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September 2004

Time Path Path

Local/ Length Width

Location Date Standard (Miles) (Yards)

NORTH DAKOTA, Central and West

Mountrail County

7 N Palermo 09 1750CST

Ward County

5 N Kenmare 09 1805CST

Ward County

1 N Kenmare 09 1810CST

1812CST

NORTH DAKOTA, East

Cavalier County

5 W Hannah 03 2245CST

Benson County

5 NE Warwick 04 0345CST

Ramsey County

2 S Doyon 04 0355CST

Nelson County

7 WSW Lakota 04 0400CST

Eddy County

10 S Hamar 20 1322CST

Nelson County

1 S Tolna 20 1340CST

Nelson County

3 S Whitman 20 1410CST

Walsh County

6 W Fordville 20 1420CST

OHIO, East

OHZ068 Noble

08 1255EST

10 0600EST

Rain from remnants of Hurricane

Frances began late on the 7th. It

ended the morning of the 9th, but

flooding continued. At 155 PM EDT,

the West Fork of Duck Creek flooded

near Caldwell. Carlisle reported 4

inches of rain. At 415 PM, Mt Ephraim

had 5″ of rain. By 528 PM, houses

were being evacuated in East Union;

all state roads were closed across

county. 200 people were evacuated

in Belle Valley and Caldwell. By 9

AM on 9th, many roads remain closed.

Total rain: Mt Ephraim 6.2 inches;

Hiramsburg 5.8″. (FRANCES)

OHZ058 Guernsey

08 1430EST

14 2200EST

Rain from remnants of Hurricane

Frances began late on the 7th. It

ended the morning of the 9th, but

flooding continued for days. By 330

PM EDT, flooding was county-wide. By

615 PM EDT, just south of Cambridge,

I-70 was closed by flooding; so were

routes 265 and 513. Many roads

remained flooded 4 PM on the 10th. By

8 PM EDT on 11th, flooding was

primarily confined to the northern

and central parts of Guernsey County.

Most small stream flooding ended by 2

am EDT on the 12th, but flooding on

Wills Creek in Cambridge continued.

Wills Creek rose to flood stage

(15 ft) at 9 PM EDT on the 8th;

crested 24.9 at 5 AM EDT 10th; and

fell below flood stage 11 PM EDT on

the 14th. The crest fell short of the

record (26.9 ft). Total rain: 6.6″ at

Salt Fork Sewage Plant. (FRANCES)

OHZ059 Belmont

08 1440EST

10 0600EST

At 340 PM EDT on the 8th, Neffs was

flooded by Big McMahon and Little

McMahon Creeks. At 4 PM, flooding

began in Colerain; school busses

stranded. At 445 PM, Pine Creek

flooded Shadyside. 549 PM, Rte 147

flooded at Bailey Mills; Rte 40

flooded Bannock. 6 PM, Lafferty

flooded. 609 PM, Rte 149 flooded

Glencoe. 650 PM, CR 2 flooded

Yorkville. 655 PM, Bethesda flooded.

720 PM, Lansing evacuations. 816 PM,

road washed away in Dilles Bottom.

854 PM, 100 homes flooded in

Wolfhurst. 914 PM, cars and buildings

under water in Maynard. 938 PM, near

Bailey Mills, car drove into flood, 2

occupants rescued. 948 PM, near

Powhatan Point, 2 woman were clinging

to a tree; rescued at 1 AM EDT on 9th.

10 PM EDT 8th, foundation of 1 house

washed away in Glencoe; Deep Run Rd

bridge washed out in Yorkville. 1026

PM, Barton evacuations. 1055 PM,

Neffs evacuations as 25 homes

flooded. 1230 AM on 9th, CR 10

collapsed near Crabapple, after

police car had passed. Countywide,

350 homes evacuated and 14 roads

flooded during the night of the 8th.

Total rain: 5.2″ in Uniontown and

4.7″ St Clairsville. (FRANCES)

OHZ057 Muskingum

08 1500EST

10 0600EST

At 4 PM EDT on 8th, roads began to

flood south of Zanesville; and 5

inches of rain fell at

Chandlersville. At 430 PM, Brush

Creek flooded near Duncan Falls. At

630 PM, Roseville was in a state of

emergency after 7 inches of rain. At

7 PM, New Concord reported severe

and widespread flooding after 7.5

inches of rain (in 24 hr).

Chandlersville and Roseville totaled

6″ of rain. (FRANCES)

OHZ039 Tuscarawas

08 1545EST

13 0600EST

By 445 PM EDT on 8th, Horse Shoe Bend

Rd flooded east of Newcomerstown; a

9-year old girl was swept off the

road by flood waters as she walked

home from school. By 5 PM, Blizzard

Rd flooded in Uhrichsville. Before

flooding ended, basements flooded

in Uhrichsville and a few homes were

evacuated in Dennison. Rte 258 closed

by mud slide. 14 structures suffered

major damage; 19 had minor. Other

roads flooded: 10, 43, 151, 331, 800.

Most small stream flooding ended by

12 PM EDT on the 9th, but flooding on

Stillwater Creek at Uhrichsville

continued. Stillwater Creek rose to

flood stage (5 ft) at 4 AM EDT on

9th; crested 10.3 at 7 AM EDT 10th;

and fell below flood stage 7 AM EDT

on the 13th. Total rain: 6.2″ at

Gilmore; 4.8 Newcomerstown. There was

a record flood on Huff Creek at

Mineral City, which crested at 5.82

ft at 530 AM EDT on 9th (previous

record 4.35). (FRANCES) F90U

OHIO, East

OHZ069 Monroe

08 1700EST

09 1400EST

At 6 PM EDT on 8th, Sunfish Creek

flooded houses in Cameron. Many roads

were under water, including those in

Sardis. By 750 PM, SR 78 was closed

by flooding near Lewisville. At 827

PM, SR 26 closed near Graysville, and

Sunfish Creek overflowed in Cameron.

Before it ended, routes 260 and 379

flooded. There were basements

flooded and people evacuated from

homes in Cameron and Clarington.

Total rain: 4.8″ in Antioch. (FRANCES)

OHZ049 Harrison

08 1700EST

10 0600EST

By 615 PM, streams were out of their

banks countywide. Basement of

Hopedale School flooded. Routes 22,

49, 151, 250, 331 closed by flooding

(times unknown). 4 to 6″ of rain by 9

PM on the 8th. By 830 AM EDT on the

9th, Jewett was closed off because

of flooding. Total rain: New Athens

4.9″; Deersville 4.6. (FRANCES)

OHZ050 Jefferson

08 1700EST

10 0600EST

By 630 PM EDT on 8th, flooding was

reported countywide. 40 roads were

closed by flooding, including SR 150.

Towns that flooded include: Adena

(evacuations), Connorsville,

Dillonvale (evac), Glen Robbins

(bridge washed out), trondale (evac),

Rayland, Smithfield (power substation

flooded), Toronto (evac), Wolf Run

(woman rescued from flooded car).

Total rain: 3.8″ in Amsterdam and

Hammondsville. There was a record

flood on Yellow Creek at

Hammondsville, which crested at

12.98 ft at 11 AM on 9th (previous

record 12.17). (FRANCES)

OHZ041 Columbiana

08 1700EST

10 0700EST

By 615 PM EDT, roads were flooded

countywide. By 730 PM, Mill Creek

began to flood the Lisbon area; and

West Point reported 6″ of rain. By

915 PM on 8th, Rte 30 from Hanoverton

to Kensington was closed by flood;

and SR 154 near Elkton is covered by

3 ft of water. Total rain: West Point

8 inches; Union 4.3; Salem 4.1.

(FRANCES)

OHZ040 Carroll

08 1715EST

12 0700EST

By 615 PM EDT, SR 524 flooded 8 miles

northeast of Carrollton. By 827 PM,

Antigua Rd was flooded about 1 mile

west of Carrollton, at the

intersection of routes 9 and 171

(rescue needed). Several roads

remained closed the morning of the

9th. By 8 AM EDT on 10th, Conotton

Creek near Sherrodsville was still

rising and causing major flooding;

while in the north, Sandy Creek

continued to flood near Minerva. 30

mobile homes were flooded in Malvern

area. In summary, 12 roads were

closed by flooding; some were

damaged. 251 homes damaged or

destroyed. Minerva sewage treatment

plant damaged. Total rain: 3.8″ in

Augusta. (FRANCES)

OHZ048 Coshocton

08 1745EST

09 0700EST

By 645 PM EDT on 8th, SR 751 flooded

near Orange; and CR 16 flooded

between Coshocton and Lafayette.

Total rain: 4.1 inches at Wills Creek

Dam. (FRANCES)

OHZ059 Belmont

17 1000EST

20 0800EST

At 11 AM EDT on 17th, CR 4 flooded

near Neffs. By noon, roads were

flooded in Bridgeport and St

Clairsville. As of 9 AM on 18th, a

few roads were still flooded but

water was receding. A total of 521

structures damaged or destroyed.

State Rte 7 was closed by multiple

mud slides. 200 ft of Rte 40 washed

away between Lansing and Brookside;

48-inch water main destroyed under

road; thousands lose water service.

Five businesses had major damage

along Rte 40, including $1 million

damage to Giant Eagle food store.

House destroyed by mud slide on Rte

250. Duffy and Powhatan Point also

flooded. Eight roads damaged by mud

slides and floods. These routes were

closed at one time: 7, 9, 145, 147,

148, 149, 250, 379, 647, 800. One

woman died (age unknown) There was a

record flood on Wheeling Creek at

Blaine, which crested at 9.86 ft

(previous record 8.21) Total rain:

6.1″ in Colerain, 5.7″ Morristown.

(Just across the river, Wheeling

storm total 9.5″) Most small stream

flooded ended by 9 AM EDT on 18th,

but flooding on the Ohio River

continued: Pike Island and Wheeling

were above flood stage from 12 AM on

18th, til 5 AM 20th. Pike Island

(flood stage 37 ft) crested 46.3 at

5 AM 19th. Wheeling (flood stage 36

ft) crested 45.3 at 5 AM 19th.

Moundsville and Powhatan Point,

(both flood stages 37 ft) were above

flood from 1 AM on 18th, til 9 AM

20th. Moundsville crested 47.0 ft at

8 AM 19th; Powhatan Point crested

45.6 at 9 AM on 19th. (All times

here EDT) (IVAN) F35VE

OHZ068 Noble

17 1014EST

18 0700EST

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Ivan began the night of the 16th and

ended just before midnight on the

17th. At 1114 AM EDT on 17th, road

flooding began in Sarahsville. By

1230 PM, major flooding occurred

from Caldwell northward. By 315 PM,

Rtes 265 and 513 were flooded west of

Batesville after 5 inches of rain. As

of 9 AM on 18th, State Rtes 147, 333,

and 564 were still closed, but water

was receding. 81 structures damaged

or destroyed. Total rain: 6″

Hiramsburg and Sharon. (IVAN)

OHZ058 Guernsey

17 1100EST

22 0700EST

By Noon EDT on 17th, many roads were

flooded, especially in southeastern

part of county. By 3 PM, people were

being evacuated because of flooding

in Quaker City. At 9 AM on 18th, 15

to 20 roads remained closed because

of flooding, including Rte 22 near

Winterset. At late as 4 PM on 19th,

Wills Creek, and streams feeding

into it, continued to cause flooding.

30 structures damaged or destroyed.

Wills Creek at Cambridge rose to

flood stage (15 ft) at 2 AM EDT on

18th; crested at 22.9 at 6 AM on

19th; and fell below flood stage 8

AM EDT on 22nd. Total rain: 4″ in

Cambridge; 3.4″ Salt Fork. (IVAN)

OHZ069 Monroe

17 1130EST

20 0900EST

At 1230 PM EDT, many roads flooded

near Woodsfield. As of 3 PM EDT,

numerous streams continued to flood

roads. Clarington also flooded.

State routes 7 and 78 were closed by

multiple mud slides. 17 structures

damaged or destroyed. Most small

stream flooding had ended by early

on the 18th, but flooding on the Ohio

River continued: at Hannibal, the

Ohio River rose above flood stage

(35 ft) at 4 AM EDT on 18th, crested

at 41.1 ft at 9 AM EDT on 19th, and

fell below flood stage at 10 AM EDT

on 20th. Total rain: 6.6 inches at

Woodsfield. (IVAN)

OHZ057 Muskingum

17 1200EST

1800EST

At 1 PM EDT on 17th, many roads were

flooded near Duncan Falls. 116

structures damaged or destroyed.

Total rain: 6.2″ at Gratiot. (IVAN)

OHZ050 Jefferson

17 1315EST

20 0100EST

At 215 PM EDT on 17th, there were

multiple mud slides on Route 7 from

Steubenville to Brilliant from heavy

rain and flooding. By 333 PM, there

was widespread flooding throughout

Jefferson Co. As of 9 AM on 18th,

many roads remained closed by

flooding and mud slides, including

Rtc 7. As of 4 PM on 19th,

Brilliant, Mingo Jet, and other

towns remained flooded. In total,

255 structures were damaged or

destroyed. These roads were closed

by flooding or mud slides at one

time: State Routes 146 through 152;

county roads 1 through 43. There was

flooding in Empire, Stratton, and

Toronto. Sewage treatment plant in

Steubenville has damaged. On the

Ohio River, New Cumberland WV was

above flood stage from 3 AM EDT on

18th, til 8 PM on 19th; it crested at

44.5 ft at 930 PM EDT on 18th (flood

stage 36). Wellsburg WV was above

flood stage from 3 AM on 18th, til 2

AM EDT on 20th; it crested at 45.1 ft

at 445 AM on 19th (flood stage 36).

Total rain: 4.2″ at Bloomingdale.

(IVAN)

OHZ048 Coshocton

17 1425EST

1800EST

At 325 PM EDT on 17th, State Rte 83

by closed by flooding near Wills

Creek in southeastern Coshocton Co.

Rtes 93 and 541 were also closed.

(IVAN)

OHZ049 Harrison

17 1445EST

19 0400EST

At 345 PM EDT on 17th, Rtes 22 and

250 were closed by flooding near

Cadiz. By 9 AM on 18th, Scio was

still under water. Rte 151 between

Scio and Bowerstown closed by flood.

137 structures damaged or destroyed.

State Routes 519, 646, and 799 also

closed by flood. Total rain: 5.1

inches in New Athens. (IVAN)

OHZ041 Columbiana

17 1500EST

18 0000EST

At 4 PM EDT on 17th, mud slides and

floods closed numerous roads near

East Liverpool. 508 PM, Will Creek

flooded Rte 518 near Summitville.

119 structures damaged or destroyed.

Total rain: 7 inches in southeastern

part of county. (IVAN)

OHIO, North

OHZ033 Mahoning

08 1800EST

2200EST

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused widespread urban and lowland

flooding in Mahoning County. Between

two and three inches of rain fell on

much of the county by late evening.

Dozens of roads in the county had to

be closed because of flooding.

Hundreds of homes in the county

experienced basement or nuisance

flooding. Flood waters in some areas

were reported to be as much as two

feet deep.

Trumbull County

Countywide 08 2120EST

09 0500EST

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused extensive flooding in Trumbull

County. The worst flooding was

reported in the eastern and central

sections of the of the county where

up to four inches of rainfall had

fallen by late evening on September

8th. The rains continued into the

9th with another two to four inches

reported in some areas before the

rain finally ended around daybreak.

Rainfall totals from the event

included: 3.36 inches at Mosquito

Creek State Park; 3.60 inches at

Newton Falls; 3.85 inches in

Leavittsburg; 4.45 inches at the

Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport

in Vienna Township and 9.40 inches

at Brookfield. The Cortland area was

especially hard hit by flooding.

Between 20 and 30 families had to be

evacuated from their homes around

2:30 a.m. after flood waters from

Walnut Run rose to nearly four feet

in depth in their neighborhood. A

total of 118 homes were damaged by

flooding in Cortland. Several roads

and culverts were also washed out in

the area. Flood waters along

Tournament Trail and Old Oak Drive

exceeded the 100 year flood plain.

Brookfield Township was also hard hit

as several small streams went into

flood washing out a couple roads and

forcing the closure of several more.

To the south, Little Yankee Creek and

Mud Run Creek went into flood in

Hubbard damaging many homes and

businesses along Main Street. Many

other roads were washed out or

damaged elsewhere in the county. A

total of 309 homes were directly

damaged by flash flooding in Trumbull

County. Hundreds of additional homes

and businesses experienced basement

or nuisance flooding.

Stark County

Southeast Portion 08 2130EST

09 0400EST

For the second time in less than

two weeks, heavy rains caused

significant flooding in the

southeastern corner of Stark County.

Rain associated with the remnants of

Tropical Storm Frances began early

on September 8th and increased in

intensity during the evening hours.

The rain continued into the early

morning hours of the 9th and finally

ended an hour or two before daybreak.

Storm total rainfall amounts

included: 2.08 inches at North

Lawrence, 2.32 inches at Genoa and

3.08 inches at Alliance. Similar to

the August 28th flash flood event,

heavy rains over Columbia County

contributed to the severity of the

flooding. Up to 9 inches of rain was

reported over the headwaters of

Sandy Creek in Columbia County. The

creek rapidly rose during the late

evening hours of the 8th and early

morning of the 9th. Over 60 homes

and business were heavily damaged

in Minerva after the creek left it’s

banks. A couple dozen people had to

be rescued or evacuated from their

homes. The water treatment plant in

Minerva sustained over $100,000 in

damages. Many roads in the southeast

corner of the county were washed out

or had to be closed because of

flooding. Dozens of additional homes

sustained damage from basement or

nuisance flooding.

Mahoning County

Countywide 08 2200EST

09 0300EST

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused flooding over portions of

Mahoning County. Most of the flooding

occurred in the eastern half of the

county where rainfall totals were the

greatest. The rain began early on the

8th and increased in intensity during

the evening hours. The heavy rain

continued into the 9th and finally

ended just before daybreak. Rainfall

totals from the event included: 3.56

inches at Sebring; 3.88 inches at

Youngstown; 5.5 inches at Poland; 7.0

inches at Canfield and 9.25 inches

near Poland. The Poland area was

especially hard hit by flooding. A

branch of Yellow Creek left it’s

banks and flooded much of the

Cobbler’s Run Subdivision along

Dobbins Road. Several families had to

be evacuated and at least two homes

were destroyed when their basement

walls collapsed. A library in Poland

was also damaged. Extensive street

nuisance flooding was reported in

both Beaver and Springfield

Townships and also in Campbell and

Boardman. Flood waters on some roads

were reported to be as much as three

feet deep. Occupants of three

vehicles had to be rescued from their

stranded cars. Two roads were washed

out in the southeastern corner of the

county. Hundreds of homes in Mahoning

County were damaged, mainly by

basement and nuisance flooding.

Ashtabula County

Countywide 08 2300EST

09 0400EST

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused flooding over portions of

Ashtabula County. Rain began early

on September 8th and increased in

intensity during the evening hours.

The heavy rain continued into the

9th and finally ended just before

daybreak. Rainfall totals from the

event included: 2.08 inches at

Ashtabula; 2.42 inches at Geneva;

2.88 inches at Jefferson; 3.00 inches

at New Lyme; 3.68 inches at Conneaut

and 4.66 inches at Pierpont.

Significant flooding occurred along

Conneaut Creek in the northeastern

corner of the county. Very heavy

rain fell over the headwaters of the

creek in Pennsylvania and caused a

rapid rise in creek levels beginning

around midnight. By 12:24 a.m., a

campground along Creek Road in

Kingsville Township was under as

much as five feet of water. 17

campers at the campground barely

escaped the rapidly rising waters

and had to be rescued by boat.

Several roads near the creek were

washed out by the floodwaters. Many

other roads, including State Route

7 had to be closed because of

flooding. Over a dozen vehicles were

damaged at an automobile dealership

by flood waters up to four feet deep.

Hundreds of homes and businesses

were damaged by flooding. Several of

these sustained significant damage.

OHZ012>014- Lake-Geauga-Ashtabula-Portage-

022>023-032>033 Trumbull-Stark-Mahoning

09 0200EST

1700EST

The remnants of Tropical Storm

Frances moved northeast across the

upper Ohio Valley on September 8th.

Gusty northerly winds behind this

storm caused considerable damage in

northeastern Ohio. Hundreds of

trees were downed in Ashtabula,

Trumbull, Mahoning, Portage, Lake,

Geauga and Stark Counties. Trumbull

County was especially hard hit with

at least five homes damaged in

the Cortland area by fallen

trees. Roads were blocked by

trees in both Niles and Liberty

Township. In Stark County, a tree hit a

moving car around 4:30 p.m. The driver

sustained only minor injuries, but the

car was heavily damaged. In Mahoning

County, a fallen tree destroyed a

garage in Milton Township. A pier at an

Eastlake marina (Lake County) was

destroyed by high winds and waves.

0HZ033 Mahoning

09 0300EST

10 2000EST

Runoff from heavy rains produced by the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused the Mahoning River to go into

flood. At Youngstown, the river went

above the flood stage of 10 feet during

the late evening hours of September

8th. The river crested at 14.35 feet

during the evening of the 9th and fell

below flood stage during the evening of

the 10th. Extensive flooding occurred

in low areas along the river. Several

roads were damaged in Mill Creek Park.

Buildings along the river in Youngstown

also sustained some damage. Many roads

along the river had to be closed

because of the flooding.

0HZ032 Stark

09 0400EST

1800EST

Heavy rains from the remnants of

Tropical Storm Frances caused

Nimishillen Creek to go into flood

during the early morning hours of

September 9th. The creek at North

Industry crested at 8.98 feet during

the early afternoon hours and fell back

below the flood stage of 8.0 feet by

early evening. Many homes and

businesses along the creek experienced

flooding. Damage to most of these

buildings was minor, but a few did

sustain significant damage. Several

roads along the creek had to be briefly

closed.

0HZ023 Trumbull

09 0500EST

10 0900EST

Runoff from rains from the remnants of

Tropical Storm Frances caused

widespread lowland and nuisance

flooding across Trumbull County. The

Mahoning River at Leavittsburg went

above the flood stage of 10 feet during

the afternoon hours of the 9th. The

river crested at 10.91 feet at 11 p.m.

and fell back below flood stage around

9 a.m. on the 10th. Homes along the

river experienced minor flooding

problems. Several roads in the county

remained closed through the 10th.

0HZ023-033 Trumbull–Mahoning

17 1115EST

19 1000EST

For the second time in a week,

extensive urban and lowland flooding

was reported across Trumbull and

Mahoning Counties. The remnants of Ivan

moved across the Ohio Valley on

September 17th. A stationary front

extending northeast from the low caused

heavy rains to develop and fall on most

of northeastern Ohio from late on

September 16th through the 17th.

Rainfall totals for the storm in

Trumbull County included: 2.00 inches

at Mespotamia; 2.87 inches at Newton

Falls and 3.64 inches at Brookfield. In

Mahoning County totals included: 2.80

inches at Canfield; 3.66 inches at East

Lewistown and 3.90 inches at Craig

Beach. Runoff from this rain caused

many rivers and streams to leave their

banks flooding many low lying areas.

Several roads had to be closed because

of the flooding. At Youngstown, the

Mahoning River went above the 10 foot

flood stage during the afternoon hours

of the 17th. The river crested at 14.26

feet at 9 p.m. and fell out of flood

late in the morning of September 19th.

At Leavittsburg, the Mahoning River

went above the 10 foot flood stage

during the evening of the 17th and

crested at 11.62 feet just before

daybreak on the 18th. The river went

out of flood early on September 19th.

Hundreds of homes in both Mahoning and

Trumbull Counties sustained damages

from either lowland or basement

flooding.

0HZ011-020>021- Cuyahoga–Medina–Summit–Wayne–Holmes

031-038

17 1200EST

1900EST

The remnants of Ivan moved across the

Ohio Valley on September 17th. A

stationary front extending northeast

from the low caused heavy rains to

develop and fall on most of

northeastern Ohio from late on

September 16th through the 17th.

Rainfall totals for the storm included:

1.76 inches at Millersburg (Holmes

County); 1.84 inches at Wooster (Wayne

County); 2.50 inches at Cuyahoga

Heights (Cuyahoga County); 2.91 inches

at Macedonia (Summit County) and 3.84

inches at Wadsworth (Medina County).

Runoff from this rain caused several

streams and creeks to leave their banks

flooding many low lying areas. A few

roads had to be closed because of

flooding. Hundreds of homes sustained

minor damage from either basement or

lowland flooding.

OHIO, Northwest

Allen County

Spencerville 03 2105EST

04 0100EST

Several county and state roads reported

closed due to flash flooding. A foot of

water reported flowing over roads.

Van Wert County

Elgin 03 2105EST

04 0100EST

County and State roads closed due to

flash flooding. At least a foot of

flowing water over roads in southeast

Van Wert county.

OHIO, Southeast

Jackson County

3 W Jackson to 04 1800EST

6 W Jackson 1815EST

Slow moving showers produced a rope

like funnel cloud west of the city.

0HZ066>067- Perry–Morgan–Athens–Washington–

075>076-083>087 Jackson–Vinton–Meigs–Gallia–

Lawrence

08 1200EST

09 2200EST

The low pressure remains of Hurricane

Frances caused about a 30 hour rain

event, from the afternoon of the 7th,

into the evening hours of the 8th.

A stalled frontal boundary helped

trigger heavier convection on the

northern, or leading edge, of the rain

shield during the late afternoon and

evening of the 7th. This initial

convection caused the heavier storm

totals to be over Morgan and Perry

Counties, compared to points further

south.

Storm totals of 4 to 7 inches were

common, with isolated amounts both

above and below those totals. Some

specific preliminary totals include New

Lexington with 7.5 inches,

McConnelsville 6.6 inches, McArthur 6.3

inches, Salem Center 5.7 inches, Athens

5.5 inches, Gallipolis 5.1 inches,

Carpenter 5.0 inches, South Point 4.7

inches, Newport and Nelsonville 4.6

inches, and finally Marietta 3.8

inches.

The Scalia Lab on the Ohio University

campus in Athens reported a storm total

of 5.3 inches. Other rain totals from

spotters included 5.9 inches at

Pageville of Meigs County, 5.7 inches

from Darwin of Meigs County and

Guysville of Athens County. Tuppers

Plain of Meigs County measured 5.4

inches. A few automated gauges totaled

5.1 inches at Coolville, 4.9 inches at

Kitts Hill, and 4.8 inches at

Amesville.

Since the ground was dry prior to this

event, most flooding was to roads and

low lying areas. In Athens County,

Sunday Creek surrounded buildings in

Trimble and blocked streets. Some

residents evacuated their homes as a

precaution. Flooding remained minor.

The gauge at Glouster crested at 16.4

feet on the 9th, well below the 19 foot

crest observed back in May, 2004.

However, flooding was more severe in

Perry, Morgan, and Washington Counties,

affecting some homes. In Perry County,

around 50 homes had major damage, with

3 homes destroyed. Duck Creek flooded

in Washington County, including around

Elba and Lower Salem. In Washington

County, one house was destroyed, while

7 homes had major damage. In Morgan

County, 8 homes had major damage.

The Muskingum River crested at 11.7

feet early on the 9th at McConnelsville

in Morgan County. Flood stage is 11

feet. The Shade river near Chester of

Meigs County rose from 4.7 feet around

0500E on the 8th, to 21.5 feet around

1830E on the 9th. Bankfull is around 17

feet.

This event set the stage for a more

widespread flood across southeast Ohio,

to follow later in the month.

