blow down occurred in bands

with roof and some structural damage.

Most structural damage was associated

with mobile homes and generally weakly

constructed permanent structures.

Several cases of large trees destroying

manufactured homes were reported, with

two injured occurring in Wayne County

due to trees down on homes.

Wave heights of 10 to 20 feet were

recorded across the coastal waters with

tides running one to two feet above

astronomical tide levels. The right

lane of the St. Simons Island Causeway

was flooded and impassable. Extensive

beach erosion occurred due to long

duration of onshore winds both from

Frances as well as a period of onshore

flow preceding the event.

Rainfall totals across southeast

Georgia generally ranged from 5 to 10

inches. The heaviest rainfall was

associated with a rainband which moved

out of Apalachee Bay across north

Florida, the Suwannee Valley and into

portions of Southeast Georgia. This

band dropped up to 16 inches of rain

from near Ocala, Florida through the

Suwannee Valley and then across the

Florida-Georgia State line over

Waycross to near Baxley. Peak

Cooperative Observer rainfall reports

with this band are 11.94 inches at

Patterson and 10.40 inches at Baxley.

Homes were flooded across the region

with the St. Marys River area in Camden

and Clinch Counties especially hard

Many primary roads were flooded and

secondary and dirt roads were washed

out for up to a week. Most rivers

in the region were pushed to flood

stage with several approaching record

flood.

Tornadoes occurred across the entire

region with over 20 confirmed

touchdowns. The banded nature of the

tropical storm wind damage made it very

difficult to differentiate between wind

damage and tornado damage in subsequent

storm damage surveys. No fatalities or

injuries are believed to have occurred

due to tornado touchdowns.

Overall tree blow down, power outages

and roadways blocked by trees were

reported most areas. In the heavy

rainfall areas many dirt and secondary

roads were left impassable for an

extended period.

Coffee County

Ambrose Funnel Cloud

Hurricane “Frances”

GAZ136 Flood

Flood waters of the Littel Satilla

River were threatening mobile homes in

the area.

GAZ152

Flood

5 dirt roads impassable due to

flooding. About 200 miles of dirt roads

are experience flooding.

GAZ165 Flood

12 roads remain closed in Browntown

area due to flowing water.

GAZ164 Flood

18 homes evacuated and flooded along

St. Marys River in southern Charlton

county. Location about 8 miles east of

Taylor (city in Baker county Florida).

GAZ164 Flood

8 homes evacuated due to rising St.

Marys river 3 miles SW of Folkston.

GAZ164 Flood

12 inches of standing rainfall water in

the streets of Folkston on U.S. 1

Coffee County

7 S Ambrose Tornado (F0)

2335 EDT reported by County 911 Center

Mobile home and sheds damaged. Tree

tops twisted and other trees uprooted.

Report relayed to 911 center at 1250 am

9/17. Event time approximate.

GAZ132>136-

149>154-162>166 Tropical Storm

Hurricane “Jeanne”

Hurricane “Jeanne” made landfall along

the central Florida cast coast, very

near the location of Hurricane

Frances some two weeks earlier. Like

“Frances” this system moved west-

northwest across central Florida and

then northwestwards into southern

Georgia. This motion once again brought

the area into the periphery of the

storm as north Florida and southeast

Georgia experienced sustained tropical

storm force winds with gusts to near

hurricane force along the coast. Across

the Suwannee Valley and portions of

southeast Georgia sustained winds were

higher than during “Frances” and rain

once again resulted in flooding of

many locations.

The lowest local barometric pressure of

980.0 mb/28.94 in Hg was recorded in

Ocala, Florida as the center moved to

near the city. The lowest pressure

readings across north Florida ranged

from 980.0/28.94 in HG at Ocala Airport

(KOCF) to 999.4 mb/29.51 in Hg at the

National Ocean Systems (NOS) Tide Gage

in Fernandina Beach, Florida. The

lowest pressure readings across

southeast Georgia ranged from 993.9

mb/29.35 in Hg at Douglas airport

(KDQH) to 1001.4 mb/29.57 in Hg at

Brunswick, Glynnco Airport (KBQK).

Maximum sustained winds recorded were

48 knots/55 mph at the St. Augustine

OMAN site (SAUF1) on the St. Augustine

Pier. The peak gust was also recorded

at SAUF1 with 65 knots/75 mph occurring

on the 26th. Generally land stations

(ASOS, AWOS III and mesonet stations)

reported sustained winds of 30 to 50

mph with gusts of 40 to 60 mph. Tree

blow down once again occurred in bands

with roof and some structural damage

with the most pronounced damage over

the Suwannee Valley and southeast

where “Frances” was not quite as

severe. Most structural damage was

associated with mobile homes and

generally weakly constructed permanent

structures. Several cases of large

trees destroying manufactured homes

were once again observed. One child

was killed due to a tree fall.

Wave heights of 20 feet were recorded

across the coastal waters with tides

running one to two and a half feet

above astronomical tide levels on the

open ocean. Tides three to four feet

above astronomical occurred on the St.

Johns River causing flooding in low

lying areas. Extensive beach erosion

once again occurred due to long

duration of onshore winds both from

Jeanne as well as a period of onshore

flow preceding the event.

Rainfall totals across north Florida

and southeast Georgia generally ranged

from 3 to 7 inches. The heaviest

rainfall was once again over the

Suwannee Valley and southeast Georgia

with Live Oak, Florida experiencing

10.88 inches of rain. Due to the

already saturated conditions, sheet

flooding, river flooding and road

washouts again occurred with this event

with Live Oak and southeast Georgia

hard hit. Most rivers in the region

returned to to flood stage and portions

of Interstate 10 were again closed due

to flooding.

Tornadoes occurred across the coastal

region; however, the tornado outbreak

was not as extensive as with “Frances.”

The banded nature of the Tropical Storm

wind damage again made it very

difficult to differentiate between wind

damage and tornado damage in subsequent

storm damage surveys. No fatalities or

injuries are believed to have occurred

due to tornado touchdowns.

Overall tree blow down, power outages

and roadways blocked by trees were

reported in most areas. In the heavy

rainfall areas many dirt and secondary

roads were once again left impassable.

Clinch County

Cogdell Tornado (F0)

Hurricane “Jeanne”

Storm spotter surveyed area and sent

pictures to the NWS which showed FO

tornado damage off of Cogdell highway

in Northern Clinch county. A patch of

20-30 trees, in the middle of a pine

forest, was damaged. Some trees were

blown down in varying directions and

others were snapped off at their tops.

GEORGIA, North and Central

Spalding County

Griffin Lightning

The Griffin Daily News reported that

lightning struck a home on Manley Road.

The home suffered significant damage

as the attic and some of the living

area was set on fire. Even areas that

did not burn suffered extensive smoke

damage.

Lamar County

Barnesville Hail (0.75)

The public reported penny-sized hail.

Jones County

Griswoldville Hail (1.00)

The public reported dime to

quarter-sized hail.

Laurens County

Dublin Lightning

The Macon Telegraph reported that

lightning struck a well pump that

served both the West Laurens Middle and

High Schools, knocking the pump out of

service and forcing the closure of the

school for the day.

Putnam County

Eatonton Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

The Putnam County Sheriff reported that

a couple of trees were blown down. In

addition, the public reported pea-sized

hail and that 4.2 inches of rain fell

in the area during a one hour period

between 10 pm and 11 pm EDT.

Spalding County

Griffin Lightning

The Griffin Daily News reported that

lightning struck one of the city’s main

water pump distribution stations

causing damage to one of the city’s two

main water supply lines. The line was

shut down most of the day while repairs

were made.

GAZ001>009-

011>016-019>025-

027-030>039-

041>062-066>076-

078>086-089>098-

102>113 Tropical Storm

Hurricane Frances, at one point a

category four hurricane (on the

Saffir-Simpson scale) with sustained

winds of 145 mph, reached the east

coast of Florida just north of West

Palm Beach, Florida early on September

5th. The storm weakened to a Tropical

Storm as it continued west-northwest

across the Central Florida Peninsula

reemerging over the northwest Gulf of

Mexico early on September 6th. The

storm then took on more of a

northwestward movement, making landfall

later on the 6th near Saint Marks

Florida along the Florida Panhandle

Gulf Coast. Continuing north-northwest-

ward from this point, Tropical Storm

Frances entered far southwest Georgia

near Bainbridge late in the evening on

the 6th. The storm continued moving

north-northwest through far western

Georgia on the 7th to near Atlanta

around midnight on the 7th, then to

near Chattanooga, Tennessee early on

the 8th. By far the most significant

problem with Frances for Georgia was

strong, sustained winds of 35 to 40 mph

with gusts in excess of 50 mph. Most of

the high winds were concentrated in a

large east-west oriented rain band that

moved north across Georgia during the

evening of the 6th and the early

morning hours of the 7th. It was during

this period of time that significant

damage occurred across many Central,

East Central, and North Central Georgia

counties. The strongest winds and most

significant damage occurred in the

areas east and south of a line from

Americus, to Atlanta, to Athens. Many

of the counties within this area

suffered extensive wind damage. Dozens

to hundreds of trees were blown down,

also bringing down dozens to hundreds

of power lines. Nearly 300,000 people

were left without power during the

storm, several thousand for several

days. Dozens of homes suffered major

damage throughout Central and North

Central Georgia, with dozens more

sustaining minor damage. The most

significant damage took place in an

area bounded by Macon, Atlanta,

Greensboro, Dublin, Americus, and back

to Macon. Damages in the millions were

observed in several of these counties,

including several large pecan orchards

which were virtually destroyed.

Estimated total damage with Frances

$14.0 million to property and $26.5

million to crops (mostly pecan, but

some peanut and cotton). Forty-one

counties in the Peachtree City forecast

area received a disaster declaration

from the Federal Emergency Management

Agency.

GAZ002-004>005-

007>008-011>016-

019>020-024>025-

027-030-037>039-

041>043-047-051-062-

074-076-078-086-

089>090-102>103 Strong Wind

Strong wind damage, associated With

Tropical Storm Frances, is listed

below, in alphabetical order by county

for those counties that “strong wind”

criteria was either met or assumed to

have been met.

Banks: The Banks County News of Homer

reported that several trees and power

lines were down throughout the county.

Three large pine trees were down on

Carson Segars Road, blocking the road.

(Estimated Damage: $7,000)

Barrow: The Barrow County 911 Center

reported that three trees and power

lines were down around the county.

(Estimated Damage: $5,000)

Carroll: The Georgian Newspaper of

Carrollton reported that several trees

and power lines were down across the

county. Several power outages were

noted around the county during the

early morning hours. (Estimated Damage:

$7,000)

Chattahoochee: The Chattahoochee County

911 Center reported that several trees

and power lines were down around the

county. No major damage was reported,

however. (Estimated Damage: $5,000)

Chattooga: The Chattooga County 911

Center reported that a few trees were

blown down. (Estimated Damage: $1,000)

Dawson: The Dawson County 911 Center

reported that several trees and power

lines were blown down. One tree had

Georgia Highway 136 blocked for a short

while. (Estimated Damage: $5,000)

Douglas: The Douglas County 911 Center

reported that a number of trees and

power lines were down around the

county. No damage to structures was

reported, however. (Estimated Damage:

$50,000)

Emanuel: The Emanuel County 911 Center

reported that several trees and power

lines were down around the county, but

no structural damage was reported.

(Estimated Damage: $25,000)

Floyd: The Floyd County Emergency

Management Director and the Rome News

Tribune reported that several trees and

power lines were down around the

county, but damage was far less

significant compared to counties

further south and east toward Atlanta.

Four roads in the county were blocked

by fallen trees during the early

morning hours. (Estimated Damage:

$5,000)

Gilmer: The Gilmer County 911 Center

reported that a few trees and power

lines were down around the county. The

Times Courier of Ellijay reported that

one tree, which was weakened by the

storm, fell the next afternoon on a

vehicle causing minor damage.

(Estimated Damage: $10,000)

Gordon: The Rome News Tribune reports

that a few trees and power lines were

blown down in the county. (Estimated

Damage: $3,000)

Haralson: The Haralson Gateway reported

that strong winds blew down several

trees and power lines around the

county. No major damage was reported.

The porch of one home suffered minor

damage when a tree fell across it. From

six to eight large trees had to be

removed from roads in the county, along

with a number of smaller trees and tree

limbs. At least 2500 residents were

left without power during the height of

the storm. (Estimated Damage: $25,000)

Harris: The Harris County Emergency

Management Director reported that

strong winds blew down a number of

trees and power lines throughout the

county. Sustained winds of 30 mph with

gusts to 47 mph were measured on Davis

Wind Equipment in Hamilton. Stronger

winds were suspected in the eastern

portion of the county. (Estimated

Damage: $25,000)

Jackson: The Commerce News of Jackson

County reported that only a few trees

and power lines were blown down.

(Estimated Damage: $5,000)

Jefferson: The News and Farmer

Jefferson Reporter reported that

numerous trees and power lines were

blown down throughout the county. At

least 30 roads in the county were

blocked. In addition, WPEH radio in

Louisville reported that 5.15 inches of

rain fell. (Estimated Damage: $75,000)

Lumpkin: The Lumpkin County 911 Center

reported that numerous trees were blown

down around the county. (Estimated

Damage: $25,000)

Madison: The Madison County 911 Center

reported that several trees and a few

power lines were blown down. (Estimated

Damage: $5,000)

Murray: The Murray County 911 Center

reported that a few trees were down.

(Estimated Damage: $5,000)

Muscogee: The Columbus Ledger-Enquirer

reported that several trees and power

lines were down throughout the county.

No major structural damage was

reported. (Estimated Damage: $30,000)

Oconee: The Oconee Enterprise of

Watkinsville reported that a number of

trees and power lines were down

throughout the county. (Estimated

Damage: $25,000)

Oglethorpe: The Oglcthorpe County 911

Center reported that many trees and

power lines were down throughout the

county. (Estimated Damage: $25,000)

Pickens: The Pickens County 911 Center

and the Pickens County Progress of

Jasper reported that several trees and

a few power lines were down. One home

sustained minor damage when a tree fell

on the structure. (Estimated Damage:

$25,000)

Polk: The Polk County 911 Center

reported that a few trees and power

lines were down. (Estimated Damage:

$5,000)

Stewart: The Stewart County Emergency

Management Director reported that

several trees were down, some on roads.

(Estimated Damage: $5,000)

Taliaferro: The Georgia Emergency

Management Agency reportcd that several

trees and power lines were down. As

much as 80 percent of the county was

left without power. (Estimated Damage:

$25,000)

Union: The Union County 911 Center

reported that a couple of trees and one

power line were down in the Suches

area. (Estimated Damage: $2,000)

Walker: The Walker County 911 Center

reported that one tree and one power

line were down. A spotter reported that

a large 16 inch diameter pin oak tree

fell down on a home causing damage to

the siding and the roof. (Estimated

Damage: $2,000)

Walton: The Walton Tribune reported

considerable damage across the county

to trees, power lines, and some

vehicles. A number of trees were down

throughout the county. One tree fell on

and crushed a chain link fence at a

private residence. Several vehicles

were also damaged when trees or tree

limbs fell on them. (Estimated Damage:

$50,000)

Warren: The Warrenton Clippcr reported

that several trees and power lines were

down around the county. However, no

damage was reported to homes or other

structures. (Estimated Damage: $25,000)

Washington: The Washington County 911

Center reported that a number of trees

and power lines were down throughout

the county. No significant structural

damage was reported, however.

(Estimated Damage: $50,000)

Webster: The Webster County 911 Center

reported that a number of trees and

power lines were down throughout the

county. No significant structural

damage was reported, however.

(Estimated Damage: $50,000)

White: The White County 911 Center

reported that a number of trees and

power lines were down throughout the

county. One home was damaged when a

tree fell on the structure. The public

estimated wind gusts of 45 mph around

Clevelend. (Estimated Damage: $50,000)

Whitfield: The Whitfield County 911

Center reported that four trees and a

couple of power lines were down.

(Estimated Damage: $3,000)

Wilkes: The Wilkes County 911 Center

reported that a few trees and power

lines were down in the county.

(Estimated Damage: $3,000)

GAZ021>023- Cherokee–Forsyth–Hall–Cobb–North

032>036-045>046- Fulton–Gwinnett–Barrow–Clarke–De

048>050-052>061- Kalb–Rockdale–Newton–Morgan–Greene

066>073-075- –Heard–Coweta–Fayette–Clayton–

079>085-091>098- Spalding–Henry–Butts–Jasper–Putnam

104>113 –Hancock–Troup–Meriwether–Pike–

Upson–Lamar–Monroe–Jones–Baldwin–

Glascock–Talbot–Taylor–Crawford–

Bibb–Twiggs–Wilkinson–Johnson–

Marion–Schley–Macon–Peach–Houston–

Bleckley–Laurens–Treutlen–Sumter–

Dooly–Crisp–Pulaski–Wilcox–Dodge–

Telfair–Wheeler–Montgomery–Toombs

High Wind (G36)

High wind damage, associated with

Tropical Storm Frances, is listed

below, in alphabetical order by county

for those counties that “high wind”

criteria was either met or assumed to

be met.

Baldwin: The Georgia Emergency

Management Agency reported that

extensive and widespread wind damage

was observed. Many trees and power

lines were down throughout the county

and many parts of the county were

expected to be without power for up to

four days as a result. In addition,

four homes suffered major damage and

five suffered minor damage. One man was

injured and taken to a local hospital

when a tree fell on his mobile home.

Four to five inches of rain was also

reported throughout the county, but no

significant flooding problems were

reported. (Estimated Damage: $500,000)

Barrow: The Barrow County News of

Winder reported that many trees and

power lines were down throughout the

county. A funeral home was damaged when

the relatively new roof was peeled back

by the high winds and a large tree fell

on the structure causing damage to the

embalming and casket room. The funeral

home owner’s adjacent private residence

was also damaged by a fallen tree.

Several other businesses and homes in

the area sustained minor damage from

fallen trees. Other businesses had

signs damaged. (Estimated Damage:

$250,000)

Bibb: The Georgia Emergency Management

Agency, the Bibb County Emergency

Management Director, and the Macon

Telegraph reported that many trees and

power lines were down throughout the

county. Two brand new vehicles, one a

minivan, were damaged by large pine

trees which fell on them and an aerial

truck was also damaged by a fallen

tree. Several homes sustained minor

damage from fallen trees. At least

45,000 people in the county were left

without power for an extensive period

of time. The Bibb County Emergency

Management Director measured wind gusts

of 51 mph at his location. (Estimated

Damage: $500,000)

Bleckley: The Cochran Journal reported

that many trees and power lines were

down throughout the county. Many roads

were blocked and 50 percent of the

county was left without power for many

hours. In addition, a large tree fell

on and damaged a home on Race Track

Lane and the scoreboard at the Cochran

High School was blown down by the

strong winds. (Estimated Damage:

$500,000)

Butts: The Jackson Progress reported

that there was extensive damage to

trees and power lines throughout the

county. One home suffered major damage

when a large pecan tree fell on the

structure and punctured it in two

different areas. In another incident, a

200 year old large 150 foot oak tree

fell and barely missed a home, but did

block the adjacent street. At Indian

Springs State Park, a large tree fell

on the main power transmission line,

causing the entire park to lose power.

In addition, dozens of large trees were

blown down throughout the park causing

the park to be closed. On Georgia

Highway 16, an 18-wheel tanker truck

carrying liquid oxygen was overturned

by the high winds. Rain froze on the

highway as the liquid oxygen spilled

from the tanker causing a 6-inch thick

sheet of ice to form. (Estimated

Damages: $250,000)

Cherokee: The Georgia Emergency

Management Agency, as well as the

Cherokee County Emergency Management

Director and the Cherokee Tribune,

reported that dozens of trees and power

lines were blown down throughout the

county. Hundreds of calls were received

at the county 911 office reporting

downed trees and power lines. A home on

Patriot Trail sustained major damage

when a large oak tree fell on the

structure and a mobile home, also on

Patriot Trail, was destroyed when a

large oak tree fell on it. Georgia

Highway 92 was blocked at West Wylie

Bridge Road east of Woodstock with

numerous downed power lines. (Estimated

Damage: $250,000)

Clarke: The Athens Banner Herald

reported that many trees and power

lines were blown down throughout the

county, causing damage to some

residences, and widespread power

outages. Two residences suffered

significant damage when large trees

fell on them. The roof of a 19th

century home on Barber Street, also

listed in the National Historic

Register, sustained significant damage

when a large tree fell on the

structure. A duplex on Northview Drive

also suffered damage when a large tree

snapped and fell on the structure. At

least 5000 residents in the county were

without power during the height of the

storm. Winds gusts of 44 mph were

recorded at the Athens airport, but

higher wind gusts were estimated

elsewhere. (Estimated Damage: $350,000)

Clayton: The News Daily of Jonesboro

reported that many trees and power

lines were down throughout the county.

A large oak tree fell on a home in

Morrow causing minor damage to the

roof. Another tree fell across North

Shore Drive, temporarily blocking the

road. Sustained winds of 42 mph with

gusts to 52 mph were reported at the

Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson

International Airport in the far

northwest comer of the county between

2 am and 3 am EDT. (Estimated Damage:

$250,000)

Cobb: The East Cobb Neighbor reported

that a number of trees and power lines

were down throughout the county. One

tree fell on a home on Old Georgia

Highway 41 in Kennesaw and another 100

foot tall tree fell on a home in Smyrna

causing cxtensive damage to the home.

The tree crashed into a bedroom,

knocked bricks off the house and broke

the roof rafters. Estimates to remove

just the tree alone were $2500.

(Estimated Damage: $250,000)

Coweta: The Coweta County 911 center

reportcd that a number of trees and

power lines were down throughout the

county. The Newnan Times/Herald

reported that shingles were blown off

the roof of the newspaper’s building.

Wind gusts at the newspaper were

recorded at 48 mph shortly after 4 am

EDT. (Estimated Damage: $150,000)

Crawford: The Georgia Post of Roberta

and the Macon Telegraph rcported that

numerous trees and power lines were

down throughout the county. At least 36

trees were blown down on roads and 15

power lines were down. Much of the

county was left without power,

including the county’s 911 center. A

family had to be rescued when a large

tree fell on their home causing damage

to the structure. Four vehicles were

damaged by fallen trees, including a

county rescue truck which was damaged

when a tree fell on a road and the

vehicle collided with the tree.

Finally, a high school football

scoreboard in Roberta was blown down by

the strong winds. (Estimated Damage:

$500,000)

Crisp: The Cordele Dispatch reported

that an extensive number of trees and

power lines were down around the

county. Roads and streets countywide

were literally strewn with debris. A

number of roads throughout the county

were blocked by fallen trees and power

lines and were closed. The Georgia

Emergency Management Agency reported

that five government buildings were

heavily damaged by downed trees,

including the Daphne Lodge. Two

businesses were damaged and three homes

sustained moderate damage, including a

home on 13th street in Cordele which

suffered minor damage when a large tree

fell on it. Damage to government

property alone was estimated at

$200,000. Several hundred residents in

the county were left without power

during the storm. (Estimated Damage:

$500,000)

DeKalb: The Atlanta Journal-

Constitution reported that a number of

trees and power lines were down

throughout the county. The worst damage

was in the Lithonia and Decatur areas,

where one home sustained moderate

damage because of a fallen tree.

Thousands of residents in the county

were left without power for several

hours during the morning hours.

(Estimated Damage: $150,000)

Dodge: The Dodge County News of Eastman

reported extensive damage to trees and

power lines throughout the county.

Trees and power lines were down

throughout the county causing damage to

structures, blocking a number of roads.

The downed power lines left three to

four thousand customers without power

as well. A double wide mobile home in

Chauncey and a trailer in Rhine both

suffered heavy damage when large trees

fell on the structures. Two other

structures in the county also suffered

damage from downed trees. Much of the

county received up to 8 inches of rain

from late Monday afternoon through

Tuesday afternoon. (Estimated Damage:

$500,000)

Dooly: The News Observer of Vienna

reported extensive damage to trees and

power lines around the county, leaving

as much as 70 percent of the residents

of the county without power during the

overnight and morning hours. Dozens of

trees and power lines were blown down.

The Electric Membership Cooperative for

the county reported extensive damage to

their power line system throughout the

county. (Estimated Damage: $250,000)

Fayette: The Fayette County Emergency

Management Director reported that

dozens of trees and power lines were

down throughout the county. In

addition, three homes sustained damage

totaling $225,000 as a result of downed

trees. The Coweta-Fayette Electric

Membership Cooperative reported

extensive damage to power lines

throughout the county. Georgia Highway

74 on the south side of Peachtree City

was blocked from downed trees and power

lines during the early morning hours.

All together, some 30 roads around the

county were blocked from downed trees

and power lines during the morning

hours. (Estimated Damage: $378,000)

Forsyth: The Forsyth County News

reported that dozens of trees and power

lines were down throughout the county.

Road crews reported that around 50

trees were down across roadways. The

911 center reported that calls of power

lines down on roadways were coming into

the center every 5 to 10 minutes during

the early morning hours. Widespread

power outages were reported in the

county. (Estimated Damage: $150,000)

Fulton: The Atlanta Journal-

Constitution reported extensive damage

across the county, especially the

northern sections, to trees, power

lines, homes, and vehicles. Several

vehicles in Atlanta either suffered

extensive damage or were totaled by

downed trees. A student’s vehicle

parked at Georgia Tech University in

North Atlanta sustained significant

damage when a power pole fell on it.

One person narrowly escaped injury when

a tree fell on their vehicle on

Briarcliff Road. Several homes also

sustained minor to moderate damage from

fallen trees. The county 911 center

received at least 59 reports of downed

trees around the county. Widespread

power outages were reported throughout

the county. (Estimated Damage:

$450,000)

Glascock: The News and Farmer Jefferson

Reporter reported that a large number

of trees were down across the county.

Up to 30 roads in the county were

blocked by fallen trees. Minor damage

was also reported to homes and other

structures in the county. One resident

of the county reported 6.5 inches of

rain. (Estimated Damage: $150,000)

Greene: The Herald Journal of

Greensboro reported extensive and

widespread damage to trees and power

lines throughout the county. Many roads

were blocked and several homes

sustained extensive damage. A home in

Woodville suffered extensive damage

when a large tree fell on the structure

and crushed the roof. Another home on

South Laurel Avenue suffered extensive

damage when a large tree fell on the

structure. Several large pecan trees

were uprooted on Broad Street in

Greensboro, one causing damage to the

front of a home. Another large pecan

tree fell and blocked Chestnut Street

in Greensboro. (Estimated Damage:

$175,000)

Gwinnett: The Gwinnett Daily Post of

Lawrenceville reported extensive damage

throughout the county. Numerous trees

and power lines were blown down.

Several structures suffered moderate

damage. An apartment complex on

Sweetwater Road suffered moderate

damage when a 60-foot pine tree fell on

the structure. Another home in

Centerville suffered extensive damage

when a large tree fell through the roof

of the home. A couple of vehicles were

also damaged by fallen trees. A small

fire was started in the exterior of one

home when a tree fell on a power line

adjacent to the home. Widespread power

outages were noted throughout the

county. (Estimated Damage: $250,000)

Hall: The Times newspaper of

Gainesville reported that a number of

trees and power lines were down around

the county. The most extensive damage

was noted in the southern portion of

the county, where two homes were

damaged by downed trees. A tree caused

minor damage to a home on Sherman Allen

Road in the southern portion of the

county and another home also received

minor damage in the southern portion of

the county. Many residents of the

county were without power during the

morning hours. Rainfall of 4.50 inches

was reported at the Gainesville airport

along with 39 mph wind gusts. The

strongest winds were estimated in the

southern portion of the county.

(Estimated Damage: $175,000)

Heard: The News and Banner of Franklin,

along with the Heard County 911 Center,

reported that high winds caused

widespread damage to trees and power

lines throughout the county. One large

tree fell on a carport and part of a

house on Georgia Highway 100 near

Franklin. While the home itself only

suffered minor to moderate structural

damage, the carport and the two sport

utility/truck vehicles inside were

destroyed. (Estimated Damage: $100,000)

Henry: The Daily Herald of McDonough

reported that a large number of trees

and power lines were down throughout

the county. A tree fell on a storage

shed at one home damaging the shed, a

tractor, and other equipment inside. In

Locust Grove, fallen trees caused

damage to Noah’s Ark, a wild animal

shelter. Some of the wild cats in the

animal shelter were temporarily set

free because of damage to the encaging

fence. They were captured later in the

day. The 911 center reported that

around 30 trees were down on roads and

power lines within the county. Much of

the county was left without power

during the early morning hours.

(Estimated Damage: $200,000)

Houston: The Houston Home Journal and

the Macon Telegraph reported extensive

damage across the county, including

Robins Air Force Base. Over 100 trees

were blown down across the county,

landing on roads, power lines, homes,

businesses, and vehicles. Two homes

suffered extensive damage when large

trees fell on the structures. At one

home a large tree crashed through the

roof damaging the kitchen and den,

while at the other end, a large tree

crashed through the balcony and landed

in one of the bedrooms of the home. A

steeple was blown off the River Light

Church of God on Corder Road. Up to 50

roads were blocked and closed because

of fallen trees while nearly 1000

residents of the county were left

without power for days. (Estimated

Damage: $500,000)

Jasper: The Georgia Emergency

Management Agency, along with the

Monticello News, reported extensive and

widespread damage throughout the county

Hundreds of trees were blown down,

causing damage to homes, blocking roads

(three of which were closed), and

knocking out power to 70 percent of the

county. One home was destroyed while

approximately 15 homes suffered major

damage and 50 homes minor damage.

(Estimated Damage: $500,000)

Johnson: The Macon Telegraph and the

Georgia Emergency Management Agency

reported widespread damage to trees,

power lines, structures, and vehiclcs

within the county. Trees were uprooted,

roofs were torn off, and metal awnings

were folded like sheets of paper. A

portion of the roof was blown off the

New Bethel Methodist Church and a tin

roof was peeled off a building in

Wrightsville. Several trees fell on a

Sheriffs Deputy car, causing

significant damage to the vehicle. A

county fire truck was damaged when a

limb crashed through the windshield. At

a farm owned by the county Emergency

Management Director, large 2-foot

diameter pine trees were blown over or

snapped off 10-15 feet above the

ground. The downed trees and power

lines left around 80 percent of the

county without power during the storm.

(Estimated Damage: $250,000)

Jones: The Macon Telegraph and the

Jones County News reported extensive

damage to trees and power lines

throughout the county. Most of the

county was left without power for an

extended period of time. The county

Emergency Management Director reported

that it was the worst and most

widespread power outage he had seen in

his more than 20 years working with the

county. (Estimated Damage: $250,000)

Lamar: The Herald Gazette of

Barnesville reported extensive damage

to trees, power lines, and even a

business in the county. A Christmas

Tree Farm reportedly lost 40 percent of

their revenue, while a local nursery

reported losses of $25,000, which

included the roof of one building.

2000-3000 ornamental trees and 30,

50-100 year-old trees were damaged or

destroyed. Trees fell on roads and

power lines throughout the county. One

large tree fell on Old Georgia Highway

41, blocking the road for several

hours, and a power pole fell across a

railroad track. (Estimated Damage:

$250,000)

Laurens: The Macon Telegraph and the

Courier Herald of Dublin reported

hundreds of trees and dozens of power

lines were down throughout the county.

Twelve homes in Dublin sustained minor

damage from fallen trees and the Bailey

Voting Precinct building was damaged.

In addition, several vehicles were

damaged. Much of the county was also

left without power during the storm.

(Estimated Damage: $750,000)

Macon: The Macon County 911 Center and

the Citizen and Georgian of Montezuma

reported that dozens of trees and power

lines were down throughout the county.

Around 1500 people were left without

power for many hours. (Estimated

Damage: $150,000)

Marion: The Tri-County Journal of

Marion and Schley counties reported

that numerous trees and power lines

were down throughout the county. One

large oak tree was blown over at the

Marion county courthouse in Buena Vista

causing damage to an adjacent home on

Georgia Highway 26. (Estimated Damage:

$100,000)

Meriwether: The Manchester Star Mercury

and the Mcriwethcr Vindicator of

Greenville reported widespread damage

to trees and power lines throughout the

county. Georgia Highway 85 near Alvaton

was blocked for several hours as a

large tree fell on two vehicles and

power lines. One of the vehicles was

overturned. In Manchester, a large

150-year old oak tree fell on a home

causing

GEORGIA, North and Central

Coweta County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Coweta County Sheriff’s Office

reported that heavy rain squalls,

associated with the remnants of

Tropical Storm Ivan, forced the

closure of several roads in Newnan

with up to one foot of water flowing

over several roads. Many roads were

under water throughout the county.

Rainfall amounts from four to over

seven inches reports from citizens

around the county showed rainfall

during the afternoon hours.

Madison County

Paoli to Tornado (F0)

1 NNW Paoli

A damage assessment conducted by the

National Weather Service and the

Madison County Emergency Management

Director concluded that a short-lived,

F0 tornado, associated with the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan, touched

down near Paoli at the intersection

of New Hope Church Road and Paoli New

Towns Road and travelled north-

northwest at 40 mph along a one-mile

long broken path treminating near

Collins Brooks Road. One barn was

completely destroyed along the path

and several homes sustained minor

structural damage. Numerous trees were

topped along the path of the tornado.

Haralson County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Haralson County 911 Center

reported that several roads were

flooded, especially across the eastern

portion of the county.

Upson County

5 N Yatesville to Tornado (F0)

5.1 N Yatesville

The Upson County Emergency Management

Director reported that a short-lived

and weak F0 tornado, associated with

the remnants of Tropical Storm Ivan,

touched down in extreme northeast

Upson county near the Lamar county

line. The tornado occurred in a rural

area and as a result, only a few trees

were damaged. There was a convergent

pattern evident in the damage

consistent with a tornado. Doppler

radar also supported a tornadic

circulation in this area.

Clayton County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Clayton County Emergency

Management Director reported that 31

roads were flooded and closed. Some of

the roads sustained minor damage as a

result. Major flooding occurred at the

headwaters of the Flint River and

various creeks which lead into the

Flint river, all in far northern

Clayton county near the Atlanta

Hartsfield-Jackson International

Airport. At least six homes in the

Springs Subdivision just south of

Jonesboro sustained extensive damage

from flood waters. The Tara Mobile

Home Park and Edmonson Mobile Home

Park were flooded. The county

Emergency Management Office had to

evacuate 37 people in this area by

boat. Some businesses in the area also

sustained flood damage. Upper

Riverdale Road was flooded with one to

two feet of water flowing over the

road, blocking an entrance to Southern

Regional Hospital.

Douglas County

Lithia Spgs Flash Flood

The Douglas County 911 Center reported

that flood waters from Sweetwater

Creek caused flooding of Mt. Vernon

Road. Around one foot of water was

flowing over the road in this area.

Meriwether County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Meriwether County 911 Center

reported flash flooding throughout the

county. Significant flooding was

observed along Mill Pond Creek, which

became a swift moving river during the

afternoon. Several roads had water

flowing over them and had to be

closed.

Talbot County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Talbot County 911 Center reported

that Georgia Highway 80, leading out

of downtown Talbotton, was flooded and

closed.

Spalding County

.5 SE Griffin Spauldin; Tornado (F0)

.4 SE Griffin

Spaulding Ar

A damage survey conducted by the

National Weather Service and the

Spalding County Emergency Management

Director concluded that a high end F0

tornado affected a small, 1/5-mile

long and 50-yard wide path just

southeast of the Griffin-Spalding

Airport near the intersection of

Maddox and Etheridge Roads. Extensive

damage to around one dozen large

mature pecan trees was observed, along

with minor damage to several

surrounding trees in a residental

neighborhood. Minor roof damage was

also noted to several of the homes.

Many of the trees were uprooted inward

to the path showing convergence and

consistent with high end F0 70 mph

tornado damage.

Cobb County

Countywide Flash Flood

Numerous reports of widespread flooding

were received from the public as

rainfall from 6-10 inches fell across

most of the county during the afternoon

and evening. Many creeks were flowing

several feet out of their banks in

Acworth, Smyrna, Powder Springs,

Marietta, and other areas in the

county. Significant flooding was

reported on Indian River Creek and

Story Creek, which was five feet out

of its banks. Many roads were flooded

also, especially U.S. Highway 41 in

Marietta where water was up to the

bottom of cars. This flooding was a

result of moderate flooding on nearby

Sope Creek. In Smyrna, afoot of water

was flowing across Atlanta Road at

Spring Street. A number of roads in the

county, especially the northern areas,

sustained damage. Some neighborhoods in

Smyrna were reported to be almost

completely under water with minor

damage to a number of homes. Many yards

were flooded in Powder Springs, with up

to six feet of water in some streets.

Sope Creek went above its flood stage

of 12 feet at 545 pro EDT, crested at

17.5 feet around 11 pin EDT, and the

fell below flood stage at 245 am EDT on

September 17th.

Fayette County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Georgia Emergency Management Agency

reported that several roads in the

county were briefly flooded as 4-5

inches of rain fell across the county

during the afternoon and early evening

hours. Four residences suffered minor

flood damage. A trained spotter for the

National Weather Service reported that

many of the golf cart paths in

Peachtree City were flooded with swift

flowing water over the paths. In

addition, several creeks and streams in

Peachtree City were out of their banks.

Furthermore, New Hope Road west of

Brandon Mill Circle was flooded and

impassable.

Pike County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Pike County 911 Center reported

that several roads were flooded with up

to a foot of water flowing over some of

these roads.

Wilkes County

.5 S Tignall to Tornado (F1)

1.5 N Norman

A damage assessment conducted by the

Wilkes County Emergency Management

Director indicated that an F1 tornado,

briefly at the high end of the F1

scale, touched down just south of

Tignall near Georgia Highway 17 and

continued north from six to seven miles

along or just west of Georgia Highway

17 to just north of Norman. The path

width of the tornado was mostly between

100 and 200 yards, but briefly was up

to 500 yards wide between Mallorysville

and Georgia Highway 17. The tornado was

believed to have been on the ground

from 70 to 80 percent of the time along

its path. Large trees were uprooted on

six single-family dwellings in the

Tignall area and several other

dwellings were damaged in Norman. All

together 23 structures sustained damage

from the tornado, ranging from very

minor to major. Numerous trees and

power lines were blown down, twisted,

or uprooted along the path, many

causing additional damage to farm

fences along the way. A large

communications tower was also

destroyed. Georgia Highway 17 was

blocked in two places along the path by

downed trees and three county dirt

roads were also blocked along the path.

At least 1000 residents in the area

lost power and phone service during the

event.

Rockdale County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Rockdale County Emergency

Management Director reported minor

flooding in the Capri Subdivision near

the headwaters of the Yellow River.

Several roads were flooded and several

homes sustained minor damage as a

result.

Spalding County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Griffin Daily News reported

significant flooding across much of the

county. A number of roads were flooded

and rendered impassable. Old Atlanta

Road was submerged by flood waters at

two intersections. The Main Street

Players headquarters building in

Griffin sustained damage from flooding.

Cherokee County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Cherokee County Emergency

Management Director, as well as many

reports from the public, indicated that

extensive and widespread flooding was

occurring throughout much of Cherokee

county as rainfall on the order of 10

inches or more fell throughout the

county during the afternoon and early

evening hours. Many roads were flooded

and closed. Several roads were washed

out and rendered impassable. Several

homes and businesses were flooded as

well. A car was swept 250 yards down an

un-named creek flowing under Water Tank

Road. The creek rose over 10 feet out

of its banks. The creek is usually only

about one foot deep. The single

occupant of the vehicle was rescued by

emergency personnel without injury. In

another incident, a Sherrif’s Deputy

narrowly escaped from her patrol

vehicle as it was swept down a swollen

stream. She was attempting to set up a

road block because of road flooding.

She was able to escape through one of

the windows and to the safety of a

tree. Major flooding was observed on

the upper branch of Town Creek in

Canton. Several buildings were washed

into the road by the creek as it

reached its 100-year flood plain

extent. Two residents of the county

were injured during the flash floods.

De Kalb County

Countywide Flash Flood

Numerous reports were received from the

DcKalb County Emergency Manager, the

media, and the public of extensive

flooding across much of the Atlanta

metropolitan area, especially the

northern parts of the county.

Widespread flooding of roads, streets,

and highways was reported throughout

the county, several of which had to be

closed. Many homes, businesses,

property and vehicles across the county

were flooded during this event. Major

flooding was reported in many areas of

the central and northern parts of the

county, specifically between

Interstates 20 and 285. Some of these

areas experienced catastrophic and

historical flooding, with some of the

worst flooding observed in nearly 100

years. National Weather Service river

gages showed that Peachtree Creek and

Nancy Creek quickly rose to record

flood levels during the late evening

hours. Peachtree Creek rose above its

flood stage of 17 feet at 545 pm EDT,

then went into record flood stage at

845 pm EDT, then fell below flood stage

between 5 and 6 am EDT September 17th.

The river crested at 22.7 feet, which

is 5.7 feet above flood stage and 1.5

feet above the record flood stage of

21.1 feet, previously reached in 1990.

The river gage on Peachtree Creek was

washed away during this event. Hundreds

of residents along and near Peachtree

Creek had to be evacuated, some by

boat. Twenty-five to 50 homes and

several apartment complexes, including

the Peachtree Apartments, were impacted

by the flood waters, many sustaining

significant and extensive damage.

Record flooding was also observed on

Nancy Creek, which reached its 11 foot

flood stage at 600 pm EDT, reached a

record flood stage of 15 feet at 1130

pm EDT, then fell below flood stage

around 4 am EDT September 17th. The

impact in this area was similar to that

near Peachtree Creek, with dozens of

homes flooded and many residents having

to be evacuated. In Decatur, one home

was devastated when the waters of

Peavine Creek rose over two feet in the

basement of one home. A number of

sinkholes were left in the county after

the flooding receded, the largest being

a 65 by 25 foot sinkhole on Durret Way

in Dunwoody.

Fulton County

Countywide Flash Flood

Numerous reports were received from the

Fulton County Emergency Manager, the

media, and the public of extensive

flooding across much of the Atlanta

metropolitan area, especially the

northern part of the county. Widespread

flooding of roads, streets, and

highways was reported throughout the

county, several of which had to be

closed. Many homes, businesses,

property, and vehicles across the

county were flooded during the event.

However, major flooding was reported in

many areas of the central and northern

part of the county, specifically

between Interstates 20 and 285. Some

areas experienced catastrophic and

historical flooding, with some of the

worst flooding reported in nearly 100

years. National Weather Service river

gages showed that Peachtree Creek and

Nancy Creek quickly rose to record

flood levels during the late evening

hours. Peachtree Creek rose above flood

stage of 17 feet at 545 pm EDT, went

into record flood stage at 845 pm EDT,

and fell below flood stage between 5

and 6 am EDT September 17th. The river

crested at 22.7 feet, which is 5.7 feet

above flood stage and 1.5 feet above

the record flood stage of 21.1 feet,

previously reached in 1990. The river

gage at Peachtree Creek was washed away

during this event. Hundreds of

residents along and near Peachtree

Creek and to be evacuated, some by

boat. At least 50 homes in this area

were impacted by the flood waters, many

sustaining significant and extensive

damage. Record flooding was also

observed on Nancy Creek, which rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet at 600

put EDT, reached a record flood stage

of 15 feet at 1130 pm EDT, then fell

below flood stage around 4 am EDT

September 17th. The impact in this area

was similar to that near Peachtree

Creek with dozens of homes flooded and

many residents having to be evacuated.

Moderate flooding also occurred on

Procter Creek, west of Atlanta. The

creek went into flood at 515 pm EDT,

crested at 14 feet around 630 pm EDT,

then fell below flood stage around 7 pm

EDT. Hortense Way at Northwest Place

was completely flooded as a result. At

least a dozen homes and apartments were

also flooded in this area. Several

residents lost all of their

possessions. The Chattahoochee River

also rose to major flood levels within

6 to 12 hours, but this fell more into

the category of main stem river

flooding instead of flash flooding.

Cherokee County

2 WSW Orange to Tornado (F1)

2 WNW Orange

The Cherokee County Emergency

Management Director reported that a

brief F1 tornado occurred at the end of

a path of extensive damage caused by

strong straight-lined winds. The

tornado touched down near Georgia

Highway 20, also known as Cumming

Highway, near the town of White City

about 8 miles east of Canton. The

tornado continued north to north-

northwest, roughly centered along Jack

Page Lane, for about 1 mile before

lifting. The damage path was determined

to be approximately 400 yards wide.

Dozens of trees were blown down in this

area in a convergent pattern. Four

people were injured on Georgia Highway

20 when trees fell on their vehicles

during the tornado. North of Georgia

Highway 20 and mostly west of Jack Page

Lane, six homes suffered extensive

damage, mostly from fallen trees.

Gwinnett County

Countywide Heavy Rain

Heavy rain, on the order of 4-6 inches

during the afternoon, caused the roof

of a distribution center to collapse

and caused a partial roof collapse at

an apartment building.

Gwinnett County

South Portion Flash Flood

Spotters with the Gwinnett County

SkyWarn program reported widespread

flooding across much of the county. The

most significant flooding was occurring

in the Norcross and Grayson areas where

water was two feet over the road in

places. The Yellow River rose several

feet out of its banks. Holcolmb Bridge

Road was flooded and closed.

Forsyth County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Forsyth County Emergency Management

Director, as well as several reports

from the public, indicated that

significant flooding was occurring

across much of the county. The Etowah

River rose to 15 feet, five feet above

its 10 foot flood stage. This caused

minor damage to Old Federal and

Nicholson Roads. In addition, a portion

of Cambridge Hills Drive was washed

out. Wildcat Creek just northeast of

Chestatee rose well out of its banks

with reported rainfall in the area of 5

inches per hour. Three residents of the

county had to be rescued from their

vehicles by county emergency crews in

rising flood waters. The telephone

company lost a distribution box that

was inundated by flood waters causing

an estimated $100,000 in damage. Near

major flooding occurred along Big Creek

from Cumming southwest to the Fulton

county line. Big Creek crested at 12

feet, which is five feet above its

flood stage of seven feet. The public

reported that several homes in Cumming

suffered minor damage from flooding.

Catoosa County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Catoosa County News of Ringgold

reported that major flooding was

observed across the county in

association with the heavy rain from

the remnants of Hurricane Ivan. At

least 18 roads were closed because of

flooding and several evacuations from

water were required, even a few by

boat. Chickamauga Creek rose well above

its flood stage, causing flooding of

nearby property. In addition, at least

five intersections in Ringgold were

completely submerged by flood waters.

White County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Georgia Emergency Management

Agency, along with local newspapers,

reported extensive and widespread

flooding across White county. A six-

year old girl, was swept away in flood

waters, while outside in the front yard

of her mobile home. The mobile home

park was flooded by the waters from a

nearby small stream. In unrelated

incidents, three other residents had to

be rescued from high water elsewhere in

the county. Several roads were washed

out. A 20-foot portion of Black Road

was washed away by flood waters. The

Chattahoochee River in Helen also rose

above its flood stage of 6 feet and

crested near 7 feet around 1130 pm EDT.

The Castle Inn of Helen experienced

flooding up to the patio level, which

affects the basement area of the

facility. F60U

Dawson County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Georgia Emergency Management Agency

reported that significant flooding was

reported across many areas of Dawson

County. Four mobile homes were flooded,

two bridges were breached because of

flood waters, six culverts were washed

away or damaged, and one dam was

breached. Several roads throughout the

county were flooded and closed as well.

Gilmer County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Gilmer County Emergency Manager,

along with local newspapers and the

public, reported extensive, and

widespread to catastrophic flooding

throughout much of the county. More

than a foot of rain fell in parts of

Gilmer county in association with the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan during a six

to eight hour period in the afternoon

and evening hours of September 16th.

Ten to 12 inches of rain was common

across the county. Catastrophic

flooding was reported along the

Cartecay River, which in some areas

exceeded the 500-year flood plain

level. Several homes and vehicles were

washed away when the river reached

these levels. Major flooding was also

reported on the Coosawattee River and

Cox Creek as well. Several homes and

vehicles along the banks of the

Coosawattee River were also washed

away. The Coosawattee River crested at

17.3 feet around midnight on the 17th,

which is several feet above bankfull.

All together across the county, 35

homes were flooded or destroyed, 12 to

18 mobile homes in the Maple Village

Mobile Home Park were either destroyed

or washed away by flooding, at least

five recreational vehicles and several

other vehicles were swept away by flood

waters. Fourteen families in the county

lost everything to the floods. Roads

and bridges also suffered significant

structural damage. Three bridges were

washed away or suffered major damage,

including Clear Creek Bridge which

collapsed. A 25 foot section of the

driveway leading from Georgia Highway

282 to the Courier Dye plant was washed

away. Other buildings and locales

suffered damage from the extensive

flooding, including the Ellijay Lions

Building, a Civil War Memorial, and

another Veterans Memorial.

Lumpkin County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Dahlonega Nugget reported that

significant flooding was observed

throughout the county causing damage to

roads and other property. The most

significant flooding occurred along the

Chestatee River, which exceeded its

banks by several feet and flooded

Georgia Highway 52. A portion of

Nimblewill Church Road and Sheep Wallow

Road were washed out. Three other roads

had to be closed because of flooding.

Banks County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Banks County News of Homer reported

significant flash flooding throughout

the county, which flooded streets and

bridges and washed out several roads.

At least one mudslide was also

reported. A five-foot cross section of

a road along Wofford Creek was washed

out and parts of the Banks County

Recreation Park were completely under

water.

Barrow County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Daily News Tribune of Cartersville

reported minor to moderate flooding

around the county. There were isolated

reports of road flooding. Small stream

flooding was the most flood-related

problem in the county. Two mobile homes

suffered damage from campgrounds,

beaches, flooding and one bridge was

damaged by flood waters. Many docks,

and boat ramps at Lake Allatoona

were flooded.

Pickens County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Georgia Emergency Management Agency

and the Pickens County Progress of

Jasper reported that flash flooding was

widespread and extensive across the

county. Several roads were washed out

from flash flooding, including portions

of Georgia Highway 136. Numerous other

roads in the county were flooded and

closed as well. Whole sections of

pipeline along some roads were washed

out, including about 100 feet of a

water line. Around 12 bridges and

culverts in the county were damaged

from flood waters and had to be

inspected. The public also reported

significant flooding in many areas of

the county as well.

Towns County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Georgia Emergency Management

Agency, along with local newspaper,

reported major and extensive flooding

throughout the county. The Hiawassee

River flooded the Enchanted Valley

Resort. Many residents in the area had

water up to the doors of their homes.

At least ten roads and ten bridges in

the county were washed out by flood

waters.

Union County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Georgia Emergency Mangement Agency,

and local newspapers, reported

significant flooding across much of the

county as anywhere from five to nine

inches of rain fell during the

afternoon and evening hours. Several

roads were blocked from flooding and/or

mudslides. Three bridges were washed

out. Flash flooding forced the rescues

of seven people and three animals from

their homes in the Twin Pond and

Pegasus Landing areas.

Whitfield County

Countywide Flash Flood

A National Weather Service SkyWarn

spotter and cooperative observer, along

with the Georgia Emergency Management

Agency, reported considerable flooding

throughout the county. A number of

creeks exceeded bank full and several

roads were flooded. Several cars were

abandoned in high water. A few roads

were washed out, most notably Old

Tilton Road which was completely washed

out and expected to remain closed for

at least two weeks.

Fannin County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Georgia Emergency Management Agency

and a storm spotter reported

significant flooding across the county.