0HZ066>067- Perry–Morgan–Athens–Washington–

075>076-084>087 Vinton–Meigs–Gallia–Lawrence

17 0815EST

21 1700EST

Light rain spread north into southeast

Ohio during the afternoon and evening

hours of the 16th. The heavier rain

from the remnants of Hurricane Ivan

developed over Lawrence County before

dawn on Friday the 17th, reaching the

Athens and Marietta vicinity by 0900E

on the 17th. By 1700E the heavy rain

was pulling east and northeast, out of

southeast Ohio. A rain event of 24 to

30 hours dumped 4 to 6.5 inches of

rain. Some specific preliminary totals

included Beverly 6.4 inches, McArthur 6

inches, McConnelsville 5.5 inches,

Athens and Waterloo 5.1 inches,

Marietta and Newport 4.8 inches,

Gallipolis 4.3 inches, and Nelsonville

4 inches. Rains were not as heavy over

central and northern portions of Perry

County. New Lexington measured 2.4

inches. Spotters reported 6.2 inches

from Guysville, 6.1 inches at Toppers

Plains, and 5.5 inches in Pageville.

Since the ground was still recovering

from the effects of Hurricane Frances 8

days earlier, streams crested higher in

many instances. The small stream

flooding developed during the late

morning and early afternoon period of

the 17th. Serious small stream flooding

occurred on such streams as Sunday

Creek, Duck Creek, Racoon Creek, Little

Racoon Creek, and Symmes Creek. On the

2 year old gauge at Bolins Mills on

Racoon Creek, the crest was 17 feet,

its highest. At Millfield on Sunday

Creek, a crest of 24.5 feet established

a new record. However, the upper

reaches of Sunday Creek in Perry and

northern Athens County were higher in

May of 2004, than this event. For

example, the gauge at Glouster crested

at 17.6 feet compared to 19 feet in

May. Symmes Creek near Aid crested at

23.3 feet.

The smaller rivers, such as the Little

Muskingum and Shade, saw serious

flooding. The Little Muskingum River

at Bloomfield crested at 31.1 feet,

surpassing the 30.7 feet crest in 1998.

The Rinard covered bridge, originally

built in 1874, was shoved into the

river. During a restoration project in

the early 1990s, gaps between the

wooden boards were taken out. Local

residents think, without those gaps,

the water pressure was greater,

knocking the bridge off its supports.

In this vicinity, general stores in

Bloomfield and Wingett Run were flooded

with 5 feet of water. The Shade River

crested at 30 feet near Chester. The

1997 crest was at 31.4 feet.

The Hocking River at Athens crested

slightly over its 20 foot flood stage

at 20.8 feet. The crest occurred before

dawn on the 18th at Athens.

The axis of heaviest rain ran up the

main stem of the Ohio River toward

Wheeling and Pittsburgh. Storm totals

of 6 to 8 inches were seen there. This

rain was almost direct local runoff

into the upper Ohio River. As a result,

a strong rise of 1 to 2 feet per hour

was observed on the Ohio River during

the Friday evening, the 17th. For

example, between 1600E and 2100E, the

Ohio River rose 9 feet at Willow Island

Lock and Dam, and around 10 feet on the

Marietta 2SW gauge. The 24 hour rise at

Marietta was 22 feet in 24 hours, the

greatest 24 hour rise there on record.

On the 18th and 19th, as most small

streams were receding, moderate to

major flooding occurred on the Ohio

River from New Matamoras and Willow

Island on down through Marietta,

Belpre, Racine and Pomeroy. It was the

highest stage since March 1964. The

crest then dampened to minor flooding

below the mouth of the Kanawha River.

Some specific crests included Willow

Island 44.8 feet, Marietta 2SW 42.4

feet, Belleville 45.8 feet, Racine 50.2

feet, Pomeroy 51.2 feet, and R C Bryd

Lock and Dam 51 feet. The crest was 2

to 4 feet deep inside hundreds of

Marietta businesses, plus on the order

of 40 businesses in Meigs County

including the town of Pomeroy.

In Washington County, the Red Cross

surveyed 159 homes with major damage,

with 60 homes destroyed. Two trailer

parks were hit hard by flooding around

Marietta. On the order of 400 to 500

businesses in the county were affected.

State damage assessments had 56 homes

with major damage in Athens County. In

Meigs County, 16 homes had major damage

and 1 house was destroyed. In Gallia

County, 6 homes had major damage with

1 home destroyed. In Lawrence County, 8

homes had major damage and 3 were

destroyed. In Vinton County, 5 homes

had major damage and 2 homes were

destroyed.

The FEMA disaster 1556 included this

flood event.

OHIO, Southwest

0HZ065-074 Fairfield–Hocking

08 1530EST

1830EST

The remnants of Hurricane Frances

brought heavy rains to portions of

central Ohio. Areas southeast of

Columbus received three to four inches

of rain, causing some minor flooding

problems. Numerous roads were flooded

across Fairfield and Hocking counties,

with a few roads closed near Lancaster.

Several creeks rose out of their banks

across Hocking County.

Scioto County

Countywide 17 0900EST

1400EST

Twenty roads were closed due to high

water across the county. Basements were

flooded in several homes, and one

evacuation took place.

0HZ074 Hocking

17 1200EST

1500EST

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan brought

persistent heavy rains to southern and

central Ohio. Three to five inches of

rain fell across Hocking County,

causing flooding on several roads in

the eastern part of the county. A

number of the roads were closed because

of the flooding.

Pike County

Beaver 17 1200EST

1400EST

Several roads were flooded and closed.

OKLAHOMA, Eastern

NONE REPORTED.

OKLAHOMA, Extreme Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

OKLAHOMA, Panhandle

Cimarron County

3 SSE Boise City 21 2015CST

A thunderstorm became severe over the

western Oklahoma panhandle during the

evening hours producing a brief high

wind gust at the Boise City Oklahoma

MesoNet. No damage or injuries were

reported.

OKLAHOMA, Western, Central and Southeast

Payne County

2 S Cushing 16 0500CST

Lightning struck a crude oil storage

tank causing a fire. The 80,000 barrel

capacity tank only had 8700 barrels of

crude in the tank at the time.

OREGON, Central and East

Grant County

1 N Granite 01 1509PST

Union County

La Grande 01 1545PST

Lightning from a thunderstorm hit a

home, which tripped circuit breakers,

knocked out some outlets, and left a

burn mark on the house.

Wallowa County

5 S Imnaha 01 1650PST

Wallowa County

20 ESE Enterprise 01 1715PST

High winds from a thunderstorm knocked

down large trees near the confluence of

north/south forks of the Imnaha River.

Wallowa County

20 ESE Enterprise 01 1715PST

0RZ047 John Day Basin

17 1504PST

A peak wind gust of 60 MPH was measured

at the John Day Airport.

OREGON, Northwest

NONE REPORTED.

OREGON, Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

OREGON, Southwest

ORZ021>022-024-026 South Central Oregon Coast–Curry

County Coast–Eastern Curry County &

Josephine County–Jackson County

03 1315PST

04 0500PST

See below.

A Red Flag Warning was issued for

Oregon fire weather zones 618/691/620

for expected strong winds and poor

recoveries, effective at the above

listed time interval. The winds did

blow, but recoveries were much better

than expected, so the warning did not

verify.

ORZ029>031 Klamath Basin–Northern & Eastern

Klamath County & Western Lake

County–Central & Eastern Lake County

20 2030PST

21 0800PST

See below.

A Freeze Warning was issued for the

above listed zones, effective at the

above listed times. Reported low

temperatures in the area ranged from 20

to 28 degrees, so the warning verified

well.

PACIFIC

NOT RECEIVED.

PENNSYLVANIA, Central

Fulton County

12.5 W Mc Connellsbur 08 1657EST

Trees and wires were knocked down by

thunderstorm winds near Crystal Spring.

PAZ004>005- Warren–Mckean–Cameron–Northern

011>012-017>019- Clinton–Clearfield–Northern Centre–

024>026-034>035- Southern Centre–Cambria Blair–

037-041-045>046 Huntingdon–Bedford–Fulton–Tioga–

Northern Lycoming–Southern Clinton–

Southern Lycoming

08 2045EST

10 0300EST

The remnants of Hurricane Frances moved

northeast across central Pennsylvania

from late Thursday afternoon on

September 8th, into the early morning

hours of Friday, September 9th,

producing widespread heavy rainfall,

and subsequent minor to moderate

flooding. Rainfall amounts of 3 to 5

inches within a 12 to 18 hour period

led to numerous road closures and

widespread basement flooding across

central Pennsylvania, particularly in

Blair and Huntingdon Counties. In Blair

County, a railroad bridge in

Hollidaysburg Borough was damaged by

flood waters, while approximately 200

persons were evacuated due to flooded

homes. In Huntingdon County, Juniata

College evacuated 23 persons from a

dormitory due to flooding, while in

Logan Township, 35 calves were swept

away by flood waters from a farm.

Somerset County

Central City 08 2100EST

09 0000EST

Thunderstorms produced torrential rain

across Somerset County, leading to

Flash Flooding in Central City. US

Route 30 was closed in several places

due to flooding and debris over the

roadway. Several secondary roads were

also closed in the vicinity of Central

City and Meyersdale.

PAZ026 Huntingdon

09 0100EST

1400EST

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Little Juniata River at Spruce Creek.

The creek rose above flood stage of 8.0

feet at 01:00 EST on the 9th, crested

at 12.94 feet at 5:45 EST on the 9th,

then fell back below flood stage at

14:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ025 Blair

09 0100EST

2200EST

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Frankstown Branch of the Juniata River

at Williamsburg. The river rose above

flood stage of 12.0 feet at 1:00 EST on

the 9th, crested at 16.91 feet at 10:00

EST on the 9th, then fell back below

flood stage at 22:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ026 Huntingdon

09 0715EST

2015EST

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Juniata River at Huntingdon. The river

rose above flood stage of 12.0 feet at

7:15 EST on the 9th, crested at 13.45

feet at 11:45 EST on the 9th, then fell

back below flood stage at 20:15 EST on

the 9th.

PAZ045 Southern Clinton

09 0900EST

2230EST

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Bald Eagle Creek at Beech Creek

Station. The creek rose above flood

stage of 11.0 feet at 09:00 EST on the

9th, crested at 12.68 feet at 14:45 EST

on the 9th, then fell back below flood

stage at 22:30 EST on the 9th.

PAZ034 Bedford

09 1100EST

1400EST

Heavy rain caused flooding of Raystown

Branch of the Juniata River at Saxton.

The river rose above flood stage of

17.0 feet at 11:00 EST on the 9th,

crested at 17.15 feet at 12:30 EST on

the 9th, then fell back below flood

stage at 14:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ010 Elk

09 1100EST

1400EST

Heavy rain caused the Clarion River at

Johnsonburg to rise above its flood

stage of 7 feet at 11:00 EST on the

9th, crest at 7.23 feet on the 9th

shortly after 11:00 EST and fell below

flood stage at 14:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ026 Huntingdon

09 1130EST

1945EST

Heavy rain caused flooding of the

Aughwick Creek at Shirleysburg. The

river rose above flood stage of 10 feet

at 11:30 EST on the 9th, crested at

10.79 feet at 16:45 EST on the 9th and

then fell back below flood stage at

19:45 EST on the 9th.

PAZ046 Southern Lycoming

10 0800EST

11 000EST

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Montgomery to

exceed its flood stage of 17 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 08:00

EST on the 10th, crested at 18.6 feet

at 11:00 on the 10th and fell below

flood stage at 00:00 EST on the 11th.

Warren County

Sheffield 17 1400EST

1926EST

Heavy rain caused rapid rises along

Tionesta Creek in southeast Warren

County. Several homes were quickly

surrounded by flood waters during the

mid afternoon hours. The flooding

prevented several school students from

returning home, since their homes were

inaccessible due to flood waters. Flood

waters quickly receded during the early

evening hours.

PAZ004>006- Warren–Mckean–Potter–Elk–Cameron–

010>012-017>019- Northern Clinton–Clearfield–Northern

024>028-033>037- Centre–Southern Centre–Cambria–

041>042-045>046- Blair–Huntingdon–Mifflin–Juniata–

049>053-056>059- Somerset–Bedford–Fulton–Franklin–

063>66 Tioga–Northern Lycoming–Sullivan–

Union–Snyder–Montour–

Northumberland–Columbia–Perry–

Dauphin–Schuylkill–Lebanon–

Cumberland–Adams–York–Lancaster

17 1500EST

19 2000EST

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan moved

north along the Appalachians during

Friday, September 17th, and interacted

with an approaching cold front, leading

to a large swath of excessive rainfall

across central Pennsylvania as the

system weakened to a tropical

depression. The rain began during

Friday morning, and then became very

heavy from Friday afternoon into Friday

evening. Rainfall amounts of 3 to 6

inches were common, with some localized

amounts exceeding 8 inches within a 12

hour period. The heavy rainfall finally

tapered off from west to east across

central Pennsylvania late Friday night.

As a result of this excessive rainfall,

and antecedent heavy rainfall from the

remnants of Hurricane Frances one week

earlier, widespread flooding occurred

throughout central Pennsylvania from

Friday evening through early Monday,

September 20th. Many smaller creeks and

streams overflowed their banks by

Friday evening, while many larger

tributaries of the Susquehanna River

experienced moderate to major flooding

from Saturday into Sunday. In fact,

flood levels at many locations reached

into the top 5 of all flood events,

with many river forecast points

cresting above levels reached in the

January 1996 flood. Overall, 32 of 47

river forecast points exceeded flood

stage in central Pennsylvania, with 2

points setting all-time record high

water marks, as Bald Eagle Creek at

Beech Creek Station reached 15.96 feet,

and the Frankstown Branch of the

Juniata River reached 19.46 feet.

The widespread flooding closed hundreds

of roads and bridges across central

Pennsylvania, causing a significant

adverse impact on commerce and

transportation for several days. In

particular, Route 322 through the

“narrows” section of Juniata and

Mifflin Counties was closed, in

addition to numerous smaller roadways.

The high water also caused the

weakening of several flood control

structures in Cambria, Huntingdon, and

Montour Counties, leading to

evacuations. In addition, two deaths

were attributed to the flooding. One

death occurred in Greenfield Township

in Blair County, where a 2.5 year old

boy was swept away from waters of

Popular Run Creek, as the family was

cleaning up storm damage and the child

wandered off to the creek and was swept

away. The death occurred between 12:30

PM and 1:00 PM EST on Saturday

September 18th. The second death

occurred in Mifflin County to a 59 year

old male, who was found within receding

waters. Preliminary monetary estimates

of flood damage from the remnants of

Ivan across the state were over 50

million dollars.

M2IW, M59IW

Fulton County

17 SW Mc Connellsbur 17 1630EST 0.5 40

1632EST

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Fulton

County Pennsylvania from the storms of

September 17 2004. The tornado occurred

3.5 miles east of McKees Gap along

route 731 (McKees Gap Road). Wind

speeds were estimated to be around 75

mph.

The tornado touched about one quarter

mile south of McKees Gap Road downing

several trees, damaging the roof of a

house, damaging part of a barn and

leveling a tractor barn. The tornado

also flattened tall grass and corn. The

tornado traveled toward the

north-northwest for about half a mile.

It toppled and uprooted trees as it

crossed McKees Gap Road before lifting

up. The width of the tornado was about

30 to 40 yards and damage could be

followed for about half a mile.

The tornado touched down at

approximately 530 pm EDT and was on the

ground for about 1 to 2 minutes. The

tornado was a weak F1 tornado on the

Fujita scale. There were no injuries or

deaths.

PAZ037 Tioga

17 1730EST

18 1245EST

Heavy rain caused the Tioga River at

Mansfield to exceed its flood stage of

9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 17:30 EST on the 17th, crested

at 14.21 feet at 04:30 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 12:45 EST

on the 18th.

Franklin County

2 SW Greencastle 17 1814EST 2 30

1918EST

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Franklin

County.

The tornado occurred near the town of

Greencastle and was rated an F1 on the

Fujita scale. Wind speeds were

estimated to be near 80 mph. The

tornado first hit the ground about 2

miles to the southwest of Greencastle

and moved to the north-northwest for

about 2 miles. The width of the storm

was approximately 30 yards. The tornado

touched down at approximately 714 pm

EDT and lifted at approximately 718 pm

EDT. The tornado caused many trees to

fall and damaged several structures.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Franklin County

3 SW St Thomas 17 1828EST 2.5 50

1832EST

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Franklin

County.

The tornado occurred near the town of

Saint Thomas and was rated an F1 on the

Fujita scale. Top wind speeds were

estimated at about 85 mph. The path was

2.5 miles long and began 3 miles

south-southwest of Saint Thomas. The

width of this tornado was 30 yards. The

tornado touched down approximately at

728 pm EDT and lifted at 732 pm EDT.

This tornado caused many trees to fall

and damaged several structures.

PAZ018>019- Northern Centre–Southern Centre–

024>028-033>036 Cambria–Blair–Huntingdon–Mifflin–

Juniata–Somerset–Bedford–Fulton–

Franklin

17 1900EST

18 0100EST

Strong winds associated with the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan, combined

with excessively wet soil resulted in

the downing of hundreds of trees across

portions of south central Pennsylvania

during Friday evening on September

17th. Although the system weakened to a

tropical depression upon reaching

Pennsylvania, with estimated winds

between 35 and 45 mph, the extremely

wet soil from recent heavy rainfall, in

addition to water-loaded foliage likely

led to this blow-down phenomenon. Areas

that were particularly hit hard

included exposed eastern slopes within

the ridges of central Pennsylvania, and

also in valley locations near the foot

of these ridges. Such areas included

the east facing ridges within Blue Knob

State Park, with an estimated 800 acres

affected, mainly between 1800 and 2000

EST, the eastern slopes within Rothrock

State Forest, and the valley at Tussey

Mountain. Fallen trees resulted in some

structural damage in Huntingdon County

where a camper was destroyed at Camp

Blue Diamond, and a hunting cottage was

damaged about 13 miles south of Camp

Blue Diamond. Most of the trees that

fell were aligned from northeast to

southwest, indicative of the strong

sustained straight line winds that

occurred during this event.

Franklin County

9 E Chambersburg 17 1918EST 1.5 100

1920EST

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed that a tornado

occurred in Caledonia State Park in

easternmost Franklin County

Pennsylvania.

The tornado began less than a mile

south of the park and then moved

northward across Route 30 and through

the park, toppling numerous trees in

its path. The tornado was about one and

one-half miles in length with a width

of 50 to 100 yards and a top wind speed

estimated around 85 mph. The tornado

was rated as an Fl on the Fujita scale.

The tornado touched down about 818 pm

EDT and lasted a couple of minutes.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Bedford County

3 NW Everett 17 1930EST 3.5 100

1935EST

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Bedford

County.

The tornado occurred north of the town

of Everett and was rated an Fl on the

Fujita scale. Wind speeds were

estimated to be around 80 mph. The

tornado first touched down 3 miles

northwest of the town of Everett on

Lower Snake Spring Road. The tornado

traveled north along Snake Spring Road

for three and one half miles before

lifting up. The width of the tornado

was 50 to 100 yards.

The tornado touched down at

approximately 830 pm EDT and lifted at

approximately 835 pm EDT. The tornado

caused many trees to fall, and damaged

one house and several farm buildings.

Extensive damage was done to corn crops

on six different farms.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Bedford County

2.5 NE Bedford 17 1940EST 2.3 50

1944EST

A survey of the area near Imlertown and

Yount revealed a tornado struck the

region around 840 pm EDT.

The damage and snapped trees near Yount

suggest a weak F1 tornado on the Fujita

scale. The tornado touched down south

of Yount along Station Road. The

tornado moved northwest causing

sporadic damage along Younts Road and

Briar Valley Road. The main damage was

snapped and uprooted trees suggesting

winds of 70 to 75 mph. On Briars Valley

Road, the tornado lifted off a barn

roof. It also uprooted and snapped

trees as it moved up the hill from the

farm. The tornado had about a two and

one quarter mile long path that was

about 50 yards wide.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Cumberland County

Oakville 17 1955EST 2 50

1958EST

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in

Cumberland County.

The tornado occurred near the town of

Oakville and was rated an F1 on the

Fujita scale. Wind speeds were

estimated to be near 90 mph. The

tornado first touched down 1 mile south

of Oakville, and moved north for about

2 miles before lifting up. The width of

the tornado was about 50 yards.

The tornado touched down at

approximately 855 pm EDT and lifted at

approximately 858 pm EDT. The tornado

caused many trees to fall, and damaged

several farm houses and farm buildings.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Juniata County

3 NW Mifflintown 17 2005EST 1 75

2007EST

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Juniata

County.

A tornado touched down near the town of

Denholm and was likely influenced by

the steep terrain of the area. The

damage, in the form of downed trees,

could be easily seen from Route 333.

About 100 trees were knocked down with

this tornado. The path was

approximately 1 mile long and about 75

yards wide. The tornado occurred around

905 pm EDT and lifted at 907 pm EDT.

This tornado was rated F1 on the Fujita

scale with winds approaching 85 mph.

There were no known injuries or deaths.

Juniata County

3 N Mifflintown 17 2010EST 4.5 100

2013EST

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Juniata

County.

A tornado touched down near the town of

Arch Rock. It downed trees which were

visible along Township Road 527. The

length of the tornado was approximately

4.5 miles and the width was about 100

yards. In addition to the tornado,

downburst winds were also observed in a

much wider swath. Damage was mainly

confined to trees being knocked down,

however several structures had minor

damage and several corn fields were

flattened. The tornado touched down at

approximately 910 pm EDT and lasted

until approximately 913 pm EDT. The

tornado was rated Fl on the Fujita

scale with winds estimated at 85 mph.

There were no known injuries or deaths.

PAZ026 Huntingdon

17 2015EST

18 2045EST

Heavy rain caused the Little Juniata

River at Spruce Creek to exceed its

flood stage of 8 feet. The river rose

above flood stage at 20:15 EST on the

17th, crested at 15.46 feet at 04:45

EST on the 18th, and fell below flood

stage at 20:45 EST on the 18th.

PAZ037 Tioga

17 2015EST

2215EST

Heavy rain caused the Tioga River at

Tioga Junction to exceed its flood

stage of 15 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 20:15 EST on the 17th,

crested at 15.33 at 21:30 EST on the

17th, and fell below flood stage at

22:15 EST on the 17th.

PAZ045 Southern Clinton

17 2045EST

19 1145EST

Heavy rain caused the Bald Eagle Creek

at Beech Creek Station to exceed its

flood stage of 11 feet. The river rose

above flood stage at 20:45 EST on the

17th, crested at 15.96 feet at 11:45

EST on the 18th, and fell below flood

stage at 11:45 EST on the 19th.

PAZ025 Blair

17 2045EST

19 0515EST

Heavy rain caused the Frankstown Branch

of the Juniata River at Williamsburg to

exceed its flood stage of 12 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 20:45

EST on the 17th, crested at 19.46

(record) at 10:45 EST on the 18th, and

fell below flood stage at 05:15 EST on

the 19th.

Perry County

9.5 SW Newport 17 2100EST

Thunderstorm winds blew the roof off a

barn on Little Germany Road near Route

274 in Little Germany.

Cambria County

11 E Carrolltown 17 2130EST

18 0046EST

Heavy rain caused Dysart Sportsmans

Club Dam to overtop during the evening

of September 17. Water overtopped the

breast of the dam by one and one half

feet, causing the evacuation of about

10 residents downstream of the dam. One

home was flooded, along with several

others reporting water in their

basements. Portions of the built-up

embankments of the retaining pond

collapsed into Clearfield Creek. In

addition, Cherry Tree Reservoir was

thought to be in danger of failing, and

evacuations also took place. This

structure did, however, not fail.

Perry County

New Germantown 17 2130EST

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

along Bryner Road in the Tuscarora

State Forest near New Germantown and

Route 274.

PAZ010 Elk

17 2200EST

18 0500EST

Heavy rain caused the Clarion River at

Ridgway to exceed its flood stage of 16

feet. The river exceeded flood stage at

22:00 EST on the 17th, crested at 16.89

feet at 00:00 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 05:00 EST on the

18th.

PAZ050 Snyder

17 2230EST

19 1615EST

Heavy rain caused Penns Creek at Penns

Creek to exceed its flood stage of 8

feet. The river rose above flood stage

at 22:30 EST on the 17th, crested at

12.19 feet at 11:30 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:15 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ026 Huntingdon

18 0000EST

19 1015EST

Heavy rain caused the Aughwick Creek at

Shirleysburg to exceed its flood stage

of 10 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 00:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 18.5 feet at 12:15 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 10:15 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ046 Southern Lycoming

18 0015EST

1600EST

Heavy rain caused the Loyalsock Creek

at Loyalsockville to exceed its flood

stage of 12 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 00:15 EST on the 18th,

crested at 15.24 feet at 10:30 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

16:00 EST on the 18th.

PAZ026 Huntingdon

18 0030EST

19 0500EST

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Huntingdon to exceed its flood stage of

12 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 00:30 EST on the 18th, crested

at 17.78 feet at 10:15 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 05:00 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ011 Cameron

18 0030EST

0830EST

Heavy rain caused Sinnemahoning Creek

at Sinnemahoning to exceed its flood

stage of 17 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 00:30 EST on the 18th,

crested at 17.78 feet at 03:00 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

08:30 EST on the 18th.

PAZ034 Bedford

18 0200EST

2015EST

Heavy rain caused the Raystown Branch

of the Susquehanna River at Saxton to

exceed its flood stage of 17 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 02:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 20.02 feet

at 11:30 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 20:15 EST on the

18th.

PAZ010 Elk

18 0215EST

0700EST

Heavy rain caused the Clarion River at

Johnsonburg to exceed its flood stage

of 7 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 02:15 EST on the 18th, crested

at 7.43 feet at 03:00 EST on the 18th

and fell below flood stage at 07:00 EST

on the 18th.

PAZ045 Southern Clinton

18 0215EST

2030EST

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Renovo to

exceed its flood stage of 16 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 02:15

EST on the 18th, crested at 21.14 feet

at 10:16 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 20:30 EST on the

18th.

PAZ056 Perry

18 0245EST

19 0100EST

Heavy rain caused the Sherman Creek at

Shermans Dale to exceed its flood stage

of 9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 02:45 EST on the 18th, crested

at 16.31 feet at 10:30 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 01:00 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ057 Dauphin

18 0300EST

20 0500EST

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Hershey to exceed its flood stage of 7

feet. The river rose above flood stage

at 03:00 EST on the 18th, crested at

14.27 feet at 09:30 on the 19th, and

fell below flood stage at 05:00 EST on

the 20th.

Lancaster County

Bainbridge 18 0400EST

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and wires in Bainbridge.

PAZ059 Lebanon

18 0415EST

19 1915EST

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Harper Tavern to exceed its flood stage

of 9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 04:15 EST on the 18th, crested

at 17.35 feet at 01:00 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 19:15 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ063 Cumberland

18 0430EST

19 1515EST

Heavy rain caused the Yellow Breeches

Creek at Camp Hill to exceed its flood

stage of 7 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 04:30 EST on the 18th,

crested at 8.67 feet at 16:15 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

15:15 EST on the 19th.

PAZ046 Southern Lycoming

18 0500EST

20 1900EST

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Montgomery to

exceed its flood stage of 17 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 05:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.8 feet

at 01:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 19:00 EST on the

20th.

PAZ026 Huntingdon

18 0600EST

19 0045EST

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Mapleton Depot to exceed its flood

stage of 20 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 06:00 EST on the 18th,

crested at 23.76 feet at 14:15 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

00:45 EST on the 19th.

PAZ045 Southern Clinton

18 0615EST

19 1100EST

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Lock Haven to

exceed its flood stage of 21 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 06:15

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.13 feet

at 16:00 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 11:00 EST on the

19th.

PENNSYLVANIA, Central

PAZ046 Southern Lycoming

18 0715EST

19 2330EST

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Williamsport

to exceed its flood stage of 20 feet.

The river rose above flood stage at

07:15 EST on the 18th, crested at 27.82

feet at 22:45 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 23:30 EST on the

19th.

PAZ033 Somerset

18 0800EST

0900EST

Heavy rain caused the Youghiogheny

River at Confluence to exceed its flood

stage of 12 feet. The river rose to

flood stage at 08:00 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 09:00 EST

on the 18th.