Several roads were washed out, one

bridge was damaged, and several

mudslides were reported. Doublehead Gap

Road was damaged when the Noontootla

Creek flooded. Flooding also caused

damage to some recreational vehicles in

the Mineral Springs RV Park.

Chattooga County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Summerville News reported that

several county roads were submerged by

flood waters. Water nearly a foot deep

was reported on Reynolds Drive and

several yards had up to a foot of water

in them. Significant flooding was also

reported along the Chattooga River and

adjacent areas were flooded.

Dade County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Dade County Sentinel and the

Georgia Emergency Management Agency

reported extensive and widespread

flooding across the county. Fifteen to

20 residences from Rising Fawn to

Lookout Mountain had to be evacuated

because of flood waters, mostly from

Lookout Creek and its tributaries.

Several homes and business around the

county suffered damage from flooding.

Thirty-three roads were flooded around

the county, several of which were

either damaged or washed out. In

addition, a bridge on Holder Loop Road

was damaged from flood waters and had

to be closed.

Murray County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Chatsworth Times reported some

flooding in various areas throughout

the county. A 100-yard stretch of

Carlton Petty Road was washed out and a

four-foot culvert of McGill Road near

Rock Creek Road was washed out. Several

other minor road erosions were observed

throughout the county.

Walker County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Walker County Messenger and the

Georgia Emergency Management Agency

reported extensive and widespread

flooding across much of the county.

Several homes in Rossville were flooded

and several homes in the Rock Creek

Community in the north part of the

county had to be evacuated because of

flood waters. Several propane tanks

were observed to be floating in flood

waters. All together, 37 roads in the

county were flooded and rendered

impassable. Several vehicles were

abandoned on streets and left submerged

in the flood waters.

Clayton County

North Portion to Flash Flood

Countywide

The Clayton County Emergency Manager

reported major flooding occurred at the

headwaters of the Flint River and

various creeks which lead into the

Flint river, all in far northern

Clayton county near the Atlanta

Hartsfield-Jackson International

Airport. At least six homes in the

Springs Subdivision just south of

Jonesboro sustained extensive damage

from flood waters. Over a dozen homes

sustained major damage along the

Roxbury Drive. In addition, The Tara

Mobile Home Park and Edmonson Mobile

Home Parks were flooded. Several

businesses along Upper Riverdale and

Arrowhead Boulevard were flooded and

sustained significant damage. The

County Emergency Management Office had

to evacuate 37 people by boat in the

area between Georgia Highway 138 and

Upper Riverdale Road. Upper Riverdale

Road was flooded with one to two feet

of water flowing over the road,

blocking an entrance to Southern

Regional Hospital. In the southern end

of the county, River’s Edge Golf Course

sustained significant damage from flood

waters and several homes were flooded

near Harbour Town Road and Place.

Upson County

Countywide Flash Flood

The Thomaston Times reported that

flooding resulted in the closure of

four roads in the county, including

Georgia Highway 36 and West County

Road.

GAZ016

Strong Wind

The public reported that strong winds,

associated with the dying remnants of

Tropical Depression Ivan in eastern

Tennessee, blew down several trees near

Georgia Highway 356. Power outages were

also observed in the area.

GAZ001>009-

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Tropical Storm

Hurricane Jeanne was the third major

southeast U.S. land falling hurricane

to affect Georgia within a three week

period, following just 10 days after

Hurricane Ivan, which followed just 10

days after Hurricane Frances. Jeanne

caused the least damage to north and

central Georgia counties of the three

tropical systems to affect the state

during the month of September. High

winds were limited mainly to the

southeast portions of middle Georgia

and flooding rains were limited to the

Atlanta area and south middle Georgia

counties. No tornadoes were observed

with Jeanne as the favorable tornado-

producing spiral feeder bands remained

well east over the Carolinas and

western Atlantic. Hurricane Jeanne

developed on September 13th from a

tropical wave over the Leeward Islands.

Jeanne moved slowly across the Virgin

Islands and Puerto Rico on the 15th,

then slowly over the Dominican Republic

and Haiti the 16th and 17th. Most of

this time, the storm maintained only

strong tropical storm strength. Jeanne

then took a northward turn on the 18th

and moved across the southeastern

Bahamas as a tropical storm. From this

point, Jeanne meandered through a slow

clockwise loop from the 20th through

23rd, when the loop was finally

completed. During this time the storm

strengthened to a category two

hurricane. Jeanne then began a slow

westward track on the 23rd and

strengthened to a category three

hurricane. The storm then made landfall

on the 25th, just north of West Palm

Beach, Florida, at almost the exact

same location as Hurricane Frances had

done 20 days prior. Jeanne weakened to

a tropical storm as it turned north-

northwest across central Florida on the

26th and then weakened into a tropical

depression as it moved into southern

Georgia early on the 27th. The storm

tracked from near Valdosta during the

early morning hours of the 27th,

reaching Macon around sunset on the

27th, then accelerating into northeast

Georgia near Athens by midnight and out

of the state early on the 28th. High

winds of 35 to 40 mph with some higher

gusts were confined mainly to the

central and southeast portions of

middle Georgia, roughly southeast of a

line from Macon to Sandersville.

Rainfall of 4-6 inches was also common

in much of middle Georgia, but flooding

problems observed in these areas were

minor. However, during the evening, a

deformation zone developed on the

northwest side of the center of

circulation around Jeanne over the

Atlanta metropolitan area. This

unfortunately brought excessive

rainfall of 4 to 8 inches to some of

the same areas that received in excess

of 10 inches of rain just 10 days prior

with Ivan. Once again major to record

flooding was observed along several

creeks on the north side of Atlanta

and subsequently the Chattahoochee

River. Many homes that were in the

stages of cleanup from Ivan, were

severely impacted once again with major

flooding. Overall damages from flooding

and high winds were estimated at

$5,000,000.

GAZ081>083-097-

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High Wind (G50)

High wind damage, associated with

Tropical Storm Jeanne, is listed below,

in alphabetical order by county for

those counties that “high wind”

criteria was either met or assumed to

be met.

Bibb: The Macon Telegraph reported that

at least two dozen reports of downed

trees and power lines were received.

Approximately 600 people were left

without power. A car sustained damage

when it drove into a tree which had

fallen on the road. No injuries or

major damage was reported. (Estimated

Damage: $30,000)

Crawford: The Crawford County Sheriff

reported that a number of trees were

down in the county. (Estimated Damage:

$5,000)

Crisp: The Crisp County Sheriff

reported that a number of trees were

down in the county. (Estimated Damage:

$5,000)

Dooly: The Dooly County Sheriff

reported that a good number of trees

and power lines were down throughout

the county. In addition, a tree fell

on a home in Unidalla causing damage to

the structure. (Estimated Damage:

$50,000)

Laurens: The Laurens County 911 Center

reported that widespread and numerous

trees were down throughout the county.

Some power lines were down as well.

(Estimated Damage: $25,000)

Sumter: The Americus Times/Recorder

reported widespread damage to trees and

power lines throughout the county. One

home sustained damage when a large tree

fell on the front porch and adjacent

power lines. (Estimated Damage:

$50,000)

Twiggs: The Twiggs County 911 Center

reported that numerous trees and power

lines were down throughout the county.

(Estimated Damage: $25,000)

Webster: The Webster County 911 Center

reported that at least 20 trees were

down within the county. (Estimated

Damage: $5,000)

GAZ008-014-016-

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Strong Wind

Strong wind damage, associated with

Tropical Storm Jeanne, is listed below

in alphabetical order by county for

those counties that “strong wind”

criteria was either met or assumed to

be met.

Baldwin: The Baldwin County Sheriff,

along with the Union Recorder or

Milledgeville reported that several

trees were down around the county, some

on roads. A couple of roads were

closed. Scattered power outages were

also reported. (Estimated Damage:

$10,000)

Banks: The Banks County Emergency

Management Director reported that three

trees and one power line were down in

the county. (Estimated Damage: $2,000)

Barrow: The Barrow County 911 Center

reported that a few trees were down in

the county. (Estimated Damage: $1000)

Butts: The Butts County 911 Center

reported that four trees were down in

the county. (Estimated Damage: $1,000)

Clarke: The Athens Police Department

reported that around 12 trees were down

in the county. (Estimated Damage:

$3,000)

Clayton: The News Daily of Jonesboro

and the Clayton Neighbor reported that

several trees and power lines were down

around the county. Several homes were

damaged when trees fell on them or

against them. One home in Riverdale

sustained significant damage when a

large oak tree fell on the home causing

damage to the roof, patio, and den.

(Estimated Damage: $150,000)

Coweta: The Times/Herald of Newnan

reported that a number of trees and

power lines were blown down throughout

the county. Two homes and a vehicle on

Newnan’s south side were damaged when

trees fell on them. (Estimated Damage:

$50,000)

Dawson: The Dawson County 911 Center

reported that one tree was down on

Georgia Highway 53 and was also down on

a power line. Consequently, a number of

residents in the county were left

without power for up to 6 hours.

(Estimated Damage: $3000)

DeKalb: The DeKalb County 911 Center

reported that several power lines were

down around the county. The public

reported that a large 75 foot oak tree

fell on a residence in North Decatur.

One tree was also down on Peachtree-

Dunwoody Road. (Estimated Damage:

$15,000)

Dodge: The Dodge County 911 Center

reported that a couple of trees were

down in the county. (Estimated Damage

$500)

Douglas: An off-duty National Weather

Service employee reported that a few

trees were down on Georgia Highway 166

in the eastern portion of the county.

(Estimated Damage: $500)

Emanuel: The Emanuel County 911 Center

reported that a few trees were down in

the county. (Estimated Damage: $1,000)

Fayette: The Fayette County 911 Center

reported that several trees and a few

power lines were down throughout the

county. (Estimated Damage: $10,000)

Forsyth: The Forsyth County 911 Center

reported that one tree was down in

Cumming. (Estimated Damage: $250)

Fulton: The Atlanta Journal-

Constitution, along with the South

Fulton Neighbor, reported that a number

of trees and power lines were blown

down around the county. Power outages

were widespread throughout the county.

A large 150-year old oak tree fell on

and caused significant damage to a home

in East Point. (Estimated Damage:

(Estimated Damage: $150,000)

Glascock: The Glascock County 911

Center reported that several trees were

down around the county. One tree fell

on the main transmission line for the

county knocking out power to the entire

county for several hours. (Estimated

Damage: $25,000)

Greene: The Greene County 911 Center

reported that several trees and some

power lines were down around the

county. (Estimated Damage: $5,000)

Gwinnett: The Atlanta Journal-

Constitution reported that several

trees and power lines were blown down

around the county causing scattered

power outages. (Estimated Damage:

$10,000)

Hall: The Hall County 911 Center

reported that a few trees were down in

the county, including a couple of trees

down on Georgia Highways 129 and 152 in

Gilisville. (Estimated Damage: $2000)

Henry: The Daily Herald of McDonough

reported that strong winds blew down

several trees and power lines in the

county. Some power outages resulted.

Two trees were down on homes causing

minor damage. (Estimated Damage:

$15,000)

Houston: The Houston Home Journal of

Perry reported that several trees and

power lines were blown down. A pickup

truck was damaged when a large pine

tree fell on the vehicle. (Estimated

Damage: $30,000)

Jackson: The Jackson County 911 Center

reported that several trees and some

power lines were down in the county.

(Estimated Damage: $5,000)

Jasper: The Jasper County 911 Center

reported that around 10 trees were down

in the county, including one which fell

on a power line. (Estimated Damage:

$5,000)

Jefferson: The Jefferson County 911

Center reported that a couple of trees

were blown down in the county.

(Estimated Damage: $500)

Macon: The Macon County Sheriff

reported that at least nine trees were

down in the county. (Estimated Damage

$2,500)

Madison: The Madison County 911 Center

reported that a few trees were down in

the county. (Estimated Damage: $1,000)

Marion: The Marion County 911 Center

reported that a few trees were down in

the county. (Estimated Damage: $500)

Meriwether: The Meriwether County 911

Center reported that one tree and

several limbs were down, especially in

the Hogansville area. (Estimated

Damage: $500)

Monroe: The Monroe County 911 Center

reported that a few trees were down

around the county. (Estimated Damage:

$2,000)

Montgomery: The Montgomery County

Sheriff reported that a few trees were

blown down in the county. (Estimated

Damage: $1,000)

Morgan: The Morgan County 911 Center

reported that four trees were blown

down in the county. (Estimated Damage:

$1,000)

Newton: The Newton County 911 Center

reported that three trees were down in

the county. One small road was blocked

as a result. (Estimated Damage: $1,000)

Oconee: The Oconee County 911 Center

reported that several trees were down

in the county. (Estimated Damage:

$2,000)

Oglethorpe: The Oglethorpe County 911

Center reported that eight trees were

down in the county. Several power lines

were affected by the downed trees.

(Estimated Damage: $5,000)

Peach: The Peach County 911 Center

reported that a couple of trees were

down in the county. (Estimated Damage:

$500)

Pulaski: The Pulaski County Sheriff

reported that a few trees were blown

down around the county. (Estimated

Damage: $1,000)

Putnam: The Eatonton Messenger and the

Union Recorder of Milledgeville

reported that a few trees were blown

down around the county. Some power

outages were noted, especially in the

northeastern part of the county.

(Estimated Damage: $5,000)

Schley: The Americus Times/Recorder

indicated that several trees and power

lines were down throughout the county.

No significant damage was reported,

however. (Estimated Damage: $10,000)

Spalding: The Spalding County 911

Center reported that a few trees and

power lines were down in the county. A

couple of roads were blocked from

downed trees. (Estimated Damage;

$5,000)

Taliaferro: The Advocate Democrat of

Crawfordville reported that a few trees

were blown down. One large pecan tree

was down at a private residence in

Crawfordville. (Estimated Damage:

$2,000)

Taylor: The Taylor County Sheriff

reported that a few trees were down in

the county. (Estimated Damage: $1,000)

Telfair: The Telfair Enterprise of

McRae and the Telfair County 911 Center

reported that a few trees and power

lines were down around the county.

(Estimated Damage: $5,000)

Toombs: The Toombs County 911 Center

reported that a couple of trees were

down in the county. (Estimated Damage:

$500)

Union: The Union County 911 Center

reported that one tree was blown down.

(Estimated Damage: $250)

Upson: The Upson County Emergency

Management Director reported that a

couple of trees and one power line were

down. One road was temporarily blocked.

(Estimated Damage: $2,000)

Walton: The Walton County 911 Center

reported that several trees and a few

power lines were down throughout the

county. (Estimated Damage: $5,000)

Warren: The Warren County 911 Center

reported that a few trees were down in

the county. (Estimated Damage: $500)

Washington: The Washington County 911

Center reported that several trees

fell, a few on power lines. A number of

residents were left without power

during the day. (Estimated Damage:

$5,000)

White: The White County 911 Center

reported that one tree was blown down.

(Estimated Damage: $250)

Wilcox: The Wilcox County 911 Center

reported that a few trees were down in

the county. (Estimated Damage: $1,000)

Wilkes: The News Reporter of Washington

indicated that a few trees were blown

down around the county. (Estimated

Damage: $2,000)

Wilkinson: The Wilkinson County News of

Irwinton reported that several trees

and power lines were down around the

county. Several roads were blocked and

some residents were left without power

much of the day. (Estimated Damage:

$50,000)

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Flood

General flooding (that which excludes

flash flooding) or river flooding

associated with Tropical Storm Jeanne,

is listed below in alphabetical order

by county.

Baldwin: The Baldwin county Sheriff and

the Union Recorder of Milledgeville

reported that up to 5 inches of rain

fell throughout the county. Several

creeks in the county were out of their

banks causing some roads to be flooded.

Barrow: The Barrow County 911 Center

reported that there was minor street

flooding on several roads in the

county.

Bibb: The Macon Telegraph reported that

flooding was observed along the

Ocmulgee River, which rose

approximately eight feet in a 24 hour

period. Some roads were also flooded,

including the Interstate 75/Interstate

16 interchange.

Clayton: The public reported

substantial flooding to roads and yards

in the Riverdale area. Some creeks were

out of their banks.

Cobb: The Chattahoochee River once

again rose several feet above its flood

stage, causing flooding of a number of

homes in Cobb county, particularly in

the Vinings area. Many of these same

homes and areas were impacted by the

record flooding from the remnants of

Hurricane Ivan just 10 days prior.

(Estimated Damage: $500,000)

Coweta: The Times/Herald of Newnan

reported that flooding was observed at

the intersection of Georgia Highway 16

and U.S. Highway 29.

Crawford: The Crawford County Sheriff

reported that a couple of minor dirt

roads were washed out and closed

because of flooding. (Estimated Damage:

$5,000)

Crisp: The Crisp County Sheriff

reported that a number of county roads

were flooded and some were even washed

out. (Estimated Damage: $25,000)

Dodge: The Dodge County 911 Center

reported that several minor roads in

the county were washed out. (Estimated

Damage: $50,000)

Dooly: The Dooly County Sheriff

reported that a number of roads in the

county were flooded from several hours

of moderate to heavy rain. On Liberty

Church Road, water was up to just one

foot shy of the bridge.

Greene: The Herald Journal of

Greensboro reported that several roads

in the county were flooded and closed.

Henry: The Daily Herald of McDonough

reported that several small streams and

creeks were out of their banks from

heavy rain.

Houston: The public reported that Bay

Gall Creek rose around one foot above

bankful level and caused some minor

flooding to at least one residence

adjacent to the creek. (Estimated

Damage: $1,000)

Jasper: The Jasper County 911 Center

reported that there was street flooding

throughout the county. The worst

flooding was occurring on Georgia

Highway 83.

Jones: The Jones County Sheriff

reported that several roads were

flooded and some were closed.

Montgomery: The Montgomery County

Sheriff reported that one road was

washed out. (Estimated Damage: $5,000)

Oconee: The Oconee County 911 Center

reported minor flooding on several

roads on the county.

Oglethorpe: The Oglethorpe County 911

Center reported that several roads in

the county were flooded, with water up

to eight inches deep in places. In

addition, a dam on a small lake in

Union Point failed. (Estimated Damage:

$5,000)

Peach: The Macon Telegraph reported

that a portion of Peach Valley Road

gave way during a period of several

inches of rain causing a garbage truck

to fall into an adjacent lake.

(Estimated Damage: $25,000)

Putnam: The Putnam County 911 Center

reported that five roads in the county

were flooded. Minor washout was

reported on a few dirt roads in the

county. Several inches of rain fell in

the county during the day. (Estimated

Damage: $5,000)

Taliaferro: The Tahaferro County

Sheriff reported that flooding was

occurring throughout the county. Minor

flooding was reported on several state

roads and one county road was closed.

Telfair: The Telfair Enterprise of

McRae reported that extensive flooding

was observed throughout the county. At

least five to six miles of county roads

were under water and impassible. At

least 50 yards of one road was under

water and on another water five feet

deep and eight feet wide was flowing

over the road. (Estimated Damage:

$10,000)

Toombs: The Toombs County 911 Center

reported that a couple of dirt roads

were washed out. (Estimated Damage:

$5,000)

Upson: The Upson County Emergency

Management Director reported that minor

street flooding was affecting several

roads.

Wilkes: The Wilkes County 911 center

and the News Reporter of Washington

indicated that a number of roads and

streets in the county were flooded,

especially in the city of Washington.

Several creeks in the county were also

out of their banks. Several dirt roads

sustained significant damage from flood

waters. Rainfall of five to six inches

was common throughout the county for

the afternoon and evening hours.

(Estimated Damage: $25,000)

Gwinnett County

Norcross Heavy Rain

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

reported that nearly 3 inches of rain

fell during the evening hours. Sixteen

to 20 apartments that were under

renovation were flooded and sustained

heavy damage when roof damage allowed

water to leak into the apartments.

Seventy-five to 100 residents had to

evacuate as a result.

De Kalb County

Northwest Portion Flash Flood

The DeKalb County Emergency Management

Director reported major flooding was

once again observed along Peachtree and

Nancy Creeks across the northern

portion of Atlanta. This information

was confirmed by National Weather

Service river gages on these creeks.

The creek was within two feet of the

record stage reached just 10 days

earlier during the remnants of

Hurricane Ivan. Major flooding affected

many roads and homes, many of which

were the same ones affected just 10

days prior. The Peachtree Apartments

were flooded. Several evacuations and

rescues were required. All of this

flooding was the result of heavy rain

which persisted on the northwest side

of the remnants of Hurricane Jeanne as

it moved through East Central Georgia.

Fulton County

North Portion Flash Flood

The Fulton County Emergency Management

Director reported major flooding was

once again observed along Peachtree and

Nancy Creeks across the northern

portion of Atlanta. This information

was confirmed by readings from National

Weather Service river gages on the

creeks. This was the second time in

just 10 days that these creeks rose to

record/historical levels. Peachtree

Creek rose to 20.6 feet, well above the

flood stage of 17 feet and within just

two feet of the record stage reached

just 10 days earlier during the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan. Nancy Creek

rose to 12.5 feet, also above its flood

stage of 11 feet. Major flooding

affected many roads and homes, many of

which were the same ones affected just

10 days prior. Biscayne and Wesley Road

were flooded along with Woodward Way.

The Colonial Homes and Peachtree

Apartments were flooded. Several homes

in Buckhead were also flooded. A number

of evacuations and rescues were

required. The Bobby Jones Golf Course

was also flooded. Flooding was also

observed on Proctor Creek west of

Atlanta. All of this flooding was the

result of heavy rain which persisted on

the northwest side of the remnants of

Hurricane Jeanne as it moved through

East Central Georgia.

Cobb County

Smyrna Heavy Rain

The East Cobb Neighbor reported that

very heavy rain caused an awning at a

shopping center in Smyrna to collapse.

Debris from the damaged awning was

spread across the sidewalk.

Cobb County

Marietta Flash Flood

The East Cobb Neighbor reported that

several homes in Marietta sustained

damage from moderate to major flooding

from heavy rain associated with the

remnants of Hurricane Jeanne.

GAZ010-017

High Wind (G50)

As the remnants of Hurricane Frances

moved north across Georgia, strong

winds developed across the mountains,

causing fairly widespread damage to

trees and power lines.

GAZ026-028>029

Flood

Persistent heavy rainfall associated

with the remnants of Hurricane Frances

resulted in flooding along numerous

creeks and small streams across the

Georgia piedmont. Numerous roads were

flooded or washed out.

GAZ010-017

Flood

Flooding associated with Frances was

more severe across the mountains, where

numerous roads and bridges were washed

out. In Rabun County, the Joy Bridge Rd

bridge was washed out. Buttermilk Ln in

the Sky Valley community caved in

against a house.

GAZ018

Flood

Flooding developed across the county

during mid-evening, with a few creeks

and streams flooding roads. Mudslides

were also responsible for taking down

a few trees.

Franklin County

Franklin Spgs Tornado (F2)

This tornado moved north across the

town of Franklin Springs, damaging or

destroying numerous structures along

its 3-mile path. The city government

building and the fire and police

stations incurred significant damage,

as did approximately 25 residences.

Several large chicken houses were also

destroyed.

Franklin County

1.5 NNW Carnesville to Tornado (F1)

Red Hill

This tornado touched down near

Carnesville, then tracked northwest

toward Red Hill, damaging a few homes,

as well as numerous trees and power

lines along its 5-mile track.

Stephens County

Eastanollee Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Elbert County

1 SE Fortsonia to Tornado (F1)

1 WNW Middleton

This tornado touched down near

Fortsonia, causing damage to a house. A

resident of the house received minor

injuries. Damage was mainly restricted

to trees along the the remainder of the

path.

Elbert County

7 NNE Elberton to Tornado (F1)

8 NNE Elberton

This brief tornado caused damage mainly

to trees and power lines.

Franklin County

7 W Franklin Spgs to Tornado (F2)

3 SW Carnesville

This tornado touched down west of

Franklin Springs, then moved

north-northwest, damaging several

homes, businesses, and vehicles as it

tracked toward Carnesville. Numerous

trees and power lines were also blown

down. A 38-year-old woman was killed

when the vehicle she was driving was

hit by a falling tree. A passenger in

the vehicle received minor injuries.

F38VE

GAZ010-017>018

High Wind (G55)

High winds developed across the

mountains and foothills of northeast

Georgia during the evening, as the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan moved just

west of the area. Widespread tree

damage occurred, and many trees fell

on structures and vehicles.

Hart County

Reed Creek Tornado (F1)

This brief tornado blew down numerous

trees and power lines near Reed Creek.

One tree fell on a house.

Habersham County

Clarkesville Flash Flood

Flash flooding developed across the

county as the outermost rain bands

associated with the remnants of

Hurricane Ivan produced intense

rainfall rates. A few streams

overflowed their banks and flooded

adjacent roads.

Habersham County

Cornelia to Tornado (F1)

2 NNW Cornelia

This tornado blew down numerous trees

and power lines along its 2-mile track.

GAZ010-017>018-029

Flood

GAZ010

Landslide

After isolated flash flooding developed

earlier in the evening, persistent

moderate to heavy rainfall led to a

gradual expansion of general flooding

across extreme northeast Georgia. By

far the hardest hit area was Rabun

County, where numerous streams flooded

severely, including Toccoa Falls and

Worley Creeks, and the Tallulah River.

Numerous homes, businesses, and several

apartment buildings were damaged by

flood water. Another home was destroyed

by a mudslide. Many roads and bridges

were washed out or otherwise damaged

across the area, including highways 15

and 76 in Rabun County, and Yonah Dam

Rd in Stephens County, which was washed

out to a depth of 30 feet in one

section. Water from Toccoa Creek washed

away an unoccupied automobile in Toccoa

Falls. In Habersham County, families

trapped by high water were rescued in

Clarkesville and in the northern part

of the county.

GAZ026-028>029

High Wind (G50)

High winds developed during mid-evening

across portions of the piedmont of

northeast Georgia, as the remnants of

Ivan passed to the west of the area.

Numerous trees and power lines were

blown down.

GAZ010-017

High Wind (G50)

As the remnants of Ivan retreated

toward the mid-Atlantic region, high

pressure building in behind the

circulation caused a resurgence of

strong winds across the mountains. This

resulted in additional tree and power

line damage.

Elbert County

Elberton Flash Flood

Intense rainfall rates associated with

the remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

resulted in rapid rises and flash

flooding along small creeks and streams

during the evening hours. Several

bridges and roads were damaged.

GAZ010-017>018

High Wind (G50)

High winds associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Jeanne resulted in

numerous trees being blown down across

extreme northeast Georgia. A few power

lines were also blown down.

GEORGIA, Southeast

Mcintosh County

Darien Tornado (F0)

A tornado caused damage along highway

99 between mile markers 7 and 8. Trees

and power lines were knocked down and

a porch was ripped off a house.

Liberty County

Hinesville Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

One tree fell onto a house.

Long County

2 E Ludowici

Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and power lines.

Mcintosh County

South Newport to Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

5 W South Newport

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

Mcintosh County

Ridgeville Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

Long County

12 NW Ludowici Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees,

one of which fell on a house.

Liberty County

3 N Retreat Tornado (F0)

A weak tornado knocked down trees and

large limbs and did damage to a roof.

Chatham County

2 SE Burroughs Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Thunderstorms winds caused significant

damage to a home on Grove Point Island.

Bryan County

5 SW Richmond Hill Tornado (F0)

A weak tornado knocked down trees and

power lines.

Bulloch County

3 S Register to Tornado (F0)

4 SE Register

A weak tornado knocked down trees in

Bulloch county before moving into

Candler county.

Candler County

8 SE Metter to Tornado (F0)

6 SE Metter

A weak tornado moved from Bulloch

county into the Candler county. The

storm knocked down trees along its

path.

Chatham County

Pooler Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

Liberty County

2 SW Fleming to Tornado (F1)

8 NW Fleming

A weak F1 tornado knocked down and

snapped numerous trees.

Bryan County

5 E Pembroke Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked trees and

large limbs down.

Chatham County

4.5 E Thunderbolt to Tornado (F1)

2 N Savannah

A tornado knocked down trees and power

lines and destroyed a fence. The

tornado tracked into Jasper county

South Carolina before dissipating.

Candler County

Metter Flash Flood

Heavy rainfall flooded numerous roads

including portions of Highway 121 and

23.

Tattnall County

Glennville Flash Flood

Heavy rainfall flooded roads throughout

the county.

Evans County

Claxton Flash Flood

Heavy rainfall flooded roads across the

county.

Long County

Ludowici Flash Flood

Heavy rainfall flooded roads across the

county.

Chatham County

Bloomingdale Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

Tattnall County

Reidsville Flash Flood

Heavy rainfall caused many roads

throughout the county to be closed.

Candler County

Metter Flash Flood

Heavy rain caused flooded roads.

Hurricane Frances made land fall over

the Florida Panhandle and continued to

track in a generally northward

direction into Georgia, before turning

more to the northeast. This track

placed the Charleston County Warning

Area in the favorable right side of the

remnants of Frances which produced

numerous tornadoes and areas of

straight line wind damage over

southeast Georgia and south

coastal South Carolina. Several Georgia

counties also experienced flash

flooding as there were isolated

rainfall amounts of 5 to 8 inches over

a 24 to 36 hour period. This was on top

of already saturated ground from heavy

rains during the month of August. The

South Carolina counties experienced

more nuisance type flooding as the

rainfall amounts were not as high as

what occurred in southeast Georgia.

GAZ087>088- Jenkins–Screven–Candler–Bulloch–

099>101-114>119- Effingham–Tattnall–Evans–Inland

137>141 Bryan–Coastal Bryan–Inland Chatham–

Coastal Chatham–Long–Inland Liberty–

Coastal Liberty–Inland Mcintosh–

Coastal Mcintosh

High Wind (G50)

Rain bands around the periphery of

Frances caused widespread

non-thunderstorm wind damage across

Southeast Georgia. Numerous trees and

power lines were knocked down.

Screven County

5 S Altman to Tornado (F1)

1 S Sylvania

A tornado bent and snapped off numerous

trees and large limbs in various

directions.

Screven County

6 NW Sylvania to Tornado (F1)

1 W Millhaven

A tornado bent and snapped trees off in

various directions for 7 miles.

Chatham County

Bloomingdale Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down large

limbs and power lines.

Bulloch County

6 E Statesboro to Tornado (F0)

5.5 E Statesboro

A weak tornado knocked trees and large

limbs down.

Bulloch County

3 NW Leefield Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and large limbs.

Screven County

1 NW Capitolo Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and large limbs.

GEORGIA, Southeast

Bryan County

1 E Ellabell Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

Bulloch County

7 NE Portal to Tornado (F0)

7 NNE Portal

A weak tornado knocked trees and large

limbs down.

Screven County

6 SE Millhaven to Tornado (F0)

5.3 SE Millhaven

A weak tornado knocked trees and large

limbs down.

Jenkins County

4 E Perkins Tornado (F0)

A weak tornado knocked down trees and

large limbs.

GAZ087>088-

099>101-114>119-

137>41

Tropical Storm

Tropical Storm Jeanne tracked well

inland across Georgia but the strongest

winds at the time were along the coast.

The maximum wind gust associated with

the storm was 44 mph at the Savannah

airport. Non-tornadic damage in south-

east Georgia was limited to isolated

trees and limbs down on power lines.

GEORGIA, Southwest

Lowndes County

12 NW Valdosta Tornado (F0)

A weak tornado briefly touched down and

uprooted several trees. One tree was

hurled into a garage. Reported by the

public.

GAZ120>122-

124>129-142>148-

155>60

Tropical Storm

Tropical Storm Frances continued to

slowly weaken as it moved north into

southwest Georgia during the late

afternoon and evening hours of

September 6. Maximum sustained winds

reached 38 knots at Albany, GA, with a

peak wind gust 59 knots. The lowest

sea-level pressure was 991.8 mb at

Albany. Rainfall totals ranged from two

inches at Newton, GA, to nearly seven

inches at Tifton, GA. Many schools and

local businesses were closed on

September 7. There were numerous

reports of washed out roads, downed

trees and power lines. Several mobile

homes and businesses were damaged. Most

of the damage occurred in Grady and

Thomas counties, with 140 homes

damaged, five mobile homes destroyed,

and numerous vehicles damaged. An

estimated 30,000 customers were without

power. Several counties in southwest

Georgia suffered crop yield losses, on

the order of 25 to 50 percent. Damage

estimates will be realized at the time

of the autumn harvest. A state of

emergency was declared for much of

southwest Georgia.

GAZ120>123-125-

129-142>146-155>161

Tropical Storm

Hurricane Ivan weakened to a tropical

storm as it moved into southwest

Alabama on September 16. The maximum

sustained wind recorded was 29 knots at

Albany, GA. The peak wind gust recorded

was 37 knots at Valdosta, GA. The

lowest sea-level pressure was 1003 mb

at Albany. Rainfall totals varied from

0.75 inches at Tifton and Valdosta, GA

to 6.50 inches at Blakely, GA. Minor

flooding was reported in Early County.

Minor rises were observed on the

Kinchafoonee and Muckalee creeks. An

estimated 20,000 customers were without

power. There were numerous reports of

downed trees and power lines. Intense

outer rain bands from Ivan spawned

several tornadoes in southwest Georgia

on September 15. The hardest hit areas

were Early and Miller counties, with

many homes and businesses damaged. Many

schools and businesses were closed on

September 16 and 17. A state of

emergency was declared for the affected

counties. Federal assistance was

granted for Early and Miller counties.

Early County

Centerville Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down briefly which

downed trees and power lines. Reported

by the Early County EMA.

GEORGIA, Southwest

Early County

Blakely to Tornado (F0)

1 NW Blakely

A tornado touched down near the county

jail in Blakely and caused minor

damage. Scattered trees and power lines

were down. Reported by a HAM radio

operator.

Early County

3 S Damascus to Tornado (F0)

1 S Damascus

A tornado touched down near Highway 45

just north of Miller County. It caused

minor damage to a few homes, and

knocked down trees and power lines.

Reported by the Early County EMA.

Miller County

2 NE Boykin to Tornado (F0)

Colquitt

A tornado caused minor damage to nine

homes and two businesses in Colquitt.

Reported by the Miller County EMA.

Calhoun County

4 W Arlington Tornado (F0)

Brief touchdown of a tornado downed

trees and power lines. Reported by the

Calhoun EMA.

Grady County

3 SE Whigham to Tornado (F1)

2 SW Harrells Still

A tornado damaged five homes and

several chicken houses in Whigham.

Numerous downed trees and power lines

blocked several roads along its path.

Reported by the Grady County EMA

Baker County

3 S Hoggard Mill to Tornado (F1)

3 SSW Hoggard Mill

Trees were uprooted and twisted. Power

lines were knocked down. Reported by

the Baker County EMA.

Baker County

Crestview to Tornado (F1)

1 W Crestview

Trees were uprooted and twisted. Power

lines were knocked down. Minor

structural damage occurred. Reported by

the Baker County EMA.

Dougherty County

3 E Williamsburg to Tornado (F0)

3 NE Williamsburg

A weak tornado touched down just east

of Williamsburg. Several homes near

Gravel Hill Road sustained minor

damage. Highway 133 near Pecan City was

closed due to downed trees. Reported by

a SKYWARN storm spotter.

GAZ125>127-

129>131-143>148-

156>61

Tropical Storm

Tropical Storm Jeanne moved north

across south central Georgia during the

early morning hours of September 27.

Maximum sustained winds up to 40 knots

with peak gusts to 50 knots were

reported. The lowest sea-level pressure

was 987.8 mb at Valdosta, GA. Rainfall

totals varied from an inch at Albany,

GA to nine inches at Tifton, GA.

Widespread areal flooding was reported

over portions of south central Georgia.

In Lowndes County, high water forced

700 residents of a Valdosta subdivision

to evacuate. The Withlacoochee River

near Valdosta rose above flood stage.

Many county and dirt roads were washed

out. Schools and local businesses were

closed on September 27. There were

numerous reports of downed trees and

power lines. An estimated 36,000

customers were without power. Many

homes were damaged by fallen trees. A

state of emergency was declared for the

affected counties, with a request for

federal assistance.

GAZ160

Flood

Torrential rainfall from Tropical Storm

Jeanne flooded over 100 homes with a

foot of water in the Chadwyck Place

subdivision in Valdosta. Many county

roads were flooded. Reported by the

Lowndes County EMA.

GULF OF MEXICO

Bonita Beach To

Englewood Fl Out

20Nm

11 NNW San Carlos Ba Waterspout

13 NW San Carlos Bay

Bonita Beach To

Englewood Fl Out

20Nm

13.5 NW San Carlos Ba Waterspout

15 WNW San Carlos

Bay

A waterspout over Pine Island Sound

moved west across Pine Island then into

the Gulf of Mexico

Lake Ponchartrain

And Lake Maurepas

Mid Lke Pontchartrain Marine Tstm Wind

HAWAII

Honolulu County

Haleiwa Funnel Cloud

A funnel cloud was sighted by a

resident of Haleiwa on the North Shore

of Oahu. The phenomenon was associated

with showery low clouds that had

developed in the afternoon hours of the

3rd. The funnel never touched down and

produced no damages or injuries.

HIZ026

Wildfire

A fire burned about 125 acres of brush

in the South Kohala District on the Big

Island of Hawaii, 9 miles south/

southwest of Kamuela and 4 1/2 miles

east/southeast of Waikoloa. The fire

was caused by a van, involved in a

two-van collision on Waikoloa

Road, when it tumbled off the road into

a nearby dry, grassy area. Part of

Waikoloa Road had to be closed for more

than six hours while firefighters

fought the blaze. However, no homes

were threatened or had to be evacuated.

There were no serious injuries or

property damage.

HIZ026

Wildfire

A fire consumed nearly 2000 acres of

brush in the South Kohala District on

the Big Island of Hawaii, 8 miles west

of Kamuela. A total of 70 families had

to be evacuated from the Mauna Kea

Uplands subdivisions near Mauna Kea

Beach Resort and from the Waiula Ole

Self-Help Housing Community on Sunday

afternoon, the 12th. All the families,

however, were allowed to return to

their homes by Sunday evening or Monday

morning. The blaze was in an area of

unexploded ordnance left over from

World War II-era training exercises.

Some of the munitions did explode

during the time of the fire, but no one

was seriously hurt. The fire forced the

closure of Kawaihae Road and Queen

Kaahumanu Highway for a time near the

blaze on the 12th. Hawaii County used

many firefighters and a lot of

equipment, including bulldozers and

helicopters, to battle the fire. This

put a severe financial burden on the

county, though even unofficial cost

estimates were not readily available.

The fire fighting was successful, on

the other hand, in that there were no

serious injuries or property damage.

The cause of the blaze was under

investigation.

HIZ001>003-

005>006-012>014-

016-018>021-023>025

Heavy Surf/High Surf

A storm low in the southern hemisphere

generated surf of 6 to 8 feet along the

south shores of all the Hawaiian

Islands. No serious injuries or

property damage were reported.

HIZ001>003-

005>006-012>014-

016-018>021-023>025

Heavy Surf/High Surf

A strong low in the southern hemisphere

produced surf of 5 to 10 feet along the

south shores of all the Hawaiian

Islands. There were no reports of

serious property damage or injuries,

however.

HAWAII WATERS

Big Island Leeward

Waters

23 NW Kailua-Kong Waterspout

An airplane pilot spotted two

waterspouts more than 20 miles

northwest of Kailua-Kona on the Big

Island of Hawaii. However, they caused

no serious injuries or property damage

to air traffic or water craft.

IDAHO, Extreme Southeast

NOT RECEIVED.

IDAHO, North

NONE REPORTED.

IDAHO, Northwest

NONE REPORTED.

IDAHO, Southeast

Custer County

8 N Stanley Thunderstorm Wind (G70)

At the Mormon Bend Campground strong

winds downed 13 large trees, cut

through 5th wheel trailer and ripped

tents. Estimated damage at 8,000

dollars.

IDAHO, Southwest

NONE REPORTED.

ILLINOIS, Central

Lawrence County

Bridgeport Flash Flood

1 to 2 inches of rain fell in a short

period of time over Lawrence County

from Sumner to just west of

Lawrenceville. The heavy rain caused

Route 250 between Bridgeport and

Lawrenceville to become flooded.

Champaign County

Champaign Flash Flood

2 to 3 inches of rain fell in the

Champaign area in a short period of

time. The heavy rainfall caused an

underpass in Champaign to become

impassible, with 3 to 4 feet of water

on the roadway.

ILLINOIS, Northeast

NONE REPORTED.

ILLINOIS, Northwest

ILZ034>035

Flood

A major rain event on the 15th of

September resulted in minor

agricultural flooding on parts of the

Cedar and La Moine Rivers.

ILLINOIS, South

ILZ083

Flood

The Little Wabash River remained above

flood stage after two rounds of intense

thunderstorms on the 26th and 28th of

August. The river crested at Carmi late

in August, and fell below flood stage

on the second of September. The

flooding was minor, consisting mostly

of inundated lowlands and county roads.

ILLINOIS, South

ILZ087

Flood

Despite very dry weather in September,

the Ohio River rose rapidly due to

copious rainfall in the upper Ohio

Valley from the remnants of Hurricanes

Frances and Ivan. The only gage

location along the Illinois side to

exceed flood stage was Shawneetown, not

far from the Indiana border. The crest

flattened out as it moved further

downriver. The crest at Shawneetown was

35.7 feet on the afternoon of the 25th.

Flood stage there is 33 feet. Minor

flooding of low-lying bottomlands

occurred.

ILLINOIS, Southwest

NONE REPORTED.

INDIANA, Central

NONE REPORTED.

INDIANA, Northeast

White County

Monon Flash Flood

Emergency management reported flash

flooding in Monon with flooding at a

trailer park and cars floating at a car

dealership.

White County

Monon Flash Flood

Morton Fire Dept reported flooding at

the station and in downtown Motion.

White County

Monon Flash Flood

Emergency management reported flooding

in downtown Monon with flash flooding

reported. A car dealership and a

trailer park had flood damage … With

flooding at the Monon Fire Dept.

Allen County

Ft Wayne Flash Flood

Underpass in downtown Ft. Wayne

reported flooded. Few roads closed

within city limits due to flash

flooding.

Allen County

Ft Wayne Flash Flood

Spy Run Creek crested at 8.88 feet …

0.8 feet above flood stage. Reports of

flash flooding along Hanauer Rd.

INDIANA, Northwest

NONE REPORTED.

INDIANA, South Central

INZ089

Flood

The Ohio River at Tell City, IN crested

at 38.2 feet around 7 AM EST on

September 24. Flood stage at Tell City

is 38 feet. Minor flooding occurs at

this level. Indiana Highway 66 is

flooded between Rome and Derby.

INDIANA, Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

INDIANA, Southwest

INZ081>082-085>088

Drought

This was the driest September on record

for southwest Indiana. At Evansville,

the monthly rainfall was only 0.09

inch, which broke the old September

record of 0.25 inch set in 1928. This

was the third driest month on record at

Evansville, where records extend back

to 1897. The dry weather turned lawns

and fields brown. The dry weather set

in too late to harm crops. In fact, the

timing of the dry weather helped

farmers harvest a bountiful crop.

INZ085-087>088

Flood

Despite very dry weather in September,

the Ohio River rose above flood stage

due to copious rainfall in the upper

Ohio Valley from the remnants of

Hurricanes Frances and Ivan. At

Newburgh Lock and Dam, the river

crested at 41.36 feet on the evening of

the 24th. This is about 3 feet above

the 38-foot flood stage. At Mount

Vernon, the river crested at 35.9 feet

on the afternoon of the 25th. Flood

stage at Mount Vernon is 35 feet. The

flooding was minor, affecting

agricultural bottomlands.

IOWA, Central

Greene County

8 S Jefferson to Tornado (F1)

4 SE Jefferson

Small tornado caused garage, porch, and

tree damage from about 310th Street and

0 Avenue to 290th Street and P avenue

showing the most damage. Damage in

Rural areas was to trees and power

poles.

Greene County

2 W Jefferson Tornado (F0)

Brief touchdown in open country.

Hamilton County

4 NW Webster City Tornado (F0)

Brief touchdown in open country.

Warren County

5 SW Norwalk Tornado (F0)

Brief touchdown in open country.

Lucas County

5 NW Lucas to Tornado (F0)

9.5 NNW Lucas

Tornado touched down in northwest Lucas

County and tracked northeast for about

two miles. Extensive damage was

reported on one farm.

Polk County

8 E Elkhart Tornado (F0)

Tornado made a brief touchdown in open

country.

Warren County

2 W Lacona Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

Story County

1 SE Collins to Tornado (F1)

3 NE Collins

Tornado damaged 4 outbuildings and

downed trees. Tornado tracked northeast

and terminated 3 miles northeast of

Collins.

Story County Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

1 N Colo

Marshall County

3 SW State Center to Tornado (F0)

State Center

Tornado tracked across open country but

did damage trees, sheds, and a grain

bin.

Marshall County

3 SW State Center to Tornado (F1)

3 WNW State Center

Tornado tracked through rural areas of

Marshall County west of State Center.

A cold front advanced across the plains

and moved into Iowa during the night of

the 6th. The weather situation was

quite dynamic for early September. A

low level jet of 50 kts developed ahead

of the cold front. Warm air moved in at

500 rob during the day, which reduced

the lapse rate significantly. There was

a lot of CAPE, shear, and helicity in

the lowest one to two kilometers of the

surface, but parameters were weak above

that. This lead to a mini supercell

event. CAPE values were around 1500

J/kg and lifted indices in the -4 to -5

C. range. The freezing level was quite

high and was in the 15,000 to 15,500

foot range. A line of thunderstorms

that had persisted through the day

ahead of the cold front strengthened

during the mid and late afternoon hours

before pushing east across Iowa. There

was very little in the way of wind with

this event with only an isolated event

reported in Story County, and no hail

reported. High winds caused tree damage

in the Lacona area of Warren County.

The winds were along the track of a

tornado that touched down in Lucas

County, however there was no evidence

that the tornado was on the ground in

Warren County. Several small tornadoes

occurred over northwest into central

Iowa. Most of them were brief

touchdowns in open area, resulting in

little damage. One of the tornadoes was

on the ground for about 2 miles in

Greene County. The tornado damages

garages, porches, and trees for the

most part. Several power lines were

taken down as well. A second tornado in

Greene County caused minor house damage

west of Jefferson. Another stronger

tornado touched down southeast of

Collins in Story County. Four out

buildings were damages or destroyed and

numerous trees were taken down. This

tornado was on the ground for nearly 3

miles as it headed northeast of

Collins. The tornado lifted and another

tornado formed in Marshall County

shortly after the cell crossed the

border. A tornado touched down in

northwest Lucas County and tracked for

2 miles northeast. One farmstead had

extensive damage with one machine shed

destroyed and others damaged. Three

other tornadoes occurred, One in Polk

County east of Elkhart did minor

damage. Another tornado touched down

northwest of State Center and caused F1

damage along its 3 mike long track.

Crawford County

1 E Charter Oak Hail (0.75)

Crawford County

3 N Schleswig Hail (1.00)

Crawford County

Deloit Hail (0.88)

Crawford County

2 S Kiron Hail (0.88)

Crawford County

5 N Dow City Hail (0.75)

Kossuth County

Burt Flash Flood

Crawford County

Deloit Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Winnebago County

Lake Mills Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Emmet County

Countywide Flash Flood

Winnebago County

Countywide Flash Flood

Worth County

Countywide Flash Flood

Palo Alto County

6 WNW Emmetsburg Flash Flood

Palo Alto County

Countywide Flash Flood

A strong southerly flow developed over

Iowa as a cold frontal boundary slid

southeast into the state. Low level

winds of 30 to 45 kts impinged on the

front during the late afternoon and

into the night. Dew points rose into

the low 70s, with surface temperatures

in the mid to upper 80s. CAPE values

were around 1500 J/kg with lifted

indices in the -4 to -5 C. range.

Plenty of moisture was drawn into the

state with precipitable water values in

the 1.5 to 2 inch range. Thunderstorms

formed during the late afternoon and

evening hours and produced three

quarter to one inch diameter hail in

west central into parts of northwest

Iowa. A few storms produced high winds

that blew down trees and broke power

lines as well. Heavy rainfall fell over

northern Iowa. The rain fell in areas

that had about 1.5 inches of rain the

previous night. As the additional 3 to

4 inches of rain fell in Kossuth

County, flash flooding was reported in

the northern part of the county near

the intersection of U.S. Highway 169

and Iowa Highway 9. Three to five

inches of rain fell in southern

Winnebago County. Flash flooding

occurred north of Forest City with U.S.

Highway 69 flooded and closed at 380th

Street two and one half miles north of

Forest City. Damage was also reported

in the Thompson area and toward Lake

Mills. Six to twelve inches of flowing

water washed out gravel roads in the

area. The same situation occurred in

Worth County, where 8 inches of rain

washed out roads in the Joice area. The

heaviest rainfall occurred in the

northwest part of the state with

officials reporting 4 to 9 inches of

rainfall overnight in Kossuth County,

and 6 to 12 inches in Emmet County. In

Emmet County, 5 to 6 feet of water was

reported in several homes and there

were numerous washouts of gravel roads.

Highway 4 in Emmet County was closed

with water running over the highway one

quarter of a mile wide. Some of the

areas were hit by two rounds of heavy

precipitation. One flash flooding event

occurred around midnight, the second

from heavy rainfall shortly before

dawn.

IAZ004>007-015>017-

023>024-027>028-039

Flood

Very heavy rain struck northwest and

extreme northern Iowa at mid-month. An

area of thunderstorms, bringing mostly

1 to 2 inch rain amounts, fell across

northwest Iowa on the night of the 13th

and morning of the 14th. This was soon

followed by a procession of

thunderstorms from mid-day on the 14th

to sunrise on the 15th when additional

6 or more inches of rain fell on a wide

area from O’Brien and Cherokee Counties

northeast into southeast Minnesota. At

Spencer (7.13, Estherville (6.45) and

Swea City (6.82) the rainfall for the

24 hour period ending at 0600 CST on 15

September was the heaviest ever

recorded for a 24-hour period. Official

24-hour totals peaked at 8.71 inches at

the Estherville Airport with unofficial

amounts reported of as much as a foot

of rain. Still more rain fell in the

area on the 17th and 21st. Official

monthly rainfall totals included 15.62

inches at Spencer Airport with 14.43

inches of it falling from the night of

the 13th to the morning of the 22nd.

This easily broke the previous Spencer

record for precipitation for any month

of 12.13 inches in August of 1975.

These were the heaviest rains reported

in Iowa since June of 1998. The heavy

rainfall caused several rivers to

overflow their banks. This caused some

damage due to flooded property and

drown crops along the river bank.

Flooding was reported in the East Fork

Des Moines, Des Moines, Winnebago,

Shell Rock, and Cedar River systems.

Pocahontas County

2 N Havelock Hail (0.88)

Webster County

Barnum Thunderstorm Wind

Calhoun County

1 N Lohrville Hail (1.00)

Calhoun County

2 S Farnhamville Hail (1.00)

Webster County

6 S Callender Hail (0.75)

A warm front extended across South

Dakota, through eastern Nebraska, into

eastern Kansas. The stability

parameters were not all that impressive

with CAPE values of 1000 J/kg or less

and lifted indices quite marginal. A

strong south-southwest flow in the low

levels developed with a 30 to 40 kt

flow crossing the frontal boundary.

Thunderstorms originally developed in

South Dakota the night before and that

small area of convection translated

east-southeast into Iowa. The main

severe weather feature was hail of

three quarter to one inch in diameter

with the storms. There was a wind gust

of 58 MPH measured in Webster County at

Barnum.