PAZ052 Northumberland

18 0845EST

20 1130EST

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Milton to rise

above its flood stage of 19 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 08:45

EST on the 18th, crested at 27.94 feet

at 06:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 11:30 EST on the

20th.

PAZ046 Southern Lycoming

18 0900EST

20 1700EST

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Muncy to

exceed its flood stage of 20 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 09:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.8 feet

at 01:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 17:00 EST on the

20th.

PAZ049 Union

18 0900EST

20 1416EST

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Lewisburg to

exceed its flood stage of 18 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 09:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 26.01 feet

at 09:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 14:16 EST on the

20th.

PAZ057 Dauphin

18 0900EST

20 0100EST

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Middletown to exceed its flood stage of

11 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 09:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 19.5 feet at 07:00 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 01:00 EST

on the 20th.

PAZ027 Mifflin

18 0930EST

19 1630EST

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Lewistown to exceed its flood stage of

23 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 09:30 EST on the 18th, crested

at 31.68 feet at 01:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:30 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ052 Northumberland

18 1100EST

20 1100EST

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Watsontown to

exceed its flood stage of 23 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 11:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.8 feet

at 01:00 on the 19th, and fell below

flood stage at 11:00 EST on the 20th.

PAZ046 Southern Lycoming

18 1200EST

19 1300EST

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Jersey Shore

to exceed its flood stage of 26 feet.

The river rose above flood stage at

12:00 EST on the 18th, crested at 30.74

feet at 21:00 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 13:00 EST on the

19th.

PAZ063 Cumberland

18 1400EST

20 1030EST

Heavy rain caused the Conodoguinet

Creek at Hogestown to exceed its flood

stage of 8 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 14:00 EST on the 18th,

crested at 11.35 feet at 17:45 EST on

the 19th, and fell below flood stage

at 10:30 EST on the 20th.

PAZ053 Columbia

18 1615EST

20 1845EST

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Bloomsburg to exceed its flood stage

of 19 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 16:15 EST on the 18th, crested

at 27.12 EST at 09:45 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 18:45 EST

on the 20th.

PAZ052 Northumberland

18 1730EST

20 1830EST

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Sunbury to exceed its flood stage of

24 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 17:30 EST on the 18th, crested

at 30.44 feet at 13:30 EST on the 19th

and fell below flood stage at 18:30 EST

on the 20th.

PAZ057 Dauphin

18 1900EST

21 0330EST

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Harrisburg to exceed its flood stage

of 17 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 19:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 24.4 feet at 19:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 03:30 EST

on the 21st.

PAZ051 Montour

18 1900EST

20 2030EST

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Danville to exceed its flood stage

of 20 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 19:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 26.22 feet at 15:30 on the 19th, and

fell below flood stage at 20:30 EST on

the 20th.

PAZ066 Lancaster

18 2000EST

21 1030EST

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Marietta to exceed its flood stage

of 49 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 20:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 55.67 feet at 16:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 10:30 EST

on the 21st.

PAZ056 Perry

18 2230EST

19 1600EST

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Newport to exceed its flood stage of 22

feet. The river rose above flood stage

at 22:30 EST on the 18th, crested at

23.58 feet at 06:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:00 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ045 Southern Clinton

28 0230EST

0700EST

Heavy rain caused the Bald Eagle Creek

at Beech Creek Station to exceed its

flood stage of 11 feet. The creek rose

above flood stage at 02:30 EST on the

28th, crested at 11.6 feet at 07:00 EST

on the 28th and fell back below flood

stage just after 07:00 EST

on the 28th.

PAZ035>036- Fulton–Franklin–Perry–Dauphin–

056>059-063>066 Schuylkill–Lebanon–Cumberland–

Adams–York–Lancaster

28 1200EST

29 0700EST

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne moved

northeast along the east slopes of the

Appalachians during Tuesday, September

28th, eventually moving off the mid

Atlantic Coast by early Tuesday

evening. However, a large plume of

tropical moisture to the northwest of

the system produced widespread heavy

rainfall across south central

Pennsylvania during Tuesday, with

rainfall amounts of 2 to 4 inches. This

rainfall, combined with excessively wet

soil and swollen rivers from the

remnants of 2 antecedent tropical

systems, produced mainly minor flooding

across portions of south central

Pennsylvania, with several road

closures and some basement flooding

report.

PAZ059 Lebanon

28 2100EST

29 1315EST

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Harper Tavern to exceed its flood stage

of 9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 21:00 EST on the 28th, crested

at 10.09 feet at 05:00 EST on the 29th,

and fell below flood stage at 13:15 EST

on the 29th.

PAZ063 Cumberland

28 2145EST

29 0530EST

Heavy rain caused the Yellow Breeches

Creek at Camp Hill to exceed its flood

stage of 7 feet. The creek rose above

flood stage at 21:45 EST on the 28th,

crested at 7.52 feet at 01:15 EST on

the 29th and fell below flood stage at

05:30 EST on the 29th.

PAZ063 Cumberland

29 0430EST

30 1130EST

Heavy rain caused the Conodoguinet

Creek at Hogestown to exceed its flood

stage of 8 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 04:30 EST on the 29th,

crested 8.73 feet at 00:00 EST on the

30th and fell below flood stage at

11:30 EST on the 30th.

PAZ057 Dauphin

29 1045EST

1600EST

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Hershey to exceed its flood stage of 7

feet. The creek rose above flood stage

at 10:45 EST on the 29th, crested at

7.01 feet at 11:30 EST on the 29th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:00 EST

on the 29th.

PAZ057 Dauphin

29 1200EST

1300EST

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Middletown to reach flood stage of 11

feet. The creek rose to flood stage at

12:00 EST on the 29th, crested at 11.00

feet at 12:00 EST on the 29th and fell

below flood stage at 13:00 EST on the

29th.

PAZ063 Cumberland

29 1655EST

30 0245EST

Heavy rain and local runoff caused the

Yellow Breeches Creek at Camp Hill to

exceed its flood stage of 7 feet again.

The creek rose above flood stage at

16:55 EST on the 29th, crested at 7.56

feet at 22:15 EST on the 29th, and fell

below flood stage at 02:45 on the 30th.

PENNSYLVANIA, East

Northampton County

Central Portion 08 1700EST

2300EST

Heavy rain associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Frances caused poor

drainage flooding and flooding of some

of the streams in Northampton County.

Most of the flooding affected the

central part of the county the most. A

number of stranded vehicles were

reported in Nazareth, Bath and Belfast.

Tatamy Road was closed near the

Nazareth Middle School in Upper

Nazareth Township. Doppler Radar storm

total estimates reached three inches in

the county. Storm totals included 3.37

inches in Forks Township and 1.59

inches at the Lehigh Valley

International Airport.

Berks County

4 W Birdsboro 17 2100EST

A severe thunderstorm knocked down

numerous trees and snapped several

poles in the Green Hills area of

Robeson Township. Sporadic tree wind

damage extended for about one mile.

Monroe County

Countywide 18 0248EST

19 2335EST

PAZ055 Monroe

18 1538EST

20 0132EST

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from the late evening of the

17th through the first half of the day

on the 18th in Monroe County. Doppler

Radar storm total estimates averaged

between 3 and 6 inches throughout the

county. The torrential rain caused

widespread poor drainage, creek and

river flooding. It was the worst

flooding along the Delaware River since

1955. Every stream in the county

flooded. About 160 homes and businesses

were damaged. Extensive damage also

occurred in the Delaware Water Gap

National Recreational Area. President

George W. Bush declared the county a

disaster area. Damage was estimated at

between fifteen and seventeen million

dollars.

The Delaware River at Tocks Island was

above its 21 foot flood stage from 438

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 232 a.m.

EDT on the 20th. It crested at 30.32

feet at 845 a.m. EDT.

The Brodhead Creek at Analomink was

above its 8 foot flood stage from 826

a.m. through Noon EDT on the 18th. It

crested at 8.53 feet at 10 a.m. EDT.

The Pohopoco Creek at Kresgeville was

above its 8.5 foot flood stage from 643

a.m. EDT through 951 p.m. EDT on the

18th. It crested at 8.99 feet at 230

p.m. EDT. The Brodhead Creek at

Minisink Hills was above its 10 foot

flood stage from 927 a.m. EDT on the

18th through 1235 a.m. EDT on the 20th.

It crested at 18.27 feet at 815 a.m.

EDT on the 19th. The Bush Kill Creek at

Shoemakers was above its 6 foot flood

stage from 732 a.m. EDT on the 18th

through 6 a.m. EDT on the 19th. It

crested at 7.27 feet at 230 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. The Lehigh River at

Stoddartsville was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 622 a.m. EDT on the

the 18th through 221 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 11.59 feet at 1215

p.m. EDT on the 18th. The Tobyhanna

Creek at Blakeslee was above its 10

foot flood stage from 348 a.m. EDT on

the 18th through 450 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 12.71 feet at 1245

p.m. EDT on the 18th.

Storm totals included 6.02 inches at

Pocono Summit.

Lehigh County

Countywide 18 0440EST

19 0652EST

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall during the first half of the

day on the 18th in Lehigh County. Storm

totals average around 5 inches and

caused widespread poor drainage,

creek and river flooding throughout the

county. Hardest hit were the city of

Allentown, Lower Macungie and Macungie

Townships. It was estimated that

85 homes, 31 businesses and five public

buildings and structures were damaged.

The preliminary damage estimate was

five million dollars.

The Lehigh River at Walnutport

(Northampton County) was above its 8

foot flood stage from 904 a.m. EDT on

the 18th through 102 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 12.32 feet at 245

p.m. EDT on the 18th. Farther

downstream the Lehigh River in

Bethlehem was above its 16 foot flood

stage from 212 p.m. EDT through 1156

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

18.79 feet at 700 p.m. EDT. The Little

Lehigh Creek within Little Lehigh Park

was above its 6 foot flood stage from

721 a.m. EDT on the 18th through

Midnight EDT on the 19th. It crested at

10.49 feet at 345 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

Farther downstream, the Little Lehigh

Creek at 10th Street within Allentown

was above its 8 foot flood stage from

1040 a.m. EDT through 951 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. It crested at 10.05 feet at

615 p.m. EDT. The Monocacy Creek at

Bethlehem was above its 4.5 foot flood

stage from 540 a.m. EDT on the 18th

through 752 a.m. EDT on the 19th. It

crested at 9.67 feet at 2 p.m. EDT on

the 18th.

Storm totals included 8.90 inches in

Orefield, 7.25 inches in Bethlehem,

5.32 inches in Coopersburg and 4.82

inches at the Lehigh Valley

International Airport.

Northampton County

Countywide 18 0440EST

19 0652EST

PAZ062 Northampton

18 1431EST

19 1942EST

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall during the first half of the

day on the 18th in Northampton County.

Storm totals average around 5 inches

and caused widespread poor drainage,

creek and river flooding throughout the

county. Runoff from the heavy rain also

caused the worst flooding along the

Delaware River since 1955. Nearly every

township in the county reported flood

damage. President George W. Bush

declared the county a disaster area.

About 865 homes, businesses and

structures were damaged including

several roads and bridges.

The Delaware River washed a home from

Harmony Township (Warren County)

downstream, the home crashed into the

Easton-Phillipsburg free bridge. The

impact sheared the roof from the home

and the remainder floated under the

bridge.

The Lehigh River at Walnutport

(Northampton County) was above its 8

foot flood stage from 904 a.m. EDT on

the 18th through 102 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 12.32 feet at 245

p.m. EDT on the 18th. Farther

downstream the Lehigh River in

Bethlehem was above its 16 foot flood

stage from 212 p.m. EDT through 1156

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

18.79 feet at 700 p.m. EDT. Farther

downstream, the Lehigh River at Glendon

was above its 19 foot flood stage from

1118 a.m. EDT on the 18th through 620

a.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested at

19.82 feet at 415 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

The Monocacy Creek at Bethlehem was

above its 4.5 foot flood stage from

540 a.m. EDT on the 18th through 752

a.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested at

9.67 feet at 2 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

Along the Delaware River at Belvidere,

the river was above its 22 foot flood

stage from 1101 p.m. EDT on the 18th

through 842 p.m. EDT on the 19th. It

crested at 24.83 feet at 915 a.m. EDT

on the 19th. Farther downstream, the

Delaware River at the Easton-

Phillipsburg Bridge was above its 22

foot flood stage from 331 p.m. EDT on

the 18th through 1126 a.m. EDT on the

20th. It crested at 33.45 feet at 8

a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Storm totals included 7.25 inches in

Bethlehem, 6.88 inches in Forks

Township and 4.70 inches in Easton.

Montgomery County

Northwest Portion 18 0557EST

2214EST

PAZ068 Montgomery

18 2214EST

19 1118EST

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacted with an approaching cold

front and dropped very heavy rain

across Montgomery County, especially

in the northwestern half of the county.

The heaviest rain fell between 3 a.m.

EDT and Noon EDT on the 18th. There was

widespread poor drainage flooding as

well as flooding of many of the streams

in the northwest part of the county.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 1.5 and 5.0 inches.

Runoff from the heavy rain within the

county and also upstream led to

flooding along the Schuylkill River.

The West Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Hillegass was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 1018 a.m. EDT through 231

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

5.76 feet at Noon EDT. The East Branch

of the Perkiomen Creek at Schwenksville

was above its 7 foot flood stage from

657 a.m. EDT through 1017 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. It crested at 10.35 feet at

830 a.m. EDT on the 18th. The main stem

of the Perkiomen Creek at East

Greenville was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 742 a.m. through 529 p.m.

EDT on the 18th. It crested at 7.07

feet at 10 a.m. EDT. Farther

downstream, the Perkiomen Creek at

Graterford was above its 11 foot flood

stage from 942 a.m. EDT through 1043

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

14.8 feet at 330 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

The Manatawny Creek at Pottstown was

above its 6 foot flood stage from 1103

a.m. EDT through 10 p.m. EDT on the

18th. It crested at 7.41 feet at 7 p.m.

EDT. The Schuylkill River at Pottstown

was above its 13 foot flood stage from

714 p.m. EDT on the 18th through 1218

p.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested at

14.59 feet at 530 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Storm totals included 4.50 inches in

Pottstown, 4.00 inches in Hatfield and

Green Lane, 3.78 inches in Palm and

3.12 inches at the Pottstown Airport.

Bucks County

Northwest Portion 18 0630EST

1622EST

PAZ069 Bucks

18 1622EST

20 1145EST

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy in

the upper part of Bucks County during

the first half of the day on the 18th.

Very heavy rain also fell in the upper

and middle sections of the Delaware

River Valley. The runoff from both

produced widespread poor drainage and

creek flooding in the upper part of

Bucks County and the worst flooding

along the Delaware River since 1955.

President George W. Bush declared Bucks

County a disaster area. Municipalities

and roadways along the Delaware River

and the Lehigh County were hardest hit

and they included Quakertown,

Springfield, Durham, Nockamixon,

Bridgeton, Tinicum, Solebury, Upper

Makefeld, Yardley and Lower Makefield.

Around 500 homes and 29 businesses were

damaged. Damage was estimated at 25

million dollars.

The Delaware River at Riegelsville was

above its 22 foot flood stage from 522

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 1025 a.m.

EDT on the 20th. It crested at 30.95

feet at 1115 a.m. EDT on the 19th. The

Delaware River at Frenchtown (Hunterdon

County) was above its 16 foot flood

stage from 6 p.m. EDT on the 18th

through 927 a.m. EDT on the 20th. It

crested at 20.7 feet at 1 p.m. EDT on

the 19th. The Delaware River at

Stockton (Hunterdon County) was above

its 18 foot flood stage from Midnight

EDT on the 19th through 836 a.m. EDT on

the 20th. It crested at 22.5 feet at 3

p.m. EDT on the 19th. The Delaware

River at Washington’s Crossing was

above its 20 foot flood stage from 416

p.m. EDT through 828 p.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 20.12 feet at 5

p.m. EDT. The Delaware River at Trenton

(Mercer County) was above its 20 foot

flood stage from 148 a.m. EDT on the

19th through 1245 p.m. EDT on the 20th.

It crested at 23.39 feet at 731 p.m.

EDT on the 19th. Flood stage is also

20 feet.

The East Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Dublin was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 1242 a.m. EDT through 249

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

6.08 feet at 130 p.m. EDT.

Specific storm totals included 5.97

inches in Springtown, 3.70 inches in

Sellersville, 3.27 inches in Perkasie

and 3.06 inches in Fricks.

Delaware County

Countywide 18 0806EST

1618EST

PAZ070 Delaware

18 1652EST

19 0316EST

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacted with an approaching cold

front and dropped very heavy rain

across Delaware County in the morning

and into the early afternoon on the

18th. Heavier rain fell upstream in

Chester County and the runoff affected

the Brandywine Creek. Doppler Radar

storm estimates ranged between 1 and 4

inches with the heaviest amounts along

the Chester County border. Chester

Creek at Chester was above its 5 foot

flood stage from 1242 p.m. through 249

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

8.58 feet at 300 p.m. EDT. The Crum

Creek at Newtown Square was above its

6 foot flood stage from 906 a.m.

through 518 p.m. EDT on the 18th. It

crested at 8.38 feet at 215 p.m. EDT.

The Brandywine Creek at Chadds Ford was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 552

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 416 a.m.

EDT on the 19th. It crested at 9.86

feet at 1212 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Berks County

Countywide 18 0818EST

1938EST

PAZ060 Berks

18 1938EST

19 0428EST

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from late in the evening on the

17th until around 10 a.m. EDT on the

18th in Berks County. Doppler Radar

storm total estimates ranged between

2.5 inches and 5 inches across most of

the county. This caused poor drainage

and creek flooding and also Schuylkill

River flooding.

The Schuylkill River at

Berne was above its 12 foot flood stage

from 918 a.m. EDT on the 18th through

1236 a.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested

at 15.05 feet at 345 p.m. EDT on the

18th. Farther downstream, the

Schuylkill River at Reading was above

foot flood stage from 146 p.m. EDT on

the 18th through 528 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 16.13 feet at 11

p.m. EDT on the 18th. The Manatawny

Creek at Spangville was above its 6

foot flood stage from 923 a.m. EDT

through 838 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

It crested at 7.5 feet at 330 p.m. EDT.

Storm totals included 4.18 inches in

Reading and 3.57 inches in Hamburg.

Carbon County

Countywide 18 0837EST

19 1010EST

PAZ054 Carbon

19 1010EST

21 0951EST

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from late in the evening on the

17th until around 10 a.m. EDT on the

18th. Storm totals average around 5

inches and caused poor drainage, creek

and river flooding throughout Carbon

County. Hardest hit were Palmerton

Boroug4h and Penn Forest and Kidder

Townships. President George W. Bush

declared the county a disaster area.

Eighty-nine homes and four businesses

were damaged. Seven public buildings

and structures were damaged including

the Henning Road Bridge over Mud Run

Creek.

In Palmerton Borough, the flooding

Aquashicola Creek flooded ten homes

into their first floor. The Aquashicola

Creek at Palmerton was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 937 a.m. EDT on the

18th through 104 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

It crested at 12.17 feet at 2 p.m. EDT

on the 18th. The Lehigh River at

Lehighton was above its 10 foot flood

stage from 940 a.m. EDT through 522

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

12.04 feet at 100 p.m. EDT. The

Pohopoco Creek at Parryville was above

its 5.5 foot flood stage from 1110 a.m.

EDT on the 19th through 1051 a.m. EDT

on the 21st. It crested at 5.71 feet at

1230 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Storm totals included 6.03 inches at

the Wilkes-Barre Scranton Airport in

Luzerne County and 4.55 inches in

Lehighton.

Chester County

Countywide 18 0838EST

1813EST

PAZ067 Chester

18 1813EST

19 1118EST

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from during the first half of

the day on the 18th. Most storm totals

average between 2.5 and 4.0 inches and

caused widespread poor drainage and

creek flooding throughout Chester

County.

The French Creek at Phoenixville was

above its 8 foot flood stage from 1119

a.m. through 645 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

It crested at 9.51 feet at 230 p.m.

EDT. The Valley Creek at Valley Forge

was above its 7 foot flood stage from

938 a.m. EDT through 509 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. It crested at 8.63 feet at

330 p.m. EDT. The White Clay Creek at

Strickersville was above its 9.5 foot

flood stage from 327 p.m. EDT through

451 p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

9.72 feet at 415 p.m. EDT. The East

Branch of the Brandywine Creek at

Downingtown was above its 7 foot flood

stage from 1137 a.m. EDT through 713

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

10.11 feet at 4 p.m. EDT. Flood stage

is 7 feet. The West Branch of the

Brandywine Creek at Honey Brook was

above its 7 foot flood stage from 1222

p.m. EDT through 538 p.m. EDT on the

18th. It crested at 8.01 feet at 245

p.m. EDT. The main stem of the

Brandywine Creek at Chadds Ford was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 552

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 416 a.m.

EDT on the 19th. It crested at 9.86

feet at 1212 a.m. EDT on the 19th. The

Schuylkill River at Pottstown

(Montgomery County) was above its 13

foot flood stage from 714 p.m. EDT on

the 18th through 1218 p.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 14.59 feet at 530

a.m. EDT.

Storm totals included 3.93 inches in

Exton, 3.40 inches in West Chester,

2.82 inches in Honey Brook and 2.78

inches in East Nantmeal Township.

PAZ071 Philadelphia

18 1836EST

19 0211EST

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

in the upstream areas in the Schuylkill

River Basin. Runoff from the heavy rain

led to flooding along the Schuylkill

River within the city from the evening

of the 18th into the early morning of

the 19th. The Schuylkill River in

Philadelphia was above its 11 foot

flood stage from 736 p.m. EDT on the

18th through 311 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

It crested at 11.33 feet at 1030 p.m.

EDT on the 18th. The heavy runoff along

the Schuylkill river also caused the

Wissahickon Creek at its mouth (where

it merges with the Schuylkill River) to

briefly (5 minutes) rise above its 5

foot flood stage and crested at 5.09

feet at 330 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

PAZ070-070>071-071 Delaware–Philadelphia

19 1400EST

20 1800EST

The combination of runoff from the

heavy rain that fell upstream in the

Delaware River and the incoming high

tide produced minor tidal flooding

along the Delaware River and tidal

parts of its tributaries during the

late afternoon high tide on both the

19th and 20th. The highest tides

occurred during the afternoon of the

19th. The Delaware River at Pier 12 in

Philadelphia reached a height of 8.96

feet above mean lower low water at 518

p.m. EDT on the 19th. Minor tidal

flooding begins at 8.2 feet above mean

lower low water.

Chester County

Countywide 28 1530EST

29 1635EST

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 3 and 8 inches with the

highest amounts toward the Delaware

County border. Widespread poor

drainage, stream and creek flooding

occurred. Many roads were flooded and

closed and numerous water rescues were

performed. Shelters were opened because

of flooding along the East Branch of

the Brandywine Creek in Downingtown.

The East Branch of the Brandywine Creek

at Downingtown was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 636 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 744 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 12.83 feet at 1101 p.m.

EDT on the 28th. The West Branch of the

Brandywine Creek at Honey Brook was

above its 7 foot flood stage from 1211

a.m. EDT through 327 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 7.21 feet at 130

a.m. EDT. The main stem of the

Brandywine Creek at Chadds Ford was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 619

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 535 p.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 13.62

feet at 243 a.m. EDT on the 29th. The

French Creek at Phoenixville was above

its 8 foot flood stage from 815 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 328 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 9.11 feet at

1115 p.m. EDT on the 28th. The Red Clay

Creek at Kenneth Square was above its

7.5 foot flood stage from 608 p.m. EDT

on the 28th through 210 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 9.65 feet at 815

p.m. EDT on the 28th. The White Clay

Creek at Strickersville was above its

9.5 foot flood stage from 552 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 356 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 14.07 feet at

1115 p.m. EDT on the 28th. The Valley

Creek at Valley Forge was above its 7

foot flood stage from 635 p.m. EDT on

the 28th through 504 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 10.91 feet at 10

a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 9.00 inches in

Avondale, 8.97 inches in West Chester,

8.00 inches in Uwchlan Township, 6.63

inches in Strickersville, 6.50 inches

in Downingtown, 5.30 inches in Valley

Forge, 4.57 inches in Modena, 3.76

inches in Glenmoore and 2.47 inches in

Honey Brook.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Delaware County

Countywide 28 1530EST

29 1635EST

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 3 and 8 inches with the

highest amounts toward the Chester

County border. Widespread poor

drainage, stream and creek flooding

occurred. Many roads were flooded and

closed and numerous water rescues were

performed. Evacuations occurred along

the Darby Creek in Darby Borough,

Marple Township and Upper Darby

Township. Darby Creek flooding also

affected Clifton Heights and

Collingdale. Flooding was also reported

along the Hermesprota Creek in Sharon

Hill.

The Chester Creek at Chester was above

its 8 foot flood stage from 646 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 830 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 16.33 feet at

215 a.m. EDT on the 29th. Crum Creek at

Newtown Square was above its 6 foot

flood stage from 618 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 345 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 11.14 feet at 930 p.m.

EDT on the 28th. The Brandywine Creek

at Chadds Ford was above its 9 foot

flood stage from 619 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 535 p.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 13.62 feet at 243 a.m.

EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 7.84 inches in

Chadds Ford and 5.49 inches in Upper

Providence. A SKYWARN Spotter reported

7 inches of rain in Havertown before

his rain gage overflowed.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Chester County

West Chester 28 1550EST

1630EST

A series of severe thunderstorms

knocked down several large tree limbs

and wires in the southeastern part of

Chester County.

Montgomery County

Countywide 28 1600EST

29 0659EST

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 3 and 8 inches with

the highest amounts toward

Philadelphia. Widespread poor drainage

and creek flooding occurred, especially

in the lower part of the county. Many

roads were flooded and closed and

numerous water rescues were performed.

Boats were used to rescue stranded

motorists.

The East Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Schwenksville was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 731 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 759 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Along the main stem of the Perkiomen

Creek, at Graterford, the creek was

above its 11 foot flood stage from 1013

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 738 a.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 12.5

feet at 4 a.m. EDT on the 29th. Gaged

sites of the Pennypack and Wissahickon

Creeks within Philadelphia all flooded.

Storm totals included 8.22 inches in

Blue Bell, 7.90 inches in Ambler, 6.70

inches in Norristown, 6.28 inches in

Wynnewood, 6.15 inches in King of

Prussia, 6.11 inches in Hatboro, 4.75

inches in Pottstown, 4.29 inches in

Eagleville, 4.26 inches in Willow

Grove, 3.26 inches in Green Lane and

3.04 inches in Palm.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Bucks County

Countywide 28 1600EST

29 1413EST

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 3 and 8 inches with

the highest amounts toward

Philadelphia. Widespread poor drainage

and creek flooding occurred, especially

in the lower part of the county. Many

roads were flooded and closed and

numerous water rescues were performed.

The East Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Dublin was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 729 p.m. EDT through 1105

p.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested at

6.49 feet at 848 p.m. EDT. The Little

Neshaminy Creek at Neshaminy was above

its 8 foot flood stage from 650 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 236 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 9.91 feet at 11

p.m. EDT on the 28th. The main stem of

the Neshaminy Creek at Langhorne was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 829

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 313 p.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 15.21

feet at 630 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 6.50 inches in

Neshaminy Falls, 6.08 inches in

Morrisville, 5.88 inches in Furlong,

5.63 inches in Levittown, 5.06 inches

in Doylestown, 4.38 inches in

Sellersville, 4.22 inches in Fricks and

3.48 inches in Springtown.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Delaware County

Radnor 28 1625EST

A severe thunderstorm pulled down

several trees and wires in Radnor

Township.