Taylor County

4 NNW Conway Hail (0.88)

Adams County

5 S Corning Hail (1.00)

Adams County

5 N Prescott Hail (1.00)

The situation remained unchanged during

the overnight hours of the 17th into

the 18th. Low pressure remained over

eastern Montana, with an elevated warm

front extending southeast through

eastern Nebraska into far eastern

Kansas. Stability parameters remained

week, however a 40 kt low level jet

continued to blow across the front. The

strong warm air advection resulted in

an area of elevated convection that

developed around midnight and continued

through much of the predawn hours.

Severe weather was limited with these

storms, but a few of the storms

produced hail up to an inch in

diameter.

IOWA, East Central and

Southeast

IAZ067-078

Flood

A major rain event on the 15th of

September resulted in minor

agricultural flooding on parts of the

Cedar and La Moine Rivers.

IOWA, Northeast

IAZ008-018

Flood

Heavy rainfall amounts of 3 to 6

inches, with locally higher amounts,

occurred across portions of southern

Minnesota from September 14 through

September 15. This caused significant

flooding on the Cedar River in

northeast Iowa. Hardest hit was the

Charles City area (Flood County), where

the Cedar River crested at 20.58 feet.

Minor structural damage was reported to

a few homes, but the flood waters

mainly impacted park land and

recreational trails around Charles

City.

IOWA, Northwest

Woodbury County

1 E Anthon to Tornado (F0)

2 E Pierson

A tornado damaged corn and soybean

crops, and trees. The tornado knocked

down 3 power poles, and destroyed 5

outbuildings on two farms.

Dickinson County

4 W Spirit Lake to Tornado (F0)

3.9 W Spirit Lake

A brief tornado caused no reported

damage.

Dickinson County

5 NE Spirit Lake Thunderstorm Wind (G61)

Thunderstorm winds damaged grain bins,

outbuildings, and other farm equipment.

Dickinson County

5 NW Spirit Lake Thunderstorm Wind (G61)

Thunderstorm winds moved two

outbuildings off their foundations.

Lyon County

3 W Larchwood Hail (1.00)

Plymouth County

9 NE Kingsley Hail (0.75)

Cherokee County

3 SW Cleghorn Hail (1.25)

Woodbury County

Sioux City Hail (1.25)

Clay County

Countywide Flash Flood

Rainfall of up to 7 inches caused

widespread flooding of roads,

basements, fields, small streams, and

other low areas. The communities of

Spencer and Royal were greatly

affected. The flooding also affected

much of the farmland in the county,

severely damaging soybean crops. Water

was up to 2 feet deep at the Clay

County fairgrounds in Spencer. The

amount of damage could not be

determined.

Dickinson County

Spirit Lake Flash Flood

Rainfall estimated at 3 to 6 inches

caused flooding of streets and

basements.

Cherokee County

Cherokee Flash Flood

Rainfall of 4.5 inches caused flooding

of streets.

Dickinson County

Countywide Flash Flood

Rainfall of 3 to 6 inches, in addition

to a similar heavy rainfall the

previous evening, caused widespread

flooding of roads, basements, small

streams, farmland, and other low areas.

Some roads were made impassable by the

high water. There was severe damage to

soybean crops in the county. The amount

of property and crop damage was not

known.

O’Brien County

Sutherland to Flash Flood

3 E Sutherland

Heavy rain caused flooding of roads,

and of a small stream that feeds into

the Waterman river just east of

Sutherland.

Clay County

Countywide Flash Flood

Rainfall of 3 to 5 inches brought the

total since the previous evening began

to over 10 inches in the Spencer and

Royal areas. The rain caused widespread

and severe flooding of roads, including

highway 18 just west of Dickens.

Basements, small streams, farmland, and

other low areas were also flooded.

Buena Vista County

4 S Linn Grove Thunderstorm Wind (G69)

Thunderstorm winds uprooted trees, blew

off the top of a 100 foot silo, and

blew down a chicken pen.

Buena Vista County

Alta Thunderstorm Wind (G61)

Thunderstorm winds caused tree damage

at a cemetery, and moved a 20 inch

tombstone 36 feet.

Buena Vista County

Storm Lake Thunderstorm Wind (G61)

Thunderstorm winds caused tree and

power line damage. The damage resulted

in a power outage that lasted two and a

half hours and affected over a thousand

city households, about a third of the

city’s population.

IAZ013>014-021>022

Flood

Repeated heavy rain caused flooding of

the Little Sioux River, and also of the

Ocheyedan River in the Spencer area.

The flooding affected mainly farmland

and other fields with resulting crop

damage. The amount of crop damage was

not known. The crest of the Little

Sioux River at Linn Grove on September

19th was the second highest stage there

on record, and the crest of the Little

Sioux River at Spencer on September

18th was 4.3 feet above flood stage.

Sioux County

5 E Ireton Hail (0.75)

Sioux County

1 S Orange City Hail (0.75)

Clay County

Spencer Flash Flood

Four inches of rain falling on

saturated ground caused widespread

flooding of streets and basements.

Several roads were closed, mostly at

intersections, because of high water

which was flowing rapidly. Other low

areas including a park and campground

were flooded. The main damage was from

the basement flooding, but the amount

of damage was not known.

Clay County

2 SW Cornell Hail (0.88)

Clay County

4 E Webb Hail (0.75)

IOWA, Southwest

Monona County

Moorhead Hail (0.88)

Harrison County

3 NW Little Sioux Hail (1.25)

KANSAS, East

Cloud County

Concordia Thunderstorm Wind (G56)

Clay County

Clay Center Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Strong winds blew down power lines.

Also a tree was blow down onto a parked

car doing minor damage. Asecond tree

was blown down onto the roof of a house

causing some roof damage.

Marshall County

Blue Rapids Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Strong winds blew down a 15 inch

diameter tree limb which did minor

damage to a pick-up truck parked

nearby.

Cloud County

Clyde Hail (1.00)

Dickinson County

3 W Hope Hail (1.25)

Dickinson County

3 W Hope Hail (1.75)

Lyon County

Neosho Rapids Hail (0.75)

KANSAS, Extreme Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

KANSAS, North Central

Phillips County

Speed Hail (0.75)

Smith County

3 SSW Gaylord Hail (0.75)

Phillips County

Logan Hail (0.75)

Phillips County

Logan Hail (0.88)

KANSAS, Northeast

Leavenworth County

3 N Leavenworth Hail (0.88)

KANSAS, Northwest

Sherman County

Goodland Arpt Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Localized microburst at airport. Winds

under 35 mph at weather office 1/2 mile

from ASOS equipment.

Sherman County

Goodland Arpt Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Decatur County

9 N Norcatur Hail (0.75)

Decatur County

Oberlin Hail (0.88)

Decatur County

Oberlin Hail (0.88)

Cheyenne County

19 NW St Francis Hail (2.00)

Cheyenne County

14 NW St Francis Hail (1.00)

Cheyenne County

4 NW St Francis Thunderstorm Wind (G61)

Cheyenne County

13 NW St Francis Thunderstorm Wind (G65)

Cheyenne County

12 N Wheeler Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

Six-inch tree limbs broken off.

Rawlins County

11 N Atwood Hail (1.75)

Rawlins County

7 N Atwood Hail (1.00)

Rawlins County

2 S Atwood Hail (1.00)

Rawlins County

Atwood Hail (1.00)

KSZ027

High Wind (G60)

Non-convective wind gust measured at

Weskan school.

KSZ001-013-015

High Wind (G52)

Wallace County

2 SW Weskan Hail (0.88)

Sherman County

14 S Kanorado Hail (0.75)

Sherman County

14 S Kanorado Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

Four-inch tree limb down.

KANSAS, Northwest

Sherman County

12 S Kanorado Hail (0.75)

Sherman County

15 S Goodland Hail (0.88)

Sherman County

15 S Goodland Hail (1.75)

Thomas County

12 N Brewster Hail (0.88)

Thomas County

12 N Brewster Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

Thomas County

Brewster Thunderstorm Wind (G65)

Tree down and power pole broken.

Thomas County

Colby Hail (0.75)

Thomas County

Colby Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Rawlins County

Atwood Thunderstorm Wind (G51)

Measured by KSN Weatherlab Site.

Graham County

3 S Morland Hail (0.75)

Graham County

11 E St Peter Hail (0.88)

Graham County

13 SSE Hill City Hail (1.00)

Graham County

8 NNE Hill City Hail (0.88)

KANSAS, Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

KANSAS, Southwest

Comanche County

4 N Coldwater Hail (1.50)

Stafford County

18 NNE St John Hail (1.25)

Kiowa County

5 SE Greensburg Hail (0.88)

Kiowa County

6 ESE Greensburg Hail (1.75)

Kiowa County

9 E Greensburg Hail (1.00)

Kiowa County

Wellsford Hail (0.75)

Pratt County

15 W Pratt Hail (0.88)

Hamilton County

20 S Coolidge Hail (0.88)

Hamilton County

13 N Coolidge Hail (0.75)

Scott County

11 NE Scott City Hail (0.75)

Trego County

8 NNW Wakeeney Hail (0.88)

KENTUCKY, Central

KYZ042

Flood

The Stoner Creek at Paris, KY crested

at 20.2 feet around 6 AM EST on

September 18. Flood stage at Paris is

18 feet. Minor flooding occurs at this

level. Water enters the yards of homes

downstream from the water plant. Parts

of the city park are flooded.

KYZ043

Flood

The Licking River at Blue Licks Spring

crested at 26.8 feet around 7 PM EST on

September 19. Flood stage at Blue Licks

Spring is 25 feet. Minor flooding of

bottomland occurs at this level.

KENTUCKY, Eastern

KYZ087

Flood

Fourteenth and 19th Streets in Middles-

boro closed due to high water. Happy

Hollow Road closed due to high water.

Mud lick road, just outside of Middles-

boro, also covered by water. Ten inches

of water on old Pineville Pike south of

Meldrum.

KYZ106-106

Flood

Highway 711 near Wrigley closed due to

high water. Water covering Laurel Fork

Road at Highway 172, about 2 miles

southwest of Crockett. Three feet of

water covering Gordon Ford Road off of

Highway 460 near Wrigley due to back-

water flooding.

KYZ106

Landslide

Highway 7, two miles north of West

Liberty, closed due to a rock and mud

slide. Highway closed for several

hours.

KYZ108

Flood

Highway 191 near Wilson Branch Road

impassable due to high water. Highway

3356, or Stamper Branch Road, and High-

way 1010 East near Tolliver impassable

due to high water.

KYZ059-059

Flood

Flood waters form Hardwick Creek over

Highway 1057. Highway 15 at Bowen and

Cane Creek Road at Rosslyn closed due

to high water along the Red River. Area

schools closed due to flooded roads.

Pompii Road near Highway 11 and Highway

615 in Clay City closed due to high

water. Beach Fork Road closed due to

high water. Highway 2026 between mile

markers 0 and 1 in Clay City closed due

to high water.

KYZ050

Flood

Water covering Highways 1050 and 460

near the Menifee county line.

KYZ111

Flood

Highway 52 W, near Crystal, was closed

for a few hours due to high water.

KYZ058

Flood

Murphys Ford Road on the Red Lick Side

was closed due to flooding. This is

located off of Route 52, west of

Irvine. Dark Hollow Road was also

closed due to flooding.

KYZ079

Strong Wind

Numerous trees and large limbs down

countywide.

KYZ080

Flood

Laurel County

Victory Flash Flood

Water reported running through a home

off Highway 490 in Victory.

KENTUCKY, Eastern

KYZ086-086-086-086-

86

Flood

On September 18, 2004 at approximately

10:47 pm EST, a 20 year old man drowned

while attempting to drive his vehicle

through flood waters on Highway 459,

near the junction of Bull Run road, 5

miles southwest of Barbourville. The

road was closed at the time of the

incident. Four feet of water over a

bridge near Central Elementary School

in Corbin. Highway 66, nine miles north

of Pineville, had water flowing over

it. Highway 229 blocked by high water.

Stinking Creek and Little Brush Creek

Roads also flooded. Highway 225, one

mile from Warren Camp underwater. Three

homes flooded on Big Bush Creek Road.

Highway 1527 also underwater.

KYZ112

Flood

Law enforcement officials reported that

Cane Creek Branch Road Smiths Branch

roads were flooded. Water depth was

unknown at time of reports. Law en-

forcement also reported that four to

five feet of water covered Highway 1098

at Smith Branch Road.

KYZ112

Flood

An off duty National Weather Service

Employee reported that the Belcher Fork

had come out of its banks and was sur-

rounding several trailers 3 miles

southwest of Jackson.

KYZ059

Flood

The public reported that water was

flowing across Highway 1057 near Clay

City. Water was also reported over the

road on Highway 2001 at the intersec-

tion of Highway 1057.

KYZ051-051

Flood

Cannel City, Sour Springs, and McCarty

roads closed due to high water. Highway

211 South in Salt Lick closed due to

high water. Water also reported over

Pistol Road and Pinegrove Road near

Olympia.

KYZ069

Flood

County officials reported that Sand

Lick Road off of Highway 421, North of

McKee, and Gray Hawk Park Road near

Gray Hawk, were impassable due to high

water. Welchburg Road, in Welchburg,

and Highway 421 near Clover Bottom were

also impossible due to high water.

KYZ108

Flood

Route 191 at Helechawa was flooded.

Maddix Branch Road closed due to 2 to 6

inches of water flowing across the

roadway. Banks Fork Road also closed

due to one and one half feet of water

flowing across roadway. Both roads are

off of Highway 1094.

KYZ117

Flood

Highway 699 near Cutshin underwater.

KYZ060

Flood

News media received reports of several

road closures. Evacuations were neces-

sary on Tolan Road due to flood water.

Some bridges also impassable due to

flood water. Flooding also reported

along Highway 460 in Frenchburg.

KYZ116-116

Flood

Highway 80 and small side roads

flooded. Eighteen inches of water

reported flowing over Highway 472 at

Money Fork, or halfway between Burning

Springs and Fogertown.

KYZ058-058

Flood

Numerous roads closed due to high water

including, Dark Hollow Road off Highway

52 near Irvine, Driftwood Drive off

Millers Creek, and Murphys Ford off

Highway 895 between Red Lick and

Wagersville Roads. Law enforcement

officials reported fourteen roads

closed due to high water in and around

Irvine.

KYZ058

Strong Wind

Cedar Creek Road, Dark Hollow Road, and

Murphys Fork Road all closed due to

downed trees. Three trees down, one

stuck by lightning, 1 tree blocking

road. Power out in Irvine.

KYZ052

Flood

Water reported over Highway 60 West at

Cincinnati Branch.

KYZ106-106-106

Flood

Route 7 near West Liberty closed due to

a mudslide. Detour around mudslide on

Route 1161 closed due to high water.

Highway 460 near Grassy Creek flooded.

Highway 711 north of Wrigley flooded.

KYZ084 Flood

Hayes Creek Road, off Highway 92 East

or 6 miles from Whitley County line,

had 6 inches of water flowing over it.

Water also flowing across Jennys Branch

Road in downtown Whitley City.

KYZ085 Flood

Highway 92 West near Jellico Creek

flooded. Wolfe Creek River Road also

flooded.

KYZ044

Flood

Muses Mills Fire Department building

flooded. Route 111, at Grange City and

Hillsboro, and Stocton Road, off Route

111, closed due to high water.

KYZ114 Flood

Four to 5 inches of water flowing

across Highway 1350.

KYZ087 Flood

Highway 66 North of Pineville flooded.

KYZ119-119 Flood

Two feet of water flowing over Route

2032 at Frog Pond.

KYZ109-109-109 Flood

Burning Fork Creek out of its banks and

flowing over several roads in Salyers-

ville.

KYZ050 Flood

Harpers Ridge Road and Spencer road,

State Road 713, closed due to high

water 6 miles southeast of Mount

Sterling.

KYZ110-110 Flood

Kentucky Highway 1427, 2 and 1/2 miles

from Highway 23, had 6 to 8 inches

of water flowing over it. Highland

Avenue in downtown Prestonsburg under

water. Abbott Creek flowing over road

off Highway 23 near Prestonsburg. Water

flowing over Spewing Camp Road in

McDowell.

KYZ107 Flood

Route 825 under water. Route 40 near

Wolf Springs under water. Some

evacuations were necessary.

KENTUCKY, Eastern

KYZ059

Flood

Emergency Management officials reported

numerous roads closed countywide due to

flooding, including Highway 77 off

Highway 15, Adams Ridge Road near Clay

City, Highway 15 near Bowan and along

Middle Fork, Cane Creek Road in

northern Powell County, and Hardwick

Creek Road in southwest Powell County.

KYZ111

Flood

Highway 52 West, between Crystal and

Whynot, near the Estill County line,

closed due to high water. Little Creek,

near Heidelberg, out of its banks and

flowing across nearby roadway.

KYZ120-120

Flood

Red Creek and Slones Branch, off of

U.S. Highway 460 in Millard, had

exceeded their banks and were flooding

nearby roadways. Highway 612 near South

Williamson had water flowing over it.

KYZ118

Flood

Water flowing across Highway 404 in

David.

KYZ113

Flood

Caney road, off of Highway 899 near

Pippa Passes covered with water.

KYZ115

Flood

Highway 476 flooded near Jakes Branch.

KYZ104

Flood

Highway 719 flooded south of Fannin.

KYZ068

Flood

Highway 1329 in Mount Vernon and

Livingston closed due to high water.

Highway 1912 and 1955 at Red Hill also

closed due to high water.

KYZ058>059-111-114

Flood

The South Fork of the Kentucky River at

Booneville crested at 28.80 feet or

1.80 feet above flood stage on 09/18/

2004 at 06:00 EST. The Kentucky River

at Heidelberg crested at 21.30 feet or

1.30 feet above flood stage on 09/18/

2004 at 11:00 EST. The Red River at

Clay City crested at 20.03 feet or 1.03

feet above flood stage on 09/18/2004 at

14:00 EST. Widespread heavy rain from

the remnants of Hurricane Ivan lead to

minor flooding at all three forecast

points. The passage of the remnants of

Hurricane Frances the week before had

left streams at 90% above mean daily

stream flow.

KYZ079>080-

084>085

Flood

Cumberland River at Williamsburg crest-

ed at 23.99 feet, or 2.99 feet above

flood stage at 21:58 EST on 09/18/2004.

Widespread heavy rain from the remnants

of Hurricane Ivan lead to minor

flooding. The passage of the remnants

of Hurricane Frances the week before

had left streams at 90% above mean

daily stream flow.

KENTUCKY, Northeast

KYZ101>103-105

Flood

Remnants of Hurricane Frances caused

about a 30 hour rain event, from the

afternoon of the 7th into the evening

hours of the 8th. The heaviest rains

fell during the morning of the 8th.

Storm total amounts of 3 to 5 inches

were widespread, with isolated amount

of 5 to 6 inches. Some specific preli-

minary amounts included Olive Hill with

5.5 inches, Grayson Lake 5.1 inches,

Charley and roads closed due to high

water in and around Irvine.

KYZ058

Strong Wind

Cedar Creek Road, Dark Hollow Road, and

Murphys Fork Road all closed due to

downed trees. Three trees down, one

stuck by lightning, 1 tree blocking

road. Power out in Irvine.

KYZ052

Flood

Water reported over Highway 60 West at

Cincinnati Branch.

KYZ106-106-106

Flood

Route 7 near West Liberty closed due to

a mudslide. Detour around mudslide on

1161 closed due to high water. Highway

460 near Grassy Creek flooded. Highway

711 north of Wrigley flooded.

KYZ084

Flood

Hayes Creek Road, off Highway 92 East

or 6 miles from Whitley County line,

had 6 of water flowing over it. Water

also across Jennys Branch Road in down-

town Whitley City.

KYZ085

Flood

Highway 92 West near Jellico Creek

flooded. Wolfe Creek River Road also

flooded.

KYZ044

Flood

Muses Mills Fire Department building

flooded. Route 111, at Grange City and

Hillsboro, and Stocton Road, off Route

111, closed due to high water.

KYZ114

Flood

Four to 5 inches of water flowing

across Highway 1350.

KYZ087

Flood

Highway 66 North of Pineville flooded.

KYZ119-119

Flood

Two feet of water flowing over Route

2032 at Frog Pond.

KYZ109-109-109

Flood

Burning Fork Creek out of its banks and

flowing over several roads in Salyers-

ville.

KYZ050

Flood

Harpers Ridge Road and Spencer road,

State Road 713, closed due to high

water 6 miles southeast of Mount

Sterling.

KYZ110-110

Flood

Kentucky Highway 1427, 2 and 1/2 miles

from Highway 23, had 6 to 8 inches

of water flowing over it. Highland

Avenue in downtown Prestonsburg under

water. Abbott Creek flowing over road

off Highway 23 near Prestonsburg. Water

flowing over Spewing Camp Road in

McDowell.

KYZ107

Flood

Route 825 under water. Route 40 near

Wolf Springs under water. Some evacua-

tions were necessary.

KENTUCKY, Southwest

Daviess County was in the Stanley and

Macco areas.

LAKE MICHIGAN

Bay Of Green Bay S

Of Ln Marinette To

Fish Creek Wi

Green Bay Light Marine Tstm Wind

Lm Rock Is Psg To

Sheboygan Wi Ewd

Byd 5Nm To Mid

Line Of Lake

24 ESE Washington Isl Marine Tstm Wind

Bay Of Green Bay

Cedar R To Rock Is

Psg To Marinette To

Fish Cr Wi

Sister Bay Marine Tstm Wind

Strong winds developed across the Bay

of Green Bay and the waters of Lake

Michigan behind a line of thunder-

storms.

Lm 5Nm W Of

Mackinac Bridge To

Manistee Mi Nwd

Beyond 5Nm Offshore

To Mid Line Of Lake

15 W South Fox Island Marine Tstm Wind

LOUISIANA, Northeast

LOUISIANA, Northwest

LOUISIANA, Southeast

St. Bernard Parish

Delacroix Lightning

An eighteen year old man was struck and

killed by lightning while fishing in a

boat.

M18BO

LAZ040-058-

060>062-066>070

Storm Surge

LAZ040-058>070

Hurricane/Typhoon

Hurricane Ivan moved steadily northward

across the north central Gulf of Mexico

on September 15th before turning north-

northeast and making landfall near Gulf

Shores, Alabama as a Category 3 hurri-

cane during the early morning of

September 16th.

Hurricane force winds affected the

lower portion of Plaquemines Parish.

The highest sustained wind recorded in

southeast Louisiana was at the NOAA

automated weather station at the South-

west Pass of the Mississippi River with

sustained winds of 72 knots (83 mph)

and gusts to 87 knot (100 mph) The

weather instruments are located at

approximately 100 ft above the sea

surface. Wind gusts of around 60 knot

(69 mph) were recorded at an automated

weather station along the coast near

Point a-la Hache. Outside of the lower

Plaquemines Parish area, tropical storm

force winds were recorded from coastal

Terrebonne Parish northeast through the

New Orleans area to eastern St. Tammany

Parish. The lowest barometric pressure

recorded was 983.6 mb at the Southwest

Pass automated weather station.

Lower portions of Plaquemines Parish

suffered the greatest wind damage.

Several school buildings suffered roof

damage as well as several public

government buildings. Around 100 mobile

homes had some type of wind damage,

with approximately 30 mobile homes

having major damage or were destroyed.

Seven houses suffered major wind

damage. 50 power poles were also downed

by high winds. In lower St. Bernard

parish about a dozen houses had some

type of wind damage. In other areas of

southeast Louisiana, generally only

minor wind damage was reported with

power outages. At least 55, 000

customers of the local electric power

company experience power outages.

The highest storm surge was confined

mostly to areas east of the Mississippi

River where storm surge averaged 3 to 5

feet above normal except locally higher

in some inlets. The highest storm surge

reading was 7.6 feet NGVD at Bayou

Dupre in St. Bernard Parish. The storm

surge flooded low lying property and

roadways outside of the hurricane pro-

tection levees in Orleans, St. Bernard

and Plaquemines Parishes. Around Lake

Pontchartrain and west of the Missi-

ssippi River, storm surge was 2 to 4

feet above normal.

No tornadoes were reported in southeast

Louisiana and storm total rainfall was

fairly light. The greatest storm rain-

fall total was 2.5 inches at Buras in

Plaquemine Parish.

Due to the threat posed by the powerful

hurricane, many area residents

evacuated the New Orleans metropolitan

area at the urging of local emergency

management officials. State Police

estimated that approximately 600,000

people evacuated from southeast

Louisiana including the the New Orleans

metro area prior to the hurricane.

Another 400,000 other coastal residents

from Florida, Alabama and Mississippi

moved through the area as they evacua-

ted to the west, away from the expected

landfall of hurricane Ivan. In an area

west of Kenner, eastbound lanes of

Interstate Highway 10 were reversed to

handle west bound traffic. Traffic jams

developed during the evacuation process

due to the large number of evacuees.

There were no direct fatalities related

to Hurricane Ivan, however four elderly

residents of southeast Louisiana died

during the large scale evacuation in

southeast Louisiana.

The Louisiana Dept of Insurance estima-

ted that insured property damage was

approximately $7.9 million. In a manner

utilized by the National Hurricane

Center for estimating storm damage, the

insured damage estimate was doubled to

arrive at total dollar damage of $15.8

million. Approximately 75% of the

damage was estimated to be related to

wind–$11.8 million. Approximately 25%

of the storm damage was estimated to be

related to storm surge–$4.0 million.

LAZ066>069

Storm Surge

LAZ066>069

Tropical Storm

The remnant circulation of Hurricane

Ivan moved back into the Gulf of Mexico

and regenerated into a tropical storm

late on September 22nd. The weak tropi-

cal storm moved west to northwest and

passed south of the southeast Louisiana

coast before making landfall late on

September 23rd near the Louisiana-Texas

border. Weather impacts on the coast

were generally minimal. A few wind

gusts to tropical storm strength occur-

red on the coast. The highest wind gust

reported was 42 kt (48 mph) at the

automated NOAA weather station at the

Southwest Pass of the Mississippi

River. The weather station is located

about 100 feet above the sea surface. A

peak gust of 33 knot (38 mph) was

recorded at an automated weather

station in Tambour Bay of Terrebonne

Parish. Minimum pressure was 1012.2 mb

at Tambour Bay.

Storm surge was generally 2 to 3 feet

above normal. The highest storm surge

reading was 3.38 ft NGVD at Caillou Bay

southwest of Cocodrie in Terrebonne

Parish. A few roads and some low lying

property were flooded from Grand Isle

west to the lower portions of Terre-

bonne Parishes.

Total storm damage was estimated at $15

thousand dollars or less, mainly from

minor coastal flooding.

LOUISIANA, Southwest

MAINE, North

MAINE, South

MARYLAND, Central

Charles County

6 SW La Plata to Tornado (F1)

2.5 S Indian Head

A tornado touched down about 1 mile

south of Garden Estates (about 6 miles

sw of La Plata) on Biggs Farm Road.

Several shelters and storage facilities

were damaged or destroyed. Numerous

trees, up to 2 feet in diameter, were

either uprooted or topped. A large

recreational van parked in front of a

log-style home was overturned and at

least 3 other automobiles were damaged

from falling trees and debris. Then

several homes sustained damage from

felled trees, lost shingles, or suffer-

ed tom siding. A second touch down of

the tornado brought damage to the

Indian Head area, in west Charles

County. 20 to 30 large trees, up to 3

feet in diameter, were uprooted. The

total track length of the combined

touchdowns was about 5 miles.

Montgomery County

Bethesda Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Trees and wires down in Bethesda,

Silver Spring, Rockville, Kensington,

and Laytonsville.

Allegany County

Westernport Flash Flood

Roads closed due to high water.

Washington County

Forest Park Flash Flood

McFarland road washed out.

MDZ002

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Frances

produced damaging winds, tornadoes and

flooding in the Mid Atlantic Region on

the 8th. The region was troubled with

felled trees, downed power lines,

washed out roads, and streams/creeks

that overflowed their banks. Allegany

and Washington Counties were especially

hard hit according to emergency

personnel. 7 inches of rain fell in the

western Panhandle of Maryland. In

Allegany County Georges Creek rose out

of its bank between Frostburg and

Western Port. Route 135 was closed for

buckling due to high water. Several

bridges were under water and around 20

basements were flooded. Students were

held in schools for an extra 1 1/2

hours due to inclement weather on the

8th and some schools were closed on the

9th. In Washington County a mudslide

washed out a section of west bound

Maryland road MD-144.

Harford County

Pylesville Thunderstorm Wind (G70)

Thunderstorm winds downed trees and

power lines in Harford County. The

thunderstorm also produced a tornado in

this area early on the morning on the

18th.

Frederick County

.5 NW Brunswick to Tornado (F1)

Burkittsville

An FI tornado produced structural

damage to a couple of homes near Bruns-

wick. A few buildings and out buildings

were destroyed. Other structures

sustained roof damage, and some trees

were downed or stripped. The tornado

damage continued to the north along

Route 17 for approximately 3 miles

before lifting at Burkinsville.

Washington County

Boonsboro Tornado (F0)

An F0 tornado moved into eastern

Washington County from Frederick

County. The storm felled trees in

Boonsboro, and the trees damaged five

homes.

Montgomery County

2 WSW Poolesville to Tornado (F1)

Beallsville

A tornado moved north out of Loudoun

County, Virginia into Montgomery

County, Maryland. The tornado damaged a

few structures in the Poolesville area

and snapped and uprooted trees in the

wooded area and farm land leading to

Beallsville.

Charles County

Maryland Pt to Tornado (F0)

3 N Maryland Pt

A weak tornado touched down in south-

west Charles County Maryland near Mary-

land Point. The tornado downed numerous

trees near the Merrick 4-H Campground.

It traveled north and downed trees

along Williams Farm Place and American

Beauty Place. The tornado dissipated

shortly after uprooting trees near the

intersection of Maryland Point and

Smith Point Roads.

Frederick County

1 E Adamstown to Tornado (F1)

Frederick

An F1 tornado touched down in south

central Frederick County, just east of

Adamstown. The storm traveled north and

produced minor structural damage. It

blew out windows, tore shingles off a

couple of roofs, and caused a chimney

to collapse. The tornado also uprooted

and sheared several large softwood and

hardwood trees.

Frederick County

6 N Catoctin to Tornado (F2)

7.5 NW Catoctin

An F2 tornado touched down in far

northwest Frederick County, on the

northwest edge of Catoctin Mountain

Park. A thickly forested stand of

hardwood trees was snapped off above

the bases.

Washington County

Hancock Tornado (F0)

A weak tornado moved out of Morgan

County, West Virginia. The tornado

downed trees in remote areas just east

of Hancock.

Harford County

Joppa Tornado (F1)

Trees fell on a single story house

causing extensive damage to the roof.

The windows were also blown out of this

residence in the Greenspring Hills

Subdivision. Just before the storm

lifted, it peeled some siding off a few

homes and blew down a few more trees.

Harford County

Pylesville to Tornado (F2)

2 N Pylesville

A tornado touched down near a residence

off Grier Nursery Road. The storm

destroyed two mobile homes, the side of

a barn was blown out, structural damage

to two homes were noted, and numerous

large healthy trees were twisted off

near the bases.

Allegany County

Countywide Flash Flood

Small streams and creeks overflowing

their banks.

Washington County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan affected

the Mid Atlantic Region on the 17th and

18th. Numerous tornadic thunderstorms

produced widespread damage across most

of Maryland, from the western panhandle

to the lower southern counties.

Frederick County was hardest hit by

tornadoes with around 40 structures

damaged. Washington and Allegany

Counties once again bore the brunt of

the flooding as small streams and

creeks rose out of their banks.

Frederick County

Wolfsville Flash Flood

U.S. Route 17 under water.

Washington County

Hagerstown Flash Flood

Roads flooded.

Baltimore County

Cockeysville Flash Flood

Numerous roads closed in the northern

portion of the county.

Baltimore City (C)

Baltimore Flash Flood

A few roads closed due to high water.

Carroll County

Westminster Flash Flood

Numerous roads closed across the

county.

MDZ003>004

Flood

Many county roads flooded.

Anne Arundel County

3 S Crownsville Flash Flood

Car stranded in high water near the

intersection of Route 450 and

Crownsville Road.

Calvert County

1 N Solomons Tornado (F0)

A waterspout moved on shore on the

28th. The small tornado briefly touched

down near Solomon. No injuries were

reported and maximum winds ranged from

45 to 65 mph.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

brought flooding to much of Maryland on

the 28th. Rainfall amounts ranged from

3 to 6 inches. Numerous reports of

stranded vehicles flooded Emergency

Operations Command Centers. In Carroll

county a group of inmates were rescued

from the roof of a security van after

it became submerged in a swollen creek.

A total of 50 roads were closed in

Maryland. Residents of the Mt. Savage

Area in Cumberland, Allegany County

were hard hit again as the stream wall

was compromised and needed to be

rebuilt, roads and basements were

flooded. The remnant low pressure even

spawned a waterspout on the Chesapeake

Bay. The storm moved ashore and

produced a weak tornado in Solomon,

Calvert County. The tornado damaged the

Solomon’s Visitor Center, taking part

of the roof and hurling it onto Route

2. The storm also toppled an old barn

in the vicinity of the visitor’s

center.

MARYLAND, Northeast

Cecil County

Charlestown to Thunderstorm Wind (G61)

Colora

Severe thunderstorms caused wind damage

in Charlestown and Colora. Two people

were killed in Colora after a large

tree fell onto the house they were

sleeping in. About six large trees were

uprooted in Colora. Two other homes

were damaged by fallen trees. Several

large tree limbs were also torn away.

One shed was destroyed by the wind.

Wind speeds were estimated at 70 mph.

In Charlestown, several large trees

were knocked down. The elementary

school suffered minor structural

damage. M?PH, F?PH

Cecil County

Elkton Flash Flood

MDZ008

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused very heavy rain to fall

during the late morning and early

afternoon of the 18th in the eastern

part of the county. Flooding was

reported along the Big Elk Creek along

Maryland State Route 7. Runoff from the

heavy rain also caused flooding along

the Susquehanna River which affected

Port Deposit the most. Damage was

estimated at one million dollars. Storm

totals included 4.25 inches in Elkton.

Kent County

Massey Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm knocked down

several wires and large tree limbs in

Massey.

Queen Anne’S County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the afternoon

of the 28th. Doppler Radar storm total

estimates ranged between 2 and 5 inches

with the highest amounts toward the

Kent County border. Stream flooding

caused several roads in the county to

be closed. Specific storm totals

included 2.65 inches in Stevensville.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Kent County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the afternoon

of the 28th. Doppler Radar storm total

estimates ranged between 3 and 6 inches

with the highest amounts toward the

Cecil County border. Stream flooding

caused numerous roads in the county to

be closed. Specific storm totals

included 6.08 inches in Galena.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Cecil County

Cecilton Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A couple of severe thunderstorms

knocked down a few trees, large limbs

and wires in southeastern Cecil County.

Cecil County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the afternoon

and early evening of the 28th. Doppler

Radar storm total estimates ranged

between 3 and 6 inches with the highest

amounts toward the New Castle County

border. Stream flooding caused several

roads in the county to be closed. The

Big Elk Creek at Elk Mills was above

its 9 foot flood stage from 1007 p.m.

through 1148 p.m. EDT on the 28th. It

crested at 9.3 feet at 1045 p.m. EDT.

Specific storm totals included 6.51

inches in Fair Hills, 3.69 inches in

Elkton and 3.66 inches at the Conowingo

Dam.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Talbot County

St Michaels Thunderstorm Wind (G56)

A severe thunderstorm knocked down a

couple of large trees in St. Michaels

and tore some shingles from the roof of

one home.

MARYLAND, South

Dorchester County

5 NNW Honga Tornado (F0)

Waterspout came onshore south of

Taylors Island, and continued across a

marshy area before dissipating.

MARYLAND, West

MDZ001

Flood

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Frances began early on the 8th and

ended early on the 9th. By 7 PM EDT on

8th, Casselman River went out of its

banks, near Grantsville. (FRANCES)

MDZ001

Flood

A few roads were flooded near

Grantsville. (IVAN)

MASSACHUSETTS, Central and East

Franklin County

Greenfield Flash Flood

Deerfield and Green Rivers

Hampshire County

Goshen Flash Flood

Lowland flooding

Heavy rainfall associated with the

remains of Ivan caused flash flooding

in Franklin and Hampshire Counties in

western Massachusetts. Storm totals of

3 to 5 inches were widely observed and

caused rapid rises on the Deerfield and

Green Rivers in Franklin County. The

two rivers caused minor flooding of

their respective low lying areas. In

Hampshire County, a trained spotter

reported several small brooks out of

their banks which flooded low lying

areas and caused minor damage. No

injuries were reported.

MASSACHUSETTS, West

Berkshire County

Great Barrington Flash Flood

Gilmore Avenue and Seekonk Roads

flooded.

Berkshire County

Hinsdale Flash Flood

Breach in metal supports of a dam

spillway along the Plunkett River

caused flooding on Commonwealth Avenue.

Part of the Conrail tracks were washed

out.

MAZ001 Flood

The Hoosic River exceeded its flood

stage of 9.0′, cresting at 9.12′ at

13:30 EST on 9/18/04 at the

Williamstown gage.

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan moved

across the region during September 17th

and 18th, dropping anywhere from three

to locally in excess of six inches of

rain in many locations across Eastern

New York and adjacent Western New

England. Hardenburg, in Ulster County,

unofficially reported the most with

7.50″ of rainfall during the two day

event. The heavy rains combined with an

unusually saturated ground and a high

water table from previous heavy rains,

produced significant runoff and

resultant flooding across the region.

The majority of flood damage sustained

from the heavy rainfall was confined to

roadways, with many roads, bridges and

culverts being washed out by

floodwaters. Landslides and serious

erosion occurred in the Town of

Hardenburg in Ulster County as the

Esopus Creek overflowed its banks.

Ulster County was especially hard hit

as the Emergency Management Official

for that county has estimated up to 2

Million dollars of damage to

infrastructure, while little if any

personal property damage was noted.

That county has been declared eligible

for aid through FEMA. Personal damage,

estimated at nearly half a million

dollars was noted in Schoharie County.

Additional damage occurred to several

docks and boats moored along Catskill

Creek and the Mohawk River. Low-lying

portions of mobile home parks in the

Village of Ravena were also evacuated

due to flooding during this event.

While power was temporarily shut off

and some telephone service was

disrupted in many of the flooded areas,

no serious injuries were reported.

MICHIGAN, East

NONE REPORTED.

MICHIGAN, Extreme Southwest

NONE REPORTED.

MICHIGAN, North

Kalkaska County

Kalkaska Hail (0.75)

An isolated severe thunderstorm

produced marginally large hail in

Kalkaska.

MICHIGAN, Upper

NONE REPORTED.

MICHIGAN, West

Newaygo County

Newaygo Hail (0.88)

Law enforcement five miles south of

Newaygo reported seven eighths inch

diameter hail.

MINNESOTA, Central and South Central

Rice County

3 W Morristown Hail (0.75)

Dime sized hail fell near Upper and

Lower Lake Sakatah.

Freeborn County

2 NE Albert Lea Funnel Cloud

A trained spotter reported a funnel

cloud just northeast of Albert Lea.

Kanabec County

6 N Mora Lightning

Lightning struck a pickup truck on

Highway 65. The driver, a 22-year-old

man, was stunned by the bolt. He was

found shaking and somewhat incoherent

but quickly recovered.

Redwood County

Lamberton Thunderstorm Wind (G62)

A 71 MPH wind gust was recorded by an

automated weather sensor at a school.

MINNESOTA, Central and South Central

Brown County

Springfield Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A few trees were downed.

Brown County

New Ulm Lightning

A home on Garden Street suffered

electrical damage after a lightning

strike.

Brown County

Sleepy Eye Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A few trees were downed.

Brown County

New Ulm Lightning

A residence on South Jefferson Street

suffered damage to a tree, transformer,

doorbell, and front door after

lightning struck.

Faribault County

Countywide Flash Flood

Freeborn County

Countywide Flash Flood

Steele County

Countywide Flash Flood

MNZ078-084>085-

91>093 Flood

Rainfall totals across Southern

Minnesota between September 14th and

15th, 2004. Courtesy of the State

Climatology Office–DNR Waters.

Five to 13 inches of rain fell across

South Central Minnesota between 5 PM on

the 14th and 5 AM on the 15th. This

amount of rainfall caused widespread

major flooding in Freeborn, Steele,

Faribault, and Martin counties. Over $6

million dollars in property damage and

nearly $22 million dollars in crop

damage were attributed to high water in

these counties. Areas of minor flooding

were also reported in southern Waseca

and Goodhue counties.

In Freeborn County $2.1 million in

property damage was reported. FEMA

reported 1 home was destroyed by flood

waters, major flood damage to 13 homes,

minor damage to 84 homes, and 292 homes

affected by flood waters across the

county. The hardest hit areas were

Albert Lea, Hollandale, Riceland

Township, and Shell Rock Township where

numerous county roads, fields,

waterways, and low lying areas were

underwater for up to 4 days. Road crews

had to repair several road washouts

after flood waters subsided.

Significant flooding was reported on

the Shell Rock River and Turtle Creek

in addition to Fountain Lake and Albert

Lea Lake. An earthen dam had to be

built around the village of Hollandale

to save the community from Turtle

Creek’s flood waters. Two thirds of

the homes in town sustained flood

damage. Water ran over the top of the

Geneva Lake Dam, flooding potato,

onion, and carrot fields. Crop losses

in this area totaled $4 million. In

Albert Lea the following roads were

closed by flooding: Front Street, East

and West Main, and Highway 65. In

Alden, Morin Lake overflowed and street

and basement flooding was reported.

Interstate 90 was closed for several

hours due to high water near Alden.

Highway 251 was closed in Maple Island.

Road and basement flooding was also

reported in Hartland and Myrtle.

Rainfall totals included 13.00 inches

5 miles southwest of Alden, 12.50

inches 4 miles north of Albert Lea,

10.66 inches in north Albert Lea, 10.25

inches in Hayward, 9.8 inches in

Powers, 8.50 inches south of Emmons,

and 8.00 inches in Bancroft and south

Albert Lea.

In Steele County rainfall amounts of 6

to 13 inches led to “unprecedented

flooding”. A total of $2.8 million in

property damage was recorded ($1.4

million home damage, $70,000 business

damage, $1.35 million infrastructure

damage). Much of the damage was caused

by major flooding along the Straight

River and Turtle Creek across the

southern portion of the county. The

cities of Blooming Prairie and

Ellendale were hardest hit. County

officials reported major flood damage

to 30 homes, minor damage to 400

homes, and 431 homes affected by flood

waters. In addition 4 county businesses

sustained major flood damage, 4

businesses reported minor damage, and 8

businesses were affected by flood

waters. Twenty-four people in the

county had to be rescued from flood

waters. Numerous roads, waterways, and

low lying areas were under water for up

to 5 days. At one time up to 75% of

county roads were closed by high water.

After the water receded significant

damage to roads, ditches, and bridges

was apparent. Blooming Prairie High

School and Elementary School were

closed due to flood damage. The

Straight River crested in Blooming

Prairie on the 18th and remained out of

its banks through the 19th. County road

212 was under water in town when the

river crested. Several parks along the

Straight River and its tributaries in

Ellendale, Blooming Prairie, and

Owatonna sustained severe water damage.

In an effort to save homes on the west

side of Blue Earth, volunteers

sandbagged along the river. In

Owatonna, a campground along the river

had to be evacuated and nearby Lake

Kohlmier was flooded. Near Ellendale

the Straight River flooded several

farms along Highway 30. A group home

along Turtle Creek in Owatonna had to

be evacuated after the river spilled

into the facility. Overflow from Maple

Creek also caused major park damage.

Countywide 20% of soybean and corn

crops and 10% of sweet corn crops were

lost to flooding, which resulted in

$10.4 million in losses.

In Faribault County $1.2 million in

property damage was reported. FEMA

reported major flood damage to 15

homes, minor damage to 29 homes, and

272 homes affected by flood waters

across the county. Numerous roadways

had to be barricaded after road and

culvert washouts occurred. Roads closed

by flooding included highways 30, and

169 in addition to county routes 121,

108, 119, 118, 219, 109, 2, 16, 21, and

13. Interstate 90 was also closed in

the eastern portion of the county. In

Wells many streets were closed by high

water. Half Moon Park was also flooded.

Road and basement flooding was also

reported in Winnebago and Minnesota

Lake. In Kiester a school was flooded

and phone service was out in some areas

for up to a week. In Bricelyn nearly

40% of homes were damaged by flood

waters. In Blue Earth the Blue Earth

River flowed into at least 2 homes and

flooded numerous basements, roads, and

parks. The city sustained nearly

$35,000 in infrastructure damage, even

after sandbagging along the river. The

flooding finally began to subside on

the 17th. Countywide 10% of soybean

crops were lost to flooding, which

resulted in $3.5 million in losses.

Rainfall totals included 10.20 inches

in Bricelyn, 10.08 inches south of

Walters, 6.73 inches in Wells, 5.00

inches in Blue Earth, and 4.86 inches

in Winnebago.

In Martin County $570,000 in property

damage was reported ($500,000 public

property, $70,000 private property). Up

to 90 homes were affected by flooding

due to storm sewer overflow, mainly

across the southern third of the

county. Five to 7 inches of rain was

commonplace across the county with up

to 10 inches in the Ceylon and East

Chain areas. A total of 6.40 inches of

rain was recorded in Fairmont. Fairmont

Junior/Senior High was closed due to

flood damage. A number of homes in the

Canyon Drive area of Fairmont suffered

basement flooding and were surrounded

by water for several hours. The bridge

over Cedar Creek in Cedar Creek Park

was washed out. In addition, the

following roads in Fairmont were closed

due to flooding: Lake Aires Road,

Winnebago Avenue, and Hall Street.

Basement and street flooding was

reported in Truman. Most of the

flooding across Martin County had

receded by the morning of the 16th.

Countywide 10% of soybean crops were

lost to flooding, which resulted in

$3.7 million in losses.

In Waseca County 3.54 inches of rain

was recorded in Waseca. Up to 6 inches

of rain flooded roads in the southern

portion of the county. In Janesville

roads and basements were flooded.

Basement flooding was also reported in

New Richland and Waseca.

In Goodhue County 3.92 inches of rain

was recorded in Zumbrota and 5 inches

of rain was estimated in Pine Island.

The Middle Fork and the North Branch of

the Zumbro River overflowed their

banks. The rivers crested in Pine

Island during the afternoon of the 15th

and fell below flood stage that

evening. Pine Island Golf Course was

flooded in addition to County Road 24

and 275th Avenue.

MNZ066-070-078 Strong Wind

Gradient winds gusting up to 45 MPH

downed trees and branches in McLeod,

Goodhue, and Dakota counties. In McLeod

County power lines were damaged in 4

locations across Hutchinson. One downed

power line started a brush fire just

north of town along Highway 15. In

Goodhue County a 30 foot tall tree

was downed along East 11th Street in

Zumbrota. In Dakota County 1000

customers lost power after branches

fell onto power lines in Hastings.

Stearns County

Sartell Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Trees and power lines were downed. A

camper trailer was blown onto its side.

Carver County

Chaska Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A large tree was downed onto a power

line, setting it on fire. A fence was

also damaged by the felled tree. The

time was estimated.

Morrison County

Little Falls Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Several trees were downed, including

one in Pine Grove Park.

MNZ060 Strong Wind

Gusty winds ahead of a thunderstorm

caused a rig platform on a high rise

building along Nicollet Mall to spin

around and crash into a window on the

36th floor. Two men who were washing

windows from the platform sustained

minor injuries. In addition, two people

had to be rescued after the gusty wind

caused their boat to capsize on Lake

Nokomis.

Ramsey County

Roseville Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A tree was downed.

Ramsey County

Arden Hills Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A tree was downed.

Anoka County

Coon Rapids Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A few trees were downed.

Anoka County

Fridley Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A few trees were downed.

Anoka County

Anoka Co Blaine Arpt Thunderstorm Wind (G56)

A 64 MPH wind gust was recorded at the

airport.

Ramsey County

St Paul Thunderstorm Wind (G58)

Several trees up to 3 feet in diameter

were downed onto roads, roofs, and

parked cars in the Dale Street and

Marshall Avenue area.

Anoka County

Oak Grove Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A few trees were downed.

Ramsey County

Maplewood Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A few trees were downed onto a power

line, setting them on fire. The time

was estimated.

Anoka County

Centerville Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A few trees and power lines were downed

near Centerville Road and Main Street.

Isanti County

8 W Cambridge Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A spotter estimated a wind gust between

60 and 65 MPH near the intersection of

highways 47 and 95.

Isanti County

1 W Cambridge Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A tree was downed.

Chisago County

Harris Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Three trees were downed.

Kanabec County

Countywide Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

A few trees were downed and shingles

were damaged in South Fork Township.

The time was estimated.

Washington County

1 NW Stillwater Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A power line was downed along Highway

96 at Norrel Ave.

MINNESOTA, Northeast

St. Louis County

Orr Lightning

Lightning caused a fire that severely

damaged the main building at a resort

near Orr.

Crow Wing County

1 W Nisswa Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

On Roy Lake, a sixty-foot reinforced TV

antenna fell on a house. There was also

severe damage to a dock and pontoon

boat.

Cass County

5 SE Pine River to Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Pine River

The strong winds lasted five minutes,

uprooting 25 to 30 trees, including

four 4-foot diameter oaks.

Crow Wing County

Brainerd Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Numerous trees were blown down.

Crow Wing County

Cross Lake Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Numerous trees were blown down.

Crow Wing County

Nisswa Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Numerous trees were blown down.

Cass County

Lake Shr Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Numerous trees were blown down.

Cass County

Pine River Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Numerous trees were blown down.

Cass County

Walker Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Numerous trees were blown down.

Pine County

Hinckley Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Power lines were blown down.

Aitkin County

Aitkin Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Trees and power lines were blown down.

Itasca County

Deer River Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Power lines were blown down.

St. Louis County

Floodwood Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Numerous trees were blown down.

Itasca County

Pengilly Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Numerous trees were blown down.

MINNESOTA, Northwest

Beltrami County

Bemidji Lightning

A lightning strike ignited a small fire

in the attic of a house.

Otter Tail County

8 SW Perham to Tornado (F2)

4 SW Perham

A tornado tracked through pasture,

forest, and corn fields. Numerous trees

were knocked down and one farmstead

received extensive barn, shed, and home

damage. Twelve head of cattle were

killed. Several trees were toppled onto

homes near Marion Lake. Farmyard debris

was carried as far as Perham, about 7

miles northeast.

Otter Tail County

2 N New York Mills Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Steel roofing was torn off a pole barn.

Becker County

13 WNW Ponsford Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

The wind gust occurred at Elbow Lake.

Hubbard County

3 N Dorset Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A southwest to northeast swath of pine

trees was blown down.

Mahnomen County

2 NE Naytahwaush Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Large branches were blown down on power

lines.

Clearwater County

10 SSW Bagley Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

Large branches were blown down.

Red Lake County

2 S Brooks Thunderstorm Wind (G54)

A MNDOT RWIS sensor detected the wind

gust.

Roseau County

7 SSE Warroad Thunderstorm Wind (G54)

Large tree branches were blown down.

Roseau County

7 NNW Warroad Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

Large tree branches were blown down

near the border crossing.

MINNESOTA, Southeast

Houston County

Mound Prairie Hail (0.88)

Dodge County

Countywide Flash Flood

Mower County

Countywide Flash Flood

Olmsted County

Countywide Flash Flood

Fillmore County

Countywide Flash Flood

Winona County

Countywide Flash Flood

MNZ086>087-

94>095 Flood

M201 W

After a relatively dry start to the

month, a potent late summer storm

system brought very heavy rain to parts

of southeast Minnesota and northeast

Iowa on September 14 and September 15.