Philadelphia County

Countywide 28 1636EST

29 1018EST

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 4 and 8 inches with

the highest amounts in the northwest

part of Philadelphia. Widespread poor

drainage and creek flooding occurred

throughout the city. All roads near

creeks flooded. Many roads were flooded

and closed and numerous water rescues

were performed. The heaviest rain

coincided with the evening commute

home. A 26-year-old woman drowned when

she was swept off her feet while

waiting to board a SEPTA bus in the

East Falls section of the city. The

flood waters carried her downhill and

she became trapped her under a parked

pickup truck where in spite of the

efforts of six people, she drowned. The

heavy rain also caused several

abandoned buildings to collapse.

The Frankford Creek at Castor Avenue

was above its 7 foot flood stage from

536 p.m. EDT on the 28th through 216

a.m. EDT on the 29th. It crested at

13.91 feet at 730 p.m. EDT on the 28th.

The Wissahickon Creek at its mouth with

the Schuylkill River was above its 5

foot flood stage from 538 p.m. EDT on

the 28th through 1118 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 10.14 feet at 2

a.m. EDT on the 29th. The Pennypack

Creek at the Rhawn Street Bridge was

above its 7 foot flood stage from 624

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 839 a.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 12.63

feet at 3 a.m. EDT on the 29th. The

Schuylkill River at Philadelphia was

above its 11 foot flood stage from 1136

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 1013 a.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 11.86

feet at 4 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 9.12 inches in

Roxborough, 5.98 inches at the Fairmont

Dam, 5.77 inches at the Northeast

Philadelphia Airport and 3.63 inches at

the Philadelphia International Airport.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further. ?260U

Berks County

Leesport to 28 1800EST

Birdsboro 29 0135EST

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 2 and 5 inches with the

highest amounts toward the Chester

County border. Poor drainage, stream

and creek flooding occurred, mainly in

the southeast quarter of the county.

Many roads were flooded. The Manatawny

Creek at Spangville was briefly above

its 6 foot flood stage from 1235 a.m.

through 235 a.m. EDT on the 29th. It

crested at 6.06 feet at 130 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. Storm totals included 3.44

inches in Hamburg, 2.88 inches in

Bethel, 2.82 inches in Berne, 2.64

inches in Reading.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Lehigh County

Countywide 28 1900EST

2300EST

Northampton County

Countywide 28 1900EST

2300EST

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused bands of heavier

rain to fall across the Lehigh Valley

from the late morning through the

evening of the 28th in the Lehigh

Valley. Doppler Radar storm total

estimates averaged between 2 and 4

inches with the highest amounts toward

the Montgomery and Bucks County

borders. Widespread poor drainage and

scattered stream and creek flooding

occurred. Many roads were flooded and

some were closed. The flooding was not

nearly as severe as it was with the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan. In

Northampton County, roads were closed

in Forks Township, Palmer Township and

Wilson Borough.

Storm totals included 4.40 inches in

Orefield (Lehigh County), 3.90 inches

in Forks Township (Northampton County)

and 2.82 inches at the Lehigh Valley

International Airport.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

PAZ070>071 Delaware–Philadelphia

30 OOOOEST

1600EST

The combination of the runoff from the

heavy rain from the remnants of

Hurricane Jeanne and the spring tides

associated with the full moon caused

minor tidal flooding during the high

tide cycles on the Pennsylvania side of

the Delaware River and tidal sections

of its tributaries on the 30th. The

highest tides occurred with the high

tide during the early morning on the

30th. That high tide reached 8.57 feet

above mean lower low water at Pier 12

in Philadelphia. Minor tidal flooding

begins at 8.2 feet above mean lower low

water.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northeast

Bradford County

Countywide 17 1900EST

18 1200EST

Heavy rain with amounts of 3 to 7

inches fell from the 16th to the 18th.

The rain was due to remnants from

hurricane Ivan. All creeks and streams

went out of their banks causing major

problems. Early on the 18th more than

half of the roads in the county were

closed, prompting a state of emergency

to be issued. River flooding also

occurred along the entire length of the

Susquehanna River. 50 homes, 5

businesses, and dozens of roads and

bridges were damaged. At least 20 water

rescues occurred.

Susquehanna County

Countywide 17 2130EST

18 1200EST

Heavy rain with amounts of 4.5 to 7

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Most creeks and streams went out

of their banks. Over 300 homes were

affected by flooding with 132 having

minor damage, 21 having major damage,

and 4 being totally destroyed. 27

businesses were affected with 19 having

minor damage and 8 having major damage.

Dozens of roads and bridges were

damaged. About 750 people had to

evacuate their homes. Their was

flooding where there had never been any

before. One major bridge was destroyed.

Wyoming County

Countywide 17 2200EST

18 1200EST

Heavy rain with amounts of 5 to 7

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. 500 homes and 30 businesses were

damaged. 50 water rescues were

reported. The hardest hit areas were

Tunkhannock, Eaton Township, Nicholson,

Exeter, Meshoppen, and Laceyville. In

Nicholson, the Shadow Brook did major

damage. The county declared a state of

emergency and closed all roads to the

public early Saturday morning. In

addition the Susquehanna River had

major flooding.

PAZ038 Bradford

18 0207EST

20 1000EST

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Waverly, NY and Sayre, PA rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet early

on the 18th, crested at 18.8 feet at

11:30 PM on the 18th, then slowly fell

to be below its flood stage late

morning on the 20th. Rainfall amounts

were 2 to 5 inches which started on the

16th and continued into the 18th. This

rain was from the remnants of hurricane

Ivan.

Luzerne County

Countywide 18 0210EST

1200EST

Heavy rain with amounts of 4.0 to 6.5

inches caused major flash flooding.

Almost all of the streams and creeks

came out of their banks. In addition,

the Susquehanna River also caused major

flooding. Solomon’s Creek in Wilkes-

Barre Township was the first to flood.

This creek caused businesses to close

and people to evacuate. 4000 homes and

dozens of businesses were damaged.

Mercy Hospital had damage to its lower

levels. The hardest hit areas were

Shickshinny, Moconqua, Plains, and

Plymouth Township.

Wayne County

Countywide 18 0300EST

1800EST

Heavy rain with amounts of 5 to 7

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Most creeks and streams went out

of their banks. In addition, the

Delaware and Lackawaxen Rivers had

major flooding. At least 1000 homes

were damaged, 10 of which were

completely destroyed. The county

Emergency Management Agency had damage

to their office in the basement of the

County Courthouse. Dozens of bridges

were closed with 2 bridges destroyed.

There were at least 50 roads that were

damaged and /or closed due to the

flooding.

Lackawanna County

Countywide 18 0315EST

1200EST

Heavy rain with amounts of 4.5 to 7.5

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. All creeks and streams were out

of their banks. In addition, the

Lackawanna River had major flooding.

Almost 1000 homes and over 30

businesses were damaged. A 40 foot deep

sinkhole developed on Pittston Avenue.

PAZ043 Wyoming

18 0323EST

19 0000EST

The Tunkhannock Creek at Tunkhannock

rose above its flood stage of 11 feet

early on the 18th, crested at 19.7 feet

at 3:30 PM on the 18th, then fell below

its flood stage around midnight on the

19th. This was the second highest crest

on record. Rainfall amounts were 4 to

7 inches which started on the 16th and

continued into the 18th. This rain was

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PAZ044 Lackawanna

18 0352EST

2100EST

The Lackawanna River at Old Forge rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet early

on the 18th, crested at 16.7 feet at

3:30 PM on the 18th, then fell below

its flood stage in the evening also on

the 18th. This was the third highest

crest on record. Rainfall amounts were

4 to 7 inches which started on the 16th

and continued into the 18th. This rain

was from the remnants of hurricane

Ivan.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northeast

PAZ072 Southern Wayne

18 0421EST

19 0300EST

The Lackawaxen River at Hawley rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet the

morning of the 18th, crested at 14.5

feet at 5:15 PM on the 18th, then fell

below the flood stage early in the

morning on the 19th. Rainfall amounts

were 4 to 7 inches due to the remnants

of hurricane Ivan. The rain fell from

the 16th to the 18th. The crest was the

fifth highest recorded at Hawley.

PAZ048 Pike

18 0421 EST

19 0300EST

The Lackawaxen River at Hawley rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet the

morning of the 18th, crested at 14.5

feet at 5:15 PM on the 18th, then fell

below the flood stage early in the

morning on the 19th. Rainfall amounts

were 4 to 7 inches due to the remnants

of hurricane Ivan. The rain fell from

the 16th to the 18th. The crest was the

fifth highest recorded at Hawley.

PAZ038 Bradford

18 0452EST

19 1800EST

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Towanda rose above its flood

stage of 16 feet early on the 18th,

crested at 22.3 feet at 7:16 PM on the

18th, then slowly fell to be below its

flood stage early evening on the 19th.

Rainfall amounts were 2 to 5 inches

which started on the 16th and continued

into the 18th. This rain was from the

remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PAZ043 Wyoming

18 0549EST

20 0300EST

The Susquehanna River at Meshoppen rose

above its flood stage of 27 feet early

on the 18th, crested at 35.3 feet at

6:15 PM on the 18th, then slowly fell

to be below its flood stage early in

the morning of the 20th. This was the

third highest crest on record. Rainfall

amounts were 4 to 7 inches which start-

ed on the 16th and continued into the

18th. This rain was from the remnants

of hurricane Ivan.

Pike County

Countywide 18 0600EST

1700EST

Heavy rain with amounts of 3.5 to 6

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Most creeks and streams went out

of their banks. In addition, the Dela-

ware and Lackawaxen Rivers had major

flooding. About a dozen rescues were

performed. Over 100 roads were closed.

The entire borough of Newfoundland in

western Pike County was evacuated. 6

bridges were closed. 2 businesses were

closed.

PAZ040 Northern Wayne

18 0630EST

19 0900EST

The Delaware River at Callicoon, NY

(near Abrahamsville, PA) rose above its

flood stage of 12 feet the morning of

the 18th, crested at 17.3 feet at 4:45

PM on the 18th, then fell below the

flood stage the morning of the 19th.

Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7 inches due

to the remnants of hurricane Ivan. The

rain fell from the 16th to the 18th.

This was the highest crest on record by

about a foot at the river gage at

Callicoon.

PAZ048 Pike

18 0815EST

19 1000EST

The Delaware River at Barryville, NY

(near Shohola, PA) went above its flood

stage of 17 feet the morning of the

18th, crested at 24.1 feet at 3:15 PM

EST on the 18th, then fell back below

the flood stage late morning on the

19th. Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7

inches due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. The rain fell from the 16th to

the 18th. This was the second highest

crest on record at Barryville. The

highest crest was in 1955.

PAZ047 Luzerne

18 1151EST

20 1400EST

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Wilkes-Barre rose above its

flood stage of 22 feet midday on the

18th, crested at 35.0 feet at 1:00 AM

on the 19th, then slowly fell to be

below its flood stage midday on the

20th. This was the third highest crest

on record. Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7

inches which started on the 16th and

continued into the 18th. This rain was

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PAZ048 Pike

18 1322EST

19 0300EST

The Delaware River at Port Jervis, NY

(near Matamoras, PA) rose above its

flood stage of 18 feet during the

afternoon on the 18th, crested at 19.5

feet at 4:45 PM on the 18th, then fell

below its flood stage early in the

morning of the 19th. This was the fifth

highest crest on record. Rainfall

amounts were 4 to 7 inches which start-

ed on the 16th and continued into the

18th. This rain was from the remnants

of hurricane Ivan.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northeast

PAZ048 Pike

18 1422EST

19 0800EST

The Delaware River at Montague, NJ

(near Milford, PA) rose above its flood

stage of 25 feet during the afternoon

on the 18th, crested at 28.4 feet at

10:15 PM on the 18th, then fell below

its flood stage the morning of the

19th. Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7

inches which started on the 16th and

continued into the 18th. This rain was

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northwest

PAZ003 Crawford

08 1904EST

2220EST

One to three inches of rain fell on

Crawford County during the afternoon

and evening hours. This rain was

associated with the remnants of Tropi-

cal Storm Frances. Runoff from the rain

caused lowland flooding to begin just

after sunset. This flooding gradually

worsened as the evening progressed. Re-

ports of street and basement flooding

were common.

Crawford County

Countywide 08 2220EST

09 0830EST

Heavy rains associated with the rem-

nants of Tropical Storm Frances caused

extensive flooding in Crawford County.

Light rain associated with this storm

began falling early on September 8th.

Rainfall rates increased during the

evening hours as the low approached

Northwest Pennsylvania. Rainfall totals

through midnight on the 9th were as

high as 4 to 5 inches, especially in

southern Crawford County. The heavy

rain continued through early morning

hours and finally ended around daybreak

after another two to four inches of

rain had fallen. Storm total rainfall

amounts included: around 4.0 inches at

Conneaut Lake; 4.20 inches at Titus-

ville; 5.07 inches at the Meadville

Airport; 5.57 inches at Saegertown, 6.0

inches at Meadville; 7.8 inches at

Springboro and 10.0 inches at Cambridge

Springs. This rain caused rapid rises

in area streams and creeks. Evacuations

in the county began just after 11 p.m.

after Crooked Creek left it’s banks

near Adamsville and Hartstown. The

flooding worsened during the early

morning hours with many road washouts

and evacuations reported. Around 3

a.m., two dozen residents were evacua-

ted from homes along Conneaut Creek in

Conneautville with some of the people

rescued from second floor windows.

Around 30 homes (most along West Street

in this area were heavily damaged by

the flooding. Nearby, seven people had

to be rescued from their vehicle after

flood waters washed if off the road.

Church Run, Sugar Creek and Oil Creek

left their banks in the southeast

corner of the county damaging many

homes and washing out several roads.

Several people had to be rescued from

homes along Shenango Creek in South

Shenango Township around 4 a.m. In

Meadville, French Creek rapidly rose

during the early morning hours. Many

people had to be evacuated from homes

in the city’s Fifth Ward. North of

Meadville, flooding along Cussewago

Creek washed out a road causing a car

to leave the road. The driver was later

rescued. Evacuations and extensive

flood damage were also reported in the

Cambridge Springs, Linesville and

Springboro areas. Over 1,200 homes in

Crawford County were damaged by flood-

ing caused by Frances. At least several

dozen of these were either destroyed or

heavily damaged. Damage to roads in the

county topped $2 million. See the flood

description for September 9th through

the 11th for information on the subse-

quent flooding along French Creek in

Meadville.

PAZ001>002 Northern Erie–Southern Erie

08 1930FST

09 0130EST

Two to four inches of rain fell on Erie

County on September 8th through the

early morning hours of the 9th. This

rain was associated with the remnants

of Tropical Storm Frances. Runoff from

the rain caused lowland flooding to

begin during the evening hours. This

flooding gradually worsened as the eve-

ning progressed. Reports of street and

basement flooding were common,

especially in the southern portion of

the county.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northwest

Erie County

Countywide 9 0130EST

0830EST

Heavy rains associated with the rem-

nants of Tropical Storm Frances persis-

ted during the early morning hours of

September 9th. The rain eventually

ended around daybreak. Storm total

rainfall amounts from early on the 8th

through the 9th generally ranged from

3 to 6 inches in Erie County. Some

totals included: 3.5 inches at North

East; 3.59 inches at Erie International

Airport; 4.32 inches at Union City;

4.75 inches at Corry; 5.0 inches on the

east side of Eric; 5.4 inches at

Cranesville; 6.5 inches at Edinboro and

7.44 inches at Franklin Center. Runoff

from this rain caused extensive flash

flooding in Erie County during the

morning hours of the 9th. Evacuations

began in the Edinboro and McKean areas

around 2:30 a.m. The flooding in Edin-

boro was particularly severe. Water

overflowed a dam on Edinboro Lake in

the city. Hundreds of residents down-

stream of the dam, including students

at Edinboro University, were evacuated

because of the possibility of a dam

failure. Cottages just south of the dam

were reported to be completely sub-

merged. A bridge just south of the city

on State Route 99 was washed out. A

second bridge was destroyed north of

Edinboro in Washington Township. A

landslide wiped out around 500 feet of

State Route 5 in Fairview Township

between 3 and 4 a.m. Cars and buildings

along State Route 5 were damaged by the

debris. Elk Creek went into flood

around the same time in Fairview for-

cing several dozen people to be evacua-

ted along State Route 98. In Mill Creek

Township, residents were evacuated from

two mobile home parks that had flood

waters up to three feet deep. Signifi-

cant flooding was also reported in the

Albion and Corry areas. Four vehicles

were stranded in flood waters up to

four feet deep east of Erie along In-

terstate 90. A total of 20 roads were

either washed out or damaged in the

county. Hundreds of homes in the county

were damaged by the flooding. Several

of these were damaged enough to be

declared destroyed.

PAZ001>003 Northern Erie–Southern Erie–Crawford

09 0200EST

1800EST

The remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

moved northeast across the Upper Ohio

Valley on September 8th. Gusty norther-

ly winds behind this storm caused

damage in extreme northwestern

Pennsylvania. A peak gust of 47 mph was

measured at Eric International Airport.

Many trees were downed in both Erie and

Crawford Counties. A couple homes in

Erie County sustained minor wind

damage.

PAZ003 Crawford

09 0830EST

11 1200EST

Runoff from heavy rains associated with

the remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused French Creek in Meadville to

rise to it’s highest level in 45 years.

The creek climbed above the flood stage

of 14 feet around daybreak on September

9th. The river crested at 16.36 feet

around 10 a.m on the 10th. This level

was the highest non-ice affected crest

on record. The river finally went below

flood stage at midday on the 11th.

Damage along the creek was extensive.

Meadville’s Fifth Ward was especially

hard hit with hundreds of homes and

businesses damaged. The flooding was

particularly bad along Spring Street,

Lincoln Avenue and Columbia Street. All

but one road leading into Meadville had

to be closed because of the flooding.

Flood waters in some neighborhoods were

as much as 4 to 5 feet deep. Over 1,200

homes were damaged in Crawford County

from the flash flooding on 9th and the

flooding along French Creek the succes-

sive days. In Meadville alone, nine

mobile homes were destroyed with 34

houses and five businesses sustaining

major damage. See the Flash Flood event

description of September 9th for more

damage estimates.

Northern Erie–Southern Erie–Crawford

PAZ001>003 17 1030EST

18 0200EST

For the second time in a week, exten-

sive urban and lowland flooding was

reported across Erie and Crawford

Counties. The remnants of Ivan moved

across the Ohio Valley on September

17th. A stationary front extending

northeast from the low caused heavy

rains to develop and fall on most of

northwestern Pennsylvania from late on

September 16th through the daylight

hours of the 17th. Rainfall totals for

the storm in Crawford County included:

1.36 inches at Cambridge Springs; 1.77

inches at the Meadville Airport and

2.00 inches at Union City. In Erie

County rain totals were: 1.30 inches at

Edinboro; 1.44 inches at Erie Interna-

tional Airport and 2.1 inches at

Cranesville. Runoff from this rain

caused many streams and creeks to leave

their banks flooding many low lying

areas. Many roads had to be closed be-

cause of the flooding. At Meadville,

French Creek rose rapidly but crested

below the flood stage of 14 feet.

Hundreds of homes in both Erie and

Crawford Counties sustained damage from

lowland or basement flooding.

PENNSYLVANIA, West Beaver

PAZ020 8 1630EST

10 0000EST

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Frances began early on the 8th and end-

ed by dawn on the 9th. By 540 PM EDT on

8th, many roads were closed by flooding

countywide, including Center and Chip-

pewa Townships. By 1030 PM on 8th, many

roads flooded, especially in Darlington

and Hopewell from Connoquenessing

Creek. At this time, the Hopewell shop-

ping plaza began to flood. By 9 AM EDT

on 9th, in Bridgewater, 80 boats broke

lose from their dock. Later, nearly 250

boats were seen piled up against a

bridge. At time unknown, there were mud

slides on Rte 18 in Potter Twp, and Rte

68 near Shippingport. By the end of the

storm, 300 homes were damaged across

the county; 35 roads were flooded, and

39 towns were flooded. Total rain: 4″

in Beaver. (FRANCES)

PENNSYLVANIA, West Washington

PAZ029 8 1800EST

9 OOOOEST

By 750 PM EDT, 30 basements were flood-

ed countywide, some to a depth of 2

feet. In Hanover Twp, North Kings Creek

Rd was washed out in part (time

unknown). Both Hickory and Eight-four

reported 2.6 inches of rain. (FRANCES)

Allegheny

PAZ021 8 1800EST

10 0500EST

By 7 PM EDT on 8th, Wexford Run flooded

in Ross Twp; Babcock Blvd flooded in

McCandless Twp; creeks were flooding

Shaler Twp; Streets Run Rd was flooded

in Baldwin. By 948 PM, people were

being evacuated in Bell Acres because

of flooding after 6 inches of rain. By

1146 PM EDT on 8th, parts of Sewickley

were being evacuated. About 1 AM EDT on

9th, in Etna, Pine Creek began to flood

and 50 people were evacuated. Many

basements flooded. Other 24-hr rain-

falls: 4.5″ Westview; 4.2″ Moon Twp;

3.6″ Pittsburgh Airport (record 1 day

rainfall). Most small stream flooding

ended by 8 AM EDT on the 9th, but the

Allegheny River at Acmetonia (C W Bill

Young Dam) rose to the flood stage of

17 ft for a few minutes around 6 AM EDT

on the 10th. The remnants of Frances

passed over the Pittsburgh airport at

230 AM EDT on the 9th. (FRANCES)

Butler

PAZ014 8 1818EST

10 OOOOEST

Basement flooding began at 718 PM EDT

on 8th. At 827 PM, Dinnerbell Rd flood-

ed in Saxonburg. By 10 PM, evacuations

began west of Butler. By 8 AM on 9th,

roads were still closed near Butler;

and people were evacuated in Evans City

and Harmony. There was flooding in

Jackson Twp and 3 other townships. Con-

noquenessing Creek flooded Zelienople

(time unknown). In total, 30 roads were

closed by flood. Total rain: 3.2″ in

Sarver. (FRANCES)

Fayette

PAZ032 8 1818EST

2200EST

Basements flooded in Redstone and

Uniontown. Chalkhill reported 2.4

inches of rain. (FRANCES)

Venango

PAZ008 8 1818EST

10 0200EST

By 718 PM EDT on 8th, basements were

flooded in Cranberry. By 922 PM, Mercer

and Addams Roads flooded in Polk;

Cherry Tree Rd and Rte 417 flooded near

Franklin; and Rte 8 north of Oil City

was flooded. By 8 AM on the 9th, French

Creek and Sugar Creek were still out of

their banks northwest of Franklin; and

50 basements had been flooded through-

out the county. Total rain: 3.2″ in

Polk. (FRANCES)

Mercer

PAZ007 8 1830EST

10 0700EST

At 730 PM EDT on 8th, State Rte 258 was

closed by flood near Mercer. As of 9 AM

on 9th, widespread flooding continued.

At Jamestown, 12 families were evacuat-

ed as a precaution because of a dam

(time unknown); the dam did not fail.

Total rain: 4 inches in Mercer. There

was a record flood on the Shenango

River at Transfer, which crested at

10.65 ft at 11 AM EDT on 9th (previous

record 10.47). (FRANCES)

Lawrence

PAZ013 8 1900EST

10 0700EST

By 859 PM EDT on 8th, several roads

were closed by flood near New Castle,

including Rtes 18 and 108. By 1145 PM,

numerous roads were flooded countywide;

and 30 people evacuated in North Beaver

Twp. By 9 AM EDT on 9th, flooding was

still widespread. In all, basements

flooded, 30 roads were flooded; 100

people evacuated, including 3 trailer

parks; one road washed away. There was

a record flood on Slippery Rock Creek

at Wurtemburg, which crested at 9.48 ft

at 11 PM EDT on 9th (previous record

8.09). (FRANCES)

Clarion

PAZ015 9 0032EST

10 0700EST

At 132 AM EDT on 9th, Rte 208 flooded

near Shippenville; Huey Rd flooded 4

miles south of Sligo; and Rte 58 flood-

ed 6 miles west of Sligo. Some roads

were still flooded as of 8 AM EDT on

9th. Clarion River at Cooksburg (north-

east corner of Clarion Co) rose to

flood stage (13 ft) at 4 PM EDT on 9th;

crested at 13.4 at 6 PM on 9th; and

fell below flood stage 11 PM EDT on

9th. (FRANCES)

Armstrong

PAZ022 9 2245EST

2259EST

Allegheny River at Mosgrove rose to

flood stage (19 feet) briefly from 1145

PM EDT to 1159 PM EDT on the 9th.

(FRANCES)

PENNSYLVANIA, West Washington

PAZ029 17 1215EST

18 1200EST

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Ivan started during the night of the

16th, and continued into the evening of

the 17th. At 115 PM EDT on 17th, roads

flooded in Canonsburg and Washington.

At 206 PM, there was widespread stream

flooding in Burgettstown, McDonald, and

Midway. At 217 PM, Houston flooded. 315

PM, Rtes 50 and 980 were flooded in

Avella and Cecil. 5 PM, mud slides in

Peters Twp, which had 4″ of rain. By 8

PM, Washington 5″ of rain. Total of 961

structures damaged or destroyed. Towns

hard hit: Avella, Burgettstown, Cecil,

Independence, Peters, Washington. Many

roads closed by mud slides or flooded.

Trailer park in Canton washed away.

Some trailer park residents were trap-

ped atop their mobile homes until dark,

asking for help by signaling SOS with

their flashlights. Other mobile homes

destroyed. Houses lifted off founda-

tions; railroad track beds gone;

several roads washed out, including Rte

19 near Houston; grocery store destroy-

ed. 11 boats, docked in Millsboro,

damaged. Total rain: 5.9″ in Canons-

burg. (IVAN)

PAZ021 Allegheny

17 1224EST

19 0730EST

At 124 PM EDT on 17th, road flooding

was reported 2 miles west of Pitts-

burgh. At 2 PM, Wexford flooded. At 218

PM, roads flooded in Oakdale. By 315

PM, Springdale Boro flooded; and Wex-

ford had 4.5″ of rain. . By 450 PM on

17th, in Tarentum, Mill St and Davidson

St were flooded; people evacuated. By 5

PM EDT on 17th, a state of emergency

was declared in 62 of the 130 municipa-

lities of Allegheny Co. South Park 6″

of rain 530 PM EDT 17th. At 6 PM, eva-

cuations in Tarentum. Widespread

flooding stranded thousands. A total of

9494 homes, 1060 businesses, 4 schools,

9 fire depts, 50 public buildings

damaged or destroyed. 140 boats broke

away and ran away down several rivers.

Some towns flooded, include: Bridge-

ville, Carnegie (by Chartiers Creek,

starting 415 PM), Etna, Millvale,

Sharpsburg, Shaler (by Little Pine

Creek), South Fayette, Tarentum, West

Deer. In Carnegie, 22 people were trap-

ped on a bridge as flood waters rose

and surrounded them. They tied them-

selves together and waited for rescue.

These roads partly washed out: Oakdale

Rd, Brocktown Rd, Boyds Run Rd, Dor-

rington Rd, Millers Run Rd, Noblestown

Rd. Total rain: 6.6 inches Franklin

Park, 6.4 Moon Twp. Pittsburgh Interna-

tional Airport set a new record for 1-

day rainfall of 5.95 inches. This broke

the old record (3.6″) set during

FRANCES on Sept 9. The Allegheny River

flooded, from Freeport to Sharpsburg,

from 11 PM EDT on 17th, until 5 AM EDT

on 19th. Here are city, flood stage,

crest, time: Freeport (flood stage 23

ft), 24.1 10 AM 18th; natrona (21 ft),

24.2 11 AM 18th; Acmetonia (17), 19.8 1

PM 18th; Sharpsburg (21), 22.1 4 PM EDT

18th. The Ohio River flooded, from

Pittsburgh to Dashields, from 10 PM on

17th, until 830 AM EDT on 19th. Pitts-

burgh (flood stage 25 ft), crested 31.0

at 4 PM EDT on 18th; Dashields (25 ft),

crested 29.9 at 8 PM on 18th. On the

Youghiogheny River, Sutersville rose

above flood stage (20 ft) 1 PM on 18th,

crested 20.7 at 430 PM, and fell below

flood stage at 730 PM EDT on 18th. The

remnants of Ivan made its closest

approach to Pittsburgh at 7 PM EDT on

the 17th. (IVAN)

M350U

PAZ007 Mercer

17 1300EST

18 OOOOEST

At 2 PM EDT on 17th, Rte 18 was closed

by flood north of Greenville. Some

flooding continued beyond 8 PM EDT on

17th. (IVAN)

PAZ013 Lawrence

17 1330EST

19 0900EST

At 236 PM EDT on 17th, numerous roads

were flooded in Pulaski and Shenango

townships. By 845 PM, Ellwood City had

3.5 inches of rain. As of 6 PM on 18th,

many roads were still flooded, and

there were a few mud slides, including

one on Vanguard Rd in Perry Twp. Part

of Mohawk School Rd washed out. (IVAN)

PAZ014 Butler

17 1345EST

19 0600EST

At 245 PM EDT on 17th, flooding began

in Sarver. At 315 PM, Butler reported

3″ of rain. At 445 PM, flooding occur-

red in Butler. State of emergency

declared 5 PM EDT 17th. By 6 PM, 4.3″

of rain in Penn Twp. Harmony and Jack-

son townships hardest hit. Part of

Monroe Rd in Buffalo Twp washed out.

Total of 588 structures damaged or

destroyed. Record flooding along Conno-

quenessing Creek. Zelienople crested at

18.17 ft (previous record 16.66) Total

rain: 6.1″ at Butler Jr High School,

5.4″ in Sarvar. (IVAN)

PAZ030 Westmoreland

17 1400EST

18 1830EST

By 3 PM EDT on 17th, 911 started

receiving flood calls. By 353 PM,

streams overflowed and flooded Vander-

grift. 417 PM, Greensburg Rd closed by

flood in New Kensington. 5 PM, Irwin

had 2.5″ of rain. 534 PM, roads flooded

1 mile southwest of Apollo. 548 PM, 1

house evacuated near a previously

damaged dam in Allegheny Twp; and New

Kensington 6″ of rain. 606 PM, Freeport

Rd flooded 1 mile south of Tarentum;

people being evacuated. Roads closed,

included Rte 30, 381, 982. Total of 819

homes and businesses, and 75 public

structures damaged or destroyed.

Ligonier sewage treatment plant

damaged. Many basements were flooded by

Youghiogheny River when Sutersville

rose above flood stage (20 ft) at 1 PM

EDT on 18th, crested 20.7 at 430 PM

PENNSYLVANIA, West

18th, and fell below flood stage 730 PM

18th. On the Conemaugh River, Seward

rose above flood stage (12 ft) at 11 AM

18th, crested 12.1 at I1 AM, and fell

below flood stage 1 PM EDT 18th. Total

rain: 6.3″ in Monesson, 6.1 Delmont, 6

inches New Kensington. (IVAN)

PAZ020 Beaver

17 1415EST

19 1600EST

At 325 PM EDT on 17th, Rte 30, and all

roads in Industry closed by flooding.

Much damage along Rte 68 corridor in

western part of county. Bridgewater and

Glasgow flooded. Total of 625 struc-

tures damaged or destroyed, including

43 businesses, mainly in Hopewell Twp.

Hundreds of runaway boats were lost,

but 93 were recovered. Several marinas

were ripped from the shore and broke up

as they slammed into bridges, with

numerous boats still attached. Roads

partly washed out: Rtes 65, 288, 588,

Hoenig Rd, Hartzell School Rd, Shady

Rest Rd, Franklin Rd, Green Garden Rd.

On the Ohio River, Montgomery Dam rose

to flood stage (33 ft) at 4 AM EDT on

18th, crested 41.0 at 10 PM 18th, and

fell below flood stage 2 PM EDT on

19th. Total rain: 4 inches in Monaca.

(IVAN)

PAZ022 Armstrong

17 1430EST

18 2000EST

By 4 PM EDT on 17th, a courthouse was

threatened by a mud slide in Kittan-

ning; and numerous roads were flooded

countywide, including Rte 66 between

Ford City and Leechburg. By 11 PM,

Bradys Bend had 5.7 inches of rain; and

Red Bank Creek, on the border of Arm-

strong and Clarion counties, continued

to flood. St Charles on the Red Bank

Creek crested around 17.9 ft around

dawn (flood stage 17). On the Clarion

River, Cooksburg rose above flood stage

(13 ft) at 2 AM EDT on 18th, crested

16.5 at 8 AM on 18th, and fell below

flood stage 8 PM EDT 18th. The Allegheny

River rose above flood stage 4 AM EDT

18th, and fell below flood stage by 9

PM EDT on 19th. Here are city, flood

stage, crest, and time: Rimer (19 ft),

19.5 at 10 AM 18th; Mosgrove (19), 20.4

at 10 AM 18th; Kittanning (21), 22.2 at

9 AM EDT 18th; Freeport (23), 24.1 at

10 AM EDT on 18th. Crooked Creek at

Idaho had a record crest of 19.33 ft at

8 AM on 18th (previous record 18.6).

Buffalo Creek at Freeport had a record

crest of 15.28 at 8 PM on 17th (pre-

vious record 13.6). Total of 56 struc-

tures damaged or destroyed, including 3

businesses and 1 church. (IVAN)

PAZ008 Venango

17 1500EST

18 1200EST

At 4 PM EDT on 17th, Moon Run Rd flood-

ed in Oil City. 656 PM, 3.1 inches of

rain 5 miles east of Oil City. (IVAN)

PAZ015 Clarion

17 1510EST

18 1900EST

At 410 PM EDT on 17th, Rte 66 closed by

flood in Shippenville. New Bethlehem,

Hawthorn, East Brady, and Sligo also

flooded. At 646 PM on 17th, there was a

mud slide on the south side of New

Bethlehem. Rte 58 also flooded. On the

Clarion River, Cooksburg rose above

flood stage (13 ft) 2 AM EDT on 18th,

crested 16.5 at 8 AM 18th, and fell be-

low flood stage 8 PM EDT on 18th. Total

of 117 homes and businesses, and 155

public roads, damaged or destroyed.

Total rain: 3.5 inches in East Brady.

(IVAN)

PAZ031 Greene

17 1600EST

18 1700EST

It started 5 PM EDT 17th, when Grays-

ville flooded, according to newspaper

accounts. By 740 PM on 17th, there was

widespread road and stream flooding

countywide, including all roads in and

out of Greensburg; Rte 21 in Franklin

Twp; and Rte 18 in Centre Twp. Total of

157 homes and 46 businesses damaged or

destroyed. Total rain: about 5 inches.

(IVAN)

PAZ016 Jefferson

17 1638EST

19 1200EST

At 538 PM EDT on 17th, roads flooded,

in Warsaw Twp, 7 miles north of Brook-

ville after 3.3 inches of rain. By 6

PM, there was widespread road and

stream flooding. At least 5 people were

rescued from their vehicles. By 8 PM,

Rockdale had 4″ of rain. By 9 PM,

Punxsutawney had 4.5 inches. Mahoning

Creek at Punxsutawney crested at 32.3

ft (flood stage 32) around 1 PM EDT on

18th. (IVAN)

PAZ023 Indiana

17 1730EST

19 OOOOEST

At 630 PM EDT on 17th, Curry Run over-

flowed and closed Rte 422 near Shelocta

(newspaper). By 720 PM, there was wide-

spread road and stream flooding. Flood

waters swept away 8 empty campers at a

camp ground between Shelocta and Elder-

ton. 845 PM, numerous roads closed by

flood. At one house in Centre Twp,

basement wall caved in. Rte 954 near

Beyer was washed out. Rte 4018 near

Smicksburg closed when Mahoning Dam

overflowed. Indiana had 3.5 inches of

rain. By 1050 PM, Clymer flooded and

people were evacuated. 150 people had

to be evacuated countywide. Shelocta

hit hard. Total of 339 structures

damaged or destroyed, 40 of them were

businesses. (IVAN)

PENNSYLVANIA, West

PAZ009 Forest

17 2000EST

18 1900EST

At 9 PM EDT on 17th, roads and a bridge

covered by water near Tionesta. On the

Clarion River, Cooksburg rose above

flood stage (13 fl) at 2 AM EDT on

18th, crested 16.5 at 8 AM 18th, and

fell below flood stage at 8 PM EDT on

18th. (IVAN)

PUERTO RICO

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Mayaguez 7 1420AST

Heavy rain and pea sized hail were

reported at Barrio Miradero.

Western Interior

Adjuntas 7 1520AST

1606AST

A near severe thunderstorm drifted over

Adjuntas during the afternoon causing

heavy rainfall which caused the loss of

a life as river Yayales, a small tribu-

tary of river Guilarte, surged out of

its banks and flowed across the inter-

sections of roads 131 and 135. A 59

year old woman drove a car into the

moving waters, attempted to escape her

car and was drowned.

F59VE

PRZO03-007-007-007 Southeast–Ponce And Vicinity

8 0400AST

2359AST

Coastal flooding was reported at

Playita Cortada in the municipality of

Santa Isabel. Three families were relo-

cated to higher ground.

PRZ003 Southeast

8 0800AST

2000AST

Coastal flooding occurred along the

coastal sector of Salinas, as the high

surf generated by Hurricane Ivan when

it was over 300 miles south of Puerto

Rico, washed ashore, rocks and debris,

which blocked the traffic along coastal

highway 109, at barrio Las Ochenta,

leading from Salinas to Guayama. The

road remained closed for a period of 12

hours.

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Hormigueros 8 1600AST

2359AST

Several areas were reported flooded in

the municipality of Hormigueros, road

319, the San Jose Lavandero community,

road 114 at Valle Hermoso Sur. Around 4

inches of rain fell in Hormigueros

during the afternoon. Landslides were

reported at Parelas San Romulado Norte,

Camino Oscar Barbosa, road 345.

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Mayaguez 8 1600AST

2359AST

Flooding was reported in Mayaguez, Del

Carmen Street at Barrio Santurce,

Barrio Rio Hondo, Wilson Street at

Parcelas Castillo, Badiz and Nenadich

Streets. Landslides were reported at

Camino Rosa, road 348, and the bridge

at Puente de Camino Juan Lebron

was affected by the rains.

PRZ003 Southeast

8 1915AST

2359AST

Coastal flooding was reported in Barrio

Guardarraya along Highway 3 in the

municipality of Patillas.

PRZ001>013 San Juan And Vicinity–Northeast–

Southeast–Eastern Interior–North

Central–Central Interior–Ponce And

Vicinity–Northwest–Western Interior–

Mayaguez And Vicinity–Southwest–

Culebra–Vieques

14 1600AST

17 2359AST

Tropical Storm Jeanne and its asso-

ciated weather affected Puerto Rico,

Vieques and Culebra from Sep. 14-17. On

its wake it left considerable damages

to the electric power grid, the water

supply system, highways and roads,

bridges, schools, individual house-

holds, businesses and commerce due to

extensive flooding, landslides and mud-

slides. Jeanne forced 3,629 people

living in flood zones to seek refuge in

shelters. Jeanne caused eight deaths in

Puerto Rico, four direct and four in-

direct. One death direct death was in

the municipality of Yabucoa, where the

winds tore the roof and ceiling of a

house to which a hammock was attached,

flunging a person from the hammock and

smashing her into the wall of an adja-

cent structure. Another,and the only

one flood related fatality was reported

in the municipality of Moca, where a

person was reportedly drowned in a tri-

butary stream of River Culebrinas. Two

other persons died and one was injured

after a tree damaged by winds fell on

an automobile in a rural road of Yauco

the Saturday after the storm. Two other

persons died due to carbon monoxide

poisoning from generators running in

closed spaces without proper ventila-

tion. The island road system was widely

impacted as 302 roads had to be closed

due to fallen trees, landslide and mud-

slides or debris. Damages to the

electrical grid were estimated at 60

million, and to the water system at 8

million. Tropical Storm Jeanne made

landfall as a strong tropical storm

over southeast Puerto Rico around noon

time on Sep. 15. Official winds reports

from the International airport in Caro-

lina were of sustained winds of 49 mph

with a gust to 71 mph. An unofficial

report from a spotter in Salinas indi-

cated sustained winds of 63 mph with

gust to 71 mph at 1140 am AST. Another

unofficial report of a wind gust to 68

mph was recorded at Palmas del Mar,

Humacao, and the Arecibo Observatory,

which recorded a wind gust of 70 mph at

an elevation of 1,200 feet on Sep 15.

The agricultural impact was signifi-

cant, the hardest hit areas were the

south and east. Damages were estimated

at 101.5 million, 55 million were

attributed to the banana an plantainx

sectors. More than 15,500 acres of

plantain and banana farm lands were

affected. Hardest hit crops were

coffee, plantain, banana and wheat. The

hydrological impact of Jeanne were

widespread and diverse with major

stream and river flooding. The island

of Vieques recorded 23.75 inches of

rain over three days, and 14.75 inches

in a 24 hour period which corresponded

to more than a 100 year return period.

Other municipalities in Puerto rico

received from 11 to 18 inches over the

three day period ending on Sep. 17 at

800 am AST. The highest return

frequency over inland Puerto Rico was

at Aibonito, where the 24 hour rainfall

of 15 inches corresponded to more than

a 100 year event. F47PH, M37 VE, M41

VE, M450U

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Anasco 16 0245AST

0645AST

River Rio Grande de Anasco was reported

out of its banks.

San Juan And

Vicinity

San Juan 21 1500AST

Funnel cloud reported between Roosevelt

and Pinciro Avenues.

San Juan And

Vicinity

Carolina 22 1535AST

Urban flooding was reported at Parque

Escorial. Standing water knee high in

some places and as high as some car

doors in spots.

Ponce And Vicinity

Ponce 28 1500AST

Heavy rains, pea size hail and strong

gusty winds were reported at Barrio

Punta Diamante in the municipality of

Ponce. Winds gusts were estimated

between 40 and 50 mph.

RHODE ISLAND

NONE REPORTED.

SOUTH CAROLINA, Central

Calhoun County

7 NE St Matthews to 7 0220EST 0.5 100

7.5 NE St Matthews 0223EST

NWS survey along with dept. of high-

ways, found trees down across US601

from a small tornado.

Calhoun County

2 SE Ft Motte 7 0337EST

Hwy Dept. reported trees down on SC

419.

Richland County

1.5 SE Gadsden to 7 0346EST 2.5 440

1 NW Gadsden 0348EST

NWS survey found 3 mobile destroyed,

several others damaged along with a

couple of businesses. Three people were

injured. Numerous trees and powerlines

down.

Richland County

Ft Jackson 7 0425EST 1 200

0428EST

Ft. Jackson reported 22 homes with

light to moderate damage from an F1

tornado.

Richland County

1 SE Columbia to 7 0517EST 0.5 100

.5 SE Columbia 0518EST

An F0 took down some trees on Bluff and

Blackberry roads.

Barnwell County

Barnwell 7 0535EST 0.5 100

0536EST

An F0 took down some trees and power-

lines and damaged some signs in Barn-

well.

SOUTH CAROLINA, Central

Aiken County

5 SE Monetta to 7 0614EST 0.5 100

4.5 SE Monetta 0615EST

An F0 tornado took down some trees on

hwys 39 and 391.

Sumter County

3 SW Sumter to 7 0628EST 4 500

2 W Sumter 0738EST

Emergency manager reported 55 homes

damaged, 9 destroyed, and 3 injuries.

Calhoun County

Countywide 7 0700EST

0900EST

Sheriff reported some secondary roads

beginning to flood with some closures.

Richland County

1 SE Columbia 7 0712EST

0900EST

Sheriff reported heavy rains and

flooding of roads in southeast Columbia

and outskirts with some closures.

Lee County

3 S Manville to 7 0740EST 4 440

4 SW Manville 0748EST

A strong F1 tornado took down huge

trees and powerlines, and also did

moderate damage to several homes and a

cotton gin mill.

Lee County

2 SW Bishopville to 7 0810EST 0.5 100

2 WSW Bishopville 0812EST

Storm Chaser reported an F0 did minor

damage to a mobile home and took down

some trees and powerlines.

Kershaw County

5 ESE Camden to 7 0818EST 3 400

5 E Camden 0824EST

Intermittent touchdown of an F0 took

down trees and powerlines in and around

Antioch with minor damage to some

mobile homes.

Kershaw County

2 SE Cassatt to 7 0835EST 5 440

3 NW Cassatt 0845EST

An F1 tornado did moderate damage to

several homes and mobile homes. A

turkey farm also had light damage.

Calhoun County

6 SW St Matthews to 7 0848EST 0.5 100

5.5 SW St Matthews 0849EST

Dept of highways reported an F0 took

down some trees and powerlines on Sc

453.

Clarendon County

2 SW Paxville to 7 0848EST 0.5 100

2.5 WSW Paxville 0849EST

Survey found an F0 path a half mile

long which took down trees.

Sumter County

Shaw Afb to 7 0903EST 3 400

2.5 N Shaw Afb 0909EST

Shaw AFB reported many homes with light

damage and a few with moderate damage

as an Fl touched down between the run-

ways and moved across the base. Many

trees and powerlines were also down.

Lancaster County

Rich Hill Xrds to 7 0940EST 2 300

2 NW Rich Hill Xrds 0944EST

A strong F1 did moderate to severe

damage to buildings on a turkey farm.

Several mobile along the path.

Kershaw County

2 NE Camden to 7 1015EST 7 880

7 N Camden 1029EST

An F3 tornado demolished several mobile

homes and severely damaged cinder block

horse stables at a horse farm. A large

horse trailer was lifted up and placed

on top of the stable. Several out-

buildings were destroyed and numerous

trees and powerlines were down.

Chesterfield County

7 SSE Cheraw to 7 1140EST 8 440

1 NNW Cheraw 1156EST

An F1 intermittently touched down and

did minor damage to several homes,

businesses, and an elementary school..

Numerous trees and powerlines were

down.

SOUTH CAROLINA, Central

Orangeburg County

5 SE Cope to 7 1145EST 0.5 100

4.5 SE Cope 1146EST

An F0 took down some trees along Cannon

Bridge road.

Chesterfield County

13 ESE Patrick to 7 1450EST 1 150

13 E Patrick 1452EST

An F0 took down trees along hwy 52

north of Society Hill as the tornado

dissipated.

Fairfield County

Jenkinsville to 7 1500EST 16 400

6 W Winnsboro 1532EST

An F0 intermittently touched down and

took down trees from Jenkinsville to

the Greenbrier Community.

Bamberg County

1 E Ehrhardt to 7 1520EST 0.5 100

1.5 NE Ehrhardt 1522EST

Emergency manager reported trees and

powerlines down along path.

SCZ016-030>031 Chesterfield–Aiken–Sumter

7 1630EST

8 0835EST

Emergency manager reported a tree on a

home 5SSE of Chesterfield and shingles

of a home.

Chesterfield County

8 E Me Bee to 7 1923EST 7 440

9 NE Me Bee 1937EST

An F2 destroyed 2 mobile homes and did

moderate to severe damage to several

others. Numerous trees and powerlines

were down.

Newberry County

Macedonia 7 2155EST

Highway Dept. reported several trees

down.

Aiken County

Aiken Muni Arpt 16 1354EST

Pilot at Aiken airport sighted a funnel

cloud moving north.

Aiken County

4 N Aiken to 16 1356EST 6 75

10 N Aiken 1408EST

Sheriff and Emergency manager reported

trees down along the path of an FO

tornado that down from 1-20 just south

of US 1 to 3 miles South of Ridge

Spring on SC511 which is Pitts Branch

road.

Saluda County

5 NNE Saluda to 16 1500EST 6 400

10 N Saluda 1512EST

Storm survey found numerous trees and

powerlines down, light to moderate

damage destroyed, 2 trees on cars, and

light to moderate roof damage to

several framed homes.

Fairfield County

3 NE Winnsboro 17 0530EST

Highway dept. reported several trees

down on SC200 northeast of town.

Clarendon County

3 W Alcolu to 27 0923EST 3 400

Alcolu 0929EST

An F1 tornado destroyed 2 mobile homes

and damaged several others. Light to

moderate and its busses. Severe damage

occurred to large open air outbuildings

at a mill across the street from the

school.

Aiken County

9 NE Aiken to 27 1239EST 3 100

11 NNE Aiken 1245EST

An F0 did moderate damage to a barn,

camper, and roof of a home.

Lee County

Bishopville to 27 1303EST 6 80

Lucknow 1315EST

An F0 touched down in Bishopville then

again in the Lucknow area. Trees and

powerlines were down with minor damage

to a couple of homes.

Chesterfield County

4 S Chesterfield to 27 1330EST 3 120

1 S Chesterfield 1336EST

An F0 took down trees, severely damage

some wood framed outbuildings and did

minor damage to a couple of mobile

homes.

Saluda County

7 N Ridge Spg 27 1404EST

Sheriff reported a funnel north of

Ridge Springs.

Saluda County

Countywide 27 1421EST

Highway dept. reported scattered trees

down around the county.

Saluda County

8 NW Saluda to 27 1539EST 2 80

9 NNW Saluda 1543EST

An F0 touched down along Old Chappells

road taking down trees.

Newberry County

Chappells 27 1600EST

Sheriff reported a funnel cloud over

Chappells.

Newberry County

8 ENE Newberry to 27 1608EST 3 220

10 ENE Newberry 1614EST

Roof torn off home with 4 other homes

damaged. Several outbuildings

destroyed. Damage was on SC34, US 176,

and BIg Pine road.

Lexington County

10 WNW Lexington to 27 1630EST 1 80

11 WNW Lexington 1632EST

An F0 touchd down on Devils Backbone

road in taking down trees which just

missed several homes.

Newberry County

.5 N Jalapa to 27 1644EST 3 100 0

3 NNW Jalapa 1650EST

An F0 touched down on Jalapa road and

Indian Creek road taking down trees and

doing minor damage to a couple of

mobile homes.

Orangeburg County

Springfield to 27 1837EST

Norway

Sheriff reported trees down in the

western part of the county.

Lexington County

Gilbert to 27 1840EST

Lexington 1850EST

Sheriff reported trees down in the

Gilbert area and in Heritage Hills

subdivision of Lexington.

Richland County

Countywide 27 1924EST

1944EST

Sheriff reported scattered trees down

around the county.

Fairfield County

3 NNW Ridgeway to 27 2008EST 2 220

5 NNW Ridgeway 2012EST

An F2 tornado destroyed 5 mobile homes,

did moderate to severe damage to 2

framed homes and injurred 13 people.

One 57 year old male died. Two vehicles

were moved 20 to 30 yards. M51MH

SOUTH CAROLINA, North

Coastal

Darlington County

2 SW Darlington to 07 1135EST 1.3 50

1 SW Darlington 1145EST

A tornado snapped trees, some of which

fell onto several homes and damaged

roofs.

Darlington County

1 S Society Hill to 07 1210EST 0.7 50

1 SE Society Hill 1215EST

Tornado snapped several trees, and

caused damage to a roof of a home.

Marlboro County

4 SSE Clio to 07 1305EST 5 100

Clio 1312EST

Tornado snapped or uprooted numerous

trees and damaged several homes.

Marlboro County

1 SW Me Coll 07 1327EST 0.3 25

1330EST

Tornado demolished a stapped down

mobile home.

Darlington County

7 NNE Darlington 07 1411EST 0.1 30

1412EST

Tornado snapped several trees and

damaged a mobile home.

Florence County

4 NE Florence to 07 1645EST 0.4 30

4 N Florence 1647EST

Tornado damaged a billboard and several

trees next to a Petro truck stop. The

tornado continued into Darlington

county.

Darlington County

7 ESE Darlington to 07 1647EST 0.6 30

7 E Darlington 1650EST

Tornado snapped numerous trees.

Dillon County

6 E Dillon to 07 1811EST 1.3 30

5 NE Dillon 1814EST

A tornado flattened and old barn and

part of the roof of a shed was torn

off. A few trees were snapped … one

damaging a roof of a home.

Marlboro County

4 SW Bennettsville to 07 2005EST 0.5 25

5 W Bennettsville 2006EST

A tornado damaged a steel conveyor belt

track at a sand and gravel mine.

Several trees were snapped, and the

roof of a front porch of a church was

lifted off.

Florence County

Florence 16 1600EST

1605EST

Public reported a funnel cloud near

Ebenezer Road.

Darlington County

Hartsville 16 1640EST

1645EST

A funnel cloud was reported near Old

Camden Rd.

Georgetown County

1 N Murrells Inlet 25 1052EST

Strong rip currents caused by the

swells from Hurricane Jeanne resulted

in a drowning. Five other people had to

be rescued by lifeguards.

??1W

Florence County

2 E Lake City to 27 1105EST 0.4 30

2 NE Lake City 1108EST

A tornado destoyed a barn and snapped

trees. A house sustained minor damage.

Georgetown County

5 NW Carvers Bay to 27 1154EST 1.6 30

7 NW Carvers Bay 1205EST

A tornado snapped telephone poles,

uprooted trees, and moved a mobile home

off its foundation. The tornado also

destroyed several sheds and outhouses.

Marion County

3 NE Peedee to 27 1325EST 1.5 30

4 N Peedee 1332EST

A tornado damaged two homes, and downed

trees, powerlines, and sheds.

Dillon County

2 E Oak Grove 27 1352EST 0.2 25

1353EST

A tornado downed trees along Interstate

95.

Marlboro County

Blenheim 27 1415EST 0.1 25

A tornado touched down in a parking lot

with no damage.

Florence County

Florence 27 2107EST

2300EST

Florence 911 reported widespread

flooding of roadways. Some of the

streets reported flooding include:

Church St., Baroody St., Coit St.,

Sumter St., Evans St., Chase St.,

Alexander St., and the Cheves area.

Darlington County

Darlington 27 2112EST

2300EST

911 reported flooding on the roadways.

SOUTH CAROLINA, Northwest

Greenville County

Mauldin 01 1530EST

1600EST

A number of streets, especially Butler

Rd., were partially closed because of

high water produced by a thunderstorm

which dropped 2 inches of rainfall very

quickly.

York County

8 N Rock Hill to 07 1043EST 1 100

9 N Rock Hill 1045EST

This tornado touched down on the

norheast side of Tega Cay and tracked

almost due north into North Carolina.

Damage was mainly limited to trees, but

a few of these fell on homes and

automobiles.

SCZ001>003 Oconee Mountains–Pickens Mountains–

Greenville Mountains

07 1100EST

2300EST

High winds associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Frances produced some

damage to trees and power lines across

the South Carolina mountains.

SCZ003-006 Greenville Mountains – Greater

Greenville

07 1630EST

08 0800EST

An extended period of moderate to heavy

rainfall associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Frances resulted in

gradual rises and eventual flooding

along Gilder and Brushy Creeks, the

Enoree River, and other streams on

Greenville’s east side. Overnight, the

flooding expanded to include most of

the remainder of the county.

SCZ001-004 Oconee Mountains–Greater Oconee

07 1700EST

08 0500EST

Widespread flooding of creeks and

streams developed across the county by

early evening. Numerous roads were

covered with water or washed out, and

the sewer systems of several

communities were damaged.

Anderson County

2 NE Sandy Spgs to 07 1830EST 1.2 50

2 N Sandy Spgs 1832EST

This tornado touched down just

northeast of Sandy Springs, then moved

northwest, uprooting several trees

along its path. An aluminum cattle

shelter was also destroyed.

Abbeville County

Abbeville 07 1900EST

2100EST

Pickens County

Countywide 07 1900EST

2100EST

Greenville County

West Central Portion 07 1930EST

2230EST

Anderson County

Anderson to 07 2000EST

Belton 2200EST

After an extended period of moderate to

heavy rainfall, a tropical rain band

produced intense rainfall rates that

led to rapid rises along some creeks

and small streams across portions of

the Upstate during the mid-to-late

evening. Streams affected by flash

flooding included Blue Hill Creek in

Abbeville and Broadway Creek between

Anderson and Belton. Some evacuations

occurred in Berea late in the evening,

as the Reedy River rose above flood

stage from Berea to downtown

Greenville. A few roads were damaged

across the area.