Rain was most intense from near Mason

City, Iowa through the Austin area

(Mower County) to near Rochester

(Olmsted County). There were many areas

that had over 4 inches of rain, with

isolated higher amounts. In fact, the

highest unofficial totals were in the

Blooming Prairie area (Dodge County)

with 11.50 inches and 13.00 inches

reported.

Flash flooding was the initial problem,

but as all the rain drained into river

basins, many of the regional rivers and

creeks saw dramatic rises during the

overnight hours of September 14 and

into the morning of September 15. The

Austin area saw very high to record

crest levels on the Cedar River and

creeks leading into it. For example,

Turtle Creek at Austin had a record

setting crest of 14.77 feet, while a

record setting crest of 23.44 feet was

established on the Cedar River at

Lansing (Mower County). Other rivers

affected included the Zumbro and Root,

however flooding was not near as

significant in these locations. Mower,

Dodge and Olmsted counties were

declared federal disaster areas.

Hardest hit was the Austin area, where

flooding affected parts of the city and

widespread sand bagging efforts took

place. There were 350 homes in Mower

County, which received flood damage,

including 300 homes in Austin alone. A

20 year old man died on his way to

work, when he walked into high water

and was swept away. A 53 year old man

also died of a heart attack, while

assisting with sand bagging efforts.

MINNESOTA, Southwest

Jackson County

10.5 S Lakefield to Tornado (F0)

9 S Lakefield

A tornado damaged corn crops , trees,

and an outbuilding on a farm.

Lyon County

6 NE Marshall Hail (0.75)

Nobles County

Round Lake Flash Flood

Rainfall of 5 inches caused widespread

street flooding.

MINNESOTA, West

NONE REPORTED.

MINNESOTA, West Central

Traverse County

8 NE Browns Vly to Tornado (F1)

8.5 NE Browns Vly

A tornado touched down and traveled

through a cornfield and a farmstead

before dissipating. The tornado damaged

several sheds and a travel trailer

along with toppling a large grain bin.

The storm traveled northwest across

Lake Traverse and into South Dakota

where another tornado touched down.

MISSISSIPPI, Central

Noxubee County

2 S Macon Thunderstorm Wind (G43)

Two trees were blown down.

MSZ030>031-033-

038>039-045>046-

051>052-057>058-

065>066-072>074 Hurricane/Typhoon

Hurricane Ivan made landfall at 2:02

AM, September 16, near Gulf Shores,

Alabama as a upper Category 3

hurricane. The western side of Ivan

effected a large portion of Eastern

Mississippi as the center moved north

through Alabama. Thousands of trees

were blown down across Eastern

Mississippi during the event as well as

hundreds of power lines. The strong

wind itself did not cause much

structural damage, however the fallen

trees did. These downed trees accounted

for several hundred homes, mobile homes

and businesses to be damaged or

destroyed. Most locations across

Eastern Mississippi reported sustained

winds between 30 and 40 mph with

Tropical Storm force gusts between 48

and 54 mph. The strongest reported

winds occurred in Newton, Lauderdale

and Oktibbeha counties. A Mississippi

mesonet site, in Newton, reported

maximum sustained winds of 42 mph and

peak gust of 54 mph. At Key Field in

Meridian, maximum sustained winds were

reported at 43 mph with a peak gust of

61 mph. The highest sustained and peak

wind occurred at the Mississippi State

Climate Lab in Starkville. This site

reported maximum sustained winds of 52

mph and a peak gust of 64 mph.

Overall, rainfall totals were held in

check as Ivan steadily moved north. The

heaviest rains were confined to far

Eastern Mississippi where 3 to 4 inches

fell over a 15 hour period. Due to the

duration of the rain no flooding was

reported.

Across Eastern Mississippi, Hurricane

Ivan was responsible for one fatality.

This fatality occurred in Brooksville

when a tree fell on a man. Damage from

Ivan was estimated at $200 Million.

M540U

MISSISSIPPI, North

Tishomingo County

Iuka Hail (0.75)

Tishomingo County

Tishomingo Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Several trees and power lines were

blown down.

Union County

New Albany Hail (0.75)

Union County

Blue Spgs Hail (1.00)

Pontotoc County

9 NE Pontotoc Hail (1.50)

Lee County

5 NW Tupelo Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Several large tree limbs were knocked

down.

Lee County

4 NW Tupelo Hail (1.75)

Lee County

Shannon Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Some trees were blown down.

Chickasaw County

Okolona Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

A shed was blown over and a lawn

tractor was overturned.

Monroe County

3 S Amory Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Several trees were knocked down.

Monroe County

Hatley Hail (0.88)

Chickasaw County

Okolona Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Several trees were blown down. One

tree fell on top of a garage.

Benton County

Countywide Flash Flood

A few road were closed across the

county.

MSZ016>017-

023>024

Tropical Storm

Hurricane Ivan had weakened to a

tropical storm before bringing strong

winds to northeast Mississippi. Some

trees and power lines were blown down.

One person was killed in Lee County

when he came in contact with an

antenna loaded with wires after the

antenna had been knocked down.

MISSISSIPPI, South

MSZ077-080>082

Hurricane/Typhoon

MSZ080>082

Storm Surge

Hurricane Ivan moved steadily

northward across the the

north-central Gulf of Mexico on

September 15th before turning

north-northeast and making landfall

near Gulf Shores, Alabama as a

Category 3 hurricane during the

early morning of September 16th.

Hurricane Ivan made landfall far

enough to the east of the Mississippi

Coast to minimize the damage to the

coastal counties, however hurricane

force winds did affect Jackson

County. An anemometer on top of the

Emergency Operation Center in

downtown Pascagoula recorded a wind

gust to 76 knots (88 mph) as the eye

of the hurricane passed to the east

of area. Tropical storm force winds

occurred over Harrison and Hancock

Counties with wind gusts approaching

hurricane force in the coastal

waters. A wind gust of 68 knots (78

mph) was recorded by an automated

wind gage at Pointe Cadet in Biloxi

Harbor, and 53 knot (61 mph) wind

gust was recorded at the Emergency

Operations Center in Waveland.

Jackson County experienced the

greatest amount of damage among

coastal counties. A roof was blown

off of an apartment building in

Pascagoula and at least a dozen homes

suffered major damage either from

wind or from fallen trees. Around 100

homes had some type of wind damage,

along with 30 mobile homes and 25

businesses. Trees and large tree

limbs were toppled in many areas

contributing to power outages in

Jackson County. Wind damage was much

less over Harrison, Hancock, and

Pearl River counties. There were

scattered reports of fallen trees

and tree limbs, downing power lines

and causing damage to some houses.

The lowest pressure recorded along

the Mississippi Coast was 975.6 mb

at 2336 CST on September 15th at the

Pascagoula Airport. However power to

the weather instrument failed

shortly after this reading and a

lower reading is highly likely. At

Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi,

the lowest pressure of 982.9 mb

occurred at 0055 CST September 16th.

Storm surge was generally 3 to 5

feet above normal along the coast.

The highest storm surge recorded

was at the mouth of the Pascagoula

River near Pascagoula with a storm

surge 6.72 ft NGVD. Some tidal

surge flooding occurred in low

lying areas near the coast.

No tornadoes were reported. Storm

total rainfall varied from an inch

or less in Hancock County to around

6 inches in eastern Jackson County.

The highest rainfall total was

6.29 inches at the Pascagoula

Emergency Operations Center.

No direct injuries or fatalities

were noted in coastal Mississippi.

Total storm damage was estimated

at around 10 million dollars with

approximately 80 percent of the

damage due to wind ($6.7 million)

and 20 percent ($ 2.3 million) due

to storm surge damage.

MISSISSIPPI, Southeast

MSZ067-075>076-

078>079

Hurricane/Typhoon

Please see the detailed narrative

on Hurricane Ivan under Alabama,

Southwest, September 13-16, 2004.

Hurricane force winds, primarily

in gusts, occurred over most

interior portions of southeast

Mississippi during the late evening

hours of September 15th and the

very early morning hours of

September 16th. Duration of the

winds producing hurricane force

gusts was around two hours. These

strong winds downed some trees

across the region, some of which

fell onto structures which were

damaged as a result. Although Ivan

did produce wind damage across

southeast Mississippi, this damage

was neither as widespread nor as

severe as was the wind damage over

much of southwest Alabama and the

western Florida panhandle.

MISSOURI, East

Ralls County

10 SW New London Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

The County Sheriff reported a

tractor trailer overturned on

Highway 19 southwest of Perry.

MISSOURI, Lower

MISSOURI, Northeast

MISSOURI, Northwest

Randolph County

1 N Moberly Flash Flood

A thunderstorm produced torrential

rains in a short period of time

around the city of Moberly.

Numerous homes and businesses

sustained water damage. There were

also several water rescues for

stranded motorists.

Buchanan County

1 ENE St Joseph Hail (0.88)

Buchanan County

1 ENE St Joseph Hail (0.88)

Buchanan County

Easton Hail (2.00)

De Kalb County

Stewartsville Hail (1.75)

Platte County

Edgerton Hail (0.75)

Andrew County

2 S Cosby Hail (1.75)

Clay County

Mosby Hail (0.75)

Andrew County

Rochester Hail (1.75)

Clinton County

Plattsburg Hail (1.00)

De Kalb County

Clarksdale Hail (0.75)

Andrew County

10 E Savannah Flash Flood

High water due to heavy rains was

observed on Route F and County

Roads 257 and 253. A water rescue

was needed for a stranded

motorist on County Road 257.

De Kalb County

6 S Union Star Flash Flood

Creek was out of its banks and

flooding Route V just east of the

Andrew-Dekalb county line. Water

over Route J in several areas.

Worth County

5 NW Grant City Hail (0.88)

Jackson County

Kansas City Hail (0.88)

Jackson County

Kansas City Hail (1.75)

Jackson County

Lees Summit Hail (1.75)

Jackson County

6 E Grandview Hail (0.88)

Jackson County

Lees Summit Hail (2.00)

Clinton County

Perrin Flash Flood

Heavy rains caused flooding on

several locations on Highway 33.

Jackson County

Kansas City Hail (0.88)

Andrew County

Savannah Hail (0.75)

Clay County

Liberty Flash Flood

Flash flooding reported along old

Highway 210 between Bluff Road and

Raines Road.

MOZ001>002

High Wind (G52)

A few trees blown down across the

county.

Platte County

Platte City Flash Flood

Several streets in town were water

covered due to brief heavy rains.

MOZ029-037

Flood

The Fishing River near Mosby

crested at 25.40 feet, or 7.40 feet

above flood stage.

MOZ044

Flood

The Blackwater River near Valley

City crested at 25.65 feet, or 3.65

feet above flood stage.

MOZ054

Flood

The Big Creek near Blairstown

crested at 24.70 feet, or 4.70 feet

above flood stage.

MISSOURI, Southeast

MOZ076-086>087-

100-107>112-114

Drought

This was the driest September on

record for southeast Missouri. At

Cape Girardeau, the monthly rainfall

was only a trace. At Poplar Bluff,

only 0.01 inch was recorded. Lawns

and fields turned brown. By the end

of the month, moderate drought

conditions were assessed over

southeast Missouri. The dry weather

set in too late to harm crops. In

fact, the timing of the dry weather

helped farmers harvest one of their

best crops on record.

MISSOURI, Southwest

Webster County

5 E Marshfield Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Severe thunderstorm wind gusts

downed a few trees and a picket

fence at a rural residence.

Ozark County

Isabella Heavy Rain

The Isabella lark site measured 0.66

inches of rain in 30 minutes.

Douglas County

4 SE Vanzant Heavy Rain

A co-op observer measured 1.50

inches of rain in 15 minutes.

Ozark County

Isabella Heavy Rain

The Isabella lark site measured

0.96 inches of rain in 30 minutes.

MONTANA, Central

Toole County

Sunburst Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

Toole County

Sunburst Hail (1.00)

A severe thunderstorm produced hail

1 inch in diameter and a wind gust

to 60 mph. The hail covered the

ground. The temperature dropped

from 87 degrees to 52 degrees in a

few minutes when the storm hit.

Glacier County

2 E East Glacier Park Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 63 mph at East Glacier

Park 2E.

Liberty County

33 N Chester Hail (0.75)

Liberty County

33 N Chester Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

Liberty County

22 E Whitlash Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 58 mph at Whif ash 22E.

Liberty County

25 NNE Chester Hail (0.75)

Liberty County

25 NNE Chester Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A severe thunderstorm dropped .75

inch diameter hail and produced a

wind gust to 60 mph at Chester 33N.

The strong winds 60 mph at Chester

25NNE. The hail flattened 200 acres

of wheat and 200 acres of barley.

Hill County

16 W Simpson Hail (0.75)

A severe thunderstorm dropped .75

inch diameter hail at Simpson 16W.

The hail covered the ground. In

addition to the hail, the storm

produced wind gusts in excess of 40

mph which blew a door off a storage

shed.

Hill County

Havre Thunderstorm Wind (G56)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 65 mph at Havre. A

roofer sustained minor injuries

when he was blown off the building

he was working on. The thunderstorm

overturned an unoccupied trailer,

knocked down numerous power and

phone lines and broke the

windshields of a dozen vehicles at

two car dealerships.

Hill County

5 N Simpson Hail (1.50)

A severe thunderstorm produced 1.5

inch diameter hail at Simpson 5N.

Liberty County

Chester Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 58 mph at Chester.

Teton County

10 W Fairfield Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 60 mph at Fairfield

10W. The storm knocked down many

tree limbs.

Teton County

7 W Fairfield Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 58 mph at Fairfield 7W.

Teton County

Fairfield Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 58 mph at Fairfield.

The storm downed several power

lines and many trees.

Teton County

Choteau Thunderstorm Wind (G77)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 89 mph at Choteau.

Teton County

5 NE Choteau Thunderstorm Wind (G70)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 80 mph at Choteau 5NE.

MTZ013

Wildfire

Thunderstorms caused 5 wildfires

during the evning hours of the 1st.

The fires (the largest of which was

500 acres) were started by lightning

strikes and by downed power lines.

Little damage resulted and the

fires were quickly contained and

extinguished.

Teton County

Collins Thunderstorm Wind (G61)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 70 mph at Collins.

Teton County

1 S Dutton Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 58 mph at Dutton 1S.

Pondera County

2 NW Brady Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 58 mph at Brady 2NW.

Pondera County

4 E Conrad Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 60 mph at Conrad 4E.

The storm snapped 20 feet off the

top of a 60 foot tree.

Liberty County

25 S Chester Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm produced a

wind gust to 58 mph at Chester 25S.

Toole County

11 S Devon Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm produced a wind

gust to 58 mph at Devon 11S.

MONTANA, East

Phillips County

Chapman Hail (0.75)

MONTANA, South

NONE REPORTED.

MONTANA, West

Flathead County

West Glacier Hail (0.88)

Missoula County

Missoula Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Missoula County

3 S Lolo Thunderstorm Wind (G71)

Missoula County

14 N Seeley Lake Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

A late season thunderstorm event struck

across portions of Western Montana.

Winds were the main threat with these

storms with trees being reported blow

down onto power lines causing a fire

north of Seeley Lake.

MTZ002

Landslide

A Canadian couple were injured and hos-

pitalized when their 2003 Porsche

Carrera GT was struk by falling rocks

the size of basketballs on Glacier

National Park’s Going to the Sun road.

The rock slide was caused by excessive

rains over the area.

NEBRASKA, Central

Garden County

Lisco to Hail (1.75)

1 SE Lisco

Garden County

15 NNW Oshkosh Hail (0.88)

Garden County

10 NE Oshkosh Hail (1.75)

Deuel County

8 NW Chappell Hail (1.75)

Deuel County

Chappell Hail (1.00)

Mcpherson County

13 W Tryon Hail (0.75)

Mcpherson County

10 W Tryon Hail (0.75)

Thomas County

3 W Thedford Hail (1.00)

Lincoln County

9 N North Platte Hail (0.75)

NEBRASKA, East

Cedar County

Hartington Hail (0.75)

Boone County

1 N Petersburg Hail (1.25)

Antelope County

2 SW Oakdale Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Thunderstorm wind gusts estimated at

over 60 mph by a cooperative observer

blew down a few trees southwest of Oak-

dale, one of which had a trunk 12

inches in diameter.

Antelope County

6 SE Elgin Hail (0.75)

Antelope County

9 ESE Elgin Hail (0.88)

Pierce County

2 N Foster Hail (0.75)

Madison County

4 SSE Tilden Hail (0.75)

Madison County

2 SW Meadow Grove Hail (1.25)

Burt County

3 N Oakland Hail (0.88)

Saline County

Wilber Thunderstorm

Thunderstorm wind gusts estimated at 60

mph downed numerous tree limbs in town.

Saline County

De Witt Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm wind gusts estimated at 60

mph caused shed damage and minor house

damage in town.

Jefferson County

Fairbury Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm wind gusts were estimated

at around 60 mph by the emergency mana-

ger in Fairbury.

Lancaster County

Lincoln Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Thunderstorm wind gusts estimated at

over 60 mph uprooted several trees and

caused serious damage to many others.

least 20 to 30 mature trees in town

came down or had to be removed due to

serious damage. Fallen tree branches

also downed power lines in Lincoln.

Lancaster County

.5 S Waverly Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Thunderstorm wind gusts estimated at 70

mph destroyed a shed and two turkey

barns and killed almost 2000 turkeys

just south of Waverly.

Douglas County

Millard Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm wind gusts estimated at 60

mph blew down some fences in the

Millard area around 128th and Harrison

Streets.

Cass County

4 W South Bend Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Thunderstorm wind gusts estimated at

over 60 mph blew 4 air-conditioning

units off of a local restaurant. The

winds also caused some crop damage

around town.

NEBRASKA, Extreme Northeast

NONE REPORTED.

NEBRASKA, Extreme Southwest

Dundy County

Haigler Hail (1.00)

Broken winds on house and vehicle.

Dundy County

Benkelman Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Dundy County

Benkelman Hail (1.75)

Dundy County

4 NW Benkelman Hail (1.00)

Dundy County

4 NW Benkelman Thunderstorm Wind (G61)

Picnic table blown around with glass

top broken.

Dundy County

Benkelman Hail (2.50)

Hitchcock County

Stratton Hail (0.75)

Hitchcock County

12 SSW Trenton Hail (1.00)

Red Willow County

4 SW Me Cook Hail (0.88)

Red Willow County

7 SSE Me Cook Hail (1.75)

NEBRASKA, South Central

Furnas County

Wilsonville Hail (1.75)

Furnas County

2 W Cambridge Hail (1.75)

NEBRASKA, West

Banner County

18 ENE Harrisburg Hail (0.75)

Banner County

16 WNW Harrisburg Hail (0.75)

Morrill County

Bridgeport to Hail (1.00)

5 SE Bridgeport

Banner County

12 ESE Harrisburg Hail (1.75)

Banner County

6 W Harrisburg Hail (1.00)

Banner County

4 W Harrisburg Hail (1.75)

Morrill County

11 SE Redington Hail (1.00)

Morrill County

12 SE Bridgeport Hail (1.75)

Morrill County

4 S Broadwater Hail (1.00)

1/2 to 1 inch diameter hail reported.

Cheyenne County

5 NE Potter Hail (0.75)

Cheyenne County

Sunol Hail (1.25)

Mostly 1/2 to 1 inch diameter hail.

NEVADA, North

NVZ035

High Wind (G52)

NVZ034

Heavy Snow

Several Snotel sites above 7500 feet

reported 4 to 7 inches of snow.

NEVADA, South

Clark County

5 SW Las Vegas Mc C Thunderstorm Wind (G58)

The weather observing equipment at the

NWS Las Vegas recorded a wind gust of

58 mph with a thunderstorm.

Clark County

Henderson Hail (0.75)

An off duty NWS meteorologist recorded

3 quarter inch hail in Henderson.

NEVADA, West

NONE REPORTED.

NEW HAMPSHIRE, North and Central

NONE REPORTED.

NEW HAMPSHIRE, Southern

Cheshire County

Keene Flash Flood

Branch Brook, Roxbury Heavy rainfall

associated with the remnants of Ivan

caused flash flooding in Cheshire

County. Storm totals of 3 to 5 inches

brought a tributary of the Branch Brook

out of its banks and flooded a nearby

roadway. No injuries were reported.

NEW JERSEY, Northeast

Hudson County

Countywide Flash Flood

Torrential rains resulted in flash

flooding. Cars were trapped and people

were rescued in Hoboken. Basements

flooded with up to four feet of water

across the county. A roadway overpass

collapsed in Weehawken. In Harrison, 5

feet of water accumulated at Path train

station. Rescues were performed by

police there.

Bergen County

Countywide Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused countywide

flash flooding. Several roads were

closed, including parts of Routes 17

and 46. In Bogota, a SUV began floating

when the vehicle was immersed in seve-

ral feet of water. This resulted in

rescues by local police.

Essex County

Newark Flash Flood

Flash flooding resulted in several feet

of water on roadways. Route 22 in

Newark was closed due to two feet of

water on the roadway near Weequahic

Park.

Union County

Rahway Flash Flood

Flash flooding caused county road 602

to become submerged in several feet of

water.

Passaic County

Passaic Flash Flood

Flash flooding caused a mile and a half

stretch of route 21 to be closed due to

at least a foot of running water. The

remnants of Hurricane Frances produced

torrential rainfall across Northeast

New Jersey on September 8th. Rainfall

amounts ranging from an inch to up to 6

inches were common across the area.

This caused extensive flash flooding

across the region, resulting in rescues

of people from homes and cars.

Hudson County

Harrison Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

on Route 280. Cars stalled in several

feet of water.

Bergen County

Bergenfield Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

of numerous roads in Bergen field. The

worst flooding occurred at Woodbine and

Lake Streets.

Bergen County

Rutherford Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

in Rutherford. Homes were flooded and

cars were stranded in several feet of

water. Torrential rains from the rem-

nants of Hurricane Ivan caused flash

flooding in Northeast New Jersey. Storm

total rainfall amounts ranged from 2 to

locally 5 inches. In addition to the

heavy rains, gusty winds up to 45 mph

in embedded thunderstorms knocked down

a tree along with power lines in Ramsey

at 8:38 am.

Bergen County

Bergenfield Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

of streets.

Essex County

Nutley Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

on the Garden State Parkway.

Passaic County

Central Portion Flash Flood

Roads closed due to extensive flash

flooding.

Union County

East Portion Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

on I-82. Portion of the highway was

closed.

Hudson County

Harrison Flash Flood

Numerous road closures in Harrison due

to torrential rains.

Hudson County

Harrison Flash Flood

Widespread flash flooding of roadways.

Car seen floating down 1-280.

Passaic County

Wayne Flash Flood

Highway 202 closed due to flash

flooding.

Union County

Cranford Flash Flood

Widespread flash flooding resulted in

numerous road closures and evacuation

of houses and vehicles.

Essex County

Countywide Flash Flood

Countywide flash flooding of streets

and highways occuring in Essex County.

resulted, with the Garden State Road

closures Parkway having several lanes

closed.

Bergen County

Bergenfield Flash Flood

Torrential rains flooded creeks which

in men flooded roads.

Bergen County

Bergenfield Flash Flood

Creeks out of banks due to torrential

rainfall. Numerous roads closed.

Essex County

Nutley Flash Flood

Garden State Parkway closed due to

flash flooding.

Hudson County

Harrison Flash Flood

Major flash flooding due to torrential

rains. Most roads in town closed.

Union County

Linden Flash Flood

Major flash flooding of the New Jersey

Turnpike at Routes 1 and 9.

Passaic County

Central Portion Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

near Wayne.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeane

produced between 3 and 6 inches of rain

across Northeast New Jersey. This re-

sulted in widespread flash flooding

across the region.

NEW JERSEY, South and Northwest

Atlantic County

Brigantine to Rip Current

Longport

Cape May County

Ocean City to Rip Current

Cape May

Monmouth County

Highland Beach to Rip Current

Manasquan

Ocean County

Pt Pleasant to Rip Current

Beach Haven Hgts

The combination of swells from Hurri-

cane Frances and a high pressure system

that built into New England and the

Canadian Maritimes caused rip currents

to occur throughout the Labor Day

weekend. Bathing restrictions were in

place throughout the weekend and water

rescues were performed. No deaths were

reported.

Warren County

Countywide Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A couple of lines of severe thunder-

storms knocked down numerous trees,

tree limbs and wires in Warren County.

Hunterdon County

Countywide Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A couple of lines of severe thunder-

storms knocked down numerous trees,

tree limbs and wires in Hunterdon

County.

Warren County

Countywide Flash Flood

NJZ007

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan interac-

ting with a slowly moving cold front

caused widespread very heavy rain to

fall during the first half of the day

on the 18th in Warren County. Storm

totals average 3 to 6 inches with

locally higher amounts throughout the

county. The torrential rain caused

widespread poor drainage, creek and

river flooding. Runoff from the heavy

rain also caused the worst flooding

along the Delaware River since 1955.

President George W. Bush declared the

county a disaster area. Damage was

estimated at twenty-eight million

dollars.

The Delaware River washed a home from

Harmony Township (Warren County) down-

stream. The home crashed into the

Easton-Phillipsburg Free Bridge. The

impact sheared the roof from the home

and the remainder floated under the

bridge. In White Township officials

condemned more than two dozen cottages

as Delaware River flood waters broke

windows and filled the homes with mud.

The Delaware River at Tocks Island was

above its 21 foot flood stage from 438

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 232 a.m.

EDT on the 20th. It crested at 30.32

feet at 845 a.m. EDT. In Belvidere, the

Delaware River was above its 22 foot

flood stage from 1101 p.m. EDT on the

18th through 842 p.m. EDT on the 19th.

It crested at 24.83 feet at 915 a.m.

EDT on the 19th. Farther downstream,

the Delaware River at the Easton-

Phillipsburg Bridge was above its 22

foot flood stage from 331 p.m. EDT on

the 18th through 1126 a.m. EDT on the

20th. It crested at 33.45 feet at 8

a.m. EDT on the 19th. Even farther

downstream at Riegelsville, the

Delaware River was above its 22 foot

flood stage from 522 p.m. EDT on the

18th through 1025 a.m. EDT on the 20th.

It crested at 30.95 feet at 1115 a.m.

EDT on the 19th.

Storm totals included 8.90 inches in

Great Meadows, 6.32 inches in

Belvidere, 5.27 inches in Blairstown,

4.70 inches in Phillipsburg and 3.93

inches in Stewartsville.

Morris County

Budd Lake Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A severe thunderstorm knocked down

several trees in Mount Olive Township

and adjacent locations in western

Morris County.

Morris County

West Portion Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan inter-

acting with a slowly moving cold front

caused widespread very heavy rain to

fall during the morning of the 18th

across the western part of Morris

County. Storm totals reached around 4

inches along the borders with Sussex

and Warren Counties. Widespread poor

drainage and some creek flooding

occurred. A mudslide in Washington

Township blocked a roadway. Storm

totals included 4.20 inches in Milton

and 4.00 inches in Chester.

Sussex County

Countywide Flash Flood

NJZ001

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan inter-

acting with a slowly moving cold front

caused widespread very heavy rain to

fall from the late evening of the 17th

through the first half of the day on

the 18th in Sussex County. Doppler

Radar storm total estimates averaged

between 2 and 5 inches throughout the

county. The torrential rain caused

widespread poor drainage, creek and

river flooding. It was the worst

flooding along the Delaware River since

1955. Extensive damage also occurred

within the Delaware Water Gap National

Recreational Area. President George W.

Bush declared the county a disaster

area.

The Delaware River at Port Jervis New

York and Matamoras Pennsylvania crested

at 19.52 feet at 545 p.m. EDT on the

18th. Flood stage is 18.0 feet. The

Delaware River at Montague crested at

18th. Flood stage is 25 feet. Farther

28.39 feet at 1115 p.m. EDT on the

downstream and down county, the Dela-

ware River at Tocks Island was above

its 21 foot flood stage from 438 p.m.

EDT on the 18th through 232 a.m. EDT

on the 20th. It crested at 30.32 feet

at 845 a.m. EDT. The Flat Brook at

Flatbrookville was above its 6 foot

flood stage from 136 p.m. EDT on the

18th through 536 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

It crested at 8.19 feet at 730 p.m. EDT

on the 18th.

Actual storm totals included 5.20

inches in Wantage and 4.55 inches in

Beamersville.

NJZ009

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan inter-

acting with a slowly moving cold front

caused widespread very heavy in the

upper and middle sections of the Dela-

ware River Valley. While the rain was

not as heavy in Hunterdon County, the

runoff from the heavy rain upstream

produced the worst flooding along the

Delaware River since 1955. Townships

and roadways along the Delaware River

were hardest hit. Damage was estimated

at close to one million dollars.

The Delaware River at Riegelsville was

above its 22 foot flood stage from 522

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 1025 a.m.

EDT on the 20th. It crested at 30.95

feet at 1115 a.m. EDT on the 29th. The

Delaware River at Frenchtown was above

its 16 foot flood stage from about 6

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 927 a.m.

EDT on 20th. It crested at 20.7 feet at

1 p.m. EDT on the 19th. Farther down-

stream, the Delaware River at Stockton

was above its 18 foot flood stage from

Midnight EDT on the 19th through 836

a.m. EDT on the 20th. It crested at

22.5 feet at 3 p.m. EDT on the 19th.

NJZ015

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan inter-

acting with a slowly moving cold front

caused widespread very heavy in the

upper and middle sections of the

Delaware River Valley. While the rain

was not heavy in Mercer County, the

run-off from the heavy rain upstream

produced the worst flooding along the

Delaware River since 1955. Townships

and roadways along the Delaware River

were hardest hit. Damage was estimated

in the millions.

The Delaware River at Washington’s

Crossing was above its 20 foot flood

stage from 416 p.m. EDT through 828

p.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested at

20.12 feet at 5 p.m. EDT. Farther down-

stream, the Delaware River at Trenton

was above its 20 foot flood stage

from 148 a.m. EDT on the 19th through

1245 p.m. EDT on the 20th. It crested

at 23.39 feet at 731 p.m. EDT on the

19th. Flood stage is also 20 feet.

NJZ017-017>018-

018>019-019 Astronomical High Tide

The combination of runoff from the

heavy rain that fell upstream in the

Delaware River and the incoming high

tide produced minor tidal flooding

along the Delaware River and tidal

parts of its tributaries during the

late afternoon and early evening high

tide on both the 19th and 20th. The

highest tides occurred on the 19th. The

Delaware River in Burlington reached a

height of 10.58 feet above mean lower

low water at 6 p.m. EDT on the 19th.

Minor tidal flooding begins at 9.0 feet

above mean lower low water. The Dela-

ware River at Pier 12 in Philadelphia

reached a height of 8.96 feet above

mean lower low water at 518 p.m. EDT

on the 19th. Minor tidal flooding

begins at 8.2 feet above mean lower low

water.

Burlington County

Countywide Heavy Rain

Gloucester County

Countywide Heavy Rain

Salem County

Countywide Heavy Rain

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne inter-

acting with two frontal boundaries in

the region caused bands of heavy down-

pours to occur during the late after-

noon and evening of the 28th. Doppler

Radar storm total estimates averaged

between 2 and 4 inches with the highest

amounts toward Philadelphia. Widespread

poor drainage flooding occurred. But,

the heavy rain fell sporadically and

this permitted most major streams and

creeks to remain within their banks.

Storm totals included 4.30 inches in

Mount Laurel (Burlington County), 3.68

inches in Mount Holly (Burlington

County), 3.46 inches in West Deptford

(Gloucester County), 3.20 inches in

Tabernacle (Burlington County) and 3.14

inches in Wrightstown (Burlington

County).

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Camden County

Cherry Hill Tornado (F0)

A confirmed F0 (Fujita Scale) tornado

touched down in Cherry Hill with maxi-

mum winds estimated at 70 mph winds.

The path length was 2.5 miles long,

with a maximum path width of 50 feet.

The nor-them part of the path was

intermittent. Damage included the

downing of some trees and power poles,

vehicles damaged by flying debris and

roof damage to at least two stores. The

worst damage was concentrated in the

shopping center containing the Super G

supermarket on Brace Road.

Hunterdon County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne inter-

acting with two frontal boundaries in

the region caused bands of torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 2 and 5 inches with

the highest amounts toward Mercer

County. Widespread poor drainage and

scattered creek flooding occurred.

Roads were flooded and closed and water

rescues were performed. The South

Branch of the Raritan River at Stanton

was above its 8 foot flood stage from

1209 a.m. EDT through 300 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 8.1 feet at 130

a.m. EDT on the 29th. Storm totals

included 4.81 inches in Ringoes, 4.65

inches in Stockton, 4.41 inches in

Califon, 4.13 inches in Wertsville,

3.94 inches in Flemington, 3.60 inches

in Califon, 3.43 inches in Annandale

and 3.26 inches in Alexandria Township.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

thesame time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Mercer County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne inter-

acting with two frontal boundaries in

the region caused torrential downpours

to occur during the late afternoon and

evening of the 28th. Doppler Radar

storm total estimates averaged between

2.5 and 6 inches across the county.

Widespread poor drainage and creek

flooding occurred in low lying areas.

Many roads were flooded and closed and

numerous water rescues were performed,

the combination of heavy rain and gusty

evening winds knocked one tree down

into a home in Ewing Township.

The Assunpink Creek at Trenton was

above its 7 foot flood stage from 718

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 322 p.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 11.08

feet at 315 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 6.20 inches in

Washington’s Crossing, 5.99 inches in

Trenton, 5.30 inches in Windsor, 4.68

inches in Hightstown and 4.08 inches in

Lawrenceville.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Middlesex County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne inter-

acting with two frontal boundaries in

the region caused torrential downpours

to occur during the late afternoon and

throughout the evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 3 and 6 inches. Wide-

spread urbanized and poor drainage

flooding occurred along with some creek

flooding. Many roads were flooded and

several were closed. Water rescues were

performed.

Storm totals included 5.38 inches in

New Brunswick, 4.90 inches in

Woodbridge, 4.80 inches in Metuchen and

3.47 inches in Middlesex.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Somerset County

Countywide Flash Flood

NJZ010

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne inter-

acting with two frontal boundaries in

the region caused torrential downpours

to occur during the late afternoon and

throughout the evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 3 and 5 inches. Wide-

spread poor drainage and creek flooding

occurred. Flooding also affected the

main stem of the Raritan and Millstone

Rivers. Many roads were flooded and

closed and water rescues were

performed.

The North Branch of the Raritan River

at North Branch was above its 12.3

flood stage from 105 a.m. through 744

a.m. EDT on the 29th. It crested at

13.2 feet at 4 a.m. EDT. Farther down-

stream, the North Branch of the Raritan

River at Raritan was above its 10 foot

flood stage from 3 a.m. EDT through 820

a.m. EDT on the 29th. It crested at

10.49 feet at 515 a.m. EDT. Even

farther downstream, the North Branch of

the Raritan River at South Branch was

above its 6.9 foot flood stage from 934

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 307 p.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 10.4

feet at 11 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

The Millstone River at Weston was above

its 12.4 foot flood stage from 359 p.m.

EDT through 555 p.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 15.8 feet at 5 p.m. EDT.

Farther downstream, the Millstone River

at Blackwells Mills was above its 9

foot flood stage from 123 p.m. EDT on

the 29th through 1115 a.m. EDT on the

30th. It crested at 10.26 feet at 833

p.m. EDT on the 29th. The main stem of

the Raritan River at Manville was above

its 14 foot flood stage from 726 a.m.

through 607 p.m. EDT on the 29th. It

crested at 15.96 feet at 1215 p.m. EDT.

Farther downstream, the main stem of

the Raritan River at Bound Brook was

above its 28 foot flood stage from 1238

p.m. EDT through 737 p.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 28.79 feet at 314

p.m. EDT.

Storm totals included 4.24 inches in

Neshanic, 4.00 inches in Middlebush,

3.97 inches in Blackwells Mills, 3.88

inches in Somerville, 3.74 inches in

Pottersville, 3.48 inches in

Readington, 3.35 inches in Far Hills,

3.30 inches in North Plainfield, 3.10

inches in Bound Brook and 2.60 inches

in Belle Mead.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Monmouth County

Howell Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A severe thunderstorm knocked down a

couple of trees and wires within Howell

Township.

Monmouth County

Countywide Flash Flood

NJZ013

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne inter-

acting with two frontal boundaries in

the region caused torrential downpours

to occur during the evening and over-

night on the 28th. Doppler Radar Storm

total estimates averaged between 3 and

6 inches. Widespread urban and poor

drainage and creek flooding occurred.

Many roads were flooded and closed and

numerous water rescues were performed.

Roads were closed and barricaded in

Hazlet, Little Silver and Upper

Freehold. The next day runoff from the

heavy rain caused flooding along the

Manasquan River. The Manasquan River at

Squankum was above its 7.5 foot flood

stage from 1007 a.m. EDT through 315

p.m. EDT on the 29th. It crested at

7.77 feet at 1245 p.m. EDT.

Storm totals included 5.85 inches in

Freehold, 4.88 inches in Marlborough,

4.75 inches in Sandy Hook, 4.53 inches

in Manalapan, 3.93 inches in Cream

Ridge and 3.17 inches in Keansburg.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Morris County

Southwest Portion Flash Flood

NJZ008

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne inter-

acting with two frontal boundaries in

the region caused heavy downpours to

occur during the late afternoon and

throughout the evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 2 and 5 inches with

the highest amounts toward central New

Jersey. Widespread poor drainage

occurred with some creek flooding in

the southwest part of the county.

Several roads were closed. Runoff from

the heavy rain led to flooding along

sections of the Rockaway River. The

Rockaway River below the Boonton Reser-

voir was above its 5 foot flood stage

from 407 a.m. EDT on the 29th through

952 a.m. EDT on the 30th. It crested at

5.87 feet at 415 p.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 4.30 inches in

Chester, 4.00 inches in Boonton, 3.84

inches in Ironia, 3.60 inches in

Pequannock, 3.50 inches in Butler, 3.47

inches in Chatham, 3.27 inches in

Lincoln Park and 3.08 inches in Moms

Plains.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

NJZ016>019

Astronomical High Tide

The combination of the runoff from the

heavy rain from the remnants of Hurri-

cane Jeanne and the spring tides asso-

ciated with the full moon caused minor

tidal flooding during four successive

high tide cycles on the New Jersey side

of the Delaware River and tidal sec-

tions of its tributaries. Tidal

flooding began with the high tide just

after midnight EDT on the 29th and

ceased after the afternoon high tide on

the 30th. The highest tides occurred

with the high tide just after midnight

EDT on the 29th. That high tide reached

10.26 feet above mean lower low water

in Burlington. Minor tidal flooding

begins at 9.0 feet above mean lower low

water.

Camden County

Central Portion Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne inter-

acting with two frontal boundaries in

in the region caused heavy downpours to

occur during the late afternoon and

evening of the 28th. Doppler Radar

storm total estimates averaged between

2 and 4 inches with the highest amounts

toward Philadelphia. Widespread poor

drainage flooding occurred and flooding

also occurred along the Cooper River.

The Cooper River at Haddonfreld was

above its 2.8 foot flood stage from

1244 a.m. EDT through 755 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 2.98 feet at

315 a.m. EDT. Storm totals included

3.71 inches in Cherry Hill and 3.48

inches in Somerdale.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

NJZ020

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne inter-

acting with two frontal boundaries in

the region caused heavy downpours to

occur during the late afternoon and

throughout the evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged from 1 inch in the southern part

of the county to around 5 inches in the

northern part of the county. This

caused poor drainage and eventually

minor flooding along the North Branch

of the Metedeconk Creek. The North

Branch of the Metedeconk Creek at Lake-

wood was above its 7 foot flood stage

from 815 p.m. EDT through 1045 p.m. EDT

on the 29th. It crested at 7.03 feet

at 9 p.m. EDT. Storm totals included

5.16 inches in Point Pleasant, 2.47

inches in Lakehurst, 1.41 inches in

Barnegat and 0.72 inches at Brant

Beach.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95 cor-

ridor. The remnants of Jeanne tracked

along this frontal boundary. At the

same time a cold front approaching from

the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

NEW MEXICO, Central and North

Roosevelt County

10 E Milnesand Hail (1.00)

Roosevelt County

10 E Milnesand Thunderstorm Wind (G51)

Harding County

6 E Mills Hail (0.88)

Chaves County

Roswell to Flash Flood

15 S Roswell

Heavy rain from Roswell south to

Dexter-Hagerman filled streets to axle

deep and flooded several crossing with

3 feet of water along the Felix River.

Roosevelt County

Elida to Flash Flood

Milnesand

Heavy rain of 2 to 3 inches swept

across southern Roosevelt County

filling ditches and causing water

ponding in many roads and dangerous

high water of 3-5 feet at arroyo

crossings.

Bernalillo County

15 W Albuquerque Hail (0.75)

Bernalillo County

Albuquerque Heavy Rain

Brief heavy rain brought yard and curb

level street flooding to southeast and

south central Albuquerque.

NEW MEXICO, South Central and Southwest

Grant County

2 N Silver City Hail (0.75)

Penny size hail accumulated to 2 inches

with drifts to 8 inches.

Sierra County

9 S Truth Or Conseqw Hail (1.75)

Hail accumulated to 4 inches on Inter-

state 25 south of Truth or Consequen-

ces, leading to multiple vehicle acci-

dents. The largest hail reported by

NMDOT was golf ball size.

Dona Ana County

14 N Las Cruces Hail (1.00)

Dona Ana County

25 NE Las Cruces Hail (0.88)

Otero County

25 SW Alamogordo Hail (0.88)

Dona Ana County

31 SW Las Cruces Hail (1.25)

Dona Ana County

Vado Hail (1.00)

Dona Ana County

3 SE Las Cruces Flash Flood

Dona Ana County

7 NW Sunland Park Hail (0.75)

Dona Ana County

7 NW Sunland Park Thunderstorm Wind (G57)

Otero County

Alamogordo Hail (1.00)

Otero County

Alamogordo Thunderstorm Wind (G61)

NEW MEXICO, Southeast

Lea County

Hobbs Flash Flood

A line of thunderstorms moved across

the southeastern plains of New Mexico

during the late evening hours of the

4th. Local officials reported flash

flooding in Hobbs. High water flowed

through several city streets and some

intersections were impassable.

Eddy County

4 N Queen to Flash Flood

8 NE Queen

Storm spotters reported “significant”

flash flooding along Last Chance Creek.

Flood waters along the swollen creek

crossed parts of Canal Street with more

than five feet of flowing water.

Lea County

Eunice Flash Flood

Eunice law enforcement officials

reported flash flooding that inundated

city streets and resulted in several

stalled vehicles. High water rescues of

stranded motorists were conducted on

Main Street. No injuries were reported.

Lea County

1 S Eunice Thunderstorm Wind (G61)

Severe thunderstorm winds damaged a

trailer home just south of Eunice. A

large tree also was uprooted. Strong to

severe thunderstorms affected south-

eastern New Mexico during the afternoon

and evening of the 21 st. Very heavy

rainfall from this activity resulted in

localized flash flooding. Thunderstorm

winds also damaged a homestead near

Eunice.

Lea County

2 W Lovington Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A line of strong to severe thunder-

storms moved across the plains of

southeastern New Mexico during the

evening of the 22nd. An anemometer at

the Lovington Airport measured a 58 MPH

thunderstorm wind gust as the storms

passed. Half inch diameter hail also

was reported by the airport staff.

Lea County

Monument to Flash Flood

3 W Lovington

A prolonged period of widespread heavy

rainfall began over the plains of

southeastern New Mexico late on

Saturday the 25th. By the early hours

of Sunday the 26th, extensive flash

flooding was occurring in Lea County.

At 02:30 MST high water was reported

flowing over State Highway 483 seven

miles south of Lovington. Additional

flash flooding occurred along a

corridor from Lovington to Monument

through early Monday the 27th.

Before daybreak Sunday morning, flash

flooding caused high water to inundate

State Highway 8, four miles north of

Monument. A swollen draw near monument

also produced flash flooding that

covered several secondary roadways with

flowing water.

Showers and thunderstorms continued to

move northwest over Lea County during

the afternoon and early evening hours.

Numerous roads and highways in the

vicinity of Lovington were affected by

flash flooding by 20:00 MST. Flood

waters submerged U.S. Highway 82 from

Lovington to three miles west of the

city.

A short-lived break in convective

activity occurred during the late

evening. Flash flooding continued,

however, as runoff maintained flash

flooding conditions over U.S. Highway

82 near Lovington.

Bands of showers and thunderstorms

redeveloped by midnight MST over

southern and central Lea County. This

activity aggravated the flash flooding

near Lovington along U.S. Highway 82

and caused additional flash flooding

that affected several secondary

roadways.

Moderate to occasionally heavy rainfall

continued over central Lea County

through early morning on Monday the

27th. At 12:00 MST local officials

reported that U.S. Highway 82 west of

Lovington remained closed due to

flowing water. Flooding there receded

by mid afternoon Monday.

Lea County

Eunice to Flash Flood

22 N Hobbs

The widespread heavy rain resulted in a

second corridor of extensive flash

flooding over eastern Lea County from

Eunice to north of Hobbs. At 05:45 MST

Sunday the 26th, Hobbs officials

reported flash flooding that resulted

in eight inches of flowing water in

many city streets.

By 09:57 MST the intersection of U.S.

Highway 82 and State Highway 18 was

inundated by flowing flood waters

twenty-three miles north of Hobbs. At

12:24 MST, a truck stalled in the

flooded intersection and local fire

department officials conducted a high

water rescue to bring the driver to

safety.

At 12:45 MST Sunday a National Weather

Service cooperative observer in Eunice

reported a rainfall measurement of six

inches since Saturday evening. Several

secondary roadways were reported to be

underwater in the Eunice area.

Additional rainfall throughout the day

Sunday aggravated the flash flooding

conditions in Hobbs. By 14:50 MST

officials reported up to one and a half

feet of flowing flood waters in some

city streets. The worst flooding was

reported along Main Street where

several vehicles were stalled.

Flash flooding subsided across eastern

Lea County by the afternoon hours

Sunday.

Eddy County

9 NE Queen to Flash Flood

Carlsbad

The widespread heavy rainfall had

spread northwest across Eddy County by

sunrise Sunday morning. Flash flooding

quickly developed along the numerous

creeks and draws that transport water

from the mountainous areas of south-

western Eddy County toward Carlsbad. At

08:53 MST local officials reported that

two and a half feet of flowing water

crossed New Mexico State Highway 137

fifteen miles northeast of Queen. By

09:55 MST heavy rainfall over Carlsbad

had resulted in more than half a foot

of water covering many city streets.

Conditions deteriorated through the day

as continued heavy rainfall combined

with runoff that emptied into Carlsbad

through Dark Canyon Draw. By 11:25 MST,

several reports indicated that vehicles

were stalled in flooded city streets.

Additional stranded motorists were

rescued from swiftly moving flood

waters on Dark Canyon Road near County

Road 408 southwest of the city. That

intersection was inundated by over

seven feet of rapidly flowing water. No

injuries were reported.

Water running through Dark Canyon Draw

continued to enter the southwest side

of Carlsbad through late afternoon. At

16:30 MST over six feet of flowing

water crossed Hidalgo Street and Dark

Canyon Road. Flood waters gradually

receded in Carlsbad through the evening

hours. By 19:00 MST the heavy rainfall

had ended, but the swollen Dark Canyon

Draw continued to flood city streets in

southwestern Carlsbad with four feet of

water. The Carlsbad Police Department

reported that all flooding in and

around Carlsbad had subsided by 01:00

Monday.

Eddy County

15 S Artesia to Flash Flood

Artesia

Flash flooding conditions developed in

the vicinity of Artesia and Lakewood

during the late morning hours of Sunday

the 26th. At 10:05 MST, local officials

reported that one and a half feet of

flowing water crossed the intersection

of Fulton and Haldeman Roads one mile

southeast of Artesia. Lakewood Road

also was inundated by flash flooding

between U.S. Highway 285 and Lakewood.

In addition, the heavy rainfall caused

small creeks and draws to swell. Eagle

Draw in Artesia rapidly filled with

flood waters and threatened U.S. High-

way 82 by 12:00 MST. No reports of

injuries or significant damage were

received.

Eddy County

21 W Carlsbad Flash Flood

Flash flooding along Rocky Arroyo,

northwest of Carlsbad, resulted in

three to four feet of flowing water

over New Mexico State Highway 137, six

miles southwest of the U.S. Highway 285

intersection.

Although heavy rainfall ended over Eddy

County by 19:00 MST, runoff into Rocky

Arroyo caused “significant” flash

flooding to persist along County Road

401 through midnight MST Monday. The

roadway was inundated by flowing water

two miles west of New Mexico Highway

137.

Lea County

12 WNW Jal Flash Flood

Another round of showers and thunder-

storms produced heavy rainfall over

southern Lea County on the morning of

Monday the 27th. Flash flooding along

State Highway 128 was reported by the

Jal Police Department. High water

flowed over the highway twelve miles

west of Jal.

In summary, flash flooding became wide-

spread across southeastern New Mexico

on Sunday the 26th and persisted into

Monday the 27th. Doppler radar estima-

ted three day rainfall totals exceeding

eleven inches across portions of Lea

County by late Monday. The excessive

rainfall caused flash flooding that

inundated many area roadways. Motorists

became stranded by flood waters in both

Eddy and Lea Counties Sunday. No inju-

ries were reported.

Eddy County

12 NW Carlsbad to Flash Flood

2 SW Carlsbad

Although heavy rainfall had temporarily

ended over Eddy County, runoff from

previous rains over the Guadalupe

Mountains resulted in another flood

wave that propagated though Dark Canyon

Draw. Flash flooding in several

Carlsbad neighborhoods resulted. County

Road 408, Hidalgo, Radio, and Boyd

Streets were all closed in the city’s

southwest side due to high water.

In addition, runoff through Rocky

Arroyo made portions of New Mexico

State Highway 137 and U.S. Highway 285

briefly impassable.

Eddy County

3 SW Carlsbad to Flash Flood

17 ESE Carlsbad

Thunderstorms and heavy rainfall again

developed over portions of southeastern

New Mexico late on the 29th. Flash

flooding was reported along Dark Canyon

Draw from the area just south of Carls-

bad, to Loving, to New Mexico State

Highway 128 in eastern Eddy County. The

first reports indicated three feet of

flood waters flowing across County Road

408 at 21:53 MST. A fifty foot stretch

of the road was submerged. Several

streets that run into the side of

Carlsbad were barricaded by local

officials due to high water. Higby and

Ogden Roads also were closed near

Loving by 23:10 MST.

Runoff and occasional heavy rainfall

continued to produce flash flooding at

the same locations through the night.

By 03:48 MST the Eddy County Sheriffs

Office reported that flooding had

spread east to New Mexico State Highway

128 in eastern Eddy County. Reports

throughout the early morning hours of

the 30th indicated little change in the

flash flood threat with numerous road-

ways that remained submerged by high

water.

Rainfall over the county ended by 10:00

MST. Runoff of the earlier heavy rains

continued to result in flash flooding

conditions, however, through early

afternoon.

Lea County

Hobbs Flash Flood

The Hobbs Police Department reported

that flash flooding caused high water

to rendered several city streets

impassable.

Eddy County

Artesia Flash Flood

Local officials reported that numerous

city streets were inundated by high

water as a result of flash flooding.

Showers and thunderstorms repeatedly

tracked over portions of southeastern

New Mexico late on the 29th and early

on the 30th. With saturated ground con-

ditions in place after recent flooding

rains, isolated flash flooding quickly

developed across parts of Eddy and Lea

Counties.

Eddy County

2 N Lakewood Hail (0.75)

An isolated supercell thunderstorm

developed over northern Eddy County

during the afternoon hours of the 30th.

This storm produced large hail as it

affected the Lakewood area along U.S.

Highway 285.

Eddy County

2 N Lakewood to Flash Flood

Carlsbad

Flash flooding affected several city

streets in Carlsbad and U.S. Highway

285 between Carlsbad and Lakewood after

a round of strong to severe thunder-

storms tracked across the area produ-

cing very heavy rainfall. Over one foot

of water flowed out of several fields

and crossed secondary roadways north of

Carlsbad.

NEW YORK, Central

Steuben County

Woodhull to Flash Flood

Bath

Flash flooding occurred in Tuscarora,

Woodhull, Addison, Jasper, Rathbone,

Canisteo, Erwin, Buena Vista, and Bath

due to heavy rain. Rainfall amounts

from the 8th into the 9th were 2.5

inches to around 5 inches in southeast

Steuben County. The heavy rain was

aided by tropical moisture from the

remnants of hurricane Frances. Many

streams and creeks were out of their

banks. Several bridges were washed out

or damaged beyond repair. The Freeman

Bridge on County Route 85 near South

Addison buckled when the foundation was

disturbed. School was cancelled in a

few towns. The worst hit area was along

Route 417 and the Tuscarora Creek in

the towns of Woodhull and Tuscarora.

The road was closed and underwater.

Several people were evacuated when

water surrounded their homes. Several

other roads were closed. Many homes had

flooded basements. The state declared

Steuben County a disaster area. A state

of emergency was declared for the towns

of Rathbone, Addison, Tuscarora, and

Woodhull. The Tuscarora Creek at

Addison rose over 11 feet in less than

12 hours. Campbell Creek in the town of

Bath overflowed forcing the evacuation

of one house’s occupants on Campbell

Creek Road.

NYZ024

Flood

Heavy rainfall from the remnants of

hurricane Frances caused the Chemung

River at Elmira to rise above its flood

stage of 12 feet. The Chemung River at

Elmira crested around 13 feet late on

the 9th. Rainfall amounts were 1.5 to 4

inches with locally higher amounts

across the Chemung River basin. Many

roads were flooded and closed due to

the river flooding in the Big Flats

area.

NYZ022

Flood

Heavy rainfall from the remnants of

hurricane Frances caused the Cohocton

River at Campbell to rise above its

flood stage of 8 feet. The Cohocton

River at Campbell crested at 8.1 feet

early in the evening on the 9th.

Rainfall amounts were 1.5 to 4 inches

with locally higher amounts.

NYZ024

Flood

Heavy rainfall from the remnants of

hurricane Frances caused the Chemung

River at Chemung to rise slightly above

its flood stage of 16 feet. Rainfall

amounts were 1.5 to 4 inches with

locally higher amounts across the

Chemung River basin.

Steuben County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 1.5 to 3.5

inches fell from the 16th into the

18th. The rain was due to the remnants

of hurricane Ivan. Southeast Steuben

County had the worst flash flooding.

This was also were the heaviest rain

was.

Broome County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rainfall with amounts of 3 to 6

inches caused flash flooding county-

wide. The rain which fell from the 16th

to the 18th was due to remnants of

hurricane Ivan. Most creeks and streams

as well as the Delaware, Susquehanna,

and Chenango Rivers were out of their

banks. Major damage occurred to at

least 100 residences with minor damage

to over 1000. At least 1000 people were

forced from their homes. Flooding

closed part of State Route 17/Inter-

state 86 in the eastern part of the

county. Several trailer parks were

flooded. Some of the trailers had water

inside them.

Tioga County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 3 to 6

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Many creeks and streams went out

of their banks. The Susquehanna River

also flooded.

Chemung County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts from 2.5 to 4

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Many streams and creeks went out

of their banks. The rain also caused

the Chemung River to flood. A few homes

were damaged by the flash flooding.

NYZ056

Flood

The Susquehanna River at Conklin rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet late

on the 17th, crested at 19.0 at noon

EST on the 18th, before slowly falling

to be below flood stage late morning on

the 20th. Many houses and mobile homes

were damaged or completely destroyed.

Rainfall amounts were 2 to 5 inches

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

The crest was the fourth highest on

record for the Conklin gage.

Delaware County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 4 to 6

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Most streams and creeks went out

of their banks. In addition the east

and west branches of the Delaware River

and the Beaver Kill had major flooding.

7 people were rescued by a New York

State Police helicopter that NWS

Binghamton recommended to be put into

use. 26 homes were destroyed with

another 60 with major damage and 60

more with minor damage. 15 businesses

were affected. 2 campgrounds were

destroyed. This was the worst flooding

since hurricane Diane in 1955.

Otsego County

Southeast Portion Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 3 to 4.5

inches in the southeast half of the

county caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. A trailer park near Oneonta

started experiencing severe flooding

around 4:30 AM. County highway 5

flooded in the town of Otego. Several

other roadways also had water on them.

Several creeks and streams, including

Schenevus Creek, went out of its banks.

NYZ055

Flood

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Waverly, NY and Sayre, PA rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet early

on the 18th, crested at 18.8 feet at

11:30 PM on the 18th, then slowly fell

to be below its flood stage late

morning on the 20th. Rainfall amounts

were 2 to 5 inches which started on the

16th and continued into the 18th. This

rain was from the remnants of hurricane

Ivan.

NYZ056

Flood

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Vestal rose above its flood

stage of 18 feet early on the 18th,

crested at 26.0 feet at 5:30 PM on the

18th, then slowly fell to be below its

flood stage the evening of the 19th.

This was the ninth highest crest on

record. Rainfall amounts were 2 to 5

inches which started on the 16th and

continued into the 18th. This rain was

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

NYZ057

Flood

The Beaver Kill at Cooks Falls rose

above its flood stage of 10 feet early

on the morning of the 18th, crested at

17.7 feet at 11:00 AM on the 18th, then

fell below the flood stage late evening

also on the 18th. Rainfall amounts were

4 to 7 inches due to the remnants of

hurricane Ivan. The rain fell from the

16th to the 18th. This was the third

highest crest recorded at Cooks Falls.

NYZ056

Flood

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Binghamton rose above its

flood stage of 14 feet early on the

18th, crested at 17.1 feet at 3:30 PM

on the 18th, then fell to be below its

flood stage on the 19th. Rainfall

amounts were 2 to 5 inches which

started on the 16th and continued into

the 18th. This rain was from the

remnants of hurricane Ivan.

Sullivan County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 3 to 6

inches caused flash flooding. The

heaviest amounts were at the highest

elevations in the northwest section of

the county. The rain which fell from

the 16th to the 18th was due to the

remnants of hurricane Ivan. Most

streams and creeks went out of their

banks. In addition, the Delaware River

had major flooding. 300 homes and at

least a dozen businesses had damage.

Several campgrounds were completely

wiped out. Livingston Manor was com-

pletely flooded. Across the county 1200

people were evacuated. 10 people were

rescued in Roscoe and 19 in Callicoon.

NYZ024

Flood

The Chemung River at Elmira rose above

its flood stage of 12 feet the morning

of the 18th, crested at 13.6 feet at

11:15 AM on the 18th, then fell below

the flood stage late evening also on

the 18th. Rainfall amounts were 2 to 5

inches due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. The rain fell from the 16th to

the 18th.

NVZ057

Flood

The East Branch of the Delaware River

at Fishs Eddy rose above its flood

stage of 15 feet the morning of the

18th, crested at 21.0 feet at 12:45 PM

on the 18th, then fell below the flood

stage midday on the 19th. Rainfall

amounts were 4 to 7 inches due to the

remnants of hurricane Ivan. The rain

fell from the 16th to the 18th. This

was the second highest crest on record

at Fishs Eddy.

Chenango County

South Portion Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 3 to 5

inches in the southern half of the

county caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Some of the creeks and streams

came out of their banks. The hardest

hit towns were Afton, Bainbridge,

Smithville, and Coventry.

NYZ024

Flood

The Chemung River at Chemung rose above

its flood stage of 16 feet the morning

of the 18th, crested at 18.5 feet at

3:15 PM EST on the 18th, then fell

below the flood stage early on the

19th. Rainfall amounts were 2 to 5

inches due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. The rain fell from the 16th to

the 18th.

NYZ062

Flood

The Delaware River at Callicoon, NY

rose above its flood stage of 12 feet

the morning of the 18th, crested at

17.3 feet at 4:45 PM on the 18th, then

fell below the flood stage the morning

of the 19th. Rainfall amounts were 4 to

7 inches due to the remnants of hurri-

cane Ivan. The rain fell from the 16th

to the 18th. This was the highest crest

on record by about a foot at the river

gage at Callicoon.

NYZ057 Flood

The Beaver Kill at Cooks Falls rose

above its flood stage of 10 feet early

on the morning of the 18th, crested at

17.7 feet at 11:00 AM on the 18th, then

fell below the flood stage late evening

also on the 18th. Rainfall amounts were

4 to 7 inches due to the remnants of

hurricane Ivan. The rain fell from the

16th to the 18th. This was the third

highest crest recorded at Cooks Falls.

NYZ056

Flood

The West Branch of the Delaware River

at Hale Eddy rose above its flood stage

of 11 feet the morning of the 18th,

crested at 12.8 feet at 11:15 AM on the

18th, then fell below the flood stage

late afternoon on the 19th. Rainfall

amounts were 4 to 7 inches due to the

remnants of hurricane Ivan. The rain

fell from the 16th to the 18th.

NYZ045

Flood

The Susquehanna River at Bainbridge

went above its flood stage of 13 feet

on the 18th, crested at 15.1 feet on

the 18th at 2 PM EST, then fell below

the flood stage midday on the 19th. The

flooding was due to 2 to 5 inches of

rain which fell on the 17th and 18th.

The rain was associated with the rem-

nants of hurricane Ivan. The crest was

the 8th highest on record for the river

gage at Bainbridge.

NYZ062

Flood

The Delaware River at Barryville went

above its flood stage of 17 feet the

morning of the 18th, crested at 24.1

feet at 3:15 PM EST on the 18th, then

fell back below the flood stage late

morning on the 19th. Rainfall amounts

were 4 to 7 inches due to the remnants

of hurricane Ivan. The rain fell from

the 16th to the 18th. This was the

second highest crest on record at

Barryville. The highest crest was in

1955.

NEW YORK, Coastal

Suffolk County

St James Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

of streets. This caused street

closures.

Nassau County

Hicksville Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

on the Long Island Expressway.

New York County

Central Portion Flash Flood

Flash flooding was the cause of

flooding on FDR drive. Lanes were

closed between 96th and 123rd streets.

Nassau County

Bethpage Flash Flood

Flash flooding on the Long Island

Expressway caused lane closures.

Streets were also closed in Plainview

due to flash flooding.

Queens County

Countywide Flash Flood

Flash flooding caused numerous road

closures across Queens. Major roads

closed included the Long Island

Expressway, Utopia Parkway, Grand

Central Parkway, and The Van Wyck. The

Belt Parkway near JFK airport was also

flooded.

Bronx County

Countywide Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

of many roadways in the Bronx. Cars

were abandoned at several locations.

Kings County

Brooklyn Flash Flood

Flash flooding on the BQE at Flushing

Boulevard.

Bronx County

Bronx Flash Flood

Flash flooding on the Bronx River

Parkway.

NYZ069

Flood

Flooding of roads in Mahwah due to the

Mahwah river overflowing its banks.

Westchester County

Mt Kisco Flash Flood

Flash flooding on the Sawmill River

Parkway.

Westchester County

Mt Kisco Flash Flood

Flooding of the Saw Mill River Parkway

in Mount Kisco.

Orange County

Cuddebackville Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

in areas of Cuddebackville including

Deerpark manor. Firefighters and other

volunteers spent hours laying sandbags

to prevent homes from the floodwaters.

Putnam County

Cold Spgs Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused extensive flash

flooding in Cold Spring. South Mountain

Pass Road was extensively damaged from

flash floods. It was completely washed

out.

Westchester County

Countywide Flash Flood

Flash flooding filled basements with

water. Rowboats and payloaders were

used to rescue people from flooded

homes and vehicles in Mamaroneck, Rye

and Harrison. The White Plains Times

Newspaper called the flash flooding in

Westchester County the worst in 28

years.

Rockland County

Countywide Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

throughout Rockland County. Basements

flooded Tompkins Cove, and Stony Point.

Several roads experienced closures,

including Routes 59, 303, and Crooked

hill Road. The Hackensack River also

overflowed its banks onto Route 59,

causing a small mouth bass to wash onto

the highway.

The remnants of Hurricane Frances

produced torrential rainfall across

Southeastern New York on September 8th.

Rainfall amounts ranging from an inch

to up to 6 inches were common across

the area. This caused extensive flash

flooding across the region, resulting

in rescues of people from homes and

cars.

Kings County

South Portion Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

on the Belt Parkway near Bensonhurst.

The parkway was closed for a short

period of time.

Nassau County

Valley Stream Flash Flood

Torrential rains flooded the Sunrise

Highway, resulting in closure.

Orange County

Port Jervis Flash Flood

Torrential rains resulted in flash

flooding on nearly all roads in Port

Jervis. A state of Emergency was

declared by the Mayor.

Bronx County

South Portion Flash Flood

Torrential rains resulted in numerous

road closures in and near Rivervale.

Queens County

North Central Portion Flash Flood

Grand Central Parkway flooded. Lane

closures near LaGuardia Airport.

Richmond County

Great Kills Flash Flood

Very heavy rains resulted in signifi-

cant street and highway flooding.

Several road closures occured in

Huguenot and Great Kills.

New York County

Countywide Flash Flood

Torrential rains caused flash flooding

that resulted in flooded subways and

streets in Manhattan.

Suffolk County

Centerport Flash Flood

Numerous streets closed due to flash

flooding.

Suffolk County

Mattituck Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A line of thunderstorms produced high

wind gusts on the North Fork of Long

Island in Mattituck. A few trees and

numerous large branches were downed as

a result. Power was knocked out for

several hours.

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan produced

torrential rains across Southeast New

York. Storm total rainfall reports

added up to over 5 inches in some

areas. This caused extensive flash

flooding of roads and highways across

the region. Thunderstorms intensified

across the North Fork of Long Island,

which produced wind damage in

Mattituck.

Orange County

Monroe Flash Flood

Flash flooding was the cause of several

road closures.

Richmond County

West Portion Flash Flood

All lanes closed on Route 440 due to

flash flooding.

Rockland County

Suffern Flash Flood

Flash flooding resulted in the closure

of several lanes on 1-87.

Westchester County

Tarrytown Flash Flood

Major flash flooding was the cause of

several road closures.

Putnam County

Mahopac Flash Flood

Flash flooding was the cause of

highways and roads being closed.

Suffolk County

Central Portion Flash Flood

Sunrise Highway closed with cars

stranded due to Major flash flooding.

New York County

East Portion Flash Flood

FDR Drive closed due to flash flooding.

Bronx County

Central Portion Flash Flood

Bronx River Parkway closed at Hartsdale

due to flash flooding.

Kings County

South Portion Flash Flood

Belt Parkway closed due to flash

flooding.

Queens County

Woodside Flash Flood

Major highways and roads closed due to

flash flooding.

Rockland County

West Nyack Flash Flood

Numerous roads closed due to flash

flooding.

Bronx County

Central Portion Flash Flood

Sawmill River Parkway closed due to

flash flooding.

Westchester County

White Plains Flash Flood

Bronx River Parkway at White Plains

closed due to flash flooding.

New York County

East Central Portion Flash Flood

FDR drive closed due to flash flooding.

Kings County

South Portion Flash Flood

Numerous roads closed due to flash

flooding. Belt Parkway closed.

Richmond County

West Portion Flash Flood

Route 440 closed due to a foot of water

on the road.

Kings County

South Portion Flash Flood

Significant street flooding in Graves

End.

Queens County

Countywide Flash Flood

Significant street flooding across

Queens. BQE experienced major flash

flooding.

Rockland County

Central Portion Flash Flood

Major roads closed in Clarkstown due to

flash flooding.

Bronx County

North Portion Flash Flood

Roads closed due to flash flooding.

New York County

East Portion Flash Flood

FDR drive closed once again due to

flash flooding.

Westchester County

Mt Vernon Flash Flood

Two lanes closed on I-87 due to flash

flooding.

Orange County

Cornwall Flash Flood

Major flash flooding with several

streets closed.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeane dropped

anywhere between 3 and 6 inches across

Southeastern New York State on

September 28th. This resulted in

numerous occurences of flash flooding

across the area.

NEW YORK, East

Greene County

Windham Flash Flood

Pond overflowed onto Route 296.

Greene County

Leeds Flash Flood

Officials closed a section of County

Route 23B in Leeds, and many other

creekside roads were closed as well. In

addition, scattered power outages were

reported due to the flooding.

Greene County

Kiskatom Flash Flood

Mountain Turnpike Road closed to all

vehicle traffic. Two people trapped in

car in parking lot of Friar Tuck Inn.

Emergency Personnel called to scene.

Ulster County

Phoenicia Flash Flood

Streams in the area flowed over County

Route 40.

Albany County

Coeymans Flash Flood

Trailer park flooded by Hannacrois

Creek.

Albany County

Rennselaerville Flash Flood

Potter Hollow Mountain Road flooded.

Schoharie County

Seward Flash Flood

Lowe Road and Clearview Road flooded.

NYZ047

Flood

The Schoharie Creek exceeded its flood

stage of 1132.0′, cresting at 1133.71′

at 12:00 EST on 9/18/04 at the Gilboa

Dam gage. The Schoharie Creek also

exceeded its flood stage of 11.0%

cresting at 14.02′ at 14:00 EST on

9/18/04 at the Breakabeen gage. In

addition, the Schoharie Creek exceeded

its flood stage of 20.0′, cresting at

22.25′ at 11:15 EST on 9/18/04 at the

Gilboa Bridge gage. The Manor Kill

Creek exceeded its flood stage of 6.0′,

cresting at 6.31′ at 11:00 EST on

9/18/04 at the Manor Kill gage.

NYZ063

Flood

The Esopus Creek exceeded its flood

stage of 7.0′, cresting at 10.91′ at

10:45 EST on 9/18/04 at the Allaben

gage. The Esopus Creek exceeded its

flood stage of 11.0′, cresting at

13.59′ at 11: 15 EST on 9/18/04 at the

Mount Tremper gage. The Esopus Creek

also exceeded its flood stage of of

591.0′, cresting at 591.3′ at 07:52 EST

on 9/19/04 at the Ashokan Reservoir,

West gage. Finally, the Esopus Creek

exceeded its flood stage of 20.0′,

cresting at 21.54′ at 10:45 EST on

9/19/04 at the Mount Marion gage.

NYZ058

Flood

The Batavia Kill exceeded its flood

stage of 5.0′, cresting at 7.47′ at

11:03 EST on 9/18/04 at the Red Falls

gage. The Bear Kill exceeded its flood

stage of 5.0′, cresting at 7.82′ at

11:02 EST on 9/18/04 at the Prattsville

gage. In addition, the Schoharie Creek

exceeded its flood stage of 12.0′,

cresting at 14.11′ at 11:00 EST on

9/18/04 at the Prattsville gage.

Greene County

Lexington Flash Flood

State Route 42 near Spruceton Road

flooded and closed.

Albany County

Coeymans Flash Flood

State Route 143, Wells Flats and State

Route 144 near Ecks Farms and Miller

Road at Route 9W flooded.

Albany County

Ravena Flash Flood

Route 9W flooded. Overflowing storm

drains forced partial evacuation of the

Four Seasons Mobile Home Park. Other

flooding was reported at the Parkside

Manor Trailer Park.

Schoharie County

Gilboa Flash Flood

South Gilboa Road, Bear Ladder Road,

Redling Road, and State Road 30 closed

due to flooding.

Schoharie County

North Blenheim Flash Flood

Darling Hollow Creek, Betty Brook, and

Westkill all flooded. Water from

Schohaire Creek on Route 30 near

Blenheim, closing it between

Middleburgh and Fulton.

Ulster County

Turnwood Flash Flood

*In Hardenbergh* All roads closed due

to flooding. Town supervisor declared a

state of emergency.

Greene County

Coxsackie Flash Flood

Route 9 closed due to flooding.

Greene County

Prattsville Flash Flood

Route 2 closed due to flooding.

Columbia County

Claverack Flash Flood

County Route 29 closed due to flooding.

Greene County

Climax Flash Flood

Route 26 closed due to flooding.

Greene County

Freehold Arpt Flash Flood

Route 67 closed due to flooding.

Greene County

Jewett Flash Flood

Route 77 closed due to flooding.

NYZ040

Flood

The Schoharie Creek exceeded its flood

stage of 6.0′, cresting at 7.71′ at

04:31 EST on 9/19/04 at the Burtons-

ville gage. The Schoharie Creek also

exceeded its flood stage of 6.0′,

cresting at 7.71′ at 23:31 EST on

9/18/04 at the Burtonsville gage. The

Mohawk River exceeded its flood stage

of 281.0′, cresting at 282.30′ at 05:00

EST on 9/19/04 at the Tribes Hill gage.

The Mohawk River also exceeded its

flood stage of 188.0′, cresting at

188.02′ at 04:46 EST on 9/19/04 at the

Crescent Dam gage. In addition,

flooding along the Mohawk River caused

fishing boat to sink near the St.

Johnsville Marina, and heavy rain

flooded the Schoharie Creek, causing

the closure of Island Road.

Rensselaer County

Schodack Center Flash Flood

State Route 150 closed in a number of

locations due to flooding.

Greene County

Catskill Flash Flood

Catskill Creek flooded Cauterskill

Road. Person trapped in car, Fire and

Rescue on scene.

NYZ054

Flood

The Hoosic River exceeded its flood

stage of 11.0′, cresting at 11.43′ at

00:30 EST on 9/19/04 at the Eagle

Bridge gage.

NEW YORK, North

NYZ035

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Frances

resulted in heavy rain across the area.

Generally between 2 and 3 inches of

rainfall 9locally higher in the

mountains) was reported. At 1230 PM EST

(130 PM EDT) the Bouquet River flooded

Route 9 with additional minor flooding

1reported in the town of New Russia.

Later in the afternoon, around 2 PM EST

(3 PM EDT), the Bouquet River resulted

in minor flooding in the Elizabethtown

area and Route 8. By evening the flood

waters receded.

NEW YORK, West

NYZ001>004-

011>012-019>021-021

Flood

Western and central New York were

inundated by drenching rains as the

remnants of hurricane Frances drifted

north across the region on Thursday

September 9th. Areawide rainfall

totaled 3 to 5 inches with the bulk of

it falling in a 6 to 9 hour period from

very late Wednesday to midday Thursday.

Several creeks in the Buffalo and

Rochester areas recorded their greatest

flows and highest gage levels ever in a

non-winter/spring season. Cazenovia

Creek at Ebenezer was above the 10 foot

flood stage from 6AM to 8PM Thursday

the 9th, cresting at 14.85 feet.

Buffalo Creek at Gardenville was above

the 7 foot flood stage from 9AM to 8PM

Thursday the 9th, cresting at 8.71

feet. Cayuga Creek at Lancaster was

above the 8 foot flood stage from 8AM

to 7PM Thursday the 9th, cresting at

9.59 feet. Allegheny River at Salamanca

was above the 12 foot flood stage from

4PM Thursday the 9th to IAM Friday the

10th, cresting at 12.33 feet. Oatka

Creek at Garbutt was above the 6 foot

flood stage from 6PM Thursday the 9th

to 2AM Friday the 10th, cresting at

6.18 feet. Black Creek at Churchville

was above the 6 foot flood stage from

IAM Friday the 10th to 11 PM Saturday

the 11th, cresting at 7.85 feet.

Ellicott Creek at Williamsville was

above the 8 foot flood stage from 5AM

to 11 PM Friday the 10th, cresting at

9.87 feet. Tonawanda Creek at Batavia

was above the 9 foot flood stage from

5AM to 9PM Friday the 10th, cresting at

10.12 feet. The heaviest rain was in a

swath from Chautauqua county northeast

across Eric and Niagara counties to

Monroe and western Wayne counties. This

area had between 3.5 and 4.5 inches

with a few spots near Chautauqua Lake

measuring 5 inches. Amounts tapered off

to the south and cast, but a good 2 to

3 inches still fell over Allegany

county, the Finger Lakes and areas east

of Lake Ontario. In Cowlesville,

Wyoming county, a three-year-old boy

drowned when he was swept away by flood

waters while playing near a stream. His

body was recovered further downstream

along the banks of Cayuga Creek in

Alden. M3IW

NORTH CAROLINA, Central

Anson County

1 NE Morven to Tornado (F1)

3 NE Morven

A tornado touched down just northeast

of Morven along Highway 145. Trees and

power lines were blown down along the

road and two turkey barns were

destroyed, with thousands of turkeys

killed. The damage was generally

contained to an area off Highway 145,

Diggs Road and Old NC 85.

Hoke County

Arabia Tornado (F0)

A tornado briefly touched down near

Arabia.

NCZ088

Strong Wind

A tree fell on a house on Foxfire Road

in Fayetteville. The 100-foot tall tree

broke in half, fell through the roof

and into a bathroom.

NCZ085

Flood

Water over two feet deep surrounded

houses on Saymon Drive just outside of

Laurinburg, with over six inches of

water in many houses. Several people

had to be rescued.

Hoke County

2 N Rockfish Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down on Ray Road just

north of Rockfish. Numerous trees were

blown down, damaging a roof to a house

and destroying one car.

Hoke County

Southeast Portion Flash Flood

Several roads had to be closed due to

high water in southern and southeastern

Hoke County including Highway 401. One

water rescue had to be performed.

Edgecombe County

6 NE Tarboro Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

High winds damaged a mobile home along

US 258 near Acorn Hill Road. A front

window was blown out, and a computer

monitor was blown out of another

window. Two trees were uprooted and

blown into the highway. The back side

of the trailer was partially torn off,

and the trailer was shifted off its

foundation.

Anson County

Countywide Flash Flood

Over 38 roads, mostly secondary and

rural, had to be closed due to high

water across the county. A one-mile

stretch of Meltonville Church Road was

under three to four feet of water. Some

schools, including Wadesboro Elemen-

tary, sustained minor flood damage.

Brown Creek and Lanes Creek both over-

flowed their banks and flooded nearby

roads.

Stanly County

South Portion Flash Flood

A few bridges were under water in

southern Stanly County around Aquadale.

Over 20 roads were closed due to high

water across the county.

Davidson County

Thomasville Flash Flood

Several roads had to be closed in

Thomasville due to high water. Over 100

yards of Randolph Street was under

water. Two men working along Randolph

street became stranded and had to be

rescued. Flooding in Thomasville

extensively damaged 12 cars. Sowers and

Brown Roads near the Yadkin River were

underwater, and parts of Hampton road

near Muddy Creek were under water.

Yadkin College Road also flooded.

Lexington City Schools experienced

minor damage.

Randolph County

Asheboro Flash Flood

Two roads had to be closed due to high

water in Asheboro.

Montgomery County

Troy Flash Flood

Several roads had to be closed due to

high water in Troy, and in the south-

western part of the county around Mount

Gilead.

Guilford County

Greensboro Flash Flood

A vehicle was stuck under water at

Holden Road and High Point Road. The

Ashley Creek apartments had to be

evacuated due to rising water. Two

vehicular water rescues had to be

performed, one on Harvey Road and one

on Stanly Road. Over six inches of

water was flowing across the bridge on

East Woodlyn Way off of Hilltop Road.

Moore County

4 E Vass Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down briefly just

northwest of Woodlake near Line Road.

Lee County

White Hill Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down along South

Plank Road on the Moore/Lee County

Line, damaging the roof on a home.

Orange County

1 N Carrboro Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down briefly just

north of Carrboro.

Harnett County

3 NE Pineview Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down briefly near

Barbecue, removing the tops of a few

trees.

Hoke County

2 W Rockfish Flash Flood

Water in McLaughlin Lake overflowed the

dam and flowed across Rockfish Road,

making the road impassable.

Guilford County

4 S Stokesdale to Tornado (F1)

1 N Stokesdale

A tornado touched down near the inter-

section of Harrell Road and Lee’s Glen

Road. Three garages lost their roofs

and numerous trees were snapped or

uprooted. The tornado then tracked

north across Meadows Drive and Haw

Meadows Drive where falling trees

caused significant damage to at least

three well-built homes, one of which

was a total loss. The tornado continued

north to Prince Edward road where about

about 70 percent of the trees in a

heavily wooded area were snapped or

downed. Along Kelly Court, a garage was

destroyed. At South Point Drive, the

roof was blown off a house resulting in

major structural damage. Other houses

lost shingles, siding and porches. The

tornado then continued across the

county line into Rockingham County. In

Guilford County, three houses suffered

total losses, nine homes sustained

major damage, and 52 sustained minor

damage.

Moore County

3 NW Vass Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down briefly near

Vass, blowing down trees and snapping

power poles.

Chatham County

4 W Pittsboro Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down briefly on the

west side of Pittsboro, blowing down

several trees, which in turn knocked

down several power lines.

Orange County

7 N Hillsborough Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees were blown down north of Hills-

borough on Keiger Road and McDades

Road.

Person County

Roxboro Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees were blown down just west of

Roxboro near Gordonton Road.

Harnett County

Lillington Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Two trees were blown down.

Wake County

Raleigh Durham Arpt Thunderstorm Wind (G69)

Five small planes at the Raleigh-Durham

Airport were damaged, with four of them

sustaining significant damage. The

airport itself sustained structural

damage, with parts of a roof blown off.

Several cars were damaged and several

light poles were blown over. Wind

damage was reported along a line from

Terminal A to Terminal C.

NORTH CAROLINA, Central

Wake County

Raleigh Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees were blown down in downtown

Raleigh.

Granville County

Butner Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees were blown down.

Johnston County

6 W Clayton Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees were blown down along Interstate

40 and Cornwallis Road just west of

Clayton. A carport sustained wind

damage.

Moore County

1 S Southern Pines to Tornado (F1)

4 N Pinehurst

A tornado touched down at the Elks Golf

Club just south of Southern Pines. Over

200 trees were snapped or uprooted at

the golf course, a few large trees were

blown down north of the golf course,

and more were blown down onto homes in

a neighborhood east of Broad Street and

south of Morganton Road. A small

shopping center on Broad Street

sustained roof and wall failure, and

damage was noted at a car dealership

as well. The tornado lifted, and

touched down again at the Memorial

Park Ball Diamonds, where F0 damage was

noted. Partial roof damage occurred to

several homes in a neighborhood along

US Highway 1 and Massachusetts Avenue.

Several large trees were blown onto

houses between Glover and Carlisle

Streets in Pinehurst. The tornado

weakened as it crossed the Plantation

Golf Club, and as it crossed Midland

Road, minor property damage occurred.

The Mid-South Country Club lost about

250 trees, and the Midland Country Club

sustained significant tree damage.

Twelve cars in the Midland parking lot

were destroyed. In all, the tornado

damaged 121 buildings, eight of which

were destroyed.

Moore County

Parkwood Tornado (F0)

A tree was blown down onto a mobile

home.

Wake County

4 SE Apex to Tornado (F0)

1 N Apex

A tornado touched down near the

intersection of Holly Springs Road and

Kildaire Farm Road. Minor property

damage occurred to a few mobile homes,

and a few trees and power lines were

blown down. The tornado lifted briefly,

and then touched down again on the

north side of Apex were several large

trees were blown down, especially near

the intersection of Schiefllin Road and

James road, and along Culvert Street.

Richmond County

2 S Plainview Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down briefly in far

northeast Richmond County, along Jones

Spring Church Road and State Road 1458,

blowing down trees and power lines.

Montgomery County

Star Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down in Star. A tree

was blown down onto a home, and several

outbuildings were destroyed at that

same residence. At another residence,

a large 100-year-old barn was moved

about two feet off its foundation, a

large chicken coop was destroyed.

Siding and structural damage was

sustained to the house, and the

chimney was blown off. Several trees

were snapped or uprooted along the

tornado’s path.

Forsyth County

Winston Salem Flash Flood

Several blocks of downtown Winston-

Salem were flooded. One apartment

complex had to be evacuated.

Guilford County

10 W Greensboro Flash Flood

Flooding occurred on Battleground

Avenue in Greensboro, as well as along

Airport Road and Interstate 40 from the

Piedmont-Triad International Airport

west to the Forsyth County Line.

Davidson County

Countywide Flash Flood

Several roads throughout Thomasville

flooded with one to two feet of water

and had to be closed. In Lexington,

flash flooding was reported on Winston

Road, Highway 29, Highway 70, and South

Main Street, and numerous roads had to

be closed.

Stanly County

Albemarle Flash Flood

Several roads in Albemarle had at least

a foot of water on them and had to be

closed.

Randolph County

Asheboro Flash Flood

Numerous roads were flooded throughout

the county. Waist-deep water was

reported on North and South Church

Streets in Asheboro. One to two feet

of water was reported across East

Central Avenue in Asheboro.

Durham County

Durham Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Straight-line winds near Interstate 85

and Club Boulevard downed trees and

blew over a fence along the back lot

of the Starlight Drive-In. One of the

panels from the fence blew through a

double-pane window at a residence

across the street. Minor roof damage,

mostly missing shingles, occurred a

other residences along the same block.

NORTH CAROLINA, Central Coastal

Carteret County

4 SE Newport Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Large trees blown down.

Martin County

4 NW Oak City to Tornado (F1)

40 NW Oak City

A house was partially destroyed with a

back wall blown out and a porch

removed. Four large storage bins were

completely destroyed with debris strewn

for one quarter mile to the northeast.

NORTH CAROLINA, Extreme Southwest

NCZ061

Tropical Depression

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county.

NCZ060

Tropical Depression

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county.

NORTH CAROLINA, North Coastal

Northampton County

1 NW Jackson Tornado (F0)

F0 tornado had non-continuous path

length of 3 miles and path width of

100 yards. Approximately 3 touchdowns

with some tree damage, roof damage to

one home, and storage trailer picked

up and turned over.

Currituck County

Corolla Rip Current

Drowned after trying to save others

from a rip current near the Whalehead

Beach community.

M351W

Currituck County

Corolla Rip Current

Drowned in a rip current near the Pine

Island community.

M35IW

NORTH CAROLINA, Northwest and North Central

NCZ001>003-005-018

Flood

The remnants of Tropical Depression

Frances brought flooding rains to

portions of Northwest North Carolina

evening on the 7th through the 8th.

Rainfall totals averaged 4 to 6

inches … with amounts higher in

portions of the mountains.

In Watauga County, the Watauga River

flooded, leading to evacuations of

homes in the Foscoe area. The

headwaters of the New River, including

the Middle and East Fork also flooded.

A mud slide destroyed one home in the

Bamboo area.

In Ashe County, small streams and

creeks flooded during the early morning

of the 8th. Subsequently, the rainfall

and runoff lead to the South Fork of

the New River flooding later that

morning. Several roads were flooded in

the Fleetwood and Crumpler areas.

Several homes along the South Fork of

the New River were isolated as roads

were flooded.

In Alleghany County, creeks and streams

overflowed their banks and flooded

1150 acres of farmland resulting in

crop damage. Across Rockingham County,

several creeks flooded their banks.

Numerous roads were flooded and

damaged. Some homes were evacuated.

In Surry County, Floodwaters from

creeks and streams closed 20 roads.

NCZ020

Flood

The remanants of tropical depression

Frances brought a moderate flood along

the Yadkin river. At Elkins, the Yadkin

river rose above the 16.0 flood stage

at 0515 am on the 8th, crested at 19.91

feet during the afternoon and fell

below flood stage at 19:55 pm during

the evening of the 8th.

Rockingham County

10 SW Wentworth Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

A severe thunderstorm with damaging

winds, from the remnants of Tropical

Depression Frances, downed several

trees during the morning of the 8th.

NCZ001>002-018-018

High Wind (G50)

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan brought

high winds to the mountains of

northwest North Carolina during the

morning of the 17th. These high winds

brought trees down across Alleghany,

Ashe, and Watauga counties. Residents

in Ashe and Watauga county sustained

power outages.

Rockingham County

5.5 S Ellisboro to Tornado (F1)

.5 E Madison

A severe thunderstorm produced a weak

tornado during the morning of the 17th.

The Rockingham County tornado

originated in Guilford County (see

Storm Data for North Carolina,

Central), and crossed into Rockingham

County at 1012 EST, just east of

Ellisboro Road. The tornado then

crossed Ellisboro Road and caused

damage to several structures. The

hardest hit of these was a doublewide

trailer home that was completely

destroyed. The tornado zigzagged

several times as it moved north to its

termination point 0.5 miles east of

Madison at 1025 EST. Path width varied

from 25 to 50 yards.

NCZ003

High Wind (G50)

High winds on the backside of the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan brought

down trees and powerlines across Surry

County during the early morning of the

18th.

NCZ001>003-018-018

High Wind (G55)

NCZ018

Flood

NCZ018

Landslide

Damaging gradient winds in the early

morning hours of 18 Nov 2004 behind

the exiting remnants of hurricane Ivan

downed numerous trees and power lines.

2000 people were without power in Ashe

Co. Locally heavy rain around the

Foscoe area of Watauga Co. prompted

flooding of small streams and

mudslides.

Stokes County

Danbury Flash Flood

Surry County

Pilot Mtn Flash Flood

Yadkin County

Yadkinville Flash Flood

Yadkin County

East Bend Flash Flood

Heavy rains from the remnants of

Hurricane Jeanne resulted in flashing

flooding during the morning of the 28th

in Stokes, Surry and Yadkin counties.

Several roads were closed due to high

water in Stokes, Surry and Yadkin. Law

Enforcement reported an elementary

school flooded in Danbury, Stokes

county.

NORTH CAROLINA, South Coastal

New Hanover County

Wilmington Heavy Rain

Heavy rain produced street flooding on

Oleander Drive and Dawson Street.

Flooding was also reported on the 7400

block of Market Street southbound.

New Hanover County

Wilmington Heavy Rain

Water was entering the buildings on

South 2nd Street. Damage, if any, was

unknown.

New Hanover County

Murraysville Heavy Rain

Street flooding was reported on

Murraysville road near the Quail Wood

community. Road was nearly impassable.

Brunswick County

Leland Heavy Rain

Significant street flooding was

reported with two feet of water on

Village Road.

Columbus County

2 ESE Cerro Gordo to Tornado (F1)

Boardman

Tornado touched down near Old Steak Rd

and moved north through Evergreen. The

tornado caused spotty damage as it

continue to Boardman, and then crossed

into Robeson county. Three homes

businesses were destroyed, with four

damaged.

Robeson County

4 SW Orrum to Tornado (F0)

3 E Proctorville

A tornado crossed into Robeson county

from Columbus county with spotty tree

damage, finally dissipating cast of

Proctorville.

Robeson County

Lumberton Tornado (F0)

Law enforcement reported a brief

touchdown. No damage was observed.

Robeson County

2 NW Marietta to Tornado (F1)

6 NW Marietta

Tornado downed many trees and caused

damage to four homes, with one shed

destroyed.

Robeson County

3 ENE Marietta to Tornado (F0)

3 NE Marietta

Tornado snapped trees and destroyed a

shed.

Brunswick County

3 N Southport Tornado (F0)

Deputy sherriff reported two nearly

stationary tornadoes. No damage was

noted.

Brunswick County

3 NE Long Beach Tornado (F0)

Ham radio operator relayed a report of

a tornado just southwest of St James

Plantation. No damage was reported.

New Hanover County

5 E Castle Hayne Heavy Rain

Heavy rain produced low land flooding

with one foot of water in parking lots

and some yards.

New Hanover County

Wilmington Heavy Rain

The Wilmington police department

reported numerous roads flooded and

impassable in the city and surrounding

communities.

Brunswick County

7 S Leland Heavy Rain

A sheriff reported Hwy 133 flooded

near Brunswick Cove nursing home.

New Hanover County

Wilmington Heavy Rain

Off duty NWS employee reported

Masonboro Loop nearly impassable with

a foot of water on the road.

Pender County

Hampstead Heavy Rain

A meteorologist reported two feet of

water in several residents’ yards.

Robeson County

Raemon Funnel Cloud

Spotter reported a funnel cloud.

Robeson County

2 W Pembroke Funnel Cloud

Highway patrol reported a funnel cloud

at the intersection of US 74 and SR

1166

NCZ100

Heavy Surf/High Surf

Heavy surf from the swells of

Hurricane Jeanne cause two men to be

thrown overboard off the coast of Oak

Island. One man was rescued, the other

drowned.

M?IW

NORTH CAROLINA, Southwest

Avery County

Linville Flash Flood

Persistent heavy rainfall along the

eastern slopes of the Blue Ridge

resulted in rapid rises along the

Linville River, which flooded a bridge

in the town of Linville. A large creek

flooded in the Land Harbor area,

forcing some evacuations. Several

small streams and creeks also flooded

in Newland and Crossnore during the

late evening, while some evacuations

became necessary during the early

morning hours as flooding developed in

Altamont.

Mitchell County

10 S Bakersville Flash Flood

Heavy rainfall resulted in rapid rises

and flooding along the North Toe River.

Several roads and bridges were washed

out or covered with water, including

the Carpenter Island Rd bridge.

NCZ050

Flood

Although the heavy rainfall that led

to earlier flash flooding relented,

the North Toe remained above flood

stage through the late morning hours.

NCZ034

Flood

Water from heavy rain that developed

over the higher terrain on the night

of the 1st gradually worked its way

down the Johns River and its

tributaries, resulting in flooding in

the Colletesville area on the morning

of the 2nd. High water covered several

roads.

Mecklenburg County

14 SW Charlotte to Tornado (F2)

13 SW Charlotte

This tornado moved north from South

Carolina, and produced widespread

damage to trees and power lines along

its 2-mile path across the southwest

corner of Mecklenburg County. The roof

of a well-constructed home was blown

off, and several other homes incurred

shingle damage. A sheet of wallboard

was torn off a garage wall and blown

away. There was additional damage to

automobiles and homes due to fallen

trees.

NCZ033>034-059-

063>065

High Wind (C50)

High winds associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Frances produced fairly

widespread damage to trees and power

lines across portions of the North

Carolina mountains, and the higher

elevations of the foothills.

NCZ052-064>065

Flood

NCZ052-064>065

Landslide

The remnants of Hurricane Frances

brought very heavy rainfall to

western North Carolina on the 7th

and 8th, resulting in widespread

severe flooding across the mountains

and foothills. Flooding first

developed in Transylvania County,

as the Little River overflowed its

banks during the afternoon. Shortly

thereafter, flooding developed

along Shaws Creek in Henderson

County, and in the Cruso community

of Haywood County. As moderate to

heavy rainfall continued into the

evening hours, flooding gradually

worsened and expanded across the

area. By the early morning hours of

the 8th, flooding was widespread

and severe across much of the area,

with most creeks and streams in

flood. Major flooding developed

along the French Broad River, which

reached a near-record stage of 25

feet at Blantyre, and 21 feet in

Canton. In Haywood County, flooding

along the Pigeon River was described

as the worst in over 60 years.

Hundreds of homes and businesses

were damaged or destroyed across the

area, necessitating a number of

evacuations and rescues. Clyde and

Canton endured the brunt of this

damage. Numerous roads and bridges

were washed out as well.

NCZ071

Flood

Heavy rainfall associated with the

remnants of Hurricane Frances

caused some flooding of small creeks

in the Charlotte area.

NCZ066>067

Flood

Flooding expanded to the southern

foothills by late afternoon, as

small streams and creeks overflowed

their banks in Polk County, and the

Rocky Broad River exceeded flood

stage in the Lake Lure and Chimney

Rock areas. The situation gradually

worsened and expanded during the

evening and overnight hours, as

flooding developed along the Green

River and Silver Creek, and

evacuations became necessary along

the Rocky Broad. Several public

buildings and private residences

were damaged and at least one home

destroyed by flood water. In

Rutherford County, the Riverwalk

over the Rocky Broad was washed

away for the second time in 8 years.

In addition, numerous roads and

bridges were washed out or covered

with water.

NCZ053

Flood

NCZ053

Landslide

Flooding began during the late

afternoon across the county and

gradually worsened during the

evening and overnight hours, with

near-record flooding observed along

the Swannaoa and French Broad

Rivers. Most valley communities

across the county were affected by

severe flooding along the rivers,

or along smaller streams. Flooding

along the Swannanoa devastated

Asheville’s Biltmore area, as well

as the Black Mountain and Swannanoa

communities. Numerous businesses

and residences were damaged or

destroyed by flood waters.

Widespread damage to roads and

bridges also occurred, either due

to flooding or landslides.

NCZ051-059-062>063

Flood

NCZ059-063

Landslide

Flooding developed in the early

evening in areas near the Blue

Ridge, from Highlands to Cashiers,

then quickly spread to include

locations such as Cullowhee,

Bryson City, and Cherokee. Jackson

and southern Macon counties were

the hardest hit, as numerous creeks

and streams flooded, including the

Little Tennessee River. Several

homes and businesses were damaged

and a few private dams were breached

or damaged in Macon County. Several

sections of highway 281 were washed

out in Jackson County. By early

morning of the 8th, flood gates were

open on all Jackson County dams, and

numerous rescues and evacuations

were underway.

NCZ033>034-

049>050-054>055

Flood

NCZ033>034-049>050

Landslide

Persistent moderate to heavy rain

led to widespread flooding along

numerous creeks and streams across

the northern foothills and northern

mountains during the early evening.

By early morning on the 8th,

flooding was described as some of

the worst in the history of the

area. Numerous homes and businesses

were damaged or destroyed,

particularly in Avery County. One

home in Burke County was swept down

the Little River. Widespread damage

and destruction to roads and bridges

also occurred due to flooding or

landslides, especially in the

southern part of Mitchell County,

which experienced severe flooding

from Crabtree Creek and the Toe

River. Large sections of the Blue

Ridge Parkway were washed out. Total

damage to the parkway was estimated

to be in excess of 10 million dollars

in western North Carolina, with the

vast majority of that damage

occurring between Asheville and

Blowing Rock.

Henderson County

South Portion Flash Flood

Polk County

Countywide Flash Flood

Transylvania County

South Portion Flash Flood

After general flooding developed

during the afternoon, rainfall rates

increased during the late evening,

as showers producing very heavy

rainfall moved continuously over the

Blue Ridge, leading to a period of

rapid rises on streams and creeks

and subsequent flash flooding. In

Polk County, evacuations became

necessary along Lake Adger during

this time.

NCZ070

Flood

An extended period of moderate to

heavy rain associated with the

remnants of Hurricane Frances led to

gradual rises along creeks and

streams, culminating in flooding

across the county by late evening.

In addition to smaller streams, the

South Fork of the Catawba River and

several of its tributaries exceeded

flood stage. Several roads were

flooded, as was a mobile home park

near Kings Mountain. A large sinkhole

in Kings Mountain forced the closure

of another road.

NCZ035

Flood

Flooding began around midnight

across the county, when a number of

roads became covered with water due

to flooding streams. The flooding

gradually worsened, and peaked

during the late morning hours of

the 8th.

NCZ048

Flood

Although rainfall over Madison

County was much less than what

occurred to the east and south,

major flooding developed along

the French Broad River, as runoff

from the extremely heavy rainfall

near the headwaters worked its way

downstream. The river reached its

highest level in over 25 years,

resulting in significant damage to

roads, bridges, and some private

property.

NCZ068

Flood

Flooding first developed during the

early morning hours when the Broad

River and its tributaries overflowed

their banks around Polkville.

Flooding developed downstream to

Boiling Springs where a family was

evacuated. Flooding persisted on

small streams and the Broad River

through much of the day.

Cabarrus County

Harrisburg to Flash Flood

Concord

After an extended period of moderate

to heavy rainfall, a period of

intense rainfall rates led to flash

flooding during the mid-morning. The

Rocky River and several of its

tributaries were the main streams

affected. Some evacuations were

required, and some parks and roads

were closed.

Cabarrus County

5 WNW Midland Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A few trees were blown down.

NCZ056

Flood

After an extended period of moderate

to heavy rainfall, rises along the

Catawba River resulted in

significant road flooding across

the county during mid-morning. Water

releases from upstream dams

contributed to the flooding along the

river. Evacuations became necessary

by late morning. Numerous homes and

a few farm ponds were damaged.

NCZ072

Flood

After earlier flash flooding,

general flooding continued through

the early afternoon. The Rocky

River continued to be the mainstream

affected, but gradual rises

eventually culminated in flooding

along additional streams as well.

NCZ069-071

Flood

Water releases upstream in the

Catawba River basin caused rises on

the river and Lake Norman. A few

homes were flooded and evacuations

were required. Flooding also

occurred along the South Fork

Catawba River as runoff from

upstream rainfall continued to work

downstream.

NCZ037

Flood

As water from the previous day’s

heavy rainfall continued to work

its way through the Yadkin River

system, Hunting Creek flooded near

its junction with the South Yadkin.

A farm was flooded, and a number of

cattle were stranded and lost.

NCZ033-048>053-

058>059-062>065

High Wind (G55)

High winds developed across the

mountains, as the remants of

Hurricane Ivan moved just west of

the area. Locations near the

southern exposure of the Blue Ridge

were the hardest hit, with major

damage occurring in and around

Highlands, Cashiers, Brevard, and

southern Henderson County. Thousands

of trees were blown down, including

90,000 apple trees in Henderson

County. Numerous trees fell on

structures and vehicles. A 55-year-

old man was killed shortly after

midnight near Hendersonville, when a

tree fell through his house.

Hundreds of structures in Henderson

County were damaged by fallen trees

and debris. A woman in Highlands

was injured when a tree limb hit

her in the head. M55PH

NCZ051-058-062

Flood

Macon County

7 SE Franklin Thunderstorm Wind (G65)

A mobile home at the base of

Fishhawk Mountain was destroyed in

the Pecks Creek community. The

home’s resident was injured when

debris from the collapsing home

fell on him. At least one other

home was damaged in the area.

NCZ062

Landslide

A landslide (debris flow) began at

the top of Fishhawk Mountain and

flowed through the Peeks Creek

valley. The slide, consisting of

water, boulders, trees, mud, and

other debris, destroyed or severely

damaged 20 to 30 homes and mobile

homes. Four people and an unborn

child were killed as their homes

were overwhelmed by the debris.

F54PH, M3PH, F49PH, M57PH

In response to persistent moderate

to heavy rainfall associated with

the remnants of Hurricane Ivan,

severe flooding developed across the

mountains for the second time in

9 days. Flooding first developed

across the southwest mountains,

when several small streams and

creeks overflowed their banks,

including Toot Hollow Creek near

Bryson City. Several rescues were

required during the evening in Macon

County, as creeks and streams began

to threaten homes. Overnight,

flooding became more widespread,

with Macon County enduring the

worst of it. The Little Tennessee

River overflowed its banks during

the early morning of the 17th, and

continued to flood through much of

the day. The river flooded an

industrial park in Macon County,

causing extensive damage. In Swain

County, 500,000 gallons of raw

sewage and numerous natural gas

tanks were swept down the river.

Hundreds of structures were damaged

or destroyed, and several private

bridges were swept away. Portions

of highways 105, 64, and 28 were

all closed in Macon County, some due

to major damage that was estimated

to take several months to repair.

In addition, a trout farm lost

60,000 pounds of fish.

NCZ059-063

Flood

NCZ059-063

Landslide

After an extended period of moderate

to heavy rainfall, flooding began in

Jackson County during the late

evening. Cope Creek was the first

stream to flood, and evacuations

became necessary along the creek.