Chester County

10 SE Chester 07 1915EST 0.5 50

1916EST

This brief tornado blew down several

trees and damaged or destroyed 2 small

trailers shortly after touching down.

It then moved north and lifted a

portion of the roof from a

well-constructed home. The garage wall

was blown inward about I foot at this

same location. A carport next to the

home was also detroyed. Several trees

were blown down and a small trailer

destroyed at a hunting club before the

tornado lifted.

Cherokee County

East Portion 07 2100EST

2200EST

Union County

Union 07 2100EST

08 0300EST

After an extended period of moderate to

occasionally heavy rainfall,

intensifying rain rates led to rapid

rises and flash flooding along some

small creeks and streams in eastern

portions of the Upstate. Several roads

were covered with water in areas from

Gaffney to Blacksburg due to flooding

of Cherokee Creek and other small

streams. However, flooding was most

severe near the city of Union, where

there was extensive damage to roads and

bridges, including 2 bridges that were

washed away. Several homes were also

damaged.

SCZ002-005 Pickens Mountains–Greater Pickens

07 2100EST

08 0800EST

SCZ010 Anderson

07 2200EST

08 0700EST

After the flash flooding that developed

earlier in the evening waned, general

flooding continued across the county

through the overnight hours, as

numerous additional streams rose

gradually to flood.

SCZ007>008 Spartanburg–Cherokee

07 2200EST

08 0700EST

General flooding became widespread

across portions of the Upstate late in

the evening, as numerous streams rose

gradually to flood. A mobile home park

near Gaffney required evacuation

overnight. The Pacolet River flooded in

northern portions of Spartanburg

County, especially areas around

Landrum. Several roads and bridges were

damaged.

Union County

6 E Union to 07 2300EST 4 225

7 NE Union 2306EST

This tornado touched down east of the

city of Union, then tracked north/

northwest, blowing down and uprooting

numerous trees, and rolling one mobile

home. Other structural damage was

limited to shingles and gutters.

Chester County

Chester 08 0200EST

0400EST

York County

Rock Hill to 08 0200EST

Ft Mill 0400EST

An intense tropical rain band moved

north across portions of the eastern

piedmont during the early morning

hours, causing small creeks and streams

to rise quickly to flood.

SCZ009-014 York–Chester

08 0400EST

0700EST

After the intense rainfall rates ended,

continued moderate to occasionally

heavy rainfall allowed general flooding

to persist into the mid-morning.

SCZ005>006 Greater Pickens–Greater Greenville

09 0900EST

10 0800EST

After flooding due to the heavy

rainfall on the 7th abated, the Saluda

River crested a seond time on the

morning of the 9th, as the heavy

rainfall that fell well upstream worked

its way through the system.

Laurens County

13 SE Laurens 16 1612EST 0.5 20

This brief, weak tornado blew down a

few trees.

SCZ001>002- Oconee Mountains–Pickens Mountains–

004>005-010 Greater Oconee–Greater Pickens–

Anderson

16 1700EST

17 0300EST

High winds developed across the

mountains and a portion of the

foothills during the evening as the

remants of Hurricane Ivan moved just

west of the area. Numerous trees were

blown down, many of which fell on

vehicles and structures. The hardest

hit areas were generally in areas from

the mountains south to highway 11.

Anderson County

4 SSE Townville 16 1725EST 0.1 15

This brief tornado produced mainly tree

damage in the Double Springs community.

Oconee County

13 SE Walhalla to 16 1735EST 5 50

8 SE Walhalla 1743EST

This weak tornado blew down numerous

trees and power lines along its 5-mile

track.

Anderson County

3 W Iva 16 1740EST 0.1 10

This tornado touched down very briefly

in an open field.

Oconee County

Westminster to 16 1755EST 4.5 50

4 NNW Westminster 1802EST

This tornado blew down numerous trees

and power lines along its track, some

of which fell on homes. A mobile home

was destroyed when it was blown into an

embankment.

SCZ001>002-004>005 Oconee Mountains–Pickens Mountains–

Greater Oconee–Greater Pickens

16 2000EST

17 0800EST

Moderate to heavy rainfall associated

with the remnants of Hurricane Ivan

resulted in flooding along a few creeks

during mid-evening across the northwest

part of the Upstate. The flooding

gradually became widespread and more

severe during the overnight hours,

especially in Oconee County, as the

Tugaloo River flooded, trapping a

number of famalies, some of which

required rescue via helicopter. A

number of bridges and roads were washed

out or otherwise damaged by flood

water.

SCZ003-006>007 Greenville Mountains–Greater

Greenville–Spartanburg

16 2300EST

17 0500EST

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

continued to cause strong enough winds

to blow down a number of trees and

power lines across portions of the

mountains and foothills. A few fell on

structures and vehicles, and there were

scattered power outages. The damage was

more widespread across the western

Upstate.

Spartanburg County

Campobello 16 2330EST

Lightning struck an industrial plant,

igniting a fire which destroyed about

2/3 of the facility.

SCZ007 Spartanburg

17 0100EST

0800EST

After an evening of heavy rainfall,

several small streams flooded just

after midnight. Several bridges were

covered with water. Most areas affected

were in the northwest quarter of the

county, including Campobello, Inman,

and Lyman. The Pacolet River also

flooded in spots.

Chester County

6 WSW Great Falls 17 0510EST

Two tractor trailers flipped over on

I-77 when the drivers lost control due

to strong winds.

Abbeville County

Abbeville to 27 1750EST

Calhoun Falls 1930EST

Greenwood County

Greenwood 27 1815EST

2000EST

Intense rainfall rates associated with

the remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

resulted in rapid rises and flash

flooding along some small creeks and

streams across the southern part of the

Upstate. Some of the worst flooding

occurred around Abbeville, where

several bridges were covered by

flooding streams. Severe urban flooding

developed in the city of Greenwood, as

the bypass at Burton Plaza was covered

with water, and a small stream flooded

a portion of Laurel St. Several other

roads were closed around the city,

including Scotts and Airport Roads. In

addition, a portion of highway 72

became covered with water near Calhoun

Falls. Several roads and bridges were

damaged by flood water.

Anderson County

5 S Anderson to 27 1830EST

Honea Path 2030EST

Oconee County

South Portion 27 1830EST

2030EST

As an intense tropical ran band moved

across the western Upstate, some flash

flooding developed. Part of highway 81S

was closed in Anderson County when a

construction site was flooded in the

northbound lane. Widespread flash

flooding also occurred around Iva,

where all low spots filled quickly with

deep water. At Honea Path, an apartment

building was evacuated after flooding

from a stopped up storm drain entered

the building. Some businesses incurred

minor flood damage in southern Oconee

County. Urban flooding also occurred in

Anderson.

Laurens County

Countywide 27 1915EST

2300EST

As the intense tropical rain band

continued to sweep over the Upstate,

flash flooding developed across Laurens

County, where up to a foot-and-a-half

of water accumulated in low places on

Interstate 385 from Laurens to the

Greenville line. Interstate 26 was also

flooded between mile markers 52 and 55.

Flooding was also reported along

highway 221 S around Waterloo with a

foot of water covering the road in low

places. By late evening, flash flooding

became severe, as 5 to 6 inches of rain

had fallen in just a 3-hour period.

Water covered a number of bridges from

the Hickory Tavern and Green Pond

areas, east across Gray Court and

Fountain Inn to the Spartanburg line.

At Cooks Bridge, just the reflectors

along the top of the bridge were

visible. Evacuations of several homes

were required around Fountain Inn.

Flooding also developed in the Ware

Shoals area.

Greenville County

Fountain Inn to 27 2000EST

Simpsonville 2300EST

Flooding developed quickly across

Greenville County during mid-evening.

Numerous automobiles were stranded in

water in the southern and eastern parts

of the county. Flash flooding occurred

around Fork Shoals, along highway 25

south of Greenville, and along Jones

Mill Rd east of Fountain Inn. Gilder

Creek flooded from Mauldin downstream

to the Enoree River. Water from the

flooded creek covered a bridge at E

Georgia Rd.

Spartanburg County

Central Portion 27 2100EST

2300EST

Greenville County

Berea to 27 2130EST

Greer 2300EST

As the intense tropical rain band

associated with the remnants of Jeanne

continued to progress north and east

across the Upstate, flash flooding

followed. Numerous streams rose quickly

to flood, including Brushy Creek and

the Enoree River around Greer and

Taylors. Numerous people required

rescue from their automobiles in this

area. The Reedy River also flooded from

Berea to downtown Greenville. In

Spartanburg County, a bridge was washed

out on Apple Valley Rd in the Berry

Shoals area. Portions of South

Blackstock Rd and Reidville Rd were

flooded, as was highway 101 north of

Woodruff.

Cherokee County

2 S Gaffney 27 2115EST 0.8 50

2116EST

This tornado destroyed a mobile home

and blew down numerous trees and power

lines.

Chester County

7 NE Chester 27 2200EST

A few trees were blown down along

highway 72. There were also some power

outages in the area.

SCZ006>007-012 Greater Greenville–Spartanburg–

Laurens

27 2300EST

28 1100EST

After an evening of flash flooding,

rises along creeks and streams

moderated, but general flooding

persisted through the overnight and

morning hours, as rainfall worked its

way downstream through the water

systems. The main flood problem was

along the Enoree River basin in eastern

Greenville and Spartanburg Counties, as

Gilder and Peters Creeks and other

tributaries remained in flood for many

hours. There was also considerable

urban and small stream flooding

throughout the city of Spartanburg.

SOUTH CAROLINA, South Coastal

Jasper County

13 SSW Hardeeville 6 1017EST 1 100

1020EST

A tornado crossed into Jasper County

from Chatham County Georgia. The

tornado tracked through a marshy area

and no significant damage occurred.

Charleston County

1 NW Adams Run 6 1155EST

1200EST

Thunderstorms winds knocked down

several trees.

Colleton County

4 NW Jacksonboro to 6 1205EST 0.5 40

4.5 NW Jacksonboro 1210EST

A tornado knocked down trees.

Jasper County

4 SE Hardeeville to 6 1355EST 2 100

2 SE Hardeeville 1405EST

A tornado knocked down limbs and trees,

one of which fell on a mobile home

causing 1 injury.

Colleton County

6 SE Walterboro 6 1810EST

1815EST

Thunderstorm winds knocked down several

trees.

Charleston County

3 WNW Hollywood 6 1820EST

1825EST

Thunderstorm winds knocked down several

trees.

Colleton County

3 W Canadys 6 1940EST

1945EST

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and large limbs.

Berkeley County

15 SW Cross 7 0015EST

0020EST

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

Dorchester County

2 NE Ridgeville 7 0145EST

0150EST

Thunderstorm winds knocked down several

trees.

Jasper County

5 NE Hardeeville to 7 0230EST 0.05 50

5.5 NE Hardeeville 0235EST

A tornado knocked down trees.

Dorchester County

8 SE Harleyville to 7 0255EST 0.5 40

7.5 SE Harleyville 0300EST

A small tornado knocked down trees and

large limbs.

Allendale County

2 NW Allendale to 7 0420EST 2 40

4 NW Allendale 0428EST

A tornado knocked down and snapped off

numerous trees.

Allendale County

4 NW Seigling to 7 0440EST 1 40

5 NW Seigling 0445EST

A tornado snapped and downed several

trees.

Jasper County

2 E Gillisonville to 7 0635EST 4 75

2 NNW Gillisonville 0645EST

A tornado knocked down trees. Many

trees were snapped off and thrown in

different directions.

Berkeley County

6 W Goose Creek 7 0940EST

0945EST

Thunderstorms winds knocked down trees.

Charleston County

North Charleston 7 1015EST

1018EST

Two trees were blown along the 52

Connector.

Berkeley County

Goose Creek 7 1028EST

1032EST

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

Allendale County

5 NW Seigling 7 1100EST

1105EST

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and large limbs.

Hampton County

5 NE Brunson to 7 1430EST 0.5 40

5 N Brunson 1435EST

A tornado knocked down trees in the

county before crossing into Allendale

county.

Allendale County

4 E Fairfax to 7 1435EST 4 100

4 ESE Sycamore 1445EST

A weak F1 tornado crossed from Hampton

county into Allendale county. The

tornado uprooted and snapped off trees

along its path.

Allendale County

10 S Martin to 7 2005EST 0.5 40

9.5 S Martin 2010EST

A tornado snapped and bent trees in

various directions.

Allendale County

4 NE Millett to 7 2020EST 1 50

4 N Millett 2030EST

A tornado snapped trees and bent others

in various directions.

Hurricane Frances made land fall over

the Florida Panhandle and continued to

track in a generally northward

direction into Georgia, before turning

more to the northeast. This track

placed the Charleston County Warning

Area in the favorable right side of the

remnants of Frances which produced

numerous tornadoes and areas of

straight line wind damage over

southeast Georgia and south coastal

South Carolina. Several Georgia

counties also experienced flash

flooding as there were isolated

rainfall amounts of 5 to 8 inches over

a 24 to 36 hour period. This was on top

of already saturated ground from heavy

rains during the month of August. The

South Carolina counties experienced

more nuisance type flooding as the

rainfall amounts were not as high as

what occurred in southeast Georgia.

Beaufort County

Hilton Head Is 6 1340EST 1 75

1345EST

A picket fenced was knocked down. Part

of the fence went through the door of a

house. The roof of a house was

partially lifted and then set back

down. This caused some interior damage

to the home.

Allendale County

13 S Martin 27 0420EST

0425EST

Several trees and large limbs were

knocked down by thunderstorm winds.

Hampton County

4 NE Early Branch to 27 0445EST 0.5 40

4 NNE Early Branch 0450EST

A weak tornado knocked down several

trees.

Berkeley County

1 W Pineville to 27 0730EST 1 150

1 NW Pineville 0735EST

A weak tornado damaged 2 mobile homes

and a shed. One mobile home had the

entire roof torn off and the second had

skirting torn off. Numerous trees and

limbs were knocked down.

Charleston County

Charleston to 27 0800EST

Isle Of Palms 0930EST

Heavy rainfall caused flooded roads in

Charleston, Mt. Pleasant, and the Isle

of Palms.

Colleton County

Countywide 27 2030EST

2100EST

Thunderstorm winds knocked down

numerous trees across the county. One

tree fell on a house and another fell

on a vehicle.

Dorchester County

St George 27 2110EST

2125EST

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

in several locations across the

northern part of the county.

SCZ043-047>050 Northern Colleton–Jasper–Beaufort–

Southern Colleton–Charleston

28 0500EST

1400EST

The center of Tropical Storm Jeanne

tracked across inland Georgia but the

strongest winds at the time were along

the coast. Maximum wind gusts were 41

mph at both the Charleston downtown

observation and the Charleston airport.

The C-Man station at Folly Beach had a

maximum wind gust of 38 mph.

Non-tornadie wind damage was limited to

a few trees falling on cars.

SOUTH DAKOTA, Central and North

Stanley County

10 W Mission Ridge 10 2130CST

Roberts County

11 S Rosholt to 23 1404CST 2.2 50

9 SSW Rosholt 1409CST

The storm entered South Dakota from

Traverse county, Minnesota where it

produced a tornado. The storm produced

a second tornado as it crossed Lake

Traverse into South Dakota. This

tornado was stronger and destroyed a

house, a mobile home, and a travel

trailer. Another house and travel

trailer were damaged and a shed was

also ripped apart. The tornado also

killed three cattle.

SOUTH DAKOTA, Southeast

Davison County

7 SE Mt Vernon 4 1830CST

Davison County

5 N Mitchell 4 1840CST

Sanborn County

3 SE Artesian 4 1858CST

Miner County

1 W Fedora 4 1908CST

Davison County

Mitchell 4 2000CST

Lightning struck and damaged a brick

chimney, and burned out a transformer

at an amusement center.

Hanson County

9 SW Alexandria 5 1750CST

Clay County

5 E Wakonda 13 1715CST

Turner County

2 N Centerville 13 1726CST

Lincoln County

5 NW Beresford 13 1730CST

Minnehaha County

Sioux Falls 13 1821CST

Minnehaha County

Sioux Falls 13 1823CST

Minnehaha County

Sioux Falls 13 1825CST

Minnehaha County

3 N Brandon 13 1830CST

Aurora County

10 NE Plankinton 16 2010CST

2015CST

Davison County

7 NW Mt Vernon 16 2010CST

2015CST

Sanborn County

1 S Letcher 16 2035CST

Davison County

3 N Loomis 16 2050CST

SOUTH DAKOTA, West

Pennington County

Keystone 10 1835MST

Pennington County

4 SW Rapid City 10 1911MST

Pennington County

7 SW Rapid City 10 1912MST

Custer County

1 W Hermosa 10 1915MST

Ziebach County

21 NE Cherry Creek 10 2015MST

Fall River County

2 N Provo 14 1600MST 0.1 10

1601MST

Small tornado was on the ground for

about 1 minute. No damage.

Custer County

22 W Custer 19 1530MST

Custer County

8 ESE Custer 19 1625MST

Fall River County

12 W Hot Spgs 19 1550MST

A 71 mph thunderstorm wind gust was

recorded at Red Canyon RAWS.

Number of Estimated

Persons Damage

Location Killed Injured Property Crops

NORTH DAKOTA, Central and West

Mountrail County

7 N Palermo 0 0

Ward County

5 N Kenmare 0 0

Ward County

1 N Kenmare 0 0

NORTH DAKOTA, East

Cavalier County

5 W Hannah 0 0

Benson County

5 NE Warwick 0 0

Ramsey County

2 S Doyon 0 0

Nelson County

7 WSW Lakota 0 0

Eddy County

10 S Hamar 0 0

Nelson County

1 S Tolna 0 0

Nelson County

3 S Whitman 0 0

Walsh County

6 W Fordville 0 0

OHIO, East

OHZ068

0 0 25K

Rain from remnants of Hurricane

Frances began late on the 7th. It

ended the morning of the 9th, but

flooding continued. At 155 PM EDT,

the West Fork of Duck Creek flooded

near Caldwell. Carlisle reported 4

inches of rain. At 415 PM, Mt Ephraim

had 5″ of rain. By 528 PM, houses

were being evacuated in East Union;

all state roads were closed across

county. 200 people were evacuated

in Belle Valley and Caldwell. By 9

AM on 9th, many roads remain closed.

Total rain: Mt Ephraim 6.2 inches;

Hiramsburg 5.8″. (FRANCES)

OHZ058

0 0 25K

Rain from remnants of Hurricane

Frances began late on the 7th. It

ended the morning of the 9th, but

flooding continued for days. By 330

PM EDT, flooding was county-wide. By

615 PM EDT, just south of Cambridge,

I-70 was closed by flooding; so were

routes 265 and 513. Many roads

remained flooded 4 PM on the 10th. By

8 PM EDT on 11th, flooding was

primarily confined to the northern

and central parts of Guernsey County.

Most small stream flooding ended by 2

am EDT on the 12th, but flooding on

Wills Creek in Cambridge continued.

Wills Creek rose to flood stage

(15 ft) at 9 PM EDT on the 8th;

crested 24.9 at 5 AM EDT 10th; and

fell below flood stage 11 PM EDT on

the 14th. The crest fell short of the

record (26.9 ft). Total rain: 6.6″ at

Salt Fork Sewage Plant. (FRANCES)

OHZ059

0 0 2M

At 340 PM EDT on the 8th, Neffs was

flooded by Big McMahon and Little

McMahon Creeks. At 4 PM, flooding

began in Colerain; school busses

stranded. At 445 PM, Pine Creek

flooded Shadyside. 549 PM, Rte 147

flooded at Bailey Mills; Rte 40

flooded Bannock. 6 PM, Lafferty

flooded. 609 PM, Rte 149 flooded

Glencoe. 650 PM, CR 2 flooded

Yorkville. 655 PM, Bethesda flooded.

720 PM, Lansing evacuations. 816 PM,

road washed away in Dilles Bottom.

854 PM, 100 homes flooded in

Wolfhurst. 914 PM, cars and buildings

under water in Maynard. 938 PM, near

Bailey Mills, car drove into flood, 2

occupants rescued. 948 PM, near

Powhatan Point, 2 woman were clinging

to a tree; rescued at 1 AM EDT on 9th.

10 PM EDT 8th, foundation of 1 house

washed away in Glencoe; Deep Run Rd

bridge washed out in Yorkville. 1026

PM, Barton evacuations. 1055 PM,

Neffs evacuations as 25 homes

flooded. 1230 AM on 9th, CR 10

collapsed near Crabapple, after

police car had passed. Countywide,

350 homes evacuated and 14 roads

flooded during the night of the 8th.

Total rain: 5.2″ in Uniontown and

4.7″ St Clairsville. (FRANCES)

OHZ057

0 0 25K

At 4 PM EDT on 8th, roads began to

flood south of Zanesville; and 5

inches of rain fell at

Chandlersville. At 430 PM, Brush

Creek flooded near Duncan Falls. At

630 PM, Roseville was in a state of

emergency after 7 inches of rain. At

7 PM, New Concord reported severe

and widespread flooding after 7.5

inches of rain (in 24 hr).

Chandlersville and Roseville totaled

6″ of rain. (FRANCES)

OHZ039

1 0 200K

By 445 PM EDT on 8th, Horse Shoe Bend

Rd flooded east of Newcomerstown; a

9-year old girl was swept off the

road by flood waters as she walked

home from school. By 5 PM, Blizzard

Rd flooded in Uhrichsville. Before

flooding ended, basements flooded

in Uhrichsville and a few homes were

evacuated in Dennison. Rte 258 closed

by mud slide. 14 structures suffered

major damage; 19 had minor. Other

roads flooded: 10, 43, 151, 331, 800.

Most small stream flooding ended by

12 PM EDT on the 9th, but flooding on

Stillwater Creek at Uhrichsville

continued. Stillwater Creek rose to

flood stage (5 ft) at 4 AM EDT on

9th; crested 10.3 at 7 AM EDT 10th;

and fell below flood stage 7 AM EDT

on the 13th. Total rain: 6.2″ at

Gilmore; 4.8 Newcomerstown. There was

a record flood on Huff Creek at

Mineral City, which crested at 5.82

ft at 530 AM EDT on 9th (previous

record 4.35). (FRANCES) F90U

OHIO, East

OHZ069

0 0 25K

At 6 PM EDT on 8th, Sunfish Creek

flooded houses in Cameron. Many roads

were under water, including those in

Sardis. By 750 PM, SR 78 was closed

by flooding near Lewisville. At 827

PM, SR 26 closed near Graysville, and

Sunfish Creek overflowed in Cameron.

Before it ended, routes 260 and 379

flooded. There were basements

flooded and people evacuated from

homes in Cameron and Clarington.

Total rain: 4.8″ in Antioch. (FRANCES)

OHZ049

0 0 50K

By 615 PM, streams were out of their

banks countywide. Basement of

Hopedale School flooded. Routes 22,

49, 151, 250, 331 closed by flooding

(times unknown). 4 to 6″ of rain by 9

PM on the 8th. By 830 AM EDT on the

9th, Jewett was closed off because

of flooding. Total rain: New Athens

4.9″; Deersville 4.6. (FRANCES)

OHZ050

0 0 200K

By 630 PM EDT on 8th, flooding was

reported countywide. 40 roads were

closed by flooding, including SR 150.

Towns that flooded include: Adena

(evacuations), Connorsville,

Dillonvale (evac), Glen Robbins

(bridge washed out), trondale (evac),

Rayland, Smithfield (power substation

flooded), Toronto (evac), Wolf Run

(woman rescued from flooded car).

Total rain: 3.8″ in Amsterdam and

Hammondsville. There was a record

flood on Yellow Creek at

Hammondsville, which crested at

12.98 ft at 11 AM on 9th (previous

record 12.17). (FRANCES)

OHZ041

0 0 300K

By 615 PM EDT, roads were flooded

countywide. By 730 PM, Mill Creek

began to flood the Lisbon area; and

West Point reported 6″ of rain. By

915 PM on 8th, Rte 30 from Hanoverton

to Kensington was closed by flood;

and SR 154 near Elkton is covered by

3 ft of water. Total rain: West Point

8 inches; Union 4.3; Salem 4.1.

(FRANCES)

OHZ040

0 0 1M

By 615 PM EDT, SR 524 flooded 8 miles

northeast of Carrollton. By 827 PM,

Antigua Rd was flooded about 1 mile

west of Carrollton, at the

intersection of routes 9 and 171

(rescue needed). Several roads

remained closed the morning of the

9th. By 8 AM EDT on 10th, Conotton

Creek near Sherrodsville was still

rising and causing major flooding;

while in the north, Sandy Creek

continued to flood near Minerva. 30

mobile homes were flooded in Malvern

area. In summary, 12 roads were

closed by flooding; some were

damaged. 251 homes damaged or

destroyed. Minerva sewage treatment

plant damaged. Total rain: 3.8″ in

Augusta. (FRANCES)

OHZ048

0 0 25K

By 645 PM EDT on 8th, SR 751 flooded

near Orange; and CR 16 flooded

between Coshocton and Lafayette.

Total rain: 4.1 inches at Wills Creek

Dam. (FRANCES)

OHZ059

1 0 13.3M

At 11 AM EDT on 17th, CR 4 flooded

near Neffs. By noon, roads were

flooded in Bridgeport and St

Clairsville. As of 9 AM on 18th, a

few roads were still flooded but

water was receding. A total of 521

structures damaged or destroyed.

State Rte 7 was closed by multiple

mud slides. 200 ft of Rte 40 washed

away between Lansing and Brookside;

48-inch water main destroyed under

road; thousands lose water service.

Five businesses had major damage

along Rte 40, including $1 million

damage to Giant Eagle food store.

House destroyed by mud slide on Rte

250. Duffy and Powhatan Point also

flooded. Eight roads damaged by mud

slides and floods. These routes were

closed at one time: 7, 9, 145, 147,

148, 149, 250, 379, 647, 800. One

woman died (age unknown) There was a

record flood on Wheeling Creek at

Blaine, which crested at 9.86 ft

(previous record 8.21) Total rain:

6.1″ in Colerain, 5.7″ Morristown.

(Just across the river, Wheeling

storm total 9.5″) Most small stream

flooded ended by 9 AM EDT on 18th,

but flooding on the Ohio River

continued: Pike Island and Wheeling

were above flood stage from 12 AM on

18th, til 5 AM 20th. Pike Island

(flood stage 37 ft) crested 46.3 at

5 AM 19th. Wheeling (flood stage 36

ft) crested 45.3 at 5 AM 19th.

Moundsville and Powhatan Point,

(both flood stages 37 ft) were above

flood from 1 AM on 18th, til 9 AM

20th. Moundsville crested 47.0 ft at

8 AM 19th; Powhatan Point crested

45.6 at 9 AM on 19th. (All times

here EDT) (IVAN) F35VE

OHZ068

0 0 243K

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Ivan began the night of the 16th and

ended just before midnight on the

17th. At 1114 AM EDT on 17th, road

flooding began in Sarahsville. By

1230 PM, major flooding occurred

from Caldwell northward. By 315 PM,

Rtes 265 and 513 were flooded west of

Batesville after 5 inches of rain. As

of 9 AM on 18th, State Rtes 147, 333,

and 564 were still closed, but water

was receding. 81 structures damaged

or destroyed. Total rain: 6″

Hiramsburg and Sharon. (IVAN)

OHZ058

0 0 90K

By Noon EDT on 17th, many roads were

flooded, especially in southeastern

part of county. By 3 PM, people were

being evacuated because of flooding

in Quaker City. At 9 AM on 18th, 15

to 20 roads remained closed because

of flooding, including Rte 22 near

Winterset. At late as 4 PM on 19th,

Wills Creek, and streams feeding

into it, continued to cause flooding.

30 structures damaged or destroyed.

Wills Creek at Cambridge rose to

flood stage (15 ft) at 2 AM EDT on

18th; crested at 22.9 at 6 AM on

19th; and fell below flood stage 8

AM EDT on 22nd. Total rain: 4″ in

Cambridge; 3.4″ Salt Fork. (IVAN)

OHZ069

0 0 310K

At 1230 PM EDT, many roads flooded

near Woodsfield. As of 3 PM EDT,

numerous streams continued to flood

roads. Clarington also flooded.

State routes 7 and 78 were closed by

multiple mud slides. 17 structures

damaged or destroyed. Most small

stream flooding had ended by early

on the 18th, but flooding on the Ohio

River continued: at Hannibal, the

Ohio River rose above flood stage

(35 ft) at 4 AM EDT on 18th, crested

at 41.1 ft at 9 AM EDT on 19th, and

fell below flood stage at 10 AM EDT

on 20th. Total rain: 6.6 inches at

Woodsfield. (IVAN)

OHZ057

0 0 350K

At 1 PM EDT on 17th, many roads were

flooded near Duncan Falls. 116

structures damaged or destroyed.

Total rain: 6.2″ at Gratiot. (IVAN)

OHZ050

0 0 1.3M

At 215 PM EDT on 17th, there were

multiple mud slides on Route 7 from

Steubenville to Brilliant from heavy

rain and flooding. By 333 PM, there

was widespread flooding throughout

Jefferson Co. As of 9 AM on 18th,

many roads remained closed by

flooding and mud slides, including

Rtc 7. As of 4 PM on 19th,

Brilliant, Mingo Jet, and other

towns remained flooded. In total,

255 structures were damaged or

destroyed. These roads were closed

by flooding or mud slides at one

time: State Routes 146 through 152;

county roads 1 through 43. There was

flooding in Empire, Stratton, and

Toronto. Sewage treatment plant in

Steubenville has damaged. On the

Ohio River, New Cumberland WV was

above flood stage from 3 AM EDT on

18th, til 8 PM on 19th; it crested at

44.5 ft at 930 PM EDT on 18th (flood

stage 36). Wellsburg WV was above

flood stage from 3 AM on 18th, til 2

AM EDT on 20th; it crested at 45.1 ft

at 445 AM on 19th (flood stage 36).

Total rain: 4.2″ at Bloomingdale.

(IVAN)

OHZ048

0 0 25K

At 325 PM EDT on 17th, State Rte 83

by closed by flooding near Wills

Creek in southeastern Coshocton Co.

Rtes 93 and 541 were also closed.

(IVAN)

OHZ049

0 0 605K

At 345 PM EDT on 17th, Rtes 22 and

250 were closed by flooding near

Cadiz. By 9 AM on 18th, Scio was

still under water. Rte 151 between

Scio and Bowerstown closed by flood.

137 structures damaged or destroyed.

State Routes 519, 646, and 799 also

closed by flood. Total rain: 5.1

inches in New Athens. (IVAN)

OHZ041

0 0 475K

At 4 PM EDT on 17th, mud slides and

floods closed numerous roads near

East Liverpool. 508 PM, Will Creek

flooded Rte 518 near Summitville.

119 structures damaged or destroyed.

Total rain: 7 inches in southeastern

part of county. (IVAN)

OHIO, North

OHZ033

0 0 250K

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused widespread urban and lowland

flooding in Mahoning County. Between

two and three inches of rain fell on

much of the county by late evening.

Dozens of roads in the county had to

be closed because of flooding.

Hundreds of homes in the county

experienced basement or nuisance

flooding. Flood waters in some areas

were reported to be as much as two

feet deep.

Trumbull County

Countywide 0 0 4.2M

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused extensive flooding in Trumbull

County. The worst flooding was

reported in the eastern and central

sections of the of the county where

up to four inches of rainfall had

fallen by late evening on September

8th. The rains continued into the

9th with another two to four inches

reported in some areas before the

rain finally ended around daybreak.

Rainfall totals from the event

included: 3.36 inches at Mosquito

Creek State Park; 3.60 inches at

Newton Falls; 3.85 inches in

Leavittsburg; 4.45 inches at the

Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport

in Vienna Township and 9.40 inches

at Brookfield. The Cortland area was

especially hard hit by flooding.

Between 20 and 30 families had to be

evacuated from their homes around

2:30 a.m. after flood waters from

Walnut Run rose to nearly four feet

in depth in their neighborhood. A

total of 118 homes were damaged by

flooding in Cortland. Several roads

and culverts were also washed out in

the area. Flood waters along

Tournament Trail and Old Oak Drive

exceeded the 100 year flood plain.

Brookfield Township was also hard hit

as several small streams went into

flood washing out a couple roads and

forcing the closure of several more.

To the south, Little Yankee Creek and

Mud Run Creek went into flood in

Hubbard damaging many homes and

businesses along Main Street. Many

other roads were washed out or

damaged elsewhere in the county. A

total of 309 homes were directly

damaged by flash flooding in Trumbull

County. Hundreds of additional homes

and businesses experienced basement

or nuisance flooding.

Stark County

Southeast Portion 0 0 1.2M

For the second time in less than

two weeks, heavy rains caused

significant flooding in the

southeastern corner of Stark County.

Rain associated with the remnants of

Tropical Storm Frances began early

on September 8th and increased in

intensity during the evening hours.

The rain continued into the early

morning hours of the 9th and finally

ended an hour or two before daybreak.

Storm total rainfall amounts

included: 2.08 inches at North

Lawrence, 2.32 inches at Genoa and

3.08 inches at Alliance. Similar to

the August 28th flash flood event,

heavy rains over Columbia County

contributed to the severity of the

flooding. Up to 9 inches of rain was

reported over the headwaters of

Sandy Creek in Columbia County. The

creek rapidly rose during the late

evening hours of the 8th and early

morning of the 9th. Over 60 homes

and business were heavily damaged

in Minerva after the creek left it’s

banks. A couple dozen people had to

be rescued or evacuated from their

homes. The water treatment plant in

Minerva sustained over $100,000 in

damages. Many roads in the southeast

corner of the county were washed out

or had to be closed because of

flooding. Dozens of additional homes

sustained damage from basement or

nuisance flooding.

Mahoning County

Countywide 0 0 1.8M

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused flooding over portions of

Mahoning County. Most of the flooding

occurred in the eastern half of the

county where rainfall totals were the

greatest. The rain began early on the

8th and increased in intensity during

the evening hours. The heavy rain

continued into the 9th and finally

ended just before daybreak. Rainfall

totals from the event included: 3.56

inches at Sebring; 3.88 inches at

Youngstown; 5.5 inches at Poland; 7.0

inches at Canfield and 9.25 inches

near Poland. The Poland area was

especially hard hit by flooding. A

branch of Yellow Creek left it’s

banks and flooded much of the

Cobbler’s Run Subdivision along

Dobbins Road. Several families had to

be evacuated and at least two homes

were destroyed when their basement

walls collapsed. A library in Poland

was also damaged. Extensive street

nuisance flooding was reported in

both Beaver and Springfield

Townships and also in Campbell and

Boardman. Flood waters on some roads

were reported to be as much as three

feet deep. Occupants of three

vehicles had to be rescued from their

stranded cars. Two roads were washed

out in the southeastern corner of the

county. Hundreds of homes in Mahoning

County were damaged, mainly by

basement and nuisance flooding.

Ashtabula County

Countywide 0 0 800K

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused flooding over portions of

Ashtabula County. Rain began early

on September 8th and increased in

intensity during the evening hours.

The heavy rain continued into the

9th and finally ended just before

daybreak. Rainfall totals from the

event included: 2.08 inches at

Ashtabula; 2.42 inches at Geneva;

2.88 inches at Jefferson; 3.00 inches

at New Lyme; 3.68 inches at Conneaut

and 4.66 inches at Pierpont.

Significant flooding occurred along

Conneaut Creek in the northeastern

corner of the county. Very heavy

rain fell over the headwaters of the

creek in Pennsylvania and caused a

rapid rise in creek levels beginning

around midnight. By 12:24 a.m., a

campground along Creek Road in

Kingsville Township was under as

much as five feet of water. 17

campers at the campground barely

escaped the rapidly rising waters

and had to be rescued by boat.

Several roads near the creek were

washed out by the floodwaters. Many

other roads, including State Route

7 had to be closed because of

flooding. Over a dozen vehicles were

damaged at an automobile dealership

by flood waters up to four feet deep.

Hundreds of homes and businesses

were damaged by flooding. Several of

these sustained significant damage.

OHZ012>014-

022>023-032>033

0 0 525K

The remnants of Tropical Storm

Frances moved northeast across the

upper Ohio Valley on September 8th.

Gusty northerly winds behind this

storm caused considerable damage in

northeastern Ohio. Hundreds of

trees were downed in Ashtabula,

Trumbull,

Mahoning, Portage, Lake, Geauga and

Stark Counties. Trumbull County was

especially hard hit with at least five

homes damaged in the Cortland area by

fallen trees. Roads were blocked by

trees in both Niles and Liberty

Township. In Stark County, a tree hit a

moving car around 4:30 p.m. The driver

sustained only minor injuries, but the

car was heavily damaged. In Mahoning

County, a fallen tree destroyed a

garage in Milton Township. A pier at an

Eastlake marina (Lake County) was

destroyed by high winds and waves.

0HZ033

0 0 500K

Runoff from heavy rains produced by the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused the Mahoning River to go into

flood. At Youngstown, the river went

above the flood stage of 10 feet during

the late evening hours of September

8th. The river crested at 14.35 feet

during the evening of the 9th and fell

below flood stage during the evening of

the 10th. Extensive flooding occurred

in low areas along the river. Several

roads were damaged in Mill Creek Park.

Buildings along the river in Youngstown

also sustained some damage. Many roads

along the river had to be closed

because of the flooding.

0HZ032

0 0 300K

Heavy rains from the remnants of

Tropical Storm Frances caused

Nimishillen Creek to go into flood

during the early morning hours of

September 9th. The creek at North

Industry crested at 8.98 feet during

the early afternoon hours and fell back

below the flood stage of 8.0 feet by

early evening. Many homes and

businesses along the creek experienced

flooding. Damage to most of these

buildings was minor, but a few did

sustain significant damage. Several

roads along the creek had to be briefly

closed.

0HZ023

0 0 250K

Runoff from rains from the remnants of

Tropical Storm Frances caused

widespread lowland and nuisance

flooding across Trumbull County. The

Mahoning River at Leavittsburg went

above the flood stage of 10 feet during

the afternoon hours of the 9th. The

river crested at 10.91 feet at 11 p.m.

and fell back below flood stage around

9 a.m. on the 10th. Homes along the

river experienced minor flooding

problems. Several roads in the county

remained closed through the 10th.

0HZ023-033

0 0 825K

For the second time in a week,

extensive urban and lowland flooding

was reported across Trumbull and

Mahoning Counties. The remnants of Ivan

moved across the Ohio Valley on

September 17th. A stationary front

extending northeast from the low caused

heavy rains to develop and fall on most

of northeastern Ohio from late on

September 16th through the 17th.

Rainfall totals for the storm in

Trumbull County included: 2.00 inches

at Mespotamia; 2.87 inches at Newton

Falls and 3.64 inches at Brookfield. In

Mahoning County totals included: 2.80

inches at Canfield; 3.66 inches at East

Lewistown and 3.90 inches at Craig

Beach. Runoff from this rain caused

many rivers and streams to leave their

banks flooding many low lying areas.

Several roads had to be closed because

of the flooding. At Youngstown, the

Mahoning River went above the 10 foot

flood stage during the afternoon hours

of the 17th. The river crested at 14.26

feet at 9 p.m. and fell out of flood

late in the morning of September 19th.

At Leavittsburg, the Mahoning River

went above the 10 foot flood stage

during the evening of the 17th and

crested at 11.62 feet just before

daybreak on the 18th. The river went

out of flood early on September 19th.

Hundreds of homes in both Mahoning and

Trumbull Counties sustained damages

from either lowland or basement

flooding.

0HZ011-020>021-

031-038

0 0 360K

The remnants of Ivan moved across the

Ohio Valley on September 17th. A

stationary front extending northeast

from the low caused heavy rains to

develop and fall on most of

northeastern Ohio from late on

September 16th through the 17th.

Rainfall totals for the storm included:

1.76 inches at Millersburg (Holmes

County); 1.84 inches at Wooster (Wayne

County); 2.50 inches at Cuyahoga

Heights (Cuyahoga County); 2.91 inches

at Macedonia (Summit County) and 3.84

inches at Wadsworth (Medina County).

Runoff from this rain caused several

streams and creeks to leave their banks

flooding many low lying areas. A few

roads had to be closed because of

flooding. Hundreds of homes sustained

minor damage from either basement or

lowland flooding.

OHIO, Northwest

Allen County

Spencerville 0 0 0

Several county and state roads reported

closed due to flash flooding. A foot of

water reported flowing over roads.

Van Wert County

Elgin 0 0 0

County and State roads closed due to

flash flooding. At least a foot of

flowing water over roads in southeast

Van Wert county.

OHIO, Southeast

Jackson County

3 W Jackson to 0 0

6 W Jackson

Slow moving showers produced a rope

like funnel cloud west of the city.

0HZ066>067-

075>076-083>087

0 0 3.5M

The low pressure remains of Hurricane

Frances caused about a 30 hour rain

event, from the afternoon of the 7th,

into the evening hours of the 8th.

A stalled frontal boundary helped

trigger heavier convection on the

northern, or leading edge, of the rain

shield during the late afternoon and

evening of the 7th. This initial

convection caused the heavier storm

totals to be over Morgan and Perry

Counties, compared to points further

south.

Storm totals of 4 to 7 inches were

common, with isolated amounts both

above and below those totals. Some

specific preliminary totals include New

Lexington with 7.5 inches,

McConnelsville 6.6 inches, McArthur 6.3

inches, Salem Center 5.7 inches, Athens

5.5 inches, Gallipolis 5.1 inches,

Carpenter 5.0 inches, South Point 4.7

inches, Newport and Nelsonville 4.6

inches, and finally Marietta 3.8

inches.

The Scalia Lab on the Ohio University

campus in Athens reported a storm total

of 5.3 inches. Other rain totals from

spotters included 5.9 inches at

Pageville of Meigs County, 5.7 inches

from Darwin of Meigs County and

Guysville of Athens County. Tuppers

Plain of Meigs County measured 5.4

inches. A few automated gauges totaled

5.1 inches at Coolville, 4.9 inches at

Kitts Hill, and 4.8 inches at

Amesville.

Since the ground was dry prior to this

event, most flooding was to roads and

low lying areas. In Athens County,

Sunday Creek surrounded buildings in

Trimble and blocked streets. Some

residents evacuated their homes as a

precaution. Flooding remained minor.

The gauge at Glouster crested at 16.4

feet on the 9th, well below the 19 foot

crest observed back in May, 2004.

However, flooding was more severe in

Perry, Morgan, and Washington Counties,

affecting some homes. In Perry County,

around 50 homes had major damage, with

3 homes destroyed. Duck Creek flooded

in Washington County, including around

Elba and Lower Salem. In Washington

County, one house was destroyed, while

7 homes had major damage. In Morgan

County, 8 homes had major damage.

The Muskingum River crested at 11.7

feet early on the 9th at McConnelsville

in Morgan County. Flood stage is 11

feet. The Shade river near Chester of

Meigs County rose from 4.7 feet around

0500E on the 8th, to 21.5 feet around

1830E on the 9th. Bankfull is around 17

feet.

This event set the stage for a more

widespread flood across southeast Ohio,

to follow later in the month.

0HZ066>067-

075>076-084>087

0 0 25.5M

Light rain spread north into southeast

Ohio during the afternoon and evening

hours of the 16th. The heavier rain

from the remnants of Hurricane Ivan

developed over Lawrence County before

dawn on Friday the 17th, reaching the

Athens and Marietta vicinity by 0900E

on the 17th. By 1700E the heavy rain

was pulling east and northeast, out of

southeast Ohio. A rain event of 24 to

30 hours dumped 4 to 6.5 inches of

rain. Some specific preliminary totals

included Beverly 6.4 inches, McArthur 6

inches, McConnelsville 5.5 inches,

Athens and Waterloo 5.1 inches,

Marietta and Newport 4.8 inches,

Gallipolis 4.3 inches, and Nelsonville

4 inches. Rains were not as heavy over

central and northern portions of Perry

County. New Lexington measured 2.4

inches. Spotters reported 6.2 inches

from Guysville, 6.1 inches at Toppers

Plains, and 5.5 inches in Pageville.

Since the ground was still recovering

from the effects of Hurricane Frances 8

days earlier, streams crested higher in

many instances. The small stream

flooding developed during the late

morning and early afternoon period of

the 17th. Serious small stream flooding

occurred on such streams as Sunday

Creek, Duck Creek, Racoon Creek, Little

Racoon Creek, and Symmes Creek. On the

2 year old gauge at Bolins Mills on

Racoon Creek, the crest was 17 feet,

its highest. At Millfield on Sunday

Creek, a crest of 24.5 feet established

a new record. However, the upper

reaches of Sunday Creek in Perry and

northern Athens County were higher in

May of 2004, than this event. For

example, the gauge at Glouster crested

at 17.6 feet compared to 19 feet in

May. Symmes Creek near Aid crested at

23.3 feet.

The smaller rivers, such as the Little

Muskingum and Shade, saw serious

flooding. The Little Muskingum River

at Bloomfield crested at 31.1 feet,

surpassing the 30.7 feet crest in 1998.

The Rinard covered bridge, originally

built in 1874, was shoved into the

river. During a restoration project in

the early 1990s, gaps between the

wooden boards were taken out. Local

residents think, without those gaps,

the water pressure was greater,

knocking the bridge off its supports.

In this vicinity, general stores in

Bloomfield and Wingett Run were flooded

with 5 feet of water. The Shade River

crested at 30 feet near Chester. The

1997 crest was at 31.4 feet.

The Hocking River at Athens crested

slightly over its 20 foot flood stage

at 20.8 feet. The crest occurred before

dawn on the 18th at Athens.

The axis of heaviest rain ran up the

main stem of the Ohio River toward

Wheeling and Pittsburgh. Storm totals

of 6 to 8 inches were seen there. This

rain was almost direct local runoff

into the upper Ohio River. As a result,

a strong rise of 1 to 2 feet per hour

was observed on the Ohio River during

the Friday evening, the 17th. For

example, between 1600E and 2100E, the

Ohio River rose 9 feet at Willow Island

Lock and Dam, and around 10 feet on the

Marietta 2SW gauge. The 24 hour rise at

Marietta was 22 feet in 24 hours, the

greatest 24 hour rise there on record.

On the 18th and 19th, as most small

streams were receding, moderate to

major flooding occurred on the Ohio

River from New Matamoras and Willow

Island on down through Marietta,

Belpre, Racine and Pomeroy. It was the

highest stage since March 1964. The

crest then dampened to minor flooding

below the mouth of the Kanawha River.

Some specific crests included Willow

Island 44.8 feet, Marietta 2SW 42.4

feet, Belleville 45.8 feet, Racine 50.2

feet, Pomeroy 51.2 feet, and R C Bryd

Lock and Dam 51 feet. The crest was 2

to 4 feet deep inside hundreds of

Marietta businesses, plus on the order

of 40 businesses in Meigs County

including the town of Pomeroy.

In Washington County, the Red Cross

surveyed 159 homes with major damage,

with 60 homes destroyed. Two trailer

parks were hit hard by flooding around

Marietta. On the order of 400 to 500

businesses in the county were affected.

State damage assessments had 56 homes

with major damage in Athens County. In

Meigs County, 16 homes had major damage

and 1 house was destroyed. In Gallia

County, 6 homes had major damage with

1 home destroyed. In Lawrence County, 8

homes had major damage and 3 were

destroyed. In Vinton County, 5 homes

had major damage and 2 homes were

destroyed.

The FEMA disaster 1556 included this

flood event.

OHIO, Southwest

0HZ065-074

0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Frances

brought heavy rains to portions of

central Ohio. Areas southeast of

Columbus received three to four inches

of rain, causing some minor flooding

problems. Numerous roads were flooded

across Fairfield and Hocking counties,

with a few roads closed near Lancaster.

Several creeks rose out of their banks

across Hocking County.

Scioto County

Countywide 0 0 5K

Twenty roads were closed due to high

water across the county. Basements were

flooded in several homes, and one

evacuation took place.

0HZ074

0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan brought

persistent heavy rains to southern and

central Ohio. Three to five inches of

rain fell across Hocking County,

causing flooding on several roads in

the eastern part of the county. A

number of the roads were closed because

of the flooding.

Pike County

Beaver 0 0

Several roads were flooded and closed.

OKLAHOMA, Eastern

NONE REPORTED.

OKLAHOMA, Extreme Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

OKLAHOMA, Panhandle

Cimarron County

3 SSE Boise City 0 0

A thunderstorm became severe over the

western Oklahoma panhandle during the

evening hours producing a brief high

wind gust at the Boise City Oklahoma

MesoNet. No damage or injuries were

reported.

OKLAHOMA, Western, Central and Southeast

Payne County

2 S Cushing 0 0 10K

Lightning struck a crude oil storage

tank causing a fire. The 80,000 barrel

capacity tank only had 8700 barrels of

crude in the tank at the time.

OREGON, Central and East

Grant County

1 N Granite 0 0

Union County

La Grande 0 0

Lightning from a thunderstorm hit a

home, which tripped circuit breakers,

knocked out some outlets, and left a

burn mark on the house.

Wallowa County

5 S Imnaha 0 0

Wallowa County

20 ESE Enterprise 0 0

High winds from a thunderstorm knocked

down large trees near the confluence of

north/south forks of the Imnaha River.

Wallowa County

20 ESE Enterprise 0 0

ORZ047

0 0

A peak wind gust of 60 MPH was measured

at the John Day Airport.

OREGON, Northwest

NONE REPORTED.

OREGON, Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

OREGON, Southwest

ORZ021>022-024-026

0 0

See below.

A Red Flag Warning was issued for

Oregon fire weather zones 618/691/620

for expected strong winds and poor

recoveries, effective at the above

listed time interval. The winds did

blow, but recoveries were much better

than expected, so the warning did not

verify.

ORZ029>031

0 0

See below.

A Freeze Warning was issued for the

above listed zones, effective at the

above listed times. Reported low

temperatures in the area ranged from 20

to 28 degrees, so the warning verified

well.

PACIFIC

NOT RECEIVED.

PENNSYLVANIA, Central

Fulton County

12.5 W Mc Connellsbur 0 0

Trees and wires were knocked down by

thunderstorm winds near Crystal Spring.

PAZ004>005-

011>012-017>019-

024>026-034>035-

037-041-045>046

0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Frances moved

northeast across central Pennsylvania

from late Thursday afternoon on

September 8th, into the early morning

hours of Friday, September 9th,

producing widespread heavy rainfall,

and subsequent minor to moderate

flooding. Rainfall amounts of 3 to 5

inches within a 12 to 18 hour period

led to numerous road closures and

widespread basement flooding across

central Pennsylvania, particularly in

Blair and Huntingdon Counties. In Blair

County, a railroad bridge in

Hollidaysburg Borough was damaged by

flood waters, while approximately 200

persons were evacuated due to flooded

homes. In Huntingdon County, Juniata

College evacuated 23 persons from a

dormitory due to flooding, while in

Logan Township, 35 calves were swept

away by flood waters from a farm.

Somerset County

Central City 0 0

Thunderstorms produced torrential rain

across Somerset County, leading to

Flash Flooding in Central City. US

Route 30 was closed in several places

due to flooding and debris over the

roadway. Several secondary roads were

also closed in the vicinity of Central

City and Meyersdale.

PAZ026

0 0

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Little Juniata River at Spruce Creek.

The creek rose above flood stage of 8.0

feet at 01:00 EST on the 9th, crested

at 12.94 feet at 5:45 EST on the 9th,

then fell back below flood stage at

14:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ025

0 0

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Frankstown Branch of the Juniata River

at Williamsburg. The river rose above

flood stage of 12.0 feet at 1:00 EST on

the 9th, crested at 16.91 feet at 10:00

EST on the 9th, then fell back below

flood stage at 22:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ026

0 0

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Juniata River at Huntingdon. The river

rose above flood stage of 12.0 feet at

7:15 EST on the 9th, crested at 13.45

feet at 11:45 EST on the 9th, then fell

back below flood stage at 20:15 EST on

the 9th.

PAZ045

0 0

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Bald Eagle Creek at Beech Creek

Station. The creek rose above flood

stage of 11.0 feet at 09:00 EST on the

9th, crested at 12.68 feet at 14:45 EST

on the 9th, then fell back below flood

stage at 22:30 EST on the 9th.

PAZ034

0 0

Heavy rain caused flooding of Raystown

Branch of the Juniata River at Saxton.

The river rose above flood stage of

17.0 feet at 11:00 EST on the 9th,

crested at 17.15 feet at 12:30 EST on

the 9th, then fell back below flood

stage at 14:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ010

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Clarion River at

Johnsonburg to rise above its flood

stage of 7 feet at 11:00 EST on the

9th, crest at 7.23 feet on the 9th

shortly after 11:00 EST and fell below

flood stage at 14:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ026

0 0

Heavy rain caused flooding of the

Aughwick Creek at Shirleysburg. The

river rose above flood stage of 10 feet

at 11:30 EST on the 9th, crested at

10.79 feet at 16:45 EST on the 9th and

then fell back below flood stage at

19:45 EST on the 9th.

PAZ046

0 0

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Montgomery to

exceed its flood stage of 17 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 08:00

EST on the 10th, crested at 18.6 feet

at 11:00 on the 10th and fell below

flood stage at 00:00 EST on the 11th.

Warren County

Sheffield 0 0

Heavy rain caused rapid rises along

Tionesta Creek in southeast Warren

County. Several homes were quickly

surrounded by flood waters during the

mid afternoon hours. The flooding

prevented several school students from

returning home, since their homes were

inaccessible due to flood waters. Flood

waters quickly receded during the early

evening hours.

PAZ004>006-

010>012-017>019-

024>028-033>037-

041>042-045>046-

049>053-056>059-

063>66

2 0 50M

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan moved

north along the Appalachians during

Friday, September 17th, and interacted

with an approaching cold front, leading

to a large swath of excessive rainfall

across central Pennsylvania as the

system weakened to a tropical

depression. The rain began during

Friday morning, and then became very

heavy from Friday afternoon into Friday

evening. Rainfall amounts of 3 to 6

inches were common, with some localized

amounts exceeding 8 inches within a 12

hour period. The heavy rainfall finally

tapered off from west to east across

central Pennsylvania late Friday night.

As a result of this excessive rainfall,

and antecedent heavy rainfall from the

remnants of Hurricane Frances one week

earlier, widespread flooding occurred

throughout central Pennsylvania from

Friday evening through early Monday,

September 20th. Many smaller creeks and

streams overflowed their banks by

Friday evening, while many larger

tributaries of the Susquehanna River

experienced moderate to major flooding

from Saturday into Sunday. In fact,

flood levels at many locations reached

into the top 5 of all flood events,

with many river forecast points

cresting above levels reached in the

January 1996 flood. Overall, 32 of 47

river forecast points exceeded flood

stage in central Pennsylvania, with 2

points setting all-time record high

water marks, as Bald Eagle Creek at

Beech Creek Station reached 15.96 feet,

and the Frankstown Branch of the

Juniata River reached 19.46 feet.

The widespread flooding closed hundreds

of roads and bridges across central

Pennsylvania, causing a significant

adverse impact on commerce and

transportation for several days. In

particular, Route 322 through the

“narrows” section of Juniata and

Mifflin Counties was closed, in

addition to numerous smaller roadways.