Evacuations also occurred along the

Tuckaseegee River, as flooding

became quite severe overnight,

exceeding the magnitude of the flood

associated with Frances only 9 days

earlier. Severe flooding also

occurred along Scotts Creek, Caney

Fork, and Cullowhee Creek. Scoffs

Creek covered Front Street in

Dillsboro with 3 to 4 feet of

water. Several landslides occurred,

one of which destroyed several

storage units at Lake Glenville.

Large sections of some roads were

washed out by slides or flood water,

including portions of highways 19A,

281, 64, and 107, all of which were

closed for long periods.

NCZ052

Flood

F69VE, F27VE, M4VE

NCZ052

Landslide

After an extended period of moderate

to heavy rainfall, flooding developed

first across the western part of the

county, when several secondary roads

became covered with water. During

the overnight hours, flooding

overspread the county, affecting

most valley communities, which

endured the second devastating

flood event in just 9 days. Severe

flooding developed first along

Allens and Hyatt Creeks, followed

by another round of severe flooding

along the Pigeon River, which

reached a record of 23 feet in

Canton. A 69-year-old woman died

when she attempted to drive her

vehicle through the flooded river

in Canton. A 27-year-old woman and

her 4-year-old son were also killed

during the evening of the 18th, when

the woman attempted to drive her SUV

through the flooded Pigeon River

which was flowing over a Forest

Service road off of 1-40. Numerous

businesses and hundreds of homes were

damaged or destroyed by flood water

or landslides. The river washed out

a large portion of interstate 40

near the Tennessee border. Numerous

other roads and highways were

damaged in places, including

highways 209, 215, 19, and 276.

NCZ053

Flood

NCZ053

Landslide

After many hours of moderate to

heavy rainfall, gradual rises on

creeks and streams resulted in the

second devastating flood across the

county in just 9 days. Flooding

first began around Candler, but

eventually affected every valley

community in the county. Flooding

was actually more widespread than

during the Frances flood, but was

not quite as severe. Virtually

every stream in the county flooded,

including the French Broad River.

Two males, ages 32 and 28, died in

Leicester when they attempted to

cross a flooded area in a pickup

truck. Hundreds of roads were

flooded and the bridge over highway

197 in Barnardsville was washed out.

The French Broad flooded the studios

and other businesses in the River

District in downtown Asheville. At

Enka, a motel was flooded, which

necessitated the rescue of 40

people. Numerous homes were

destroyed or severely damaged by

flood water or landslides.

NCZ048

Flood

After hours of heavy rain, gradual

rises along creeks and streams

culminated in flooding across the

county by midnight. The first streams

to flood were Spring Creek in Hot

Springs and Big Pine Creek west of

Marshall. By sunrise on the 17th,

virtually every stream in the county

had flooded. Flooding was quite

severe, as most stream levels

exceeded those of recent memory.

Southwest of Marshall, 4 feet of

water from Sandymush Creek entered

the basement of a home located 100

feet north and 10 feet above the

upper banks of the creek. Long-time

residents described the flooding as

the worst in at least 25 years.

NCZ064

Flood

Flooding began across the county

around midnight, as Rosman was

evacuated when the French Broad

River began to flood. Overnight,

flooding spread across much of the

remainder of the county, with

evacuations required in the

Duckworth and Pisgah Forest areas.

Numerous roads were closed due to

flood damage, including portions

of highway 276, which were closed

for several days.

NCZ034-054>055-

066>067

High Wind (G50)

The remnants of hurricane Ivan

continued to cause strong enough

winds to down a number of trees and

power lines across the foothills. A

few fell on structures and vehicles,

and there were scattered power

outages. The most concentrated

damage was in the southern

foothills, especially in Saluda in

Polk County.

NCZ049

Flood

After an extended period of moderate

to heavy rainfall, flooding began

shortly after midnight. Almost every

stream in the county reached or

exceeded flood stage. Numerous roads

were closed due to high water, and

a mobile home park was evacuated when

up to 1.5 feet of water entered some

of the trailers.

NCZ067

Flood

Flooding began in the northwest part

of the county shortly after

midnight, when the Rocky Broad River

rose to a higher level than what was

observed during the Frances flood 9

days earlier. However, the river’s

crest was brief. Other smaller

streams flooded throughout the

morning.

NCZ033

Landslide

NCZ033>034-050-

054>055

Flood

Flooding began shortly after

midnight across much of the northern

mountains and northern foothills.

The hardest hit locations were

northern McDowell, Mitchell and

Avery Counties, where flooding was

at least as severe as that which

accompanied Frances. Most of the

streams in Mitchell County flooded.

Property damage due to mudslides

and flooding was extensive in Avery

County, and there were numerous

rescues and evacuations,

particularly around Newland.

Numerous roads were washed out,

covered with water, or covered with

debris from landslides. All roads

into Banner Elk were impassable by

sunrise on the 17th. Other roads

affected included portions of

highways 226, 221, and 19. A bridge

was washed out on highway 194 in

Avery County. Flooding was much less

severe in Burke and Caldwell

Counties, although some evacuations

were required along the John’s River

in Caldwell County, and portions of

highways 181 and 126 were closed

briefly in Burke County.

NCZ065>066

Flood

Flooding began shortly after

midnight across portions of the

southern mountains and foothills.

Henderson County experienced the

most severe flooding, as numerous

homes were damaged by flood waters,

with damaged homes from the

combination of the Ivan and Frances

floods numbering in the hundreds.

Residents described the small

stream flooding experienced in

Henderson County as the worst seen

in many years. Numerous roads were

blocked by high water, including

highways 64, 280, and 25. The

situation was much less serious in

Polk County, although flooding did

develop along the Pacolet River and

several of its tributaries, as well

as some creeks in the Columbus area.

Cleveland County

Waco Tornado (F0)

This brief tomado blew down numerous

trees and power lines along Hatcher

and Costner Roads in the town of

Waco. Some trees fell on vehicles

and homes. Roofs were blown off of a

barn and a chicken house. The metal

roof of a porch was also blown off.

In addition, 2 power poles and a

street light were snapped.

NCZ033>035-

048>055-059-063>067

High Wind (C50)

As the remnants of Ivan retreated

toward the mid-Atlantic region, high

pressure building in behind the

circulation caused a resurgence of

strong winds across the mountains

and foothills. This resulted in

additional tree and power line

damage.

Transylvania County

Brevard Flash Flood

Heavy rain bands associated with

the remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

produced the third flood episode in

three weeks across western North

Carolina. However, flooding was much

less severe and more short-lived

than what was experienced during

Frances and Ivan. In Transylvania

County, several small streams and

creeks rose quickly, covering a

few roads with water.

Cleveland County

Patterson Spgs to Tornado (F1)

2 NNW Patterson

Spgs

This tornado touched down near the

community of Patterson Springs,

blowing down numerous trees and

power lines along its 2-mile track.

Some of the trees fell on homes.

Several outbuildings were also

destroyed.

Mecklenburg County

Charlotte Flash Flood

Union County

Monroe to Flash Flood

Stallings

Moderate to heavy rain fell through

much of the early evening hours, but

flooding developed rapidly around

midnight, as an intense tropical

rain band produced around 2 inches

of rain across the area in a 2-to-3

hour span. Overflowing streams

caused flooding of numerous roads in

areas from Monroe northward to

Charlotte and vicinity.

Henderson County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain associated with the

remnants of Hurricane Jeanne resulted

in the third flood event in three

weeks across the county. However,

this event was minor in comparison

with the previous floods. A couple

of roads were flooded near Etowah and

Fletcher, while the Rocky Broad River

went above flood stage at Bat Cave,

flooding one lane of highway 64/74a.

Rutherford County

Lake Lure Flash Flood

The Rocky Broad River rose rapidly to

flood in the Lake Lure and Chimney

Rock areas, with water encroaching on

highway 64/74a in the Lake Lure

community. Other smaller streams also

flooded around Lake Lure.

Rowan County

Kannapolis to Flash Flood

China Grove

After an evening of moderate to heavy

rainfall, flash flooding developed

quickly as an intense tropical rain

band moved over the county. Several

flooded creeks and small streams

covered roads in the Brookdale

section with several inches of water.

Water also entered a few homes in

this area. At one point, water was

described as “hood deep” at the China

Grove exit on interstate 85.

NCZ049

Flood

Some minor flooding developed along

several streams during the early

morning hours.

Cabarrus County

Countywide Flash Flood

Flash flooding developed across the

county shortly after midnight in

response to an intense tropical rain

band. Roads were damaged and water

entered homes and businesses,

particularly in the Harrisburg area.

Rowan County

Salisbury to Flash Flood

6 N Salisbury

Flash flooding eventually spread to

the northern part of the county,

where several small streams and roads

flooded around Salisbury and points

north. A mud slide blocked a street

in the city.

NCZ036>037

Flood

An extended period of moderate to

heavy rainfall resulted in gradual

rises along creeks and streams, which

culminated in minor flooding of a few

roads and low areas across portions

of the northwest piedmont.

NCZ082

Flood

After earlier flash flooding,

moderating rain rates led to more

gradual rises along creeks and

streams, but general flooding

continued. Numerous small streams and

low-lying areas remained flooded

through late morning.

NCZ057-072

Flood

Although moderating rainfall rates

resulted in more gradual rises along

creeks and streams, flooding expanded

and became widespread later in the

morning. By mid-morning, numerous

roads were closed. A school in

Cabarrus County was evacuated when it

was threatened by rising water. In

Rowan County, several motorists had

to be rescued after driving their

vehicles through flood water.

NORTH DAKOTA, Central and West

Mountrail County

7 N Palermo Hail (1.50)

Ward County

5 N Kenmare Hail (0.75)

Ward County

1 N Kenmare Hail (1.00)

NORTH DAKOTA, East

Cavalier County

5 W Hannah Hail (0.88)

Benson County

5 NE Warwick Hail (0.75)

Ramsey County

2 S Doyon Hail (0.75)

Nelson County

7 WSW Lakota Hail (0.75)

Eddy County

10 S Hamar Hail (0.75)

Nelson County

1 S Tolna Hail (0.88)

Nelson County

3 S Whitman Hail (0.75)

Walsh County

6 W Fordville Hail (0.75)

OHIO, East

OHZ068

Flood

Rain from remnants of Hurricane

Frances began late on the 7th. It

ended the morning of the 9th, but

flooding continued. At 155 PM EDT,

the West Fork of Duck Creek flooded

near Caldwell. Carlisle reported 4

inches of rain. At 415 PM, Mt Ephraim

had 5″ of rain. By 528 PM, houses

were being evacuated in East Union;

all state roads were closed across

county. 200 people were evacuated

in Belle Valley and Caldwell. By 9

AM on 9th, many roads remain closed.

Total rain: Mt Ephraim 6.2 inches;

Hiramsburg 5.8″. (FRANCES)

OHZ058

Flood

Rain from remnants of Hurricane

Frances began late on the 7th. It

ended the morning of the 9th, but

flooding continued for days. By 330

PM EDT, flooding was county-wide. By

615 PM EDT, just south of Cambridge,

I-70 was closed by flooding; so were

routes 265 and 513. Many roads

remained flooded 4 PM on the 10th. By

8 PM EDT on 11th, flooding was

primarily confined to the northern

and central parts of Guernsey County.

Most small stream flooding ended by 2

am EDT on the 12th, but flooding on

Wills Creek in Cambridge continued.

Wills Creek rose to flood stage

(15 ft) at 9 PM EDT on the 8th;

crested 24.9 at 5 AM EDT 10th; and

fell below flood stage 11 PM EDT on

the 14th. The crest fell short of the

record (26.9 ft). Total rain: 6.6″ at

Salt Fork Sewage Plant. (FRANCES)

OHZ059

Flood

At 340 PM EDT on the 8th, Neffs was

flooded by Big McMahon and Little

McMahon Creeks. At 4 PM, flooding

began in Colerain; school busses

stranded. At 445 PM, Pine Creek

flooded Shadyside. 549 PM, Rte 147

flooded at Bailey Mills; Rte 40

flooded Bannock. 6 PM, Lafferty

flooded. 609 PM, Rte 149 flooded

Glencoe. 650 PM, CR 2 flooded

Yorkville. 655 PM, Bethesda flooded.

720 PM, Lansing evacuations. 816 PM,

road washed away in Dilles Bottom.

854 PM, 100 homes flooded in

Wolfhurst. 914 PM, cars and buildings

under water in Maynard. 938 PM, near

Bailey Mills, car drove into flood, 2

occupants rescued. 948 PM, near

Powhatan Point, 2 woman were clinging

to a tree; rescued at 1 AM EDT on 9th.

10 PM EDT 8th, foundation of 1 house

washed away in Glencoe; Deep Run Rd

bridge washed out in Yorkville. 1026

PM, Barton evacuations. 1055 PM,

Neffs evacuations as 25 homes

flooded. 1230 AM on 9th, CR 10

collapsed near Crabapple, after

police car had passed. Countywide,

350 homes evacuated and 14 roads

flooded during the night of the 8th.

Total rain: 5.2″ in Uniontown and

4.7″ St Clairsville. (FRANCES)

OHZ057

Flood

At 4 PM EDT on 8th, roads began to

flood south of Zanesville; and 5

inches of rain fell at

Chandlersville. At 430 PM, Brush

Creek flooded near Duncan Falls. At

630 PM, Roseville was in a state of

emergency after 7 inches of rain. At

7 PM, New Concord reported severe

and widespread flooding after 7.5

inches of rain (in 24 hr).

Chandlersville and Roseville totaled

6″ of rain. (FRANCES)

OHZ039

Flood

By 445 PM EDT on 8th, Horse Shoe Bend

Rd flooded east of Newcomerstown; a

9-year old girl was swept off the

road by flood waters as she walked

home from school. By 5 PM, Blizzard

Rd flooded in Uhrichsville. Before

flooding ended, basements flooded

in Uhrichsville and a few homes were

evacuated in Dennison. Rte 258 closed

by mud slide. 14 structures suffered

major damage; 19 had minor. Other

roads flooded: 10, 43, 151, 331, 800.

Most small stream flooding ended by

12 PM EDT on the 9th, but flooding on

Stillwater Creek at Uhrichsville

continued. Stillwater Creek rose to

flood stage (5 ft) at 4 AM EDT on

9th; crested 10.3 at 7 AM EDT 10th;

and fell below flood stage 7 AM EDT

on the 13th. Total rain: 6.2″ at

Gilmore; 4.8 Newcomerstown. There was

a record flood on Huff Creek at

Mineral City, which crested at 5.82

ft at 530 AM EDT on 9th (previous

record 4.35). (FRANCES) F90U

OHIO, East

OHZ069

Flood

At 6 PM EDT on 8th, Sunfish Creek

flooded houses in Cameron. Many roads

were under water, including those in

Sardis. By 750 PM, SR 78 was closed

by flooding near Lewisville. At 827

PM, SR 26 closed near Graysville, and

Sunfish Creek overflowed in Cameron.

Before it ended, routes 260 and 379

flooded. There were basements

flooded and people evacuated from

homes in Cameron and Clarington.

Total rain: 4.8″ in Antioch. (FRANCES)

OHZ049

Flood

By 615 PM, streams were out of their

banks countywide. Basement of

Hopedale School flooded. Routes 22,

49, 151, 250, 331 closed by flooding

(times unknown). 4 to 6″ of rain by 9

PM on the 8th. By 830 AM EDT on the

9th, Jewett was closed off because

of flooding. Total rain: New Athens

4.9″; Deersville 4.6. (FRANCES)

OHZ050

Flood

By 630 PM EDT on 8th, flooding was

reported countywide. 40 roads were

closed by flooding, including SR 150.

Towns that flooded include: Adena

(evacuations), Connorsville,

Dillonvale (evac), Glen Robbins

(bridge washed out), trondale (evac),

Rayland, Smithfield (power substation

flooded), Toronto (evac), Wolf Run

(woman rescued from flooded car).

Total rain: 3.8″ in Amsterdam and

Hammondsville. There was a record

flood on Yellow Creek at

Hammondsville, which crested at

12.98 ft at 11 AM on 9th (previous

record 12.17). (FRANCES)

OHZ041

Flood

By 615 PM EDT, roads were flooded

countywide. By 730 PM, Mill Creek

began to flood the Lisbon area; and

West Point reported 6″ of rain. By

915 PM on 8th, Rte 30 from Hanoverton

to Kensington was closed by flood;

and SR 154 near Elkton is covered by

3 ft of water. Total rain: West Point

8 inches; Union 4.3; Salem 4.1.

(FRANCES)

OHZ040

Flood

By 615 PM EDT, SR 524 flooded 8 miles

northeast of Carrollton. By 827 PM,

Antigua Rd was flooded about 1 mile

west of Carrollton, at the

intersection of routes 9 and 171

(rescue needed). Several roads

remained closed the morning of the

9th. By 8 AM EDT on 10th, Conotton

Creek near Sherrodsville was still

rising and causing major flooding;

while in the north, Sandy Creek

continued to flood near Minerva. 30

mobile homes were flooded in Malvern

area. In summary, 12 roads were

closed by flooding; some were

damaged. 251 homes damaged or

destroyed. Minerva sewage treatment

plant damaged. Total rain: 3.8″ in

Augusta. (FRANCES)

OHZ048

Flood

By 645 PM EDT on 8th, SR 751 flooded

near Orange; and CR 16 flooded

between Coshocton and Lafayette.

Total rain: 4.1 inches at Wills Creek

Dam. (FRANCES)

OHZ059

Flood

At 11 AM EDT on 17th, CR 4 flooded

near Neffs. By noon, roads were

flooded in Bridgeport and St

Clairsville. As of 9 AM on 18th, a

few roads were still flooded but

water was receding. A total of 521

structures damaged or destroyed.

State Rte 7 was closed by multiple

mud slides. 200 ft of Rte 40 washed

away between Lansing and Brookside;

48-inch water main destroyed under

road; thousands lose water service.

Five businesses had major damage

along Rte 40, including $1 million

damage to Giant Eagle food store.

House destroyed by mud slide on Rte

250. Duffy and Powhatan Point also

flooded. Eight roads damaged by mud

slides and floods. These routes were

closed at one time: 7, 9, 145, 147,

148, 149, 250, 379, 647, 800. One

woman died (age unknown) There was a

record flood on Wheeling Creek at

Blaine, which crested at 9.86 ft

(previous record 8.21) Total rain:

6.1″ in Colerain, 5.7″ Morristown.

(Just across the river, Wheeling

storm total 9.5″) Most small stream

flooded ended by 9 AM EDT on 18th,

but flooding on the Ohio River

continued: Pike Island and Wheeling

were above flood stage from 12 AM on

18th, til 5 AM 20th. Pike Island

(flood stage 37 ft) crested 46.3 at

5 AM 19th. Wheeling (flood stage 36

ft) crested 45.3 at 5 AM 19th.

Moundsville and Powhatan Point,

(both flood stages 37 ft) were above

flood from 1 AM on 18th, til 9 AM

20th. Moundsville crested 47.0 ft at

8 AM 19th; Powhatan Point crested

45.6 at 9 AM on 19th. (All times

here EDT) (IVAN) F35VE

OHZ068

Flood

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Ivan began the night of the 16th and

ended just before midnight on the

17th. At 1114 AM EDT on 17th, road

flooding began in Sarahsville. By

1230 PM, major flooding occurred

from Caldwell northward. By 315 PM,

Rtes 265 and 513 were flooded west of

Batesville after 5 inches of rain. As

of 9 AM on 18th, State Rtes 147, 333,

and 564 were still closed, but water

was receding. 81 structures damaged

or destroyed. Total rain: 6″

Hiramsburg and Sharon. (IVAN)

OHZ058

Flood

By Noon EDT on 17th, many roads were

flooded, especially in southeastern

part of county. By 3 PM, people were

being evacuated because of flooding

in Quaker City. At 9 AM on 18th, 15

to 20 roads remained closed because

of flooding, including Rte 22 near

Winterset. At late as 4 PM on 19th,

Wills Creek, and streams feeding

into it, continued to cause flooding.

30 structures damaged or destroyed.

Wills Creek at Cambridge rose to

flood stage (15 ft) at 2 AM EDT on

18th; crested at 22.9 at 6 AM on

19th; and fell below flood stage 8

AM EDT on 22nd. Total rain: 4″ in

Cambridge; 3.4″ Salt Fork. (IVAN)

OHZ069

Flood

At 1230 PM EDT, many roads flooded

near Woodsfield. As of 3 PM EDT,

numerous streams continued to flood

roads. Clarington also flooded.

State routes 7 and 78 were closed by

multiple mud slides. 17 structures

damaged or destroyed. Most small

stream flooding had ended by early

on the 18th, but flooding on the Ohio

River continued: at Hannibal, the

Ohio River rose above flood stage

(35 ft) at 4 AM EDT on 18th, crested

at 41.1 ft at 9 AM EDT on 19th, and

fell below flood stage at 10 AM EDT

on 20th. Total rain: 6.6 inches at

Woodsfield. (IVAN)

OHZ057

Flood

At 1 PM EDT on 17th, many roads were

flooded near Duncan Falls. 116

structures damaged or destroyed.

Total rain: 6.2″ at Gratiot. (IVAN)

OHZ050

Flood

At 215 PM EDT on 17th, there were

multiple mud slides on Route 7 from

Steubenville to Brilliant from heavy

rain and flooding. By 333 PM, there

was widespread flooding throughout

Jefferson Co. As of 9 AM on 18th,

many roads remained closed by

flooding and mud slides, including

Rtc 7. As of 4 PM on 19th,

Brilliant, Mingo Jet, and other

towns remained flooded. In total,

255 structures were damaged or

destroyed. These roads were closed

by flooding or mud slides at one

time: State Routes 146 through 152;

county roads 1 through 43. There was

flooding in Empire, Stratton, and

Toronto. Sewage treatment plant in

Steubenville has damaged. On the

Ohio River, New Cumberland WV was

above flood stage from 3 AM EDT on

18th, til 8 PM on 19th; it crested at

44.5 ft at 930 PM EDT on 18th (flood

stage 36). Wellsburg WV was above

flood stage from 3 AM on 18th, til 2

AM EDT on 20th; it crested at 45.1 ft

at 445 AM on 19th (flood stage 36).

Total rain: 4.2″ at Bloomingdale.

(IVAN)

OHZ048

Flood

At 325 PM EDT on 17th, State Rte 83

by closed by flooding near Wills

Creek in southeastern Coshocton Co.

Rtes 93 and 541 were also closed.

(IVAN)

OHZ049

Flood

At 345 PM EDT on 17th, Rtes 22 and

250 were closed by flooding near

Cadiz. By 9 AM on 18th, Scio was

still under water. Rte 151 between

Scio and Bowerstown closed by flood.

137 structures damaged or destroyed.

State Routes 519, 646, and 799 also

closed by flood. Total rain: 5.1

inches in New Athens. (IVAN)

OHZ041

Flood

At 4 PM EDT on 17th, mud slides and

floods closed numerous roads near

East Liverpool. 508 PM, Will Creek

flooded Rte 518 near Summitville.

119 structures damaged or destroyed.

Total rain: 7 inches in southeastern

part of county. (IVAN)

OHIO, North

OHZ033

Flood

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused widespread urban and lowland

flooding in Mahoning County. Between

two and three inches of rain fell on

much of the county by late evening.

Dozens of roads in the county had to

be closed because of flooding.

Hundreds of homes in the county

experienced basement or nuisance

flooding. Flood waters in some areas

were reported to be as much as two

feet deep.

Trumbull County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused extensive flooding in Trumbull

County. The worst flooding was

reported in the eastern and central

sections of the of the county where

up to four inches of rainfall had

fallen by late evening on September

8th. The rains continued into the

9th with another two to four inches

reported in some areas before the

rain finally ended around daybreak.

Rainfall totals from the event

included: 3.36 inches at Mosquito

Creek State Park; 3.60 inches at

Newton Falls; 3.85 inches in

Leavittsburg; 4.45 inches at the

Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport

in Vienna Township and 9.40 inches

at Brookfield. The Cortland area was

especially hard hit by flooding.

Between 20 and 30 families had to be

evacuated from their homes around

2:30 a.m. after flood waters from

Walnut Run rose to nearly four feet

in depth in their neighborhood. A

total of 118 homes were damaged by

flooding in Cortland. Several roads

and culverts were also washed out in

the area. Flood waters along

Tournament Trail and Old Oak Drive

exceeded the 100 year flood plain.

Brookfield Township was also hard hit

as several small streams went into

flood washing out a couple roads and

forcing the closure of several more.

To the south, Little Yankee Creek and

Mud Run Creek went into flood in

Hubbard damaging many homes and

businesses along Main Street. Many

other roads were washed out or

damaged elsewhere in the county. A

total of 309 homes were directly

damaged by flash flooding in Trumbull

County. Hundreds of additional homes

and businesses experienced basement

or nuisance flooding.

Stark County

Southeast Portion Flash Flood

For the second time in less than

two weeks, heavy rains caused

significant flooding in the

southeastern corner of Stark County.

Rain associated with the remnants of

Tropical Storm Frances began early

on September 8th and increased in

intensity during the evening hours.

The rain continued into the early

morning hours of the 9th and finally

ended an hour or two before daybreak.

Storm total rainfall amounts

included: 2.08 inches at North

Lawrence, 2.32 inches at Genoa and

3.08 inches at Alliance. Similar to

the August 28th flash flood event,

heavy rains over Columbia County

contributed to the severity of the

flooding. Up to 9 inches of rain was

reported over the headwaters of

Sandy Creek in Columbia County. The

creek rapidly rose during the late

evening hours of the 8th and early

morning of the 9th. Over 60 homes

and business were heavily damaged

in Minerva after the creek left it’s

banks. A couple dozen people had to

be rescued or evacuated from their

homes. The water treatment plant in

Minerva sustained over $100,000 in

damages. Many roads in the southeast

corner of the county were washed out

or had to be closed because of

flooding. Dozens of additional homes

sustained damage from basement or

nuisance flooding.

Mahoning County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused flooding over portions of

Mahoning County. Most of the flooding

occurred in the eastern half of the

county where rainfall totals were the

greatest. The rain began early on the

8th and increased in intensity during

the evening hours. The heavy rain

continued into the 9th and finally

ended just before daybreak. Rainfall

totals from the event included: 3.56

inches at Sebring; 3.88 inches at

Youngstown; 5.5 inches at Poland; 7.0

inches at Canfield and 9.25 inches

near Poland. The Poland area was

especially hard hit by flooding. A

branch of Yellow Creek left it’s

banks and flooded much of the

Cobbler’s Run Subdivision along

Dobbins Road. Several families had to

be evacuated and at least two homes

were destroyed when their basement

walls collapsed. A library in Poland

was also damaged. Extensive street

nuisance flooding was reported in

both Beaver and Springfield

Townships and also in Campbell and

Boardman. Flood waters on some roads

were reported to be as much as three

feet deep. Occupants of three

vehicles had to be rescued from their

stranded cars. Two roads were washed

out in the southeastern corner of the

county. Hundreds of homes in Mahoning

County were damaged, mainly by

basement and nuisance flooding.

Ashtabula County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused flooding over portions of

Ashtabula County. Rain began early

on September 8th and increased in

intensity during the evening hours.

The heavy rain continued into the

9th and finally ended just before

daybreak. Rainfall totals from the

event included: 2.08 inches at

Ashtabula; 2.42 inches at Geneva;

2.88 inches at Jefferson; 3.00 inches

at New Lyme; 3.68 inches at Conneaut

and 4.66 inches at Pierpont.

Significant flooding occurred along

Conneaut Creek in the northeastern

corner of the county. Very heavy

rain fell over the headwaters of the

creek in Pennsylvania and caused a

rapid rise in creek levels beginning

around midnight. By 12:24 a.m., a

campground along Creek Road in

Kingsville Township was under as

much as five feet of water. 17

campers at the campground barely

escaped the rapidly rising waters

and had to be rescued by boat.

Several roads near the creek were

washed out by the floodwaters. Many

other roads, including State Route

7 had to be closed because of

flooding. Over a dozen vehicles were

damaged at an automobile dealership

by flood waters up to four feet deep.

Hundreds of homes and businesses

were damaged by flooding. Several of

these sustained significant damage.

OHZ012>014-

022>023-032>033

Strong Wind

The remnants of Tropical Storm

Frances moved northeast across the

upper Ohio Valley on September 8th.

Gusty northerly winds behind this

storm caused considerable damage in

northeastern Ohio. Hundreds of

trees were downed in Ashtabula,

Trumbull,

Mahoning, Portage, Lake, Geauga and

Stark Counties. Trumbull County was

especially hard hit with at least five

homes damaged in the Cortland area by

fallen trees. Roads were blocked by

trees in both Niles and Liberty

Township. In Stark County, a tree hit a

moving car around 4:30 p.m. The driver

sustained only minor injuries, but the

car was heavily damaged. In Mahoning

County, a fallen tree destroyed a

garage in Milton Township. A pier at an

Eastlake marina (Lake County) was

destroyed by high winds and waves.

0HZ033

Flood

Runoff from heavy rains produced by the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused the Mahoning River to go into

flood. At Youngstown, the river went

above the flood stage of 10 feet during

the late evening hours of September

8th. The river crested at 14.35 feet

during the evening of the 9th and fell

below flood stage during the evening of

the 10th. Extensive flooding occurred

in low areas along the river. Several

roads were damaged in Mill Creek Park.

Buildings along the river in Youngstown

also sustained some damage. Many roads

along the river had to be closed

because of the flooding.

0HZ032

Flood

Heavy rains from the remnants of

Tropical Storm Frances caused

Nimishillen Creek to go into flood

during the early morning hours of

September 9th. The creek at North

Industry crested at 8.98 feet during

the early afternoon hours and fell back

below the flood stage of 8.0 feet by

early evening. Many homes and

businesses along the creek experienced

flooding. Damage to most of these

buildings was minor, but a few did

sustain significant damage. Several

roads along the creek had to be briefly

closed.

0HZ023

Flood

Runoff from rains from the remnants of

Tropical Storm Frances caused

widespread lowland and nuisance

flooding across Trumbull County. The

Mahoning River at Leavittsburg went

above the flood stage of 10 feet during

the afternoon hours of the 9th. The

river crested at 10.91 feet at 11 p.m.

and fell back below flood stage around

9 a.m. on the 10th. Homes along the

river experienced minor flooding

problems. Several roads in the county

remained closed through the 10th.

0HZ023-033

Flood

For the second time in a week,

extensive urban and lowland flooding

was reported across Trumbull and

Mahoning Counties. The remnants of Ivan

moved across the Ohio Valley on

September 17th. A stationary front

extending northeast from the low caused

heavy rains to develop and fall on most

of northeastern Ohio from late on

September 16th through the 17th.

Rainfall totals for the storm in

Trumbull County included: 2.00 inches

at Mespotamia; 2.87 inches at Newton

Falls and 3.64 inches at Brookfield. In

Mahoning County totals included: 2.80

inches at Canfield; 3.66 inches at East

Lewistown and 3.90 inches at Craig

Beach. Runoff from this rain caused

many rivers and streams to leave their

banks flooding many low lying areas.

Several roads had to be closed because

of the flooding. At Youngstown, the

Mahoning River went above the 10 foot

flood stage during the afternoon hours

of the 17th. The river crested at 14.26

feet at 9 p.m. and fell out of flood

late in the morning of September 19th.

At Leavittsburg, the Mahoning River

went above the 10 foot flood stage

during the evening of the 17th and

crested at 11.62 feet just before

daybreak on the 18th. The river went

out of flood early on September 19th.

Hundreds of homes in both Mahoning and

Trumbull Counties sustained damages

from either lowland or basement

flooding.

0HZ011-020>021-

031-038

Flood

The remnants of Ivan moved across the

Ohio Valley on September 17th. A

stationary front extending northeast

from the low caused heavy rains to

develop and fall on most of

northeastern Ohio from late on

September 16th through the 17th.

Rainfall totals for the storm included:

1.76 inches at Millersburg (Holmes

County); 1.84 inches at Wooster (Wayne

County); 2.50 inches at Cuyahoga

Heights (Cuyahoga County); 2.91 inches

at Macedonia (Summit County) and 3.84

inches at Wadsworth (Medina County).

Runoff from this rain caused several

streams and creeks to leave their banks

flooding many low lying areas. A few

roads had to be closed because of

flooding. Hundreds of homes sustained

minor damage from either basement or

lowland flooding.

OHIO, Northwest

Allen County

Spencerville Flash Flood

Several county and state roads reported

closed due to flash flooding. A foot of

water reported flowing over roads.

Van Wert County

Elgin Flash Flood

County and State roads closed due to

flash flooding. At least a foot of

flowing water over roads in southeast

Van Wert county.

OHIO, Southeast

Jackson County

3 W Jackson to Funnel Cloud

6 W Jackson

Slow moving showers produced a rope

like funnel cloud west of the city.

0HZ066>067-

075>076-083>087

Flood

The low pressure remains of Hurricane

Frances caused about a 30 hour rain

event, from the afternoon of the 7th,

into the evening hours of the 8th.

A stalled frontal boundary helped

trigger heavier convection on the

northern, or leading edge, of the rain

shield during the late afternoon and

evening of the 7th. This initial

convection caused the heavier storm

totals to be over Morgan and Perry

Counties, compared to points further

south.

Storm totals of 4 to 7 inches were

common, with isolated amounts both

above and below those totals. Some

specific preliminary totals include New

Lexington with 7.5 inches,

McConnelsville 6.6 inches, McArthur 6.3

inches, Salem Center 5.7 inches, Athens

5.5 inches, Gallipolis 5.1 inches,

Carpenter 5.0 inches, South Point 4.7

inches, Newport and Nelsonville 4.6

inches, and finally Marietta 3.8

inches.

The Scalia Lab on the Ohio University

campus in Athens reported a storm total

of 5.3 inches. Other rain totals from

spotters included 5.9 inches at

Pageville of Meigs County, 5.7 inches

from Darwin of Meigs County and

Guysville of Athens County. Tuppers

Plain of Meigs County measured 5.4

inches. A few automated gauges totaled

5.1 inches at Coolville, 4.9 inches at

Kitts Hill, and 4.8 inches at

Amesville.

Since the ground was dry prior to this

event, most flooding was to roads and

low lying areas. In Athens County,

Sunday Creek surrounded buildings in

Trimble and blocked streets. Some

residents evacuated their homes as a

precaution. Flooding remained minor.

The gauge at Glouster crested at 16.4

feet on the 9th, well below the 19 foot

crest observed back in May, 2004.

However, flooding was more severe in

Perry, Morgan, and Washington Counties,

affecting some homes. In Perry County,

around 50 homes had major damage, with

3 homes destroyed. Duck Creek flooded

in Washington County, including around

Elba and Lower Salem. In Washington

County, one house was destroyed, while

7 homes had major damage. In Morgan

County, 8 homes had major damage.

The Muskingum River crested at 11.7

feet early on the 9th at McConnelsville

in Morgan County. Flood stage is 11

feet. The Shade river near Chester of

Meigs County rose from 4.7 feet around

0500E on the 8th, to 21.5 feet around

1830E on the 9th. Bankfull is around 17

feet.

This event set the stage for a more

widespread flood across southeast Ohio,

to follow later in the month.

0HZ066>067-

075>076-084>087

Flood

Light rain spread north into southeast

Ohio during the afternoon and evening

hours of the 16th. The heavier rain

from the remnants of Hurricane Ivan

developed over Lawrence County before

dawn on Friday the 17th, reaching the

Athens and Marietta vicinity by 0900E

on the 17th. By 1700E the heavy rain

was pulling east and northeast, out of

southeast Ohio. A rain event of 24 to

30 hours dumped 4 to 6.5 inches of

rain. Some specific preliminary totals

included Beverly 6.4 inches, McArthur 6

inches, McConnelsville 5.5 inches,

Athens and Waterloo 5.1 inches,

Marietta and Newport 4.8 inches,

Gallipolis 4.3 inches, and Nelsonville

4 inches. Rains were not as heavy over

central and northern portions of Perry

County. New Lexington measured 2.4

inches. Spotters reported 6.2 inches

from Guysville, 6.1 inches at Toppers

Plains, and 5.5 inches in Pageville.

Since the ground was still recovering

from the effects of Hurricane Frances 8

days earlier, streams crested higher in

many instances. The small stream

flooding developed during the late

morning and early afternoon period of

the 17th. Serious small stream flooding

occurred on such streams as Sunday

Creek, Duck Creek, Racoon Creek, Little

Racoon Creek, and Symmes Creek. On the

2 year old gauge at Bolins Mills on

Racoon Creek, the crest was 17 feet,

its highest. At Millfield on Sunday

Creek, a crest of 24.5 feet established

a new record. However, the upper

reaches of Sunday Creek in Perry and

northern Athens County were higher in

May of 2004, than this event. For

example, the gauge at Glouster crested

at 17.6 feet compared to 19 feet in

May. Symmes Creek near Aid crested at

23.3 feet.

The smaller rivers, such as the Little

Muskingum and Shade, saw serious

flooding. The Little Muskingum River

at Bloomfield crested at 31.1 feet,

surpassing the 30.7 feet crest in 1998.

The Rinard covered bridge, originally

built in 1874, was shoved into the

river. During a restoration project in

the early 1990s, gaps between the

wooden boards were taken out. Local

residents think, without those gaps,

the water pressure was greater,

knocking the bridge off its supports.

In this vicinity, general stores in

Bloomfield and Wingett Run were flooded

with 5 feet of water. The Shade River

crested at 30 feet near Chester. The

1997 crest was at 31.4 feet.

The Hocking River at Athens crested

slightly over its 20 foot flood stage

at 20.8 feet. The crest occurred before

dawn on the 18th at Athens.

The axis of heaviest rain ran up the

main stem of the Ohio River toward

Wheeling and Pittsburgh. Storm totals

of 6 to 8 inches were seen there. This

rain was almost direct local runoff

into the upper Ohio River. As a result,

a strong rise of 1 to 2 feet per hour

was observed on the Ohio River during

the Friday evening, the 17th. For

example, between 1600E and 2100E, the

Ohio River rose 9 feet at Willow Island

Lock and Dam, and around 10 feet on the

Marietta 2SW gauge. The 24 hour rise at

Marietta was 22 feet in 24 hours, the

greatest 24 hour rise there on record.

On the 18th and 19th, as most small

streams were receding, moderate to

major flooding occurred on the Ohio

River from New Matamoras and Willow

Island on down through Marietta,

Belpre, Racine and Pomeroy. It was the

highest stage since March 1964. The

crest then dampened to minor flooding

below the mouth of the Kanawha River.

Some specific crests included Willow

Island 44.8 feet, Marietta 2SW 42.4

feet, Belleville 45.8 feet, Racine 50.2

feet, Pomeroy 51.2 feet, and R C Bryd

Lock and Dam 51 feet. The crest was 2

to 4 feet deep inside hundreds of

Marietta businesses, plus on the order

of 40 businesses in Meigs County

including the town of Pomeroy.

In Washington County, the Red Cross

surveyed 159 homes with major damage,

with 60 homes destroyed. Two trailer

parks were hit hard by flooding around

Marietta. On the order of 400 to 500

businesses in the county were affected.

State damage assessments had 56 homes

with major damage in Athens County. In

Meigs County, 16 homes had major damage

and 1 house was destroyed. In Gallia

County, 6 homes had major damage with

1 home destroyed. In Lawrence County, 8

homes had major damage and 3 were

destroyed. In Vinton County, 5 homes

had major damage and 2 homes were

destroyed.

The FEMA disaster 1556 included this

flood event.

OHIO, Southwest

0HZ065-074

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Frances

brought heavy rains to portions of

central Ohio. Areas southeast of

Columbus received three to four inches

of rain, causing some minor flooding

problems. Numerous roads were flooded

across Fairfield and Hocking counties,

with a few roads closed near Lancaster.

Several creeks rose out of their banks

across Hocking County.

Scioto County

Countywide Flash Flood

Twenty roads were closed due to high

water across the county. Basements were

flooded in several homes, and one

evacuation took place.

0HZ074

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan brought

persistent heavy rains to southern and

central Ohio. Three to five inches of

rain fell across Hocking County,

causing flooding on several roads in

the eastern part of the county. A

number of the roads were closed because

of the flooding.

Pike County

Beaver Flash Flood

Several roads were flooded and closed.

OKLAHOMA, Eastern

NONE REPORTED.

OKLAHOMA, Extreme Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

OKLAHOMA, Panhandle

Cimarron County

3 SSE Boise City Thunderstorm Wind (G70)

A thunderstorm became severe over the

western Oklahoma panhandle during the

evening hours producing a brief high

wind gust at the Boise City Oklahoma

MesoNet. No damage or injuries were

reported.

OKLAHOMA, Western, Central and Southeast

Payne County

2 S Cushing Lightning

Lightning struck a crude oil storage

tank causing a fire. The 80,000 barrel

capacity tank only had 8700 barrels of

crude in the tank at the time.

OREGON, Central and East

Grant County

l N Granite Hail (0.75)

Union County

La Grande Lightning

Lightning from a thunderstorm hit a

home, which tripped circuit breakers,

knocked out some outlets, and left a

burn mark on the house.

Wallowa County

5 S Imnaha Hail (0.75)

Wallowa County

20 ESE Enterprise Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

High winds from a thunderstorm knocked

down large trees near the confluence of

north/south forks of the Imnaha River.

Wallowa County

20 ESE Enterprise Hail (0.75)

ORZ047

High Wind (G52)

A peak wind gust of 60 MPH was measured

at the John Day Airport.

OREGON, Northwest

NONE REPORTED.

OREGON, Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

OREGON, Southwest

ORZ021>022-024-026

Wildfire

See below.

A Red Flag Warning was issued for

Oregon fire weather zones 618/691/620

for expected strong winds and poor

recoveries, effective at the above

listed time interval. The winds did

blow, but recoveries were much better

than expected, so the warning did not

verify.

ORZ029>031

See below.

Frost/Freeze

A Freeze Warning was issued for the

above listed zones, effective at the

above listed times. Reported low

temperatures in the area ranged from 20

to 28 degrees, so the warning verified

well.

PACIFIC

NOT RECEIVED.

PENNSYLVANIA, Central

Fulton County

12.5 W Mc Connellsbur Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees and wires were knocked down by

thunderstorm winds near Crystal Spring.

PAZ004>005-

011>012-017>019-

024>026-034>035-

037-041-045>046

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Frances moved

northeast across central Pennsylvania

from late Thursday afternoon on

September 8th, into the early morning

hours of Friday, September 9th,

producing widespread heavy rainfall,

and subsequent minor to moderate

flooding. Rainfall amounts of 3 to 5

inches within a 12 to 18 hour period

led to numerous road closures and

widespread basement flooding across

central Pennsylvania, particularly in

Blair and Huntingdon Counties. In Blair

County, a railroad bridge in

Hollidaysburg Borough was damaged by

flood waters, while approximately 200

persons were evacuated due to flooded

homes. In Huntingdon County, Juniata

College evacuated 23 persons from a

dormitory due to flooding, while in

Logan Township, 35 calves were swept

away by flood waters from a farm.

Somerset County

Central City Flash Flood

Thunderstorms produced torrential rain

across Somerset County, leading to

Flash Flooding in Central City. US

Route 30 was closed in several places

due to flooding and debris over the

roadway. Several secondary roads were

also closed in the vicinity of Central

City and Meyersdale.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Little Juniata River at Spruce Creek.

The creek rose above flood stage of 8.0

feet at 01:00 EST on the 9th, crested

at 12.94 feet at 5:45 EST on the 9th,

then fell back below flood stage at

14:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ025

Flood

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Frankstown Branch of the Juniata River

at Williamsburg. The river rose above

flood stage of 12.0 feet at 1:00 EST on

the 9th, crested at 16.91 feet at 10:00

EST on the 9th, then fell back below

flood stage at 22:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Juniata River at Huntingdon. The river

rose above flood stage of 12.0 feet at

7:15 EST on the 9th, crested at 13.45

feet at 11:45 EST on the 9th, then fell

back below flood stage at 20:15 EST on

the 9th.

PAZ045

Flood

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Bald Eagle Creek at Beech Creek

Station. The creek rose above flood

stage of 11.0 feet at 09:00 EST on the

9th, crested at 12.68 feet at 14:45 EST

on the 9th, then fell back below flood

stage at 22:30 EST on the 9th.

PAZ034

Flood

Heavy rain caused flooding of Raystown

Branch of the Juniata River at Saxton.

The river rose above flood stage of

17.0 feet at 11:00 EST on the 9th,

crested at 17.15 feet at 12:30 EST on

the 9th, then fell back below flood

stage at 14:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ010

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Clarion River at

Johnsonburg to rise above its flood

stage of 7 feet at 11:00 EST on the

9th, crest at 7.23 feet on the 9th

shortly after 11:00 EST and fell below

flood stage at 14:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused flooding of the

Aughwick Creek at Shirleysburg. The

river rose above flood stage of 10 feet

at 11:30 EST on the 9th, crested at

10.79 feet at 16:45 EST on the 9th and

then fell back below flood stage at

19:45 EST on the 9th.

PAZ046

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Montgomery to

exceed its flood stage of 17 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 08:00

EST on the 10th, crested at 18.6 feet

at 11:00 on the 10th and fell below

flood stage at 00:00 EST on the 11th.

Warren County

Sheffield Flash Flood

Heavy rain caused rapid rises along

Tionesta Creek in southeast Warren

County. Several homes were quickly

surrounded by flood waters during the

mid afternoon hours. The flooding

prevented several school students from

returning home, since their homes were

inaccessible due to flood waters. Flood

waters quickly receded during the early

evening hours.

PAZ004>006-

010>012-017>019-

024>028-033>037-

041>042-045>046-

049>053-056>059-

063>66

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan moved

north along the Appalachians during

Friday, September 17th, and interacted

with an approaching cold front, leading

to a large swath of excessive rainfall

across central Pennsylvania as the

system weakened to a tropical

depression. The rain began during

Friday morning, and then became very

heavy from Friday afternoon into Friday

evening. Rainfall amounts of 3 to 6

inches were common, with some localized

amounts exceeding 8 inches within a 12

hour period. The heavy rainfall finally

tapered off from west to east across

central Pennsylvania late Friday night.

As a result of this excessive rainfall,

and antecedent heavy rainfall from the

remnants of Hurricane Frances one week

earlier, widespread flooding occurred

throughout central Pennsylvania from

Friday evening through early Monday,

September 20th. Many smaller creeks and

streams overflowed their banks by

Friday evening, while many larger

tributaries of the Susquehanna River

experienced moderate to major flooding

from Saturday into Sunday. In fact,

flood levels at many locations reached

into the top 5 of all flood events,

with many river forecast points

cresting above levels reached in the

January 1996 flood. Overall, 32 of 47

river forecast points exceeded flood

stage in central Pennsylvania, with 2

points setting all-time record high

water marks, as Bald Eagle Creek at

Beech Creek Station reached 15.96 feet,

and the Frankstown Branch of the

Juniata River reached 19.46 feet.

The widespread flooding closed hundreds

of roads and bridges across central

Pennsylvania, causing a significant

adverse impact on commerce and

transportation for several days. In

particular, Route 322 through the

“narrows” section of Juniata and

Mifflin Counties was closed, in

addition to numerous smaller roadways.

The high water also caused the

weakening of several flood control

structures in Cambria, Huntingdon, and

Montour Counties, leading to

evacuations. In addition, two deaths

were attributed to the flooding. One

death occurred in Greenfield Township

in Blair County, where a 2.5 year old

boy was swept away from waters of

Popular Run Creek, as the family was

cleaning up storm damage and the child

wandered off to the creek and was swept

away. The death occurred between 12:30

PM and 1:00 PM EST on Saturday

September 18th. The second death

occurred in Mifflin County to a 59 year

old male, who was found within receding

waters. Preliminary monetary estimates

of flood damage from the remnants of

Ivan across the state were over 50

million dollars.

M2IW, M59IW

Fulton County

17 SW Mc Connellsbur Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Fulton

County Pennsylvania from the storms of

September 17 2004. The tornado occurred

3.5 miles east of McKees Gap along

route 731 (McKees Gap Road). Wind

speeds were estimated to be around 75

mph.

The tornado touched about one quarter

mile south of McKees Gap Road downing

several trees, damaging the roof of a

house, damaging part of a barn and

leveling a tractor barn. The tornado

also flattened tall grass and corn. The

tornado traveled toward the

north-northwest for about half a mile.

It toppled and uprooted trees as it

crossed McKees Gap Road before lifting

up. The width of the tornado was about

30 to 40 yards and damage could be

followed for about half a mile.

The tornado touched down at

approximately 530 pm EDT and was on the

ground for about 1 to 2 minutes. The

tornado was a weak F1 tornado on the

Fujita scale. There were no injuries or

deaths.

PAZ037

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Tioga River at

Mansfield to exceed its flood stage of

9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 17:30 EST on the 17th, crested

at 14.21 feet at 04:30 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 12:45 EST

on the 18th.

Franklin County

2 SW Greencastle Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Franklin

County.

The tornado occurred near the town of

Greencastle and was rated an F1 on the

Fujita scale. Wind speeds were

estimated to be near 80 mph. The

tornado first hit the ground about 2

miles to the southwest of Greencastle

and moved to the north-northwest for

about 2 miles. The width of the storm

was approximately 30 yards. The tornado

touched down at approximately 714 pm

EDT and lifted at approximately 718 pm

EDT. The tornado caused many trees to

fall and damaged several structures.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Franklin County

3 SW St Thomas Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Franklin

County.

The tornado occurred near the town of

Saint Thomas and was rated an F1 on the

Fujita scale. Top wind speeds were

estimated at about 85 mph. The path was

2.5 miles long and began 3 miles

south-southwest of Saint Thomas. The

width of this tornado was 30 yards. The

tornado touched down approximately at

728 pm EDT and lifted at 732 pm EDT.

This tornado caused many trees to fall

and damaged several structures.

PAZ018>019-

024>028-033>036

Strong Wind

Strong winds associated with the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan, combined

with excessively wet soil resulted in

the downing of hundreds of trees across

portions of south central Pennsylvania

during Friday evening on September

17th. Although the system weakened to a

tropical depression upon reaching

Pennsylvania, with estimated winds

between 35 and 45 mph, the extremely

wet soil from recent heavy rainfall, in

addition to water-loaded foliage likely

led to this blow-down phenomenon. Areas

that were particularly hit hard

included exposed eastern slopes within

the ridges of central Pennsylvania, and

also in valley locations near the foot

of these ridges. Such areas included

the east facing ridges within Blue Knob

State Park, with an estimated 800 acres

affected, mainly between 1800 and 2000

EST, the eastern slopes within Rothrock

State Forest, and the valley at Tussey

Mountain. Fallen trees resulted in some

structural damage in Huntingdon County

where a camper was destroyed at Camp

Blue Diamond, and a hunting cottage was

damaged about 13 miles south of Camp

Blue Diamond. Most of the trees that

fell were aligned from northeast to

southwest, indicative of the strong

sustained straight line winds that

occurred during this event.

Franklin County

9 E Chambersburg Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed that a tornado

occurred in Caledonia State Park in

easternmost Franklin County

Pennsylvania.

The tornado began less than a mile

south of the park and then moved

northward across Route 30 and through

the park, toppling numerous trees in

its path. The tornado was about one and

one-half miles in length with a width

of 50 to 100 yards and a top wind speed

estimated around 85 mph. The tornado

was rated as an Fl on the Fujita scale.

The tornado touched down about 818 pm

EDT and lasted a couple of minutes.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Bedford County

3 NW Everett Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Bedford

County.

The tornado occurred north of the town

of Everett and was rated an Fl on the

Fujita scale. Wind speeds were

estimated to be around 80 mph. The

tornado first touched down 3 miles

northwest of the town of Everett on

Lower Snake Spring Road. The tornado

traveled north along Snake Spring Road

for three and one half miles before

lifting up. The width of the tornado

was 50 to 100 yards.

The tornado touched down at

approximately 830 pm EDT and lifted at

approximately 835 pm EDT. The tornado

caused many trees to fall, and damaged

one house and several farm buildings.

Extensive damage was done to corn crops

on six different farms.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Bedford County

2.5 NE Bedford Tornado (F1)

A survey of the area near Imlertown and

Yount revealed a tornado struck the

region around 840 pm EDT.

The damage and snapped trees near Yount

suggest a weak F1 tornado on the Fujita

scale. The tornado touched down south

of Yount along Station Road. The

tornado moved northwest causing

sporadic damage along Younts Road and

Briar Valley Road. The main damage was

snapped and uprooted trees suggesting

winds of 70 to 75 mph. On Briars Valley

Road, the tornado lifted off a barn

roof. It also uprooted and snapped

trees as it moved up the hill from the

farm. The tornado had about a two and

one quarter mile long path that was

about 50 yards wide.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Cumberland County

Oakville Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in

Cumberland County.

The tornado occurred near the town of

Oakville and was rated an F1 on the

Fujita scale. Wind speeds were

estimated to be near 90 mph. The

tornado first touched down 1 mile south

of Oakville, and moved north for about

2 miles before lifting up. The width of

the tornado was about 50 yards.

The tornado touched down at

approximately 855 pm EDT and lifted at

approximately 858 pm EDT. The tornado

caused many trees to fall, and damaged

several farm houses and farm buildings.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Juniata County

3 NW Mifflintown Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Juniata

County.

A tornado touched down near the town of

Denholm and was likely influenced by

the steep terrain of the area. The

damage, in the form of downed trees,

could be easily seen from Route 333.

About 100 trees were knocked down with

this tornado. The path was

approximately 1 mile long and about 75

yards wide. The tornado occurred around

905 pm EDT and lifted at 907 pm EDT.

This tornado was rated F1 on the Fujita

scale with winds approaching 85 mph.

There were no known injuries or deaths.

Juniata County

3 N Mifflintown Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Juniata

County.

A tornado touched down near the town of

Arch Rock. It downed trees which were

visible along Township Road 527. The

length of the tornado was approximately

4.5 miles and the width was about 100

yards. In addition to the tornado,

downburst winds were also observed in a

much wider swath. Damage was mainly

confined to trees being knocked down,

however several structures had minor

damage and several corn fields were

flattened. The tornado touched down at

approximately 910 pm EDT and lasted

until approximately 913 pm EDT. The

tornado was rated Fl on the Fujita

scale with winds estimated at 85 mph.

There were no known injuries or deaths.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Little Juniata

River at Spruce Creek to exceed its

flood stage of 8 feet. The river rose

above flood stage at 20:15 EST on the

17th, crested at 15.46 feet at 04:45

EST on the 18th, and fell below flood

stage at 20:45 EST on the 18th.

PAZ037

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Tioga River at

Tioga Junction to exceed its flood

stage of 15 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 20:15 EST on the 17th,

crested at 15.33 at 21:30 EST on the

17th, and fell below flood stage at

22:15 EST on the 17th.

PAZ045

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Bald Eagle Creek

at Beech Creek Station to exceed its

flood stage of 11 feet. The river rose

above flood stage at 20:45 EST on the

17th, crested at 15.96 feet at 11:45

EST on the 18th, and fell below flood

stage at 11:45 EST on the 19th.

PAZ025

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Frankstown Branch

of the Juniata River at Williamsburg to

exceed its flood stage of 12 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 20:45

EST on the 17th, crested at 19.46

(record) at 10:45 EST on the 18th, and

fell below flood stage at 05:15 EST on

the 19th.

Perry County

9.5 SW Newport Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds blew the roof off a

barn on Little Germany Road near Route

274 in Little Germany.

Cambria County

11 E Carrolltown Flash Flood

Heavy rain caused Dysart Sportsmans

Club Dam to overtop during the evening

of September 17. Water overtopped the

breast of the dam by one and one half

feet, causing the evacuation of about

10 residents downstream of the dam. One

home was flooded, along with several

others reporting water in their

basements. Portions of the built-up

embankments of the retaining pond

collapsed into Clearfield Creek. In

addition, Cherry Tree Reservoir was

thought to be in danger of failing, and

evacuations also took place. This

structure did, however, not fail.

Perry County

New Germantown Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

along Bryner Road in the Tuscarora

State Forest near New Germantown and

Route 274.

PAZ010

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Clarion River at

Ridgway to exceed its flood stage of 16

feet. The river exceeded flood stage at

22:00 EST on the 17th, crested at 16.89

feet at 00:00 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 05:00 EST on the

18th.

PAZ050

Flood

Heavy rain caused Penns Creek at Penns

Creek to exceed its flood stage of 8

feet. The river rose above flood stage

at 22:30 EST on the 17th, crested at

12.19 feet at 11:30 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:15 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Aughwick Creek at

Shirleysburg to exceed its flood stage

of 10 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 00:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 18.5 feet at 12:15 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 10:15 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ046

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Loyalsock Creek

at Loyalsockville to exceed its flood

stage of 12 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 00:15 EST on the 18th,

crested at 15.24 feet at 10:30 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

16:00 EST on the 18th.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Huntingdon to exceed its flood stage of

12 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 00:30 EST on the 18th, crested

at 17.78 feet at 10:15 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 05:00 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ011

Flood

Heavy rain caused Sinnemahoning Creek

at Sinnemahoning to exceed its flood

stage of 17 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 00:30 EST on the 18th,

crested at 17.78 feet at 03:00 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

08:30 EST on the 18th.

PAZ034

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Raystown Branch

of the Susquehanna River at Saxton to

exceed its flood stage of 17 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 02:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 20.02 feet

at 11:30 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 20:15 EST on the

18th.

PAZ010

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Clarion River at

Johnsonburg to exceed its flood stage

of 7 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 02:15 EST on the 18th, crested

at 7.43 feet at 03:00 EST on the 18th

and fell below flood stage at 07:00 EST

on the 18th.

PAZ045

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Renovo to

exceed its flood stage of 16 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 02:15

EST on the 18th, crested at 21.14 feet

at 10:16 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 20:30 EST on the

18th.

PAZ056

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Sherman Creek at

Shermans Dale to exceed its flood stage

of 9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 02:45 EST on the 18th, crested

at 16.31 feet at 10:30 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 01:00 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ057

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Hershey to exceed its flood stage of 7

feet. The river rose above flood stage

at 03:00 EST on the 18th, crested at

14.27 feet at 09:30 on the 19th, and

fell below flood stage at 05:00 EST on

the 20th.

Lancaster County

Bainbridge Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and wires in Bainbridge.

PAZ059

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Harper Tavern to exceed its flood stage

of 9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 04:15 EST on the 18th, crested

at 17.35 feet at 01:00 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 19:15 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ063

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Yellow Breeches

Creek at Camp Hill to exceed its flood

stage of 7 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 04:30 EST on the 18th,

crested at 8.67 feet at 16:15 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

15:15 EST on the 19th.

PAZ046

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Montgomery to

exceed its flood stage of 17 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 05:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.8 feet

at 01:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 19:00 EST on the

20th.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Mapleton Depot to exceed its flood

stage of 20 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 06:00 EST on the 18th,

crested at 23.76 feet at 14:15 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

00:45 EST on the 19th.

PAZ045

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Lock Haven to

exceed its flood stage of 21 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 06:15

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.13 feet

at 16:00 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 11:00 EST on the

19th.

PENNSYLVANIA, Central

PAZ046

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Williamsport

to exceed its flood stage of 20 feet.

The river rose above flood stage at

07:15 EST on the 18th, crested at 27.82

feet at 22:45 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 23:30 EST on the

19th.

PAZ033

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Youghiogheny

River at Confluence to exceed its flood

stage of 12 feet. The river rose to

flood stage at 08:00 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 09:00 EST

on the 18th.

PAZ052

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Milton to rise

above its flood stage of 19 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 08:45

EST on the 18th, crested at 27.94 feet

at 06:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 11:30 EST on the

20th.

PAZ046

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Muncy to

exceed its flood stage of 20 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 09:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.8 feet

at 01:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 17:00 EST on the

20th.

PAZ049

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Lewisburg to

exceed its flood stage of 18 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 09:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 26.01 feet

at 09:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 14:16 EST on the

20th.

PAZ057

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Middletown to exceed its flood stage of

11 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 09:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 19.5 feet at 07:00 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 01:00 EST

on the 20th.

PAZ027

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Lewistown to exceed its flood stage of

23 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 09:30 EST on the 18th, crested

at 31.68 feet at 01:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:30 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ052

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Watsontown to

exceed its flood stage of 23 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 11:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.8 feet

at 01:00 on the 19th, and fell below

flood stage at 11:00 EST on the 20th.

PAZ046

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Jersey Shore

to exceed its flood stage of 26 feet.

The river rose above flood stage at

12:00 EST on the 18th, crested at 30.74

feet at 21:00 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 13:00 EST on the

19th.

PAZ063

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Conodoguinet

Creek at Hogestown to exceed its flood

stage of 8 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 14:00 EST on the 18th,

crested at 11.35 feet at 17:45 EST on

the 19th, and fell below flood stage

at 10:30 EST on the 20th.

PAZ053

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Bloomsburg to exceed its flood stage

of 19 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 16:15 EST on the 18th, crested

at 27.12 EST at 09:45 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 18:45 EST

on the 20th.

PAZ052

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Sunbury to exceed its flood stage of

24 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 17:30 EST on the 18th, crested

at 30.44 feet at 13:30 EST on the 19th

and fell below flood stage at 18:30 EST

on the 20th.

PAZ057

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Harrisburg to exceed its flood stage

of 17 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 19:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 24.4 feet at 19:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 03:30 EST

on the 21st.

PAZ051

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Danville to exceed its flood stage

of 20 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 19:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 26.22 feet at 15:30 on the 19th, and

fell below flood stage at 20:30 EST on

the 20th.

PAZ066

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Marietta to exceed its flood stage

of 49 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 20:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 55.67 feet at 16:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 10:30 EST

on the 21st.

PAZ056

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Newport to exceed its flood stage of 22

feet. The river rose above flood stage

at 22:30 EST on the 18th, crested at

23.58 feet at 06:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:00 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ045

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Bald Eagle Creek

at Beech Creek Station to exceed its

flood stage of 11 feet. The creek rose

above flood stage at 02:30 EST on the

28th, crested at 11.6 feet at 07:00 EST

on the 28th and fell back below flood

stage just after 07:00 EST

on the 28th.

PAZ035>036-

056>059-063>066

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne moved

northeast along the east slopes of the

Appalachians during Tuesday, September

28th, eventually moving off the mid

Atlantic Coast by early Tuesday

evening. However, a large plume of

tropical moisture to the northwest of

the system produced widespread heavy

rainfall across south central

Pennsylvania during Tuesday, with

rainfall amounts of 2 to 4 inches. This

rainfall, combined with excessively wet

soil and swollen rivers from the

remnants of 2 antecedent tropical

systems, produced mainly minor flooding

across portions of south central

Pennsylvania, with several road

closures and some basement flooding

report.

PAZ059

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Harper Tavern to exceed its flood stage

of 9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 21:00 EST on the 28th, crested

at 10.09 feet at 05:00 EST on the 29th,

and fell below flood stage at 13:15 EST

on the 29th.

PAZ063

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Yellow Breeches

Creek at Camp Hill to exceed its flood

stage of 7 feet. The creek rose above

flood stage at 21:45 EST on the 28th,

crested at 7.52 feet at 01:15 EST on

the 29th and fell below flood stage at

05:30 EST on the 29th.

PAZ063

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Conodoguinet

Creek at Hogestown to exceed its flood

stage of 8 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 04:30 EST on the 29th,

crested 8.73 feet at 00:00 EST on the

30th and fell below flood stage at

11:30 EST on the 30th.

PAZ057

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Hershey to exceed its flood stage of 7

feet. The creek rose above flood stage

at 10:45 EST on the 29th, crested at

7.01 feet at 11:30 EST on the 29th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:00 EST

on the 29th.

PAZ057

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Middletown to reach flood stage of 11

feet. The creek rose to flood stage at

12:00 EST on the 29th, crested at 11.00

feet at 12:00 EST on the 29th and fell

below flood stage at 13:00 EST on the

29th.

PAZ063

Flood

Heavy rain and local runoff caused the

Yellow Breeches Creek at Camp Hill to

exceed its flood stage of 7 feet again.

The creek rose above flood stage at

16:55 EST on the 29th, crested at 7.56

feet at 22:15 EST on the 29th, and fell

below flood stage at 02:45 on the 30th.

PENNSYLVANIA, East

Northampton County

Central Portion Flash Flood

Heavy rain associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Frances caused poor

drainage flooding and flooding of some

of the streams in Northampton County.

Most of the flooding affected the

central part of the county the most. A

number of stranded vehicles were

reported in Nazareth, Bath and Belfast.

Tatamy Road was closed near the

Nazareth Middle School in Upper

Nazareth Township. Doppler Radar storm

total estimates reached three inches in

the county. Storm totals included 3.37

inches in Forks Township and 1.59

inches at the Lehigh Valley

International Airport.

Berks County

4 W Birdsboro Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A severe thunderstorm knocked down

numerous trees and snapped several

poles in the Green Hills area of

Robeson Township. Sporadic tree wind

damage extended for about one mile.

Monroe County

Countywide Flash Flood

PAZ055

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from the late evening of the

17th through the first half of the day

on the 18th in Monroe County. Doppler

Radar storm total estimates averaged

between 3 and 6 inches throughout the

county. The torrential rain caused

widespread poor drainage, creek and

river flooding. It was the worst

flooding along the Delaware River since

1955. Every stream in the county

flooded. About 160 homes and businesses

were damaged. Extensive damage also

occurred in the Delaware Water Gap

National Recreational Area. President

George W. Bush declared the county a

disaster area. Damage was estimated at

between fifteen and seventeen million

dollars.

The Delaware River at Tocks Island was

above its 21 foot flood stage from 438

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 232 a.m.

EDT on the 20th. It crested at 30.32

feet at 845 a.m. EDT.

The Brodhead Creek at Analomink was

above its 8 foot flood stage from 826

a.m. through Noon EDT on the 18th. It

crested at 8.53 feet at 10 a.m. EDT.

The Pohopoco Creek at Kresgeville was

above its 8.5 foot flood stage from 643

a.m. EDT through 951 p.m. EDT on the

18th. It crested at 8.99 feet at 230

p.m. EDT. The Brodhead Creek at

Minisink Hills was above its 10 foot

flood stage from 927 a.m. EDT on the

18th through 1235 a.m. EDT on the 20th.

It crested at 18.27 feet at 815 a.m.

EDT on the 19th. The Bush Kill Creek at

Shoemakers was above its 6 foot flood

stage from 732 a.m. EDT on the 18th

through 6 a.m. EDT on the 19th. It

crested at 7.27 feet at 230 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. The Lehigh River at

Stoddartsville was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 622 a.m. EDT on the

the 18th through 221 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 11.59 feet at 1215

p.m. EDT on the 18th. The Tobyhanna

Creek at Blakeslee was above its 10

foot flood stage from 348 a.m. EDT on

the 18th through 450 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 12.71 feet at 1245

p.m. EDT on the 18th.

Storm totals included 6.02 inches at

Pocono Summit.

Lehigh County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall during the first half of the

day on the 18th in Lehigh County. Storm

totals average around 5 inches and

caused widespread poor drainage,

creek and river flooding throughout the

county. Hardest hit were the city of

Allentown, Lower Macungie and Macungie

Townships. It was estimated that

85 homes, 31 businesses and five public

buildings and structures were damaged.

The preliminary damage estimate was

five million dollars.

The Lehigh River at Walnutport

(Northampton County) was above its 8

foot flood stage from 904 a.m. EDT on

the 18th through 102 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 12.32 feet at 245

p.m. EDT on the 18th. Farther

downstream the Lehigh River in

Bethlehem was above its 16 foot flood

stage from 212 p.m. EDT through 1156

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

18.79 feet at 700 p.m. EDT. The Little

Lehigh Creek within Little Lehigh Park

was above its 6 foot flood stage from

721 a.m. EDT on the 18th through

Midnight EDT on the 19th. It crested at

10.49 feet at 345 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

Farther downstream, the Little Lehigh

Creek at 10th Street within Allentown

was above its 8 foot flood stage from

1040 a.m. EDT through 951 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. It crested at 10.05 feet at

615 p.m. EDT. The Monocacy Creek at

Bethlehem was above its 4.5 foot flood

stage from 540 a.m. EDT on the 18th

through 752 a.m. EDT on the 19th. It

crested at 9.67 feet at 2 p.m. EDT on

the 18th.

Storm totals included 8.90 inches in

Orefield, 7.25 inches in Bethlehem,

5.32 inches in Coopersburg and 4.82

inches at the Lehigh Valley

International Airport.

Northampton County

Countywide Flash Flood

PAZ062

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall during the first half of the

day on the 18th in Northampton County.

Storm totals average around 5 inches

and caused widespread poor drainage,

creek and river flooding throughout the

county. Runoff from the heavy rain also

caused the worst flooding along the

Delaware River since 1955. Nearly every

township in the county reported flood

damage. President George W. Bush

declared the county a disaster area.

About 865 homes, businesses and

structures were damaged including

several roads and bridges.

The Delaware River washed a home from

Harmony Township (Warren County)

downstream, the home crashed into the

Easton-Phillipsburg free bridge. The

impact sheared the roof from the home

and the remainder floated under the

bridge.

The Lehigh River at Walnutport

(Northampton County) was above its 8

foot flood stage from 904 a.m. EDT on

the 18th through 102 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 12.32 feet at 245

p.m. EDT on the 18th. Farther

downstream the Lehigh River in

Bethlehem was above its 16 foot flood

stage from 212 p.m. EDT through 1156

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

18.79 feet at 700 p.m. EDT. Farther

downstream, the Lehigh River at Glendon

was above its 19 foot flood stage from

1118 a.m. EDT on the 18th through 620

a.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested at

19.82 feet at 415 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

The Monocacy Creek at Bethlehem was

above its 4.5 foot flood stage from

540 a.m. EDT on the 18th through 752

a.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested at

9.67 feet at 2 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

Along the Delaware River at Belvidere,

the river was above its 22 foot flood

stage from 1101 p.m. EDT on the 18th

through 842 p.m. EDT on the 19th. It

crested at 24.83 feet at 915 a.m. EDT

on the 19th. Farther downstream, the

Delaware River at the Easton-

Phillipsburg Bridge was above its 22

foot flood stage from 331 p.m. EDT on

the 18th through 1126 a.m. EDT on the

20th. It crested at 33.45 feet at 8

a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Storm totals included 7.25 inches in

Bethlehem, 6.88 inches in Forks

Township and 4.70 inches in Easton.

Montgomery County

Northwest Portion Flash Flood

PAZ068

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacted with an approaching cold

front and dropped very heavy rain

across Montgomery County, especially

in the northwestern half of the county.

The heaviest rain fell between 3 a.m.

EDT and Noon EDT on the 18th. There was

widespread poor drainage flooding as

well as flooding of many of the streams

in the northwest part of the county.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 1.5 and 5.0 inches.

Runoff from the heavy rain within the

county and also upstream led to

flooding along the Schuylkill River.

The West Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Hillegass was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 1018 a.m. EDT through 231

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

5.76 feet at Noon EDT. The East Branch

of the Perkiomen Creek at Schwenksville

was above its 7 foot flood stage from

657 a.m. EDT through 1017 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. It crested at 10.35 feet at

830 a.m. EDT on the 18th. The main stem

of the Perkiomen Creek at East

Greenville was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 742 a.m. through 529 p.m.

EDT on the 18th. It crested at 7.07

feet at 10 a.m. EDT. Farther

downstream, the Perkiomen Creek at

Graterford was above its 11 foot flood

stage from 942 a.m. EDT through 1043

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

14.8 feet at 330 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

The Manatawny Creek at Pottstown was

above its 6 foot flood stage from 1103

a.m. EDT through 10 p.m. EDT on the

18th. It crested at 7.41 feet at 7 p.m.

EDT. The Schuylkill River at Pottstown

was above its 13 foot flood stage from

714 p.m. EDT on the 18th through 1218

p.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested at

14.59 feet at 530 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Storm totals included 4.50 inches in

Pottstown, 4.00 inches in Hatfield and

Green Lane, 3.78 inches in Palm and

3.12 inches at the Pottstown Airport.

Bucks County

Northwest Portion Flash Flood

PAZ069

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy in

the upper part of Bucks County during

the first half of the day on the 18th.

Very heavy rain also fell in the upper

and middle sections of the Delaware

River Valley. The runoff from both

produced widespread poor drainage and

creek flooding in the upper part of

Bucks County and the worst flooding

along the Delaware River since 1955.

President George W. Bush declared Bucks

County a disaster area. Municipalities

and roadways along the Delaware River

and the Lehigh County were hardest hit

and they included Quakertown,

Springfield, Durham, Nockamixon,

Bridgeton, Tinicum, Solebury, Upper

Makefeld, Yardley and Lower Makefield.

Around 500 homes and 29 businesses were

damaged. Damage was estimated at 25

million dollars.

The Delaware River at Riegelsville was

above its 22 foot flood stage from 522

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 1025 a.m.

EDT on the 20th. It crested at 30.95

feet at 1115 a.m. EDT on the 19th. The

Delaware River at Frenchtown (Hunterdon

County) was above its 16 foot flood

stage from 6 p.m. EDT on the 18th

through 927 a.m. EDT on the 20th. It

crested at 20.7 feet at 1 p.m. EDT on

the 19th. The Delaware River at

Stockton (Hunterdon County) was above

its 18 foot flood stage from Midnight

EDT on the 19th through 836 a.m. EDT on

the 20th. It crested at 22.5 feet at 3

p.m. EDT on the 19th. The Delaware

River at Washington’s Crossing was

above its 20 foot flood stage from 416

p.m. EDT through 828 p.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 20.12 feet at 5

p.m. EDT. The Delaware River at Trenton

(Mercer County) was above its 20 foot

flood stage from 148 a.m. EDT on the

19th through 1245 p.m. EDT on the 20th.

It crested at 23.39 feet at 731 p.m.

EDT on the 19th. Flood stage is also

20 feet.

The East Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Dublin was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 1242 a.m. EDT through 249

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

6.08 feet at 130 p.m. EDT.

Specific storm totals included 5.97

inches in Springtown, 3.70 inches in

Sellersville, 3.27 inches in Perkasie

and 3.06 inches in Fricks.

Delaware County

Countywide Flash Flood

PAZ070

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacted with an approaching cold

front and dropped very heavy rain

across Delaware County in the morning

and into the early afternoon on the

18th. Heavier rain fell upstream in

Chester County and the runoff affected

the Brandywine Creek. Doppler Radar

storm estimates ranged between 1 and 4

inches with the heaviest amounts along

the Chester County border. Chester

Creek at Chester was above its 5 foot

flood stage from 1242 p.m. through 249

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

8.58 feet at 300 p.m. EDT. The Crum

Creek at Newtown Square was above its

6 foot flood stage from 906 a.m.

through 518 p.m. EDT on the 18th. It

crested at 8.38 feet at 215 p.m. EDT.

The Brandywine Creek at Chadds Ford was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 552

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 416 a.m.

EDT on the 19th. It crested at 9.86

feet at 1212 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Berks County

Countywide Flash Flood

PAZ060

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from late in the evening on the

17th until around 10 a.m. EDT on the

18th in Berks County. Doppler Radar

storm total estimates ranged between

2.5 inches and 5 inches across most of

the county. This caused poor drainage

and creek flooding and also Schuylkill

River flooding.

The Schuylkill River at

Berne was above its 12 foot flood stage

from 918 a.m. EDT on the 18th through

1236 a.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested

at 15.05 feet at 345 p.m. EDT on the

18th. Farther downstream, the

Schuylkill River at Reading was above

foot flood stage from 146 p.m. EDT on

the 18th through 528 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 16.13 feet at 11

p.m. EDT on the 18th. The Manatawny

Creek at Spangville was above its 6

foot flood stage from 923 a.m. EDT

through 838 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

It crested at 7.5 feet at 330 p.m. EDT.

Storm totals included 4.18 inches in

Reading and 3.57 inches in Hamburg.

Carbon County

Countywide Flash Flood

PAZ054

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from late in the evening on the

17th until around 10 a.m. EDT on the

18th. Storm totals average around 5

inches and caused poor drainage, creek

and river flooding throughout Carbon

County. Hardest hit were Palmerton

Borough and Penn Forest and Kidder

Townships. President George W. Bush

declared the county a disaster area.

Eighty-nine homes and four businesses

were damaged. Seven public buildings

and structures were damaged including

the Henning Road Bridge over Mud Run

Creek.

In Palmerton Borough, the flooding

Aquashicola Creek flooded ten homes

into their first floor. The Aquashicola

Creek at Palmerton was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 937 a.m. EDT on the

18th through 104 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

It crested at 12.17 feet at 2 p.m. EDT

on the 18th. The Lehigh River at

Lehighton was above its 10 foot flood

stage from 940 a.m. EDT through 522

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

12.04 feet at 100 p.m. EDT. The

Pohopoco Creek at Parryville was above

its 5.5 foot flood stage from 1110 a.m.

EDT on the 19th through 1051 a.m. EDT

on the 21st. It crested at 5.71 feet at

1230 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Storm totals included 6.03 inches at

the Wilkes-Barre Scranton Airport in

Luzerne County and 4.55 inches in

Lehighton.

Chester County

Countywide Flash Flood

PAZ067

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from during the first half of

the day on the 18th. Most storm totals

average between 2.5 and 4.0 inches and

caused widespread poor drainage and

creek flooding throughout Chester

County.

The French Creek at Phoenixville was

above its 8 foot flood stage from 1119

a.m. through 645 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

It crested at 9.51 feet at 230 p.m.

EDT. The Valley Creek at Valley Forge

was above its 7 foot flood stage from

938 a.m. EDT through 509 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. It crested at 8.63 feet at

330 p.m. EDT. The White Clay Creek at

Strickersville was above its 9.5 foot

flood stage from 327 p.m. EDT through

451 p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

9.72 feet at 415 p.m. EDT. The East

Branch of the Brandywine Creek at

Downingtown was above its 7 foot flood

stage from 1137 a.m. EDT through 713

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

10.11 feet at 4 p.m. EDT. Flood stage

is 7 feet. The West Branch of the

Brandywine Creek at Honey Brook was

above its 7 foot flood stage from 1222

p.m. EDT through 538 p.m. EDT on the

18th. It crested at 8.01 feet at 245

p.m. EDT. The main stem of the

Brandywine Creek at Chadds Ford was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 552

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 416 a.m.

EDT on the 19th. It crested at 9.86

feet at 1212 a.m. EDT on the 19th. The

Schuylkill River at Pottstown

(Montgomery County) was above its 13

foot flood stage from 714 p.m. EDT on

the 18th through 1218 p.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 14.59 feet at 530

a.m. EDT.

Storm totals included 3.93 inches in

Exton, 3.40 inches in West Chester,

2.82 inches in Honey Brook and 2.78

inches in East Nantmeal Township.

PAZ071

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

in the upstream areas in the Schuylkill

River Basin. Runoff from the heavy rain

led to flooding along the Schuylkill

River within the city from the evening

of the 18th into the early morning of

the 19th. The Schuylkill River in

Philadelphia was above its 11 foot

flood stage from 736 p.m. EDT on the

18th through 311 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

It crested at 11.33 feet at 1030 p.m.

EDT on the 18th. The heavy runoff along

the Schuylkill river also caused the

Wissahickon Creek at its mouth (where

it merges with the Schuylkill River) to

briefly (5 minutes) rise above its 5

foot flood stage and crested at 5.09

feet at 330 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

PAZ070-070>071-071

Astronomical High Tide

The combination of runoff from the

heavy rain that fell upstream in the

Delaware River and the incoming high

tide produced minor tidal flooding

along the Delaware River and tidal

parts of its tributaries during the

late afternoon high tide on both the

19th and 20th. The highest tides

occurred during the afternoon of the

19th. The Delaware River at Pier 12 in

Philadelphia reached a height of 8.96

feet above mean lower low water at 518

p.m. EDT on the 19th. Minor tidal

flooding begins at 8.2 feet above mean

lower low water.

Chester County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 3 and 8 inches with the

highest amounts toward the Delaware

County border. Widespread poor

drainage, stream and creek flooding

occurred. Many roads were flooded and

closed and numerous water rescues were

performed. Shelters were opened because

of flooding along the East Branch of

the Brandywine Creek in Downingtown.

The East Branch of the Brandywine Creek

at Downingtown was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 636 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 744 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 12.83 feet at 1101 p.m.

EDT on the 28th. The West Branch of the

Brandywine Creek at Honey Brook was

above its 7 foot flood stage from 1211

a.m. EDT through 327 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 7.21 feet at 130

a.m. EDT. The main stem of the

Brandywine Creek at Chadds Ford was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 619

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 535 p.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 13.62

feet at 243 a.m. EDT on the 29th. The

French Creek at Phoenixville was above

its 8 foot flood stage from 815 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 328 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 9.11 feet at

1115 p.m. EDT on the 28th. The Red Clay

Creek at Kenneth Square was above its

7.5 foot flood stage from 608 p.m. EDT

on the 28th through 210 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 9.65 feet at 815

p.m. EDT on the 28th. The White Clay

Creek at Strickersville was above its

9.5 foot flood stage from 552 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 356 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 14.07 feet at

1115 p.m. EDT on the 28th. The Valley

Creek at Valley Forge was above its 7

foot flood stage from 635 p.m. EDT on

the 28th through 504 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 10.91 feet at 10

a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 9.00 inches in

Avondale, 8.97 inches in West Chester,

8.00 inches in Uwchlan Township, 6.63

inches in Strickersville, 6.50 inches

in Downingtown, 5.30 inches in Valley

Forge, 4.57 inches in Modena, 3.76

inches in Glenmoore and 2.47 inches in

Honey Brook.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Delaware County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 3 and 8 inches with the

highest amounts toward the Chester

County border. Widespread poor

drainage, stream and creek flooding

occurred. Many roads were flooded and

closed and numerous water rescues were

performed. Evacuations occurred along

the Darby Creek in Darby Borough,

Marple Township and Upper Darby

Township. Darby Creek flooding also

affected Clifton Heights and

Collingdale. Flooding was also reported

along the Hermesprota Creek in Sharon

Hill.

The Chester Creek at Chester was above

its 8 foot flood stage from 646 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 830 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 16.33 feet at

215 a.m. EDT on the 29th. Crum Creek at

Newtown Square was above its 6 foot

flood stage from 618 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 345 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 11.14 feet at 930 p.m.

EDT on the 28th. The Brandywine Creek

at Chadds Ford was above its 9 foot

flood stage from 619 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 535 p.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 13.62 feet at 243 a.m.

EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 7.84 inches in

Chadds Ford and 5.49 inches in Upper

Providence. A SKYWARN Spotter reported

7 inches of rain in Havertown before

his rain gage overflowed.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Chester County

West Chester Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A series of severe thunderstorms

knocked down several large tree limbs

and wires in the southeastern part of

Chester County.

Montgomery County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 3 and 8 inches with

the highest amounts toward

Philadelphia. Widespread poor drainage

and creek flooding occurred, especially

in the lower part of the county. Many

roads were flooded and closed and

numerous water rescues were performed.

Boats were used to rescue stranded

motorists.

The East Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Schwenksville was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 731 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 759 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Along the main stem of the Perkiomen

Creek, at Graterford, the creek was

above its 11 foot flood stage from 1013

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 738 a.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 12.5

feet at 4 a.m. EDT on the 29th. Gaged

sites of the Pennypack and Wissahickon

Creeks within Philadelphia all flooded.

Storm totals included 8.22 inches in

Blue Bell, 7.90 inches in Ambler, 6.70

inches in Norristown, 6.28 inches in

Wynnewood, 6.15 inches in King of

Prussia, 6.11 inches in Hatboro, 4.75

inches in Pottstown, 4.29 inches in

Eagleville, 4.26 inches in Willow

Grove, 3.26 inches in Green Lane and

3.04 inches in Palm.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Bucks County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 3 and 8 inches with

the highest amounts toward

Philadelphia. Widespread poor drainage

and creek flooding occurred, especially

in the lower part of the county. Many

roads were flooded and closed and

numerous water rescues were performed.

The East Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Dublin was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 729 p.m. EDT through 1105

p.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested at

6.49 feet at 848 p.m. EDT. The Little

Neshaminy Creek at Neshaminy was above

its 8 foot flood stage from 650 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 236 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 9.91 feet at 11

p.m. EDT on the 28th. The main stem of

the Neshaminy Creek at Langhorne was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 829

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 313 p.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 15.21

feet at 630 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 6.50 inches in

Neshaminy Falls, 6.08 inches in

Morrisville, 5.88 inches in Furlong,

5.63 inches in Levittown, 5.06 inches

in Doylestown, 4.38 inches in

Sellersville, 4.22 inches in Fricks and

3.48 inches in Springtown.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Delaware County

Radnor Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A severe thunderstorm pulled down

several trees and wires in Radnor

Township.

Philadelphia County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 4 and 8 inches with

the highest amounts in the northwest

part of Philadelphia. Widespread poor

drainage and creek flooding occurred

throughout the city. All roads near

creeks flooded. Many roads were flooded

and closed and numerous water rescues

were performed. The heaviest rain

coincided with the evening commute

home. A 26-year-old woman drowned when

she was swept off her feet while

waiting to board a SEPTA bus in the

East Falls section of the city. The

flood waters carried her downhill and

she became trapped her under a parked

pickup truck where in spite of the

efforts of six people, she drowned. The

heavy rain also caused several

abandoned buildings to collapse.

The Frankford Creek at Castor Avenue

was above its 7 foot flood stage from

536 p.m. EDT on the 28th through 216

a.m. EDT on the 29th. It crested at

13.91 feet at 730 p.m. EDT on the 28th.

The Wissahickon Creek at its mouth with

the Schuylkill River was above its 5

foot flood stage from 538 p.m. EDT on

the 28th through 1118 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 10.14 feet at 2

a.m. EDT on the 29th. The Pennypack

Creek at the Rhawn Street Bridge was

above its 7 foot flood stage from 624

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 839 a.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 12.63

feet at 3 a.m. EDT on the 29th. The

Schuylkill River at Philadelphia was

above its 11 foot flood stage from 1136

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 1013 a.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 11.86

feet at 4 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 9.12 inches in

Roxborough, 5.98 inches at the Fairmont

Dam, 5.77 inches at the Northeast

Philadelphia Airport and 3.63 inches at

the Philadelphia International Airport.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further. ?260U

Berks County

Leesport to Flash Flood

Birdsboro

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 2 and 5 inches with the

highest amounts toward the Chester

County border. Poor drainage, stream

and creek flooding occurred, mainly in

the southeast quarter of the county.

Many roads were flooded. The Manatawny

Creek at Spangville was briefly above

its 6 foot flood stage from 1235 a.m.

through 235 a.m. EDT on the 29th. It

crested at 6.06 feet at 130 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. Storm totals included 3.44

inches in Hamburg, 2.88 inches in

Bethel, 2.82 inches in Berne, 2.64

inches in Reading.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Lehigh County

Countywide Flash Flood

Northampton County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused bands of heavier

rain to fall across the Lehigh Valley

from the late morning through the

evening of the 28th in the Lehigh

Valley. Doppler Radar storm total

estimates averaged between 2 and 4

inches with the highest amounts toward

the Montgomery and Bucks County

borders. Widespread poor drainage and

scattered stream and creek flooding

occurred. Many roads were flooded and

some were closed. The flooding was not

nearly as severe as it was with the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan. In

Northampton County, roads were closed

in Forks Township, Palmer Township and

Wilson Borough.

Storm totals included 4.40 inches in

Orefield (Lehigh County), 3.90 inches

in Forks Township (Northampton County)

and 2.82 inches at the Lehigh Valley

International Airport.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

PAZ070>071

Astronomical High Tide

The combination of the runoff from the

heavy rain from the remnants of

Hurricane Jeanne and the spring tides

associated with the full moon caused

minor tidal flooding during the high

tide cycles on the Pennsylvania side of

the Delaware River and tidal sections

of its tributaries on the 30th. The

highest tides occurred with the high

tide during the early morning on the

30th. That high tide reached 8.57 feet

above mean lower low water at Pier 12

in Philadelphia. Minor tidal flooding

begins at 8.2 feet above mean lower low

water.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northeast

Bradford County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 3 to 7

inches fell from the 16th to the 18th.

The rain was due to remnants from

hurricane Ivan. All creeks and streams

went out of their banks causing major

problems. Early on the 18th more than

half of the roads in the county were

closed, prompting a state of emergency

to be issued. River flooding also

occurred along the entire length of the

Susquehanna River. 50 homes, 5

businesses, and dozens of roads and

bridges were damaged. At least 20 water

rescues occurred.

Susquehanna County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 4.5 to 7

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Most creeks and streams went out

of their banks. Over 300 homes were

affected by flooding with 132 having

minor damage, 21 having major damage,

and 4 being totally destroyed. 27

businesses were affected with 19 having

minor damage and 8 having major damage.

Dozens of roads and bridges were

damaged. About 750 people had to

evacuate their homes. Their was

flooding where there had never been any

before. One major bridge was destroyed.

Wyoming County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 5 to 7

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. 500 homes and 30 businesses were

damaged. 50 water rescues were

reported. The hardest hit areas were

Tunkhannock, Eaton Township, Nicholson,

Exeter, Meshoppen, and Laceyville. In

Nicholson, the Shadow Brook did major

damage. The county declared a state of

emergency and closed all roads to the

public early Saturday morning. In

addition the Susquehanna River had

major flooding.

PAZ038

Flood

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Waverly, NY and Sayre, PA rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet early

on the 18th, crested at 18.8 feet at

11:30 PM on the 18th, then slowly fell

to be below its flood stage late

morning on the 20th. Rainfall amounts

were 2 to 5 inches which started on the

16th and continued into the 18th. This

rain was from the remnants of hurricane

Ivan.

Luzerne County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 4.0 to 6.5

inches caused major flash flooding.

Almost all of the streams and creeks

came out of their banks. In addition,

the Susquehanna River also caused major

flooding. Solomon’s Creek in Wilkes-

Barre Township was the first to flood.

This creek caused businesses to close

and people to evacuate. 4000 homes and

dozens of businesses were damaged.

Mercy Hospital had damage to its lower

levels. The hardest hit areas were

Shickshinny, Moconqua, Plains, and

Plymouth Township.

Wayne County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 5 to 7

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Most creeks and streams went out

of their banks. In addition, the

Delaware and Lackawaxen Rivers had

major flooding. At least 1000 homes

were damaged, 10 of which were

completely destroyed. The county

Emergency Management Agency had damage

to their office in the basement of the

County Courthouse. Dozens of bridges

were closed with 2 bridges destroyed.

There were at least 50 roads that were

damaged and /or closed due to the

flooding.

Lackawanna County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 4.5 to 7.5

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. All creeks and streams were out

of their banks. In addition, the

Lackawanna River had major flooding.

Almost 1000 homes and over 30

businesses were damaged. A 40 foot deep

sinkhole developed on Pittston Avenue.

PAZ043

Flood

The Tunkhannock Creek at Tunkhannock

rose above its flood stage of 11 feet

early on the 18th, crested at 19.7 feet

at 3:30 PM on the 18th, then fell below

its flood stage around midnight on the

19th. This was the second highest crest

on record. Rainfall amounts were 4 to

7 inches which started on the 16th and

continued into the 18th. This rain was

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PAZ044

Flood

The Lackawanna River at Old Forge rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet early

on the 18th, crested at 16.7 feet at

3:30 PM on the 18th, then fell below

its flood stage in the evening also on

the 18th. This was the third highest

crest on record. Rainfall amounts were

4 to 7 inches which started on the 16th

and continued into the 18th. This rain

was from the remnants of hurricane

Ivan.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northeast

PAZ072

Flood

The Lackawaxen River at Hawley rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet the

morning of the 18th, crested at 14.5

feet at 5:15 PM on the 18th, then fell

below the flood stage early in the

morning on the 19th. Rainfall amounts

were 4 to 7 inches due to the remnants

of hurricane Ivan. The rain fell from

the 16th to the 18th. The crest was the

fifth highest recorded at Hawley.

PAZ048

Flood

The Lackawaxen River at Hawley rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet the

morning of the 18th, crested at 14.5

feet at 5:15 PM on the 18th, then fell

below the flood stage early in the

morning on the 19th. Rainfall amounts

were 4 to 7 inches due to the remnants

of hurricane Ivan. The rain fell from

the 16th to the 18th. The crest was the

fifth highest recorded at Hawley.

PAZ038

Flood

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Towanda rose above its flood

stage of 16 feet early on the 18th,

crested at 22.3 feet at 7:16 PM on the

18th, then slowly fell to be below its

flood stage early evening on the 19th.

Rainfall amounts were 2 to 5 inches

which started on the 16th and continued

into the 18th. This rain was from the

remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PAZ043

Flood

The Susquehanna River at Meshoppen rose

above its flood stage of 27 feet early

on the 18th, crested at 35.3 feet at

6:15 PM on the 18th, then slowly fell

to be below its flood stage early in

the morning of the 20th. This was the

third highest crest on record. Rainfall

amounts were 4 to 7 inches which start-

ed on the 16th and continued into the

18th. This rain was from the remnants

of hurricane Ivan.

Pike County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 3.5 to 6

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Most creeks and streams went out

of their banks. In addition, the Dela-

ware and Lackawaxen Rivers had major

flooding. About a dozen rescues were

performed. Over 100 roads were closed.

The entire borough of Newfoundland in

western Pike County was evacuated. 6

bridges were closed. 2 businesses were

closed.

PAZ040

Flood

The Delaware River at Callicoon, NY

(near Abrahamsville, PA) rose above its

flood stage of 12 feet the morning of

the 18th, crested at 17.3 feet at 4:45

PM on the 18th, then fell below the

flood stage the morning of the 19th.

Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7 inches due

to the remnants of hurricane Ivan. The

rain fell from the 16th to the 18th.

This was the highest crest on record by

about a foot at the river gage at

Callicoon.

PAZ048

Flood

The Delaware River at Barryville, NY

(near Shohola, PA) went above its flood

stage of 17 feet the morning of the

18th, crested at 24.1 feet at 3:15 PM

EST on the 18th, then fell back below

the flood stage late morning on the

19th. Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7

inches due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. The rain fell from the 16th to

the 18th. This was the second highest

crest on record at Barryville. The

highest crest was in 1955.

PAZ047

Flood

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Wilkes-Barre rose above its

flood stage of 22 feet midday on the

18th, crested at 35.0 feet at 1:00 AM

on the 19th, then slowly fell to be

below its flood stage midday on the

20th. This was the third highest crest

on record. Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7

inches which started on the 16th and

continued into the 18th. This rain was

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PAZ048

Flood

The Delaware River at Port Jervis, NY

(near Matamoras, PA) rose above its

flood stage of 18 feet during the

afternoon on the 18th, crested at 19.5

feet at 4:45 PM on the 18th, then fell

below its flood stage early in the

morning of the 19th. This was the fifth

highest crest on record. Rainfall

amounts were 4 to 7 inches which start-

ed on the 16th and continued into the

18th. This rain was from the remnants

of hurricane Ivan.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northeast

PAZ048

Flood

The Delaware River at Montague, NJ

(near Milford, PA) rose above its flood

stage of 25 feet during the afternoon

on the 18th, crested at 28.4 feet at

10:15 PM on the 18th, then fell below

its flood stage the morning of the

19th. Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7

inches which started on the 16th and

continued into the 18th. This rain was

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northwest

PAZ003

Flood

One to three inches of rain fell on

Crawford County during the afternoon

and evening hours. This rain was

associated with the remnants of Tropi-

cal Storm Frances. Runoff from the rain

caused lowland flooding to begin just

after sunset. This flooding gradually

worsened as the evening progressed. Re-

ports of street and basement flooding

were common.

Crawford County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rains associated with the rem-

nants of Tropical Storm Frances caused

extensive flooding in Crawford County.

Light rain associated with this storm

began falling early on September 8th.

Rainfall rates increased during the

evening hours as the low approached

Northwest Pennsylvania. Rainfall totals

through midnight on the 9th were as

high as 4 to 5 inches, especially in

southern Crawford County. The heavy

rain continued through early morning

hours and finally ended around daybreak

after another two to four inches of

rain had fallen. Storm total rainfall

amounts included: around 4.0 inches at

Conneaut Lake; 4.20 inches at Titus-

ville; 5.07 inches at the Meadville

Airport; 5.57 inches at Saegertown, 6.0

inches at Meadville; 7.8 inches at

Springboro and 10.0 inches at Cambridge

Springs. This rain caused rapid rises

in area streams and creeks. Evacuations

in the county began just after 11 p.m.

after Crooked Creek left it’s banks

near Adamsville and Hartstown. The

flooding worsened during the early

morning hours with many road washouts

and evacuations reported. Around 3

a.m., two dozen residents were evacua-

ted from homes along Conneaut Creek in

Conneautville with some of the people

rescued from second floor windows.

Around 30 homes (most along West Street

in this area were heavily damaged by

the flooding. Nearby, seven people had

to be rescued from their vehicle after

flood waters washed if off the road.

Church Run, Sugar Creek and Oil Creek

left their banks in the southeast

corner of the county damaging many

homes and washing out several roads.

Several people had to be rescued from

homes along Shenango Creek in South

Shenango Township around 4 a.m. In

Meadville, French Creek rapidly rose

during the early morning hours. Many

people had to be evacuated from homes

in the city’s Fifth Ward. North of

Meadville, flooding along Cussewago

Creek washed out a road causing a car

to leave the road. The driver was later

rescued. Evacuations and extensive

flood damage were also reported in the

Cambridge Springs, Linesville and

Springboro areas. Over 1,200 homes in

Crawford County were damaged by flood-

ing caused by Frances. At least several

dozen of these were either destroyed or

heavily damaged. Damage to roads in the

county topped $2 million. See the flood

description for September 9th through

the 11th for information on the subse-

quent flooding along French Creek in

Meadville.

PAZ001>002

Flood

Two to four inches of rain fell on Erie

County on September 8th through the

early morning hours of the 9th. This

rain was associated with the remnants

of Tropical Storm Frances. Runoff from

the rain caused lowland flooding to

begin during the evening hours. This

flooding gradually worsened as the eve-

ning progressed. Reports of street and

basement flooding were common,

especially in the southern portion of

the county.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northwest

Erie County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rains associated with the rem-

nants of Tropical Storm Frances persis-

ted during the early morning hours of

September 9th. The rain eventually

ended around daybreak. Storm total

rainfall amounts from early on the 8th

through the 9th generally ranged from

3 to 6 inches in Erie County. Some

totals included: 3.5 inches at North

East; 3.59 inches at Erie International

Airport; 4.32 inches at Union City;

4.75 inches at Corry; 5.0 inches on the

east side of Eric; 5.4 inches at

Cranesville; 6.5 inches at Edinboro and

7.44 inches at Franklin Center. Runoff

from this rain caused extensive flash

flooding in Erie County during the

morning hours of the 9th. Evacuations

began in the Edinboro and McKean areas

around 2:30 a.m. The flooding in Edin-

boro was particularly severe. Water

overflowed a dam on Edinboro Lake in

the city. Hundreds of residents down-

stream of the dam, including students

at Edinboro University, were evacuated

because of the possibility of a dam

failure. Cottages just south of the dam

were reported to be completely sub-

merged. A bridge just south of the city

on State Route 99 was washed out. A

second bridge was destroyed north of

Edinboro in Washington Township. A

landslide wiped out around 500 feet of

State Route 5 in Fairview Township

between 3 and 4 a.m. Cars and buildings

along State Route 5 were damaged by the

debris. Elk Creek went into flood

around the same time in Fairview for-

cing several dozen people to be evacua-

ted along State Route 98. In Mill Creek

Township, residents were evacuated from

two mobile home parks that had flood

waters up to three feet deep. Signifi-

cant flooding was also reported in the

Albion and Corry areas. Four vehicles

were stranded in flood waters up to

four feet deep east of Erie along In-

terstate 90. A total of 20 roads were

either washed out or damaged in the

county. Hundreds of homes in the county

were damaged by the flooding. Several

of these were damaged enough to be

declared destroyed.

PAZ001>003

Strong Wind

The remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

moved northeast across the Upper Ohio

Valley on September 8th. Gusty norther-

ly winds behind this storm caused

damage in extreme northwestern

Pennsylvania. A peak gust of 47 mph was

measured at Eric International Airport.

Many trees were downed in both Erie and

Crawford Counties. A couple homes in

Erie County sustained minor wind

damage.

PAZ003

Flood

Runoff from heavy rains associated with

the remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused French Creek in Meadville to

rise to it’s highest level in 45 years.

The creek climbed above the flood stage

of 14 feet around daybreak on September

9th. The river crested at 16.36 feet

around 10 a.m on the 10th. This level

was the highest non-ice affected crest

on record. The river finally went below

flood stage at midday on the 11th.

Damage along the creek was extensive.

Meadville’s Fifth Ward was especially

hard hit with hundreds of homes and

businesses damaged. The flooding was

particularly bad along Spring Street,

Lincoln Avenue and Columbia Street. All

but one road leading into Meadville had

to be closed because of the flooding.

Flood waters in some neighborhoods were

as much as 4 to 5 feet deep. Over 1,200

homes were damaged in Crawford County

from the flash flooding on 9th and the

flooding along French Creek the succes-

sive days. In Meadville alone, nine

mobile homes were destroyed with 34

houses and five businesses sustaining

major damage. See the Flash Flood event

description of September 9th for more

damage estimates.

PAZ001>003

Flood

For the second time in a week, exten-

sive urban and lowland flooding was

reported across Erie and Crawford

Counties. The remnants of Ivan moved

across the Ohio Valley on September

17th. A stationary front extending

northeast from the low caused heavy

rains to develop and fall on most of

northwestern Pennsylvania from late on

September 16th through the daylight

hours of the 17th. Rainfall totals for

the storm in Crawford County included:

1.36 inches at Cambridge Springs; 1.77

inches at the Meadville Airport and

2.00 inches at Union City. In Erie

County rain totals were: 1.30 inches at

Edinboro; 1.44 inches at Erie Interna-

tional Airport and 2.1 inches at

Cranesville. Runoff from this rain

caused many streams and creeks to leave

their banks flooding many low lying

areas. Many roads had to be closed be-

cause of the flooding. At Meadville,

French Creek rose rapidly but crested

below the flood stage of 14 feet.

Hundreds of homes in both Erie and

Crawford Counties sustained damage from

lowland or basement flooding.

PENNSYLVANIA, West

PAZ020

Flood

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Frances began early on the 8th and end-

ed by dawn on the 9th. By 540 PM EDT on

8th, many roads were closed by flooding

countywide, including Center and Chip-

pewa Townships. By 1030 PM on 8th, many

roads flooded, especially in Darlington

and Hopewell from Connoquenessing

Creek. At this time, the Hopewell shop-

ping plaza began to flood. By 9 AM EDT

on 9th, in Bridgewater, 80 boats broke

lose from their dock. Later, nearly 250

boats were seen piled up against a

bridge. At time unknown, there were mud

slides on Rte 18 in Potter Twp, and Rte

68 near Shippingport. By the end of the

storm, 300 homes were damaged across

the county; 35 roads were flooded, and

39 towns were flooded. Total rain: 4″

in Beaver. (FRANCES)

PENNSYLVANIA, West

PAZ029

Flood

By 750 PM EDT, 30 basements were flood-

ed countywide, some to a depth of 2

feet. In Hanover Twp, North Kings Creek

Rd was washed out in part (time

unknown). Both Hickory and Eight-four

reported 2.6 inches of rain. (FRANCES)

PAZ021

Flood

By 7 PM EDT on 8th, Wexford Run flooded

in Ross Twp; Babcock Blvd flooded in

McCandless Twp; creeks were flooding

Shaler Twp; Streets Run Rd was flooded

in Baldwin. By 948 PM, people were

being evacuated in Bell Acres because

of flooding after 6 inches of rain. By

1146 PM EDT on 8th, parts of Sewickley

were being evacuated. About 1 AM EDT on

9th, in Etna, Pine Creek began to flood

and 50 people were evacuated. Many

basements flooded. Other 24-hr rain-

falls: 4.5″ Westview; 4.2″ Moon Twp;

3.6″ Pittsburgh Airport (record 1 day

rainfall). Most small stream flooding

ended by 8 AM EDT on the 9th, but the

Allegheny River at Acmetonia (C W Bill

Young Dam) rose to the flood stage of

17 ft for a few minutes around 6 AM EDT

on the 10th. The remnants of Frances

passed over the Pittsburgh airport at

230 AM EDT on the 9th. (FRANCES)

PAZ014

Flood

Basement flooding began at 718 PM EDT

on 8th. At 827 PM, Dinnerbell Rd flood-

ed in Saxonburg. By 10 PM, evacuations

began west of Butler. By 8 AM on 9th,

roads were still closed near Butler;

and people were evacuated in Evans City

and Harmony. There was flooding in

Jackson Twp and 3 other townships. Con-

noquenessing Creek flooded Zelienople

(time unknown). In total, 30 roads were

closed by flood. Total rain: 3.2″ in

Sarver. (FRANCES)

PAZ032

Flood

Basements flooded in Redstone and

Uniontown. Chalkhill reported 2.4

inches of rain. (FRANCES)

PAZ008

Flood

By 718 PM EDT on 8th, basements were

flooded in Cranberry. By 922 PM, Mercer

and Addams Roads flooded in Polk;

Cherry Tree Rd and Rte 417 flooded near

Franklin; and Rte 8 north of Oil City

was flooded. By 8 AM on the 9th, French

Creek and Sugar Creek were still out of

their banks northwest of Franklin; and

50 basements had been flooded through-

out the county. Total rain: 3.2″ in

Polk. (FRANCES)

PAZ007

Flood

At 730 PM EDT on 8th, State Rte 258 was

closed by flood near Mercer. As of 9 AM

on 9th, widespread flooding continued.

At Jamestown, 12 families were evacuat-

ed as a precaution because of a dam

(time unknown); the dam did not fail.

Total rain: 4 inches in Mercer. There

was a record flood on the Shenango

River at Transfer, which crested at

10.65 ft at 11 AM EDT on 9th (previous

record 10.47). (FRANCES)

PAZ013

Flood

By 859 PM EDT on 8th, several roads

were closed by flood near New Castle,

including Rtes 18 and 108. By 1145 PM,

numerous roads were flooded countywide;

and 30 people evacuated in North Beaver

Twp. By 9 AM EDT on 9th, flooding was

still widespread. In all, basements

flooded, 30 roads were flooded; 100

people evacuated, including 3 trailer

parks; one road washed away. There was

a record flood on Slippery Rock Creek

at Wurtemburg, which crested at 9.48 ft

at 11 PM EDT on 9th (previous record

8.09). (FRANCES)

PAZ015

Flood

At 132 AM EDT on 9th, Rte 208 flooded

near Shippenville; Huey Rd flooded 4

miles south of Sligo; and Rte 58 flood-

ed 6 miles west of Sligo. Some roads

were still flooded as of 8 AM EDT on

9th. Clarion River at Cooksburg (north-

east corner of Clarion Co) rose to

flood stage (13 ft) at 4 PM EDT on 9th;

crested at 13.4 at 6 PM on 9th; and

fell below flood stage 11 PM EDT on

9th. (FRANCES)

PAZ022

Flood

Allegheny River at Mosgrove rose to

flood stage (19 feet) briefly from 1145

PM EDT to 1159 PM EDT on the 9th.

(FRANCES)

PENNSYLVANIA, West

PAZ029

Flood

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Ivan started during the night of the

16th, and continued into the evening of

the 17th. At 115 PM EDT on 17th, roads

flooded in Canonsburg and Washington.

At 206 PM, there was widespread stream

flooding in Burgettstown, McDonald, and

Midway. At 217 PM, Houston flooded. 315

PM, Rtes 50 and 980 were flooded in

Avella and Cecil. 5 PM, mud slides in

Peters Twp, which had 4″ of rain. By 8

PM, Washington 5″ of rain. Total of 961

structures damaged or destroyed. Towns

hard hit: Avella, Burgettstown, Cecil,

Independence, Peters, Washington. Many

roads closed by mud slides or flooded.

Trailer park in Canton washed away.

Some trailer park residents were trap-

ped atop their mobile homes until dark,

asking for help by signaling SOS with

their flashlights. Other mobile homes

destroyed. Houses lifted off founda-

tions; railroad track beds gone;

several roads washed out, including Rte

19 near Houston; grocery store destroy-

ed. 11 boats, docked in Millsboro,

damaged. Total rain: 5.9″ in Canons-

burg. (IVAN)

PAZ021

Flood

At 124 PM EDT on 17th, road flooding

was reported 2 miles west of Pitts-

burgh. At 2 PM, Wexford flooded. At 218

PM, roads flooded in Oakdale. By 315

PM, Springdale Boro flooded; and Wex-

ford had 4.5″ of rain. . By 450 PM on

17th, in Tarentum, Mill St and Davidson

St were flooded; people evacuated. By 5

PM EDT on 17th, a state of emergency

was declared in 62 of the 130 municipa-

lities of Allegheny Co. South Park 6″

of rain 530 PM EDT 17th. At 6 PM, eva-

cuations in Tarentum. Widespread

flooding stranded thousands. A total of

9494 homes, 1060 businesses, 4 schools,

9 fire depts, 50 public buildings

damaged or destroyed. 140 boats broke

away and ran away down several rivers.

Some towns flooded, include: Bridge-

ville, Carnegie (by Chartiers Creek,

starting 415 PM), Etna, Millvale,

Sharpsburg, Shaler (by Little Pine

Creek), South Fayette, Tarentum, West

Deer. In Carnegie, 22 people were trap-

ped on a bridge as flood waters rose

and surrounded them. They tied them-

selves together and waited for rescue.

These roads partly washed out: Oakdale

Rd, Brocktown Rd, Boyds Run Rd, Dor-

rington Rd, Millers Run Rd, Noblestown

Rd. Total rain: 6.6 inches Franklin

Park, 6.4 Moon Twp. Pittsburgh Interna-

tional Airport set a new record for 1-

day rainfall of 5.95 inches. This broke

the old record (3.6″) set during

FRANCES on Sept 9. The Allegheny River

flooded, from Freeport to Sharpsburg,

from 11 PM EDT on 17th, until 5 AM EDT

on 19th. Here are city, flood stage,

crest, time: Freeport (flood stage 23

ft), 24.1 10 AM 18th; natrona (21 ft),

24.2 11 AM 18th; Acmetonia (17), 19.8 1

PM 18th; Sharpsburg (21), 22.1 4 PM EDT

18th. The Ohio River flooded, from

Pittsburgh to Dashields, from 10 PM on

17th, until 830 AM EDT on 19th. Pitts-

burgh (flood stage 25 ft), crested 31.0

at 4 PM EDT on 18th; Dashields (25 ft),

crested 29.9 at 8 PM on 18th. On the

Youghiogheny River, Sutersville rose

above flood stage (20 ft) 1 PM on 18th,

crested 20.7 at 430 PM, and fell below

flood stage at 730 PM EDT on 18th. The

remnants of Ivan made its closest

approach to Pittsburgh at 7 PM EDT on

the 17th. (IVAN)

M350U

PAZ007

Flood

At 2 PM EDT on 17th, Rte 18 was closed

by flood north of Greenville. Some

flooding continued beyond 8 PM EDT on

17th. (IVAN)

PAZ013

Flood

At 236 PM EDT on 17th, numerous roads

were flooded in Pulaski and Shenango

townships. By 845 PM, Ellwood City had

3.5 inches of rain. As of 6 PM on 18th,

many roads were still flooded, and

there were a few mud slides, including

one on Vanguard Rd in Perry Twp. Part

of Mohawk School Rd washed out. (IVAN)

PAZ014

Flood

At 245 PM EDT on 17th, flooding began

in Sarver. At 315 PM, Butler reported

3″ of rain. At 445 PM, flooding occur-

red in Butler. State of emergency

declared 5 PM EDT 17th. By 6 PM, 4.3″

of rain in Penn Twp. Harmony and Jack-

son townships hardest hit. Part of

Monroe Rd in Buffalo Twp washed out.

Total of 588 structures damaged or

destroyed. Record flooding along Conno-

quenessing Creek. Zelienople crested at

18.17 ft (previous record 16.66) Total

rain: 6.1″ at Butler Jr High School,

5.4″ in Sarvar. (IVAN)

PAZ030

Flood

By 3 PM EDT on 17th, 911 started

receiving flood calls. By 353 PM,

streams overflowed and flooded Vander-

grift. 417 PM, Greensburg Rd closed by

flood in New Kensington. 5 PM, Irwin

had 2.5″ of rain. 534 PM, roads flooded

1 mile southwest of Apollo. 548 PM, 1

house evacuated near a previously

damaged dam in Allegheny Twp; and New

Kensington 6″ of rain. 606 PM, Freeport

Rd flooded 1 mile south of Tarentum;

people being evacuated. Roads closed,

included Rte 30, 381, 982. Total of 819

homes and businesses, and 75 public

structures damaged or destroyed.

Ligonier sewage treatment plant

damaged. Many basements were flooded by

Youghiogheny River when Sutersville

rose above flood stage (20 ft) at 1 PM

EDT on 18th, crested 20.7 at 430 PM

PENNSYLVANIA, West

18th, and fell below flood stage 730 PM

18th. On the Conemaugh River, Seward

rose above flood stage (12 ft) at 11 AM

18th, crested 12.1 at I1 AM, and fell

below flood stage 1 PM EDT 18th. Total

rain: 6.3″ in Monesson, 6.1 Delmont, 6

inches New Kensington. (IVAN)

PAZ020

Flood

At 325 PM EDT on 17th, Rte 30, and all

roads in Industry closed by flooding.

Much damage along Rte 68 corridor in

western part of county. Bridgewater and

Glasgow flooded. Total of 625 struc-

tures damaged or destroyed, including

43 businesses, mainly in Hopewell Twp.

Hundreds of runaway boats were lost,

but 93 were recovered. Several marinas

were ripped from the shore and broke up

as they slammed into bridges, with

numerous boats still attached. Roads

partly washed out: Rtes 65, 288, 588,

Hoenig Rd, Hartzell School Rd, Shady

Rest Rd, Franklin Rd, Green Garden Rd.

On the Ohio River, Montgomery Dam rose

to flood stage (33 ft) at 4 AM EDT on

18th, crested 41.0 at 10 PM 18th, and

fell below flood stage 2 PM EDT on

19th. Total rain: 4 inches in Monaca.

(IVAN)

PAZ022

Flood

By 4 PM EDT on 17th, a courthouse was

threatened by a mud slide in Kittan-

ning; and numerous roads were flooded

countywide, including Rte 66 between

Ford City and Leechburg. By 11 PM,

Bradys Bend had 5.7 inches of rain; and

Red Bank Creek, on the border of Arm-

strong and Clarion counties, continued

to flood. St Charles on the Red Bank

Creek crested around 17.9 ft around

dawn (flood stage 17). On the Clarion

River, Cooksburg rose above flood stage

(13 ft) at 2 AM EDT on 18th, crested

16.5 at 8 AM on 18th, and fell below

flood stage 8 PM EDT 18th. The Allegheny

River rose above flood stage 4 AM EDT

18th, and fell below flood stage by 9

PM EDT on 19th. Here are city, flood

stage, crest, and time: Rimer (19 ft),

19.5 at 10 AM 18th; Mosgrove (19), 20.4

at 10 AM 18th; Kittanning (21), 22.2 at

9 AM EDT 18th; Freeport (23), 24.1 at

10 AM EDT on 18th. Crooked Creek at

Idaho had a record crest of 19.33 ft at

8 AM on 18th (previous record 18.6).

Buffalo Creek at Freeport had a record

crest of 15.28 at 8 PM on 17th (pre-

vious record 13.6). Total of 56 struc-

tures damaged or destroyed, including 3

businesses and 1 church. (IVAN)

PAZ008

Flood

At 4 PM EDT on 17th, Moon Run Rd flood-

ed in Oil City. 656 PM, 3.1 inches of

rain 5 miles east of Oil City. (IVAN)

PAZ015

Flood

At 410 PM EDT on 17th, Rte 66 closed by

flood in Shippenville. New Bethlehem,

Hawthorn, East Brady, and Sligo also

flooded. At 646 PM on 17th, there was a

mud slide on the south side of New

Bethlehem. Rte 58 also flooded. On the

Clarion River, Cooksburg rose above

flood stage (13 ft) 2 AM EDT on 18th,

crested 16.5 at 8 AM 18th, and fell be-

low flood stage 8 PM EDT on 18th. Total

of 117 homes and businesses, and 155

public roads, damaged or destroyed.

Total rain: 3.5 inches in East Brady.

(IVAN)

PAZ031

Flood

It started 5 PM EDT 17th, when Grays-

ville flooded, according to newspaper

accounts. By 740 PM on 17th, there was

widespread road and stream flooding

countywide, including all roads in and

out of Greensburg; Rte 21 in Franklin

Twp; and Rte 18 in Centre Twp. Total of

157 homes and 46 businesses damaged or

destroyed. Total rain: about 5 inches.

(IVAN)

PAZ016

Flood

At 538 PM EDT on 17th, roads flooded,

in Warsaw Twp, 7 miles north of Brook-

ville after 3.3 inches of rain. By 6

PM, there was widespread road and

stream flooding. At least 5 people were

rescued from their vehicles. By 8 PM,

Rockdale had 4″ of rain. By 9 PM,

Punxsutawney had 4.5 inches. Mahoning

Creek at Punxsutawney crested at 32.3

ft (flood stage 32) around 1 PM EDT on

18th. (IVAN)

PAZ023

Flood

At 630 PM EDT on 17th, Curry Run over-

flowed and closed Rte 422 near Shelocta

(newspaper). By 720 PM, there was wide-

spread road and stream flooding. Flood

waters swept away 8 empty campers at a

camp ground between Shelocta and Elder-

ton. 845 PM, numerous roads closed by

flood. At one house in Centre Twp,

basement wall caved in. Rte 954 near

Beyer was washed out. Rte 4018 near

Smicksburg closed when Mahoning Dam

overflowed. Indiana had 3.5 inches of

rain. By 1050 PM, Clymer flooded and

people were evacuated. 150 people had

to be evacuated countywide. Shelocta

hit hard. Total of 339 structures

damaged or destroyed, 40 of them were

businesses. (IVAN)

PENNSYLVANIA, West

PAZ009

Flood

At 9 PM EDT on 17th, roads and a bridge

covered by water near Tionesta. On the

Clarion River, Cooksburg rose above

flood stage (13 fl) at 2 AM EDT on

18th, crested 16.5 at 8 AM 18th, and

fell below flood stage at 8 PM EDT on

18th. (IVAN)

PUERTO RICO

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Mayaguez Heavy Rain

Heavy rain and pea sized hail were

reported at Barrio Miradero.

Western Interior

Adjuntas Flash Flood

A near severe thunderstorm drifted over

Adjuntas during the afternoon causing

heavy rainfall which caused the loss of

a life as river Yayales, a small tribu-

tary of river Guilarte, surged out of

its banks and flowed across the inter-

sections of roads 131 and 135. A 59

year old woman drove a car into the

moving waters, attempted to escape her

car and was drowned.

F59VE

PRZO03-007-007-007

Heavy Surf/High Surf

Coastal flooding was reported at

Playita Cortada in the municipality of

Santa Isabel. Three families were relo-

cated to higher ground.

PRZO03

Heavy Surf/High Surf

Coastal flooding occurred along the

coastal sector of Salinas, as the high

surf generated by Hurricane Ivan when

it was over 300 miles south of Puerto

Rico, washed ashore, rocks and debris,

which blocked the traffic along coastal

highway 109, at barrio Las Ochenta,

leading from Salinas to Guayama. The

road remained closed for a period of 12

hours.

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Hormigueros Heavy Rain

Several areas were reported flooded in

the municipality of Hormigueros, road

319, the San Jose Lavandero community,

road 114 at Valle Hermoso Sur. Around 4

inches of rain fell in Hormigueros

during the afternoon. Landslides were

reported at Parelas San Romulado Norte,

Camino Oscar Barbosa, road 345.

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Mayaguez Heavy Rain

Flooding was reported in Mayaguez, Del

Carmen Street at Barrio Santurce,

Barrio Rio Hondo, Wilson Street at

Parcelas Castillo, Badiz and Nenadich

Streets. Landslides were reported at

Camino Rosa, road 348, and the bridge

at Puente de Camino Juan Lebron

was affected by the rains.

PRZO03

Heavy Surf/High Surf

Coastal flooding was reported in Barrio

Guardarraya along Highway 3 in the

municipality of Patillas.

PRZ001>013

Tropical Storm

Tropical Storm Jeanne and its asso-

ciated weather affected Puerto Rico,

Vieques and Culebra from Sep. 14-17. On

its wake it left considerable damages

to the electric power grid, the water

supply system, highways and roads,

bridges, schools, individual house-

holds, businesses and commerce due to

extensive flooding, landslides and mud-

slides. Jeanne forced 3,629 people

living in flood zones to seek refuge in

shelters. Jeanne caused eight deaths in

Puerto Rico, four direct and four in-

direct. One death direct death was in

the municipality of Yabucoa, where the

winds tore the roof and ceiling of a

house to which a hammock was attached,

flunging a person from the hammock and

smashing her into the wall of an adja-

cent structure. Another,and the only

one flood related fatality was reported

in the municipality of Moca, where a

person was reportedly drowned in a tri-

butary stream of River Culebrinas. Two

other persons died and one was injured

after a tree damaged by winds fell on

an automobile in a rural road of Yauco

the Saturday after the storm. Two other

persons died due to carbon monoxide

poisoning from generators running in

closed spaces without proper ventila-

tion. The island road system was widely

impacted as 302 roads had to be closed

due to fallen trees, landslide and mud-

slides or debris. Damages to the

electrical grid were estimated at 60

million, and to the water system at 8

million. Tropical Storm Jeanne made

landfall as a strong tropical storm

over southeast Puerto Rico around noon

time on Sep. 15. Official winds reports

from the International airport in Caro-

lina were of sustained winds of 49 mph

with a gust to 71 mph. An unofficial

report from a spotter in Salinas indi-

cated sustained winds of 63 mph with

gust to 71 mph at 1140 am AST. Another

unofficial report of a wind gust to 68

mph was recorded at Palmas del Mar,

Humacao, and the Arecibo Observatory,

which recorded a wind gust of 70 mph at

an elevation of 1,200 feet on Sep 15.

The agricultural impact was signifi-

cant, the hardest hit areas were the

south and east. Damages were estimated

at 101.5 million, 55 million were

attributed to the banana an plantainx

sectors. More than 15,500 acres of

plantain and banana farm lands were

affected. Hardest hit crops were

coffee, plantain, banana and wheat. The

hydrological impact of Jeanne were

widespread and diverse with major

stream and river flooding. The island

of Vieques recorded 23.75 inches of

rain over three days, and 14.75 inches

in a 24 hour period which corresponded

to more than a 100 year return period.

Other municipalities in Puerto rico

received from 11 to 18 inches over the

three day period ending on Sep. 17 at

800 am AST. The highest return

frequency over inland Puerto Rico was

at Aibonito, where the 24 hour rainfall

of 15 inches corresponded to more than

a 100 year event. F47PH, M37 VE, M41

VE, M450U

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Anasco Flash Flood

River Rio Grande de Anasco was reported

out of its banks.

San Juan And

Vicinity

San Juan Funnel Cloud

Funnel cloud reported between Roosevelt

and Pinciro Avenues.

San Juan And

Vicinity

Carolina Heavy Rain

Urban flooding was reported at Parque

Escorial. Standing water knee high in

some places and as high as some car

doors in spots.

Ponce And Vicinity

Ponce Heavy Rain

Heavy rains, pea size hail and strong

gusty winds were reported at Barrio

Punta Diamante in the municipality of

Ponce. Winds gusts were estimated

between 40 and 50 mph.

RHODE ISLAND

NONE REPORTED.

SOUTH CAROLINA,

Calhoun County

7 NE St Matthews to Tornado (F0)

7.5 NE St Matthews

NWS survey along with dept. of high-

ways, found trees down across US601

from a small tornado.

Calhoun County

2 SE Ft Motte Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Hwy Dept. reported trees down on SC

419.

Richland County

1.5 SE Gadsden to Tornado (F2)

1 NW Gadsden

NWS survey found 3 mobile destroyed,

several others damaged along with a

couple of businesses. Three people were

injured. Numerous trees and powerlines

down.

Richland County

Ft Jackson Tornado (F1)

Ft. Jackson reported 22 homes with

light to moderate damage from an F1

tornado.

Richland County

1 SE Columbia to Tornado (F0)

.5 SE Columbia

An F0 took down some trees on Bluff and

Blackberry roads.

Barnwell County

Barnwell Tornado (F0)

An F0 took down some trees and power-

lines and damaged some signs in Barn-

well.

SOUTH CAROLINA, Central

Aiken County

5 SE Monetta to Tornado (F0)

4.5 SE Monetta

An F0 tornado took down some trees on

hwys 39 and 391.

Sumter County

3 SW Sumter to Tornado (F2)

2 W Sumter

Emergency manager reported 55 homes

damaged, 9 destroyed, and 3 injuries.

Calhoun County

Countywide Flash Flood

Sheriff reported some secondary roads

beginning to flood with some closures.

Richland County

1 SE Columbia Flash Flood

Sheriff reported heavy rains and

flooding of roads in southeast Columbia

and outskirts with some closures.

Lee County

3 S Manville to Tornado (F1)

4 SW Manville

A strong F1 tornado took down huge

trees and powerlines, and also did

moderate damage to several homes and a

cotton gin mill.

Lee County

2 SW Bishopville to Tornado (F0)

2 WSW Bishopville

Storm Chaser reported an F0 did minor

damage to a mobile home and took down

some trees and powerlines.

Kershaw County

5 ESE Camden to Tornado (F0)

5 E Camden

Intermittent touchdown of an F0 took

down trees and powerlines in and around

Antioch with minor damage to some

mobile homes.

Kershaw County

2 SE Cassatt to Tornado (F1)

3 NW Cassatt

An F1 tornado did moderate damage to

several homes and mobile homes. A

turkey farm also had light damage.

Calhoun County

6 SW St Matthews to Tornado (F0)

5.5 SW St Matthews

Dept of highways reported an F0 took

down some trees and powerlines on Sc

453.

Clarendon County

2 SW Paxville to Tornado (F0)

2.5 WSW Paxville

Survey found an F0 path a half mile

long which took down trees.

Sumter County

Shaw Afb to Tornado (F1)

2.5 N Shaw Afb

Shaw AFB reported many homes with light

damage and a few with moderate damage

as an Fl touched down between the run-

ways and moved across the base. Many

trees and powerlines were also down.

Lancaster County

Rich Hill Xrds to Tornado (F1)

2 NW Rich Hill Xrds

A strong F1 did moderate to severe

damage to buildings on a turkey farm.

Several mobile along the path.

Kershaw County

2 NE Camden to Tornado (F3)

7 N Camden

An F3 tornado demolished several mobile

homes and severely damaged cinder block

horse stables at a horse farm. A large

horse trailer was lifted up and placed

on top of the stable. Several out-

buildings were destroyed and numerous

trees and powerlines were down.

Chesterfield County

7 SSE Cheraw to Tornado (F1)

1 NNW Cheraw

An F1 intermittently touched down and

did minor damage to several homes,

businesses, and an elementary school..

Numerous trees and powerlines were

down.

SOUTH CAROLINA, Central

Orangeburg County

5 SE Cope to Tornado (F0)

4.5 SE Cope

An F0 took down some trees along Cannon

Bridge road.

Chesterfield County

13 ESE Patrick to Tornado (F0)

13 E Patrick

An F0 took down trees along hwy 52

north of Society Hill as the tornado

dissipated.

Fairfield County

Jenkinsville to Tornado (F0)

6 W Winnsboro

An F0 intermittently touched down and

took down trees from Jenkinsville to

the Greenbrier Community.

Bamberg County

1 E Ehrhardt to Tornado (F0)

1.5 NE Ehrhardt

Emergency manager reported trees and

powerlines down along path.

SCZ016-030>031

Tropical Storm

Emergency manager reported a tree on a

home 5SSE of Chesterfield and shingles

of a home.

Chesterfield County

8 E Me Bee to Tornado (F2)

9 NE Me Bee

An F2 destroyed 2 mobile homes and did

moderate to severe damage to several

others. Numerous trees and powerlines

were down.

Newberry County

Macedonia Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Highway Dept. reported several trees

down.

Aiken County

Aiken Muni Arpt Funnel Cloud

Pilot at Aiken airport sighted a funnel

cloud moving north.

Aiken County

4 N Aiken to Tornado (F0)

10 N Aiken

Sheriff and Emergency manager reported

trees down along the path of an F0

tornado that down from 1-20 just south

of US 1 to 3 miles South of Ridge

Spring on SC511 which is Pitts Branch

road.

Saluda County

5 NNE Saluda to Tornado (F1)

10 N Saluda

Storm survey found numerous trees and

powerlines down, light to moderate

damage destroyed, 2 trees on cars, and

light to moderate roof damage to

several framed homes.

Fairfield County

3 NE Winnsboro Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Highway dept. reported several trees

down on SC200 northeast of town.

Clarendon County

3 W Alcolu to Tornado (F1)

Alcolu

An F1 tornado destroyed 2 mobile homes

and damaged several others. Light to

moderate and its busses. Severe damage

occurred to large open air outbuildings

at a mill across the street from the

school.

Aiken County

9 NE Aiken to Tornado (F0)

11 NNE Aiken

An F0 did moderate damage to a barn,

camper, and roof of a home.

Lee County

Bishopville to Tornado (F0)

Lucknow

An F0 touched down in Bishopville then

again in the Lucknow area. Trees and

powerlines were down with minor damage

to a couple of homes.

Chesterfield County

4 S Chesterfield to Tornado (F0)

1 S Chesterfield

An F0 took down trees, severely damage

some wood framed outbuildings and did

minor damage to a couple of mobile

homes.

Saluda County

7 N Ridge Spg Funnel Cloud

Sheriff reported a funnel north of

Ridge Springs.

Saluda County

Countywide Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Highway dept. reported scattered trees

down around the county.

Saluda County

8 NW Saluda to Tornado (F0)

9 NNW Saluda

An F0 touched down along Old Chappells

road taking down trees.

Newberry County

Chappells Funnel Cloud

Sheriff reported a funnel cloud over

Chappells.

Newberry County

8 ENE Newberry to Tornado (F1)

10 ENE Newberry

Roof torn off home with 4 other homes

damaged. Several outbuildings

destroyed. Damage was on SC34, US 176,

and BIg Pine road.

Lexington County

10 WNW Lexington to Tornado (F0)

11 WNW Lexington

An F0 touchd down on Devils Backbone

road in taking down trees which just

missed several homes.

Newberry County

.5 N Jalapa to Tornado (F0)

3 NNW Jalapa

An F0 touched down on Jalapa road and

Indian Creek road taking down trees and

doing minor damage to a couple of

mobile homes.

Orangeburg County

Springfield to Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Norway

Sheriff reported trees down in the

western part of the county.

Lexington County

Gilbert to Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Lexington

Sheriff reported trees down in the

Gilbert area and in Heritage Hills

subdivision of Lexington.

Richland County

Countywide Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Sheriff reported scattered trees down

around the county.

Fairfield County

3 NNW Ridgeway to Tornado (F2)

5 NNW Ridgeway

An F2 tornado destroyed 5 mobile homes,

did moderate to severe damage to 2

framed homes and injurred 13 people.

One 57 year old male died. Two vehicles

were moved 20 to 30 yards. M51MH

SOUTH CAROLINA, North

Coastal

Darlington County

2 SW Darlington to Tornado (F0)

1 SW Darlington

A tornado snapped trees, some of which

fell onto several homes and damaged

roofs.

Darlington County

1 S Society Hill to Tornado (F0)

1 SE Society Hill

Tornado snapped several trees, and

caused damage to a roof of a home.

Marlboro County

4 SSE Clio to Tornado (F1)

Clio

Tornado snapped or uprooted numerous

trees and damaged several homes.

Marlboro County

1 SW Me Coll Tornado (F1)

Tornado demolished a stapped down

mobile home.

Darlington County

7 NNE Darlington Tornado (F1)

Tornado snapped several trees and

damaged a mobile home.

Florence County

4 NE Florence to Tornado (F0)

4 N Florence

Tornado damaged a billboard and several

trees next to a Petro truck stop. The

tornado continued into Darlington

county.

Darlington County

7 ESE Darlington to Tornado (F0)

7 E Darlington

Tornado snapped numerous trees.

Dillon County

6 E Dillon to Tornado (F0)

5 NE Dillon

A tornado flattened and old barn and

part of the roof of a shed was torn

off. A few trees were snapped … one

damaging a roof of a home.

Marlboro County

4 SW Bennettsville to Tornado (F0)

5 W Bennettsville

A tornado damaged a steel conveyor belt

track at a sand and gravel mine.

Several trees were snapped, and the

roof of a front porch of a church was

lifted off.

Florence County

Florence Funnel Cloud

Public reported a funnel cloud near

Ebenezer Road.

Darlington County

Hartsville Funnel Cloud

A funnel cloud was reported near Old

Camden Rd.

Georgetown County

1 N Murrells Inlet Rip Current

Strong rip currents caused by the

swells from Hurricane Jeanne resulted

in a drowning. Five other people had to

be rescued by lifeguards.

??1W

Florence County

2 E Lake City to Tornado (F1)

2 NE Lake City

A tornado destoyed a barn and snapped

trees. A house sustained minor damage.

Georgetown County

5 NW Carvers Bay to Tornado (F1)

7 NW Carvers Bay

A tornado snapped telephone poles,

uprooted trees, and moved a mobile home

off its foundation. The tornado also

destroyed several sheds and outhouses.

Marion County

3 NE Peedee to Tornado (F1)

4 N Peedee

A tornado damaged two homes, and downed

trees, powerlines, and sheds.

Dillon County

2 E Oak Grove Tornado (F0)

A tornado downed trees along Interstate

95.

Marlboro County

Blenheim Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down in a parking lot

with no damage.

Florence County

Florence Heavy Rain

Florence 911 reported widespread

flooding of roadways. Some of the

streets reported flooding include:

Church St., Baroody St., Coit St.,

Sumter St., Evans St., Chase St.,

Alexander St., and the Cheves area.

Darlington County

Darlington Heavy Rain

911 reported flooding on the roadways.

SOUTH CAROLINA, Northwest

Greenville County

Mauldin Heavy Rain

A number of streets, especially Butler

Rd., were partially closed because of

high water produced by a thunderstorm

which dropped 2 inches of rainfall very

quickly.

York County

8 N Rock Hill to Tornado (F1)

9 N Rock Hill

This tornado touched down on the

norheast side of Tega Cay and tracked

almost due north into North Carolina.

Damage was mainly limited to trees, but

a few of these fell on homes and

automobiles.

SCZ001>003

High Wind (G50)

High winds associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Frances produced some

damage to trees and power lines across

the South Carolina mountains.

SCZ003-006

Flood

An extended period of moderate to heavy

rainfall associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Frances resulted in

gradual rises and eventual flooding

along Gilder and Brushy Creeks, the

Enoree River, and other streams on

Greenville’s east side. Overnight, the

flooding expanded to include most of

the remainder of the county.

SCZ001-004

Flood

Widespread flooding of creeks and

streams developed across the county by

early evening. Numerous roads were

covered with water or washed out, and

the sewer systems of several

communities were damaged.

Anderson County

2 NE Sandy Spgs to Tornado (F0)

2 N Sandy Spgs

This tornado touched down just

northeast of Sandy Springs, then moved

northwest, uprooting several trees

along its path. An aluminum cattle

shelter was also destroyed.

Abbeville County

Abbeville Flash Flood

Pickens County

Countywide Flash Flood

Greenville County

West Central Portion Flash Flood

Anderson County

Anderson to Flash Flood

Belton

After an extended period of moderate to

heavy rainfall, a tropical rain band

produced intense rainfall rates that

led to rapid rises along some creeks

and small streams across portions of

the Upstate during the mid-to-late

evening. Streams affected by flash

flooding included Blue Hill Creek in

Abbeville and Broadway Creek between

Anderson and Belton. Some evacuations

occurred in Berea late in the evening,

as the Reedy River rose above flood

stage from Berea to downtown

Greenville. A few roads were damaged

across the area.

Chester County

10 SE Chester Tornado (F1)

This brief tornado blew down several

trees and damaged or destroyed 2 small

trailers shortly after touching down.

It then moved north and lifted a

portion of the roof from a

well-constructed home. The garage wall

was blown inward about I foot at this

same location. A carport next to the

home was also detroyed. Several trees

were blown down and a small trailer

destroyed at a hunting club before the

tornado lifted.

Cherokee County

East Portion Flash Flood

Union County

Union Flash Flood

After an extended period of moderate to

occasionally heavy rainfall,

intensifying rain rates led to rapid

rises and flash flooding along some

small creeks and streams in eastern

portions of the Upstate. Several roads

were covered with water in areas from

Gaffney to Blacksburg due to flooding

of Cherokee Creek and other small

streams. However, flooding was most

severe near the city of Union, where

there was extensive damage to roads and

bridges, including 2 bridges that were

washed away. Several homes were also

damaged.

SCZ002-005

Flood

SCZ010

Flood

After the flash flooding that developed

earlier in the evening waned, general

flooding continued across the county

through the overnight hours, as

numerous additional streams rose

gradually to flood.

SCZ007>008

Flood

General flooding became widespread

across portions of the Upstate late in

the evening, as numerous streams rose

gradually to flood. A mobile home park

near Gaffney required evacuation

overnight. The Pacolet River flooded in

northern portions of Spartanburg

County, especially areas around

Landrum. Several roads and bridges were

damaged.

Union County

6 E Union to Tornado (F1)

7 NE Union

This tornado touched down east of the

city of Union, then tracked north/

northwest, blowing down and uprooting

numerous trees, and rolling one mobile

home. Other structural damage was

limited to shingles and gutters.

Chester County

Chester Flash Flood

York County

Rock Hill to Flash Flood

Ft Mill

An intense tropical rain band moved

north across portions of the eastern

piedmont during the early morning

hours, causing small creeks and streams

to rise quickly to flood.

SCZ009-014

Flood

After the intense rainfall rates ended,

continued moderate to occasionally

heavy rainfall allowed general flooding

to persist into the mid-morning.

SCZ005>006

Flood

After flooding due to the heavy

rainfall on the 7th abated, the Saluda

River crested a seond time on the

morning of the 9th, as the heavy

rainfall that fell well upstream worked

its way through the system.

Laurens County

13 SE Laurens Tornado (F0)

This brief, weak tornado blew down a

few trees.

SCZ001>002-

004>005-010

High Wind (G55)

High winds developed across the

mountains and a portion of the

foothills during the evening as the

remants of Hurricane Ivan moved just

west of the area. Numerous trees were

blown down, many of which fell on

vehicles and structures. The hardest

hit areas were generally in areas from

the mountains south to highway 11.

Anderson County

4 SSE Townville Tornado (F0)

This brief tornado produced mainly tree

damage in the Double Springs community.

Oconee County

13 SE Walhalla to Tornado (F0)

8 SE Walhalla

This weak tornado blew down numerous

trees and power lines along its 5-mile

track.

Anderson County

3 W Iva Tornado (F0)

This tornado touched down very briefly

in an open field.

Oconee County

Westminster to Tornado (F1)

4 NNW Westminster

This tornado blew down numerous trees

and power lines along its track, some

of which fell on homes. A mobile home

was destroyed when it was blown into an

embankment.

SCZ001>002-004>005

Flood

Moderate to heavy rainfall associated

with the remnants of Hurricane Ivan

resulted in flooding along a few creeks

during mid-evening across the northwest

part of the Upstate. The flooding

gradually became widespread and more

severe during the overnight hours,

especially in Oconee County, as the

Tugaloo River flooded, trapping a

number of famalies, some of which

required rescue via helicopter. A

number of bridges and roads were washed

out or otherwise damaged by flood

water.

SCZ003-006>007

High Wind (G50)

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

continued to cause strong enough winds

to blow down a number of trees and

power lines across portions of the

mountains and foothills. A few fell on

structures and vehicles, and there were

scattered power outages. The damage was

more widespread across the western

Upstate.

Spartanburg County

Campobello Lightning

Lightning struck an industrial plant,

igniting a fire which destroyed about

2/3 of the facility.

SCZ007

Flood

After an evening of heavy rainfall,

several small streams flooded just

after midnight. Several bridges were

covered with water. Most areas affected

were in the northwest quarter of the

county, including Campobello, Inman,

and Lyman. The Pacolet River also

flooded in spots.

Chester County

6 WSW Great Falls Thunderstorm Wind (G65)

Two tractor trailers flipped over on

I-77 when the drivers lost control due

to strong winds.

Abbeville County

Abbeville to Flash Flood

Calhoun Falls

Greenwood County

Greenwood Flash Flood

Intense rainfall rates associated with

the remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

resulted in rapid rises and flash

flooding along some small creeks and

streams across the southern part of the

Upstate. Some of the worst flooding

occurred around Abbeville, where

several bridges were covered by

flooding streams. Severe urban flooding

developed in the city of Greenwood, as

the bypass at Burton Plaza was covered

with water, and a small stream flooded

a portion of Laurel St. Several other

roads were closed around the city,

including Scotts and Airport Roads. In

addition, a portion of highway 72

became covered with water near Calhoun

Falls. Several roads and bridges were

damaged by flood water.

Anderson County

5 S Anderson to Flash Flood

Honea Path

Oconee County

South Portion Flash Flood

As an intense tropical ran band moved

across the western Upstate, some flash

flooding developed. Part of highway 81S

was closed in Anderson County when a

construction site was flooded in the

northbound lane. Widespread flash

flooding also occurred around Iva,

where all low spots filled quickly with

deep water. At Honea Path, an apartment

building was evacuated after flooding

from a stopped up storm drain entered

the building. Some businesses incurred

minor flood damage in southern Oconee

County. Urban flooding also occurred in

Anderson.

Laurens County

Countywide Flash Flood

As the intense tropical rain band

continued to sweep over the Upstate,

flash flooding developed across Laurens

County, where up to a foot-and-a-half

of water accumulated in low places on

Interstate 385 from Laurens to the

Greenville line. Interstate 26 was also

flooded between mile markers 52 and 55.

Flooding was also reported along

highway 221 S around Waterloo with a

foot of water covering the road in low

places. By late evening, flash flooding

became severe, as 5 to 6 inches of rain

had fallen in just a 3-hour period.

Water covered a number of bridges from

the Hickory Tavern and Green Pond

areas, east across Gray Court and

Fountain Inn to the Spartanburg line.

At Cooks Bridge, just the reflectors

along the top of the bridge were

visible. Evacuations of several homes

were required around Fountain Inn.

Flooding also developed in the Ware

Shoals area.

Greenville County

Fountain Inn to Flash Flood

Simpsonville

Flooding developed quickly across

Greenville County during mid-evening.

Numerous automobiles were stranded in

water in the southern and eastern parts

of the county. Flash flooding occurred

around Fork Shoals, along highway 25

south of Greenville, and along Jones

Mill Rd east of Fountain Inn. Gilder

Creek flooded from Mauldin downstream

to the Enoree River. Water from the

flooded creek covered a bridge at E

Georgia Rd.

Spartanburg County

Central Portion Flash Flood

Greenville County

Berea to Flash Flood

Greer

As the intense tropical rain band

associated with the remnants of Jeanne

continued to progress north and east

across the Upstate, flash flooding

followed. Numerous streams rose quickly

to flood, including Brushy Creek and

the Enoree River around Greer and

Taylors. Numerous people required

rescue from their automobiles in this

area. The Reedy River also flooded from

Berea to downtown Greenville. In

Spartanburg County, a bridge was washed

out on Apple Valley Rd in the Berry

Shoals area. Portions of South

Blackstock Rd and Reidville Rd were

flooded, as was highway 101 north of

Woodruff.

Cherokee County

2 S Gaffney Tornado (F1)

This tornado destroyed a mobile home

and blew down numerous trees and power

lines.

Chester County

7 NE Chester Thunderstorm Wind

A few trees were blown down along

highway 72. There were also some power

outages in the area.

SCZ006>007-012

Flood

After an evening of flash flooding,

rises along creeks and streams

moderated, but general flooding

persisted through the overnight and

morning hours, as rainfall worked its

way downstream through the water

systems. The main flood problem was

along the Enoree River basin in eastern

Greenville and Spartanburg Counties, as

Gilder and Peters Creeks and other

tributaries remained in flood for many

hours. There was also considerable

urban and small stream flooding

throughout the city of Spartanburg.

SOUTH CAROLINA, South Coastal

Jasper County

13 SSW Hardeeville Tornado (F0)

A tornado crossed into Jasper County

from Chatham County Georgia. The

tornado tracked through a marshy area

and no significant damage occurred.

Charleston County

1 NW Adams Run Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorms winds knocked down

several trees.

Colleton County

4 NW Jacksonboro to Tornado (F0)

4.5 NW Jacksonboro

A tornado knocked down trees.

Jasper County

4 SE Hardeeville to Tornado (F1)

2 SE Hardeeville

A tornado knocked down limbs and trees,

one of which fell on a mobile home

causing 1 injury.

Colleton County

6 SE Walterboro Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down several

trees.

Charleston County

3 WNW Hollywood Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down several

trees.

Colleton County

3 W Canadys Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and large limbs.

Berkeley County

15 SW Cross Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

Dorchester County

2 NE Ridgeville Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down several

trees.

Jasper County

5 NE Hardeeville to Tornado (F0)

5.5 NE Hardeeville

A tornado knocked down trees.

Dorchester County

8 SE Harleyville to Tornado (F0)

7.5 SE Harleyville

A small tornado knocked down trees and

large limbs.

Allendale County

2 NW Allendale to Tornado (F0)

4 NW Allendale

A tornado knocked down and snapped off

numerous trees.

Allendale County

4 NW Seigling to Tornado (F0)

5 NW Seigling

A tornado snapped and downed several

trees.

Jasper County

2 E Gillisonville to Tornado (F1)

2 NNW Gillisonville

A tornado knocked down trees. Many

trees were snapped off and thrown in

different directions.

Berkeley County

6 W Goose Creek Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorms winds knocked down trees.

Charleston County

North Charleston Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Two trees were blown along the 52

Connector.

Berkeley County

Goose Creek Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

Allendale County

5 NW Seigling Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and large limbs.

Hampton County

5 NE Brunson to Tornado (F0)

5 N Brunson

A tornado knocked down trees in the

county before crossing into Allendale

county.

Allendale County

4 E Fairfax to Tornado (F1)

4 ESE Sycamore

A weak F1 tornado crossed from Hampton

county into Allendale county. The

tornado uprooted and snapped off trees

along its path.

Allendale County

10 S Martin to Tornado (F0)

9.5 S Martin

A tornado snapped and bent trees in

various directions.

Allendale County

4 NE Millett to Tornado (F0)

4 N Millett

A tornado snapped trees and bent others

in various directions.

Hurricane Frances made land fall over

the Florida Panhandle and continued to

track in a generally northward

direction into Georgia, before turning

more to the northeast. This track

placed the Charleston County Warning

Area in the favorable right side of the

remnants of Frances which produced

numerous tornadoes and areas of

straight line wind damage over

southeast Georgia and south coastal

South Carolina. Several Georgia

counties also experienced flash

flooding as there were isolated

rainfall amounts of 5 to 8 inches over

a 24 to 36 hour period. This was on top

of already saturated ground from heavy

rains during the month of August. The

South Carolina counties experienced

more nuisance type flooding as the

rainfall amounts were not as high as

what occurred in southeast Georgia.

Beaufort County

Hilton Head Is Tornado (F1)

A picket fenced was knocked down. Part

of the fence went through the door of a

house. The roof of a house was

partially lifted and then set back

down. This caused some interior damage

to the home.

Allendale County

13 S Martin Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Several trees and large limbs were

knocked down by thunderstorm winds.

Hampton County

4 NE Early Branch to Tornado (F0)

4 NNE Early Branch

A weak tornado knocked down several

trees.

Berkeley County

1 W Pineville to Tornado (F0)

1 NW Pineville

A weak tornado damaged 2 mobile homes

and a shed. One mobile home had the

entire roof torn off and the second had

skirting torn off. Numerous trees and

limbs were knocked down.

Charleston County

Charleston to Flash Flood

Isle Of Palms

Heavy rainfall caused flooded roads in

Charleston, Mt. Pleasant, and the Isle

of Palms.

Colleton County

Countywide Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down

numerous trees across the county. One

tree fell on a house and another fell

on a vehicle.

Dorchester County

St George Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

in several locations across the

northern part of the county.

SCZ043-047>050

Tropical Storm

The center of Tropical Storm Jeanne

tracked across inland Georgia but the

strongest winds at the time were along

the coast. Maximum wind gusts were 41

mph at both the Charleston downtown

observation and the Charleston airport.

The C-Man station at Folly Beach had a

maximum wind gust of 38 mph.

Non-tornadie wind damage was limited to

a few trees falling on cars.

SOUTH DAKOTA, Central and North

Stanley County

10 W Mission Ridge Hail (2.00)

Roberts County

11 S Rosholt to Tornado (F2)

9 SSW Rosholt

The storm entered South Dakota from

Traverse county, Minnesota where it

produced a tornado. The storm produced

a second tornado as it crossed Lake

Traverse into South Dakota. This

tornado was stronger and destroyed a

house, a mobile home, and a travel

trailer. Another house and travel

trailer were damaged and a shed was

also ripped apart. The tornado also

killed three cattle.

SOUTH DAKOTA, Southeast

Davison County

7 SE Mt Vernon Hail (1.00)

Davison County

5 N Mitchell Hail (0.75)

Sanborn County

3 SE Artesian Hail (1.00)

Miner County

1 W Fedora Hail (0.75)

Davison County

Mitchell Lightning

Lightning struck and damaged a brick

chimney, and burned out a transformer

at an amusement center.

Hanson County

9 SW Alexandria Hail (0.75)

Clay County

5 E Wakonda Hail (1.50)

Turner County

2 N Centerville Hail (1.00)

Lincoln County

5 NW Beresford Hail (1.50)

Minnehaha County

Sioux Falls Hail (1.00)

Minnehaha County

Sioux Falls Hail (0.75)

Minnehaha County

Sioux Falls Hail (0.88)

Minnehaha County

3 N Brandon Hail (0.88)

Aurora County

10 NE Plankinton Hail (0.75)

Davison County

7 NW Mt Vernon Hail (0.88)

Sanborn County

1 S Letcher Hail (0.75)

Davison County

3 N Loomis Hail (0.88)

SOUTH DAKOTA, West

Pennington County

Keystone Hail (1.25)

Pennington County

4 SW Rapid City Hail (0.75)

Pennington County

7 SW Rapid City Hail (0.75)

Custer County

1 W Hermosa Hail (1.00)

Ziebach County

21 NE Cherry Creek Hail (0.75)

Fall River County

2 N Provo Tornado (F0)

Small tornado was on the ground for

about 1 minute. No damage.

Custer County

22 W Custer Thunderstorm Wind (G65)

Custer County

8 ESE Custer Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

Fall River County

12 W Hot Spgs Thunderstorm Wind (G62)

A 71 mph thunderstorm wind gust was

recorded at Red Canyon RAWS.

TENNESSEE, Central

Davidson County

9.6 NE Nashville Flash Flood

NWS employee reported street flooding

near the intersection of Old Hicklory

Boulevard and Merritt Street in the Old

Hickory area of Davidson County.

Humphreys County

Mc Ewen Hail (1.00)

Law enforcment reported hail the size

of quarters during this 20 minute

period.

Benton County

Big Sandy Hail (1.75)

Sheriffs office reported golf ball size

hail.

Perry County

Linden Flash Flood

U.S. Highway 412 E and Highway 100

intersection was flooded near the high

school.

Perry County

Linden Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees were blown down.

Wayne County

17 S Waynesboro Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees were blown down on Spain Rd.

Wayne County

10 SE Waynesboro Flash Flood

Shawnette Creek Road was flooded and

impassable.

TNZ011-033>034-

057>062-066-075-077-

079>080-093>095

High Wind (G40)

Strong winds from the remains of

Hurricane Ivan blew down many trees and

power lines across Middle Tennessee

from Thursday evening into early Friday

morning. There were 30 incidents on

Thursday night where trees had fallen

across roadways or downed power lines

in Lawrence County alone. Many homes in

Lawrence County sustained damage from

fallen trees and tree limbs. U.S.

Highway 64 west and east was blocked

for a time in Lawrence County by fallen

trees. Lawrence County students enjoyed

a day off on Friday due to clean up

efforts. In the city of Loretto, a tree

fell on a building on Broad Street and

caused some structural damage. A pine

tree fell on a shed in Tullahoma. A

large oak tree in just off Ragsdale

Road in Manchester fell on 2 small

barns and a lawn tractor.

A 100-foot tree fell at the Salters

residence on Fuller Hollow Road in

Marshall County. Also, a large tree

fell on a pick up truck on Derry Street

in Shelbyville.

The 3 inches of rain on the night of

September 16th along with the gusty

winds destroyed the Amazing Corn Maize

at Rippavilla located in Spring Hill.

Damage was estimated to be $17,000.

Rippavilla was scheduled to open on

Thursday. The corn maize formed a

portrait of explorer Meriwether Lewis

at the historic Rippavilla Plantation.

About 7000 people lost power in Middle

Tennessee due to the remains of

Hurricane Ivan.

In Giles County alone, there was $1.7

million done to the white corn crop.

The winds blew down the corn stalks. A

business in Ardmore, also in Giles

County, lost a roof, and sustained

about $50,000 in damages. Also, there

was roof damage done to the Giles

County High School. The School Board

approved funds for a new roof costing

$74,619. These damage assessments were

from the Emergency Management Director

and newspaper clippings.

Total damage due to this storm in

Middle Tennessee was about $170,000 in

property damage and $1.7 million in

crop damage.

TNZ032>033-064-

066-080 Flood

Street flooding was reported in

Monterey.

TENNESSEE, East

TNZ098 Tropical Depression

Numerous trees and power lines were

reported down across the county from</