The high water also caused the

weakening of several flood control

structures in Cambria, Huntingdon, and

Montour Counties, leading to

evacuations. In addition, two deaths

were attributed to the flooding. One

death occurred in Greenfield Township

in Blair County, where a 2.5 year old

boy was swept away from waters of

Popular Run Creek, as the family was

cleaning up storm damage and the child

wandered off to the creek and was swept

away. The death occurred between 12:30

PM and 1:00 PM EST on Saturday

September 18th. The second death

occurred in Mifflin County to a 59 year

old male, who was found within receding

waters. Preliminary monetary estimates

of flood damage from the remnants of

Ivan across the state were over 50

million dollars.

M2IW, M59IW

Fulton County

17 SW Mc Connellsbur 0 0

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Fulton

County Pennsylvania from the storms of

September 17 2004. The tornado occurred

3.5 miles east of McKees Gap along

route 731 (McKees Gap Road). Wind

speeds were estimated to be around 75

mph.

The tornado touched about one quarter

mile south of McKees Gap Road downing

several trees, damaging the roof of a

house, damaging part of a barn and

leveling a tractor barn. The tornado

also flattened tall grass and corn. The

tornado traveled toward the

north-northwest for about half a mile.

It toppled and uprooted trees as it

crossed McKees Gap Road before lifting

up. The width of the tornado was about

30 to 40 yards and damage could be

followed for about half a mile.

The tornado touched down at

approximately 530 pm EDT and was on the

ground for about 1 to 2 minutes. The

tornado was a weak F1 tornado on the

Fujita scale. There were no injuries or

deaths.

PAZ037

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Tioga River at

Mansfield to exceed its flood stage of

9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 17:30 EST on the 17th, crested

at 14.21 feet at 04:30 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 12:45 EST

on the 18th.

Franklin County

2 SW Greencastle 0 0

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Franklin

County.

The tornado occurred near the town of

Greencastle and was rated an F1 on the

Fujita scale. Wind speeds were

estimated to be near 80 mph. The

tornado first hit the ground about 2

miles to the southwest of Greencastle

and moved to the north-northwest for

about 2 miles. The width of the storm

was approximately 30 yards. The tornado

touched down at approximately 714 pm

EDT and lifted at approximately 718 pm

EDT. The tornado caused many trees to

fall and damaged several structures.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Franklin County

3 SW St Thomas 0 0

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Franklin

County.

The tornado occurred near the town of

Saint Thomas and was rated an F1 on the

Fujita scale. Top wind speeds were

estimated at about 85 mph. The path was

2.5 miles long and began 3 miles

south-southwest of Saint Thomas. The

width of this tornado was 30 yards. The

tornado touched down approximately at

728 pm EDT and lifted at 732 pm EDT.

This tornado caused many trees to fall

and damaged several structures.

PAZ018>019-

024>028-033>036

0 0 49.9K

Strong winds associated with the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan, combined

with excessively wet soil resulted in

the downing of hundreds of trees across

portions of south central Pennsylvania

during Friday evening on September

17th. Although the system weakened to a

tropical depression upon reaching

Pennsylvania, with estimated winds

between 35 and 45 mph, the extremely

wet soil from recent heavy rainfall, in

addition to water-loaded foliage likely

led to this blow-down phenomenon. Areas

that were particularly hit hard

included exposed eastern slopes within

the ridges of central Pennsylvania, and

also in valley locations near the foot

of these ridges. Such areas included

the east facing ridges within Blue Knob

State Park, with an estimated 800 acres

affected, mainly between 1800 and 2000

EST, the eastern slopes within Rothrock

State Forest, and the valley at Tussey

Mountain. Fallen trees resulted in some

structural damage in Huntingdon County

where a camper was destroyed at Camp

Blue Diamond, and a hunting cottage was

damaged about 13 miles south of Camp

Blue Diamond. Most of the trees that

fell were aligned from northeast to

southwest, indicative of the strong

sustained straight line winds that

occurred during this event.

Franklin County

9 E Chambersburg 0 0

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed that a tornado

occurred in Caledonia State Park in

easternmost Franklin County

Pennsylvania.

The tornado began less than a mile

south of the park and then moved

northward across Route 30 and through

the park, toppling numerous trees in

its path. The tornado was about one and

one-half miles in length with a width

of 50 to 100 yards and a top wind speed

estimated around 85 mph. The tornado

was rated as an Fl on the Fujita scale.

The tornado touched down about 818 pm

EDT and lasted a couple of minutes.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Bedford County

3 NW Everett 0 0

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Bedford

County.

The tornado occurred north of the town

of Everett and was rated an Fl on the

Fujita scale. Wind speeds were

estimated to be around 80 mph. The

tornado first touched down 3 miles

northwest of the town of Everett on

Lower Snake Spring Road. The tornado

traveled north along Snake Spring Road

for three and one half miles before

lifting up. The width of the tornado

was 50 to 100 yards.

The tornado touched down at

approximately 830 pm EDT and lifted at

approximately 835 pm EDT. The tornado

caused many trees to fall, and damaged

one house and several farm buildings.

Extensive damage was done to corn crops

on six different farms.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Bedford County

2.5 NE Bedford 0 0

A survey of the area near Imlertown and

Yount revealed a tornado struck the

region around 840 pm EDT.

The damage and snapped trees near Yount

suggest a weak F1 tornado on the Fujita

scale. The tornado touched down south

of Yount along Station Road. The

tornado moved northwest causing

sporadic damage along Younts Road and

Briar Valley Road. The main damage was

snapped and uprooted trees suggesting

winds of 70 to 75 mph. On Briars Valley

Road, the tornado lifted off a barn

roof. It also uprooted and snapped

trees as it moved up the hill from the

farm. The tornado had about a two and

one quarter mile long path that was

about 50 yards wide.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Cumberland County

Oakville 0 0

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in

Cumberland County.

The tornado occurred near the town of

Oakville and was rated an F1 on the

Fujita scale. Wind speeds were

estimated to be near 90 mph. The

tornado first touched down 1 mile south

of Oakville, and moved north for about

2 miles before lifting up. The width of

the tornado was about 50 yards.

The tornado touched down at

approximately 855 pm EDT and lifted at

approximately 858 pm EDT. The tornado

caused many trees to fall, and damaged

several farm houses and farm buildings.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Juniata County

3 NW Mifflintown 0 0

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Juniata

County.

A tornado touched down near the town of

Denholm and was likely influenced by

the steep terrain of the area. The

damage, in the form of downed trees,

could be easily seen from Route 333.

About 100 trees were knocked down with

this tornado. The path was

approximately 1 mile long and about 75

yards wide. The tornado occurred around

905 pm EDT and lifted at 907 pm EDT.

This tornado was rated F1 on the Fujita

scale with winds approaching 85 mph.

There were no known injuries or deaths.

Juniata County

3 N Mifflintown 0 0

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Juniata

County.

A tornado touched down near the town of

Arch Rock. It downed trees which were

visible along Township Road 527. The

length of the tornado was approximately

4.5 miles and the width was about 100

yards. In addition to the tornado,

downburst winds were also observed in a

much wider swath. Damage was mainly

confined to trees being knocked down,

however several structures had minor

damage and several corn fields were

flattened. The tornado touched down at

approximately 910 pm EDT and lasted

until approximately 913 pm EDT. The

tornado was rated Fl on the Fujita

scale with winds estimated at 85 mph.

There were no known injuries or deaths.

PAZ026

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Little Juniata

River at Spruce Creek to exceed its

flood stage of 8 feet. The river rose

above flood stage at 20:15 EST on the

17th, crested at 15.46 feet at 04:45

EST on the 18th, and fell below flood

stage at 20:45 EST on the 18th.

PAZ037

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Tioga River at

Tioga Junction to exceed its flood

stage of 15 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 20:15 EST on the 17th,

crested at 15.33 at 21:30 EST on the

17th, and fell below flood stage at

22:15 EST on the 17th.

PAZ045

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Bald Eagle Creek

at Beech Creek Station to exceed its

flood stage of 11 feet. The river rose

above flood stage at 20:45 EST on the

17th, crested at 15.96 feet at 11:45

EST on the 18th, and fell below flood

stage at 11:45 EST on the 19th.

PAZ025

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Frankstown Branch

of the Juniata River at Williamsburg to

exceed its flood stage of 12 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 20:45

EST on the 17th, crested at 19.46

(record) at 10:45 EST on the 18th, and

fell below flood stage at 05:15 EST on

the 19th.

Perry County

9.5 SW Newport 0 0

Thunderstorm winds blew the roof off a

barn on Little Germany Road near Route

274 in Little Germany.

Cambria County

11 E Carrolltown 0 0

Heavy rain caused Dysart Sportsmans

Club Dam to overtop during the evening

of September 17. Water overtopped the

breast of the dam by one and one half

feet, causing the evacuation of about

10 residents downstream of the dam. One

home was flooded, along with several

others reporting water in their

basements. Portions of the built-up

embankments of the retaining pond

collapsed into Clearfield Creek. In

addition, Cherry Tree Reservoir was

thought to be in danger of failing, and

evacuations also took place. This

structure did, however, not fail.

Perry County

New Germantown 0 0

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

along Bryner Road in the Tuscarora

State Forest near New Germantown and

Route 274.

PAZ010

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Clarion River at

Ridgway to exceed its flood stage of 16

feet. The river exceeded flood stage at

22:00 EST on the 17th, crested at 16.89

feet at 00:00 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 05:00 EST on the

18th.

PAZ050

0 0

Heavy rain caused Penns Creek at Penns

Creek to exceed its flood stage of 8

feet. The river rose above flood stage

at 22:30 EST on the 17th, crested at

12.19 feet at 11:30 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:15 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ026

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Aughwick Creek at

Shirleysburg to exceed its flood stage

of 10 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 00:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 18.5 feet at 12:15 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 10:15 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ046

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Loyalsock Creek

at Loyalsockville to exceed its flood

stage of 12 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 00:15 EST on the 18th,

crested at 15.24 feet at 10:30 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

16:00 EST on the 18th.

PAZ026

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Huntingdon to exceed its flood stage of

12 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 00:30 EST on the 18th, crested

at 17.78 feet at 10:15 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 05:00 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ011

0 0

Heavy rain caused Sinnemahoning Creek

at Sinnemahoning to exceed its flood

stage of 17 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 00:30 EST on the 18th,

crested at 17.78 feet at 03:00 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

08:30 EST on the 18th.

PAZ034

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Raystown Branch

of the Susquehanna River at Saxton to

exceed its flood stage of 17 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 02:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 20.02 feet

at 11:30 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 20:15 EST on the

18th.

PAZ010

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Clarion River at

Johnsonburg to exceed its flood stage

of 7 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 02:15 EST on the 18th, crested

at 7.43 feet at 03:00 EST on the 18th

and fell below flood stage at 07:00 EST

on the 18th.

PAZ045

0 0

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Renovo to

exceed its flood stage of 16 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 02:15

EST on the 18th, crested at 21.14 feet

at 10:16 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 20:30 EST on the

18th.

PAZ056

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Sherman Creek at

Shermans Dale to exceed its flood stage

of 9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 02:45 EST on the 18th, crested

at 16.31 feet at 10:30 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 01:00 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ057

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Hershey to exceed its flood stage of 7

feet. The river rose above flood stage

at 03:00 EST on the 18th, crested at

14.27 feet at 09:30 on the 19th, and

fell below flood stage at 05:00 EST on

the 20th.

Lancaster County

Bainbridge 0 0

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and wires in Bainbridge.

PAZ059

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Harper Tavern to exceed its flood stage

of 9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 04:15 EST on the 18th, crested

at 17.35 feet at 01:00 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 19:15 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ063

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Yellow Breeches

Creek at Camp Hill to exceed its flood

stage of 7 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 04:30 EST on the 18th,

crested at 8.67 feet at 16:15 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

15:15 EST on the 19th.

PAZ046

0 0

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Montgomery to

exceed its flood stage of 17 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 05:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.8 feet

at 01:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 19:00 EST on the

20th.

PAZ026

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Mapleton Depot to exceed its flood

stage of 20 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 06:00 EST on the 18th,

crested at 23.76 feet at 14:15 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

00:45 EST on the 19th.

PAZ045

0 0

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Lock Haven to

exceed its flood stage of 21 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 06:15

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.13 feet

at 16:00 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 11:00 EST on the

19th.

PENNSYLVANIA, Central

PAZ046

0 0

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Williamsport

to exceed its flood stage of 20 feet.

The river rose above flood stage at

07:15 EST on the 18th, crested at 27.82

feet at 22:45 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 23:30 EST on the

19th.

PAZ033

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Youghiogheny

River at Confluence to exceed its flood

stage of 12 feet. The river rose to

flood stage at 08:00 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 09:00 EST

on the 18th.

PAZ052

0 0

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Milton to rise

above its flood stage of 19 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 08:45

EST on the 18th, crested at 27.94 feet

at 06:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 11:30 EST on the

20th.

PAZ046

0 0

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Muncy to

exceed its flood stage of 20 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 09:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.8 feet

at 01:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 17:00 EST on the

20th.

PAZ049

0 0

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Lewisburg to

exceed its flood stage of 18 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 09:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 26.01 feet

at 09:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 14:16 EST on the

20th.

PAZ057

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Middletown to exceed its flood stage of

11 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 09:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 19.5 feet at 07:00 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 01:00 EST

on the 20th.

PAZ027

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Lewistown to exceed its flood stage of

23 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 09:30 EST on the 18th, crested

at 31.68 feet at 01:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:30 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ052

0 0

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Watsontown to

exceed its flood stage of 23 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 11:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.8 feet

at 01:00 on the 19th, and fell below

flood stage at 11:00 EST on the 20th.

PAZ046

0 0

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Jersey Shore

to exceed its flood stage of 26 feet.

The river rose above flood stage at

12:00 EST on the 18th, crested at 30.74

feet at 21:00 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 13:00 EST on the

19th.

PAZ063

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Conodoguinet

Creek at Hogestown to exceed its flood

stage of 8 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 14:00 EST on the 18th,

crested at 11.35 feet at 17:45 EST on

the 19th, and fell below flood stage

at 10:30 EST on the 20th.

PAZ053

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Bloomsburg to exceed its flood stage

of 19 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 16:15 EST on the 18th, crested

at 27.12 EST at 09:45 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 18:45 EST

on the 20th.

PAZ052

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Sunbury to exceed its flood stage of

24 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 17:30 EST on the 18th, crested

at 30.44 feet at 13:30 EST on the 19th

and fell below flood stage at 18:30 EST

on the 20th.

PAZ057

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Harrisburg to exceed its flood stage

of 17 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 19:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 24.4 feet at 19:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 03:30 EST

on the 21st.

PAZ051

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Danville to exceed its flood stage

of 20 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 19:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 26.22 feet at 15:30 on the 19th, and

fell below flood stage at 20:30 EST on

the 20th.

PAZ066

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Marietta to exceed its flood stage

of 49 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 20:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 55.67 feet at 16:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 10:30 EST

on the 21st.

PAZ056

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Newport to exceed its flood stage of 22

feet. The river rose above flood stage

at 22:30 EST on the 18th, crested at

23.58 feet at 06:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:00 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ045

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Bald Eagle Creek

at Beech Creek Station to exceed its

flood stage of 11 feet. The creek rose

above flood stage at 02:30 EST on the

28th, crested at 11.6 feet at 07:00 EST

on the 28th and fell back below flood

stage just after 07:00 EST

on the 28th.

PAZ035>036-

056>059-063>066

0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne moved

northeast along the east slopes of the

Appalachians during Tuesday, September

28th, eventually moving off the mid

Atlantic Coast by early Tuesday

evening. However, a large plume of

tropical moisture to the northwest of

the system produced widespread heavy

rainfall across south central

Pennsylvania during Tuesday, with

rainfall amounts of 2 to 4 inches. This

rainfall, combined with excessively wet

soil and swollen rivers from the

remnants of 2 antecedent tropical

systems, produced mainly minor flooding

across portions of south central

Pennsylvania, with several road

closures and some basement flooding

report.

PAZ059

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Harper Tavern to exceed its flood stage

of 9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 21:00 EST on the 28th, crested

at 10.09 feet at 05:00 EST on the 29th,

and fell below flood stage at 13:15 EST

on the 29th.

PAZ063

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Yellow Breeches

Creek at Camp Hill to exceed its flood

stage of 7 feet. The creek rose above

flood stage at 21:45 EST on the 28th,

crested at 7.52 feet at 01:15 EST on

the 29th and fell below flood stage at

05:30 EST on the 29th.

PAZ063

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Conodoguinet

Creek at Hogestown to exceed its flood

stage of 8 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 04:30 EST on the 29th,

crested 8.73 feet at 00:00 EST on the

30th and fell below flood stage at

11:30 EST on the 30th.

PAZ057

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Hershey to exceed its flood stage of 7

feet. The creek rose above flood stage

at 10:45 EST on the 29th, crested at

7.01 feet at 11:30 EST on the 29th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:00 EST

on the 29th.

PAZ057

0 0

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Middletown to reach flood stage of 11

feet. The creek rose to flood stage at

12:00 EST on the 29th, crested at 11.00

feet at 12:00 EST on the 29th and fell

below flood stage at 13:00 EST on the

29th.

PAZ063

0 0

Heavy rain and local runoff caused the

Yellow Breeches Creek at Camp Hill to

exceed its flood stage of 7 feet again.

The creek rose above flood stage at

16:55 EST on the 29th, crested at 7.56

feet at 22:15 EST on the 29th, and fell

below flood stage at 02:45 on the 30th.

PENNSYLVANIA, East

Northampton County

Central Portion 0 0

Heavy rain associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Frances caused poor

drainage flooding and flooding of some

of the streams in Northampton County.

Most of the flooding affected the

central part of the county the most. A

number of stranded vehicles were

reported in Nazareth, Bath and Belfast.

Tatamy Road was closed near the

Nazareth Middle School in Upper

Nazareth Township. Doppler Radar storm

total estimates reached three inches in

the county. Storm totals included 3.37

inches in Forks Township and 1.59

inches at the Lehigh Valley

International Airport.

Berks County

4 W Birdsboro 0 0

A severe thunderstorm knocked down

numerous trees and snapped several

poles in the Green Hills area of

Robeson Township. Sporadic tree wind

damage extended for about one mile.

Monroe County

Countywide 0 0 8M

PAZ055

0 0 8M

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from the late evening of the

17th through the first half of the day

on the 18th in Monroe County. Doppler

Radar storm total estimates averaged

between 3 and 6 inches throughout the

county. The torrential rain caused

widespread poor drainage, creek and

river flooding. It was the worst

flooding along the Delaware River since

1955. Every stream in the county

flooded. About 160 homes and businesses

were damaged. Extensive damage also

occurred in the Delaware Water Gap

National Recreational Area. President

George W. Bush declared the county a

disaster area. Damage was estimated at

between fifteen and seventeen million

dollars.

The Delaware River at Tocks Island was

above its 21 foot flood stage from 438

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 232 a.m.

EDT on the 20th. It crested at 30.32

feet at 845 a.m. EDT.

The Brodhead Creek at Analomink was

above its 8 foot flood stage from 826

a.m. through Noon EDT on the 18th. It

crested at 8.53 feet at 10 a.m. EDT.

The Pohopoco Creek at Kresgeville was

above its 8.5 foot flood stage from 643

a.m. EDT through 951 p.m. EDT on the

18th. It crested at 8.99 feet at 230

p.m. EDT. The Brodhead Creek at

Minisink Hills was above its 10 foot

flood stage from 927 a.m. EDT on the

18th through 1235 a.m. EDT on the 20th.

It crested at 18.27 feet at 815 a.m.

EDT on the 19th. The Bush Kill Creek at

Shoemakers was above its 6 foot flood

stage from 732 a.m. EDT on the 18th

through 6 a.m. EDT on the 19th. It

crested at 7.27 feet at 230 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. The Lehigh River at

Stoddartsville was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 622 a.m. EDT on the

the 18th through 221 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 11.59 feet at 1215

p.m. EDT on the 18th. The Tobyhanna

Creek at Blakeslee was above its 10

foot flood stage from 348 a.m. EDT on

the 18th through 450 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 12.71 feet at 1245

p.m. EDT on the 18th.

Storm totals included 6.02 inches at

Pocono Summit.

Lehigh County

Countywide 0 0 5M

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall during the first half of the

day on the 18th in Lehigh County. Storm

totals average around 5 inches and

caused widespread poor drainage,

creek and river flooding throughout the

county. Hardest hit were the city of

Allentown, Lower Macungie and Macungie

Townships. It was estimated that

85 homes, 31 businesses and five public

buildings and structures were damaged.

The preliminary damage estimate was

five million dollars.

The Lehigh River at Walnutport

(Northampton County) was above its 8

foot flood stage from 904 a.m. EDT on

the 18th through 102 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 12.32 feet at 245

p.m. EDT on the 18th. Farther

downstream the Lehigh River in

Bethlehem was above its 16 foot flood

stage from 212 p.m. EDT through 1156

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

18.79 feet at 700 p.m. EDT. The Little

Lehigh Creek within Little Lehigh Park

was above its 6 foot flood stage from

721 a.m. EDT on the 18th through

Midnight EDT on the 19th. It crested at

10.49 feet at 345 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

Farther downstream, the Little Lehigh

Creek at 10th Street within Allentown

was above its 8 foot flood stage from

1040 a.m. EDT through 951 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. It crested at 10.05 feet at

615 p.m. EDT. The Monocacy Creek at

Bethlehem was above its 4.5 foot flood

stage from 540 a.m. EDT on the 18th

through 752 a.m. EDT on the 19th. It

crested at 9.67 feet at 2 p.m. EDT on

the 18th.

Storm totals included 8.90 inches in

Orefield, 7.25 inches in Bethlehem,

5.32 inches in Coopersburg and 4.82

inches at the Lehigh Valley

International Airport.

Northampton County

Countywide 0 0 1M

PAZ062

0 0 1M

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall during the first half of the

day on the 18th in Northampton County.

Storm totals average around 5 inches

and caused widespread poor drainage,

creek and river flooding throughout the

county. Runoff from the heavy rain also

caused the worst flooding along the

Delaware River since 1955. Nearly every

township in the county reported flood

damage. President George W. Bush

declared the county a disaster area.

About 865 homes, businesses and

structures were damaged including

several roads and bridges.

The Delaware River washed a home from

Harmony Township (Warren County)

downstream, the home crashed into the

Easton-Phillipsburg free bridge. The

impact sheared the roof from the home

and the remainder floated under the

bridge.

The Lehigh River at Walnutport

(Northampton County) was above its 8

foot flood stage from 904 a.m. EDT on

the 18th through 102 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 12.32 feet at 245

p.m. EDT on the 18th. Farther

downstream the Lehigh River in

Bethlehem was above its 16 foot flood

stage from 212 p.m. EDT through 1156

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

18.79 feet at 700 p.m. EDT. Farther

downstream, the Lehigh River at Glendon

was above its 19 foot flood stage from

1118 a.m. EDT on the 18th through 620

a.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested at

19.82 feet at 415 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

The Monocacy Creek at Bethlehem was

above its 4.5 foot flood stage from

540 a.m. EDT on the 18th through 752

a.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested at

9.67 feet at 2 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

Along the Delaware River at Belvidere,

the river was above its 22 foot flood

stage from 1101 p.m. EDT on the 18th

through 842 p.m. EDT on the 19th. It

crested at 24.83 feet at 915 a.m. EDT

on the 19th. Farther downstream, the

Delaware River at the Easton-

Phillipsburg Bridge was above its 22

foot flood stage from 331 p.m. EDT on

the 18th through 1126 a.m. EDT on the

20th. It crested at 33.45 feet at 8

a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Storm totals included 7.25 inches in

Bethlehem, 6.88 inches in Forks

Township and 4.70 inches in Easton.

Montgomery County

Northwest Portion 0 0

PAZ068

0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacted with an approaching cold

front and dropped very heavy rain

across Montgomery County, especially

in the northwestern half of the county.

The heaviest rain fell between 3 a.m.

EDT and Noon EDT on the 18th. There was

widespread poor drainage flooding as

well as flooding of many of the streams

in the northwest part of the county.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 1.5 and 5.0 inches.

Runoff from the heavy rain within the

county and also upstream led to

flooding along the Schuylkill River.

The West Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Hillegass was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 1018 a.m. EDT through 231

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

5.76 feet at Noon EDT. The East Branch

of the Perkiomen Creek at Schwenksville

was above its 7 foot flood stage from

657 a.m. EDT through 1017 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. It crested at 10.35 feet at

830 a.m. EDT on the 18th. The main stem

of the Perkiomen Creek at East

Greenville was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 742 a.m. through 529 p.m.

EDT on the 18th. It crested at 7.07

feet at 10 a.m. EDT. Farther

downstream, the Perkiomen Creek at

Graterford was above its 11 foot flood

stage from 942 a.m. EDT through 1043

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

14.8 feet at 330 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

The Manatawny Creek at Pottstown was

above its 6 foot flood stage from 1103

a.m. EDT through 10 p.m. EDT on the

18th. It crested at 7.41 feet at 7 p.m.

EDT. The Schuylkill River at Pottstown

was above its 13 foot flood stage from

714 p.m. EDT on the 18th through 1218

p.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested at

14.59 feet at 530 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Storm totals included 4.50 inches in

Pottstown, 4.00 inches in Hatfield and

Green Lane, 3.78 inches in Palm and

3.12 inches at the Pottstown Airport.

Bucks County

Northwest Portion 0 0 1M

PAZ069

0 0 24M

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy in

the upper part of Bucks County during

the first half of the day on the 18th.

Very heavy rain also fell in the upper

and middle sections of the Delaware

River Valley. The runoff from both

produced widespread poor drainage and

creek flooding in the upper part of

Bucks County and the worst flooding

along the Delaware River since 1955.

President George W. Bush declared Bucks

County a disaster area. Municipalities

and roadways along the Delaware River

and the Lehigh County were hardest hit

and they included Quakertown,

Springfield, Durham, Nockamixon,

Bridgeton, Tinicum, Solebury, Upper

Makefeld, Yardley and Lower Makefield.

Around 500 homes and 29 businesses were

damaged. Damage was estimated at 25

million dollars.

The Delaware River at Riegelsville was

above its 22 foot flood stage from 522

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 1025 a.m.

EDT on the 20th. It crested at 30.95

feet at 1115 a.m. EDT on the 19th. The

Delaware River at Frenchtown (Hunterdon

County) was above its 16 foot flood

stage from 6 p.m. EDT on the 18th

through 927 a.m. EDT on the 20th. It

crested at 20.7 feet at 1 p.m. EDT on

the 19th. The Delaware River at

Stockton (Hunterdon County) was above

its 18 foot flood stage from Midnight

EDT on the 19th through 836 a.m. EDT on

the 20th. It crested at 22.5 feet at 3

p.m. EDT on the 19th. The Delaware

River at Washington’s Crossing was

above its 20 foot flood stage from 416

p.m. EDT through 828 p.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 20.12 feet at 5

p.m. EDT. The Delaware River at Trenton

(Mercer County) was above its 20 foot

flood stage from 148 a.m. EDT on the

19th through 1245 p.m. EDT on the 20th.

It crested at 23.39 feet at 731 p.m.

EDT on the 19th. Flood stage is also

20 feet.

The East Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Dublin was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 1242 a.m. EDT through 249

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

6.08 feet at 130 p.m. EDT.

Specific storm totals included 5.97

inches in Springtown, 3.70 inches in

Sellersville, 3.27 inches in Perkasie

and 3.06 inches in Fricks.

Delaware County

Countywide 0 0

PAZ070

0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacted with an approaching cold

front and dropped very heavy rain

across Delaware County in the morning

and into the early afternoon on the

18th. Heavier rain fell upstream in

Chester County and the runoff affected

the Brandywine Creek. Doppler Radar

storm estimates ranged between 1 and 4

inches with the heaviest amounts along

the Chester County border. Chester

Creek at Chester was above its 5 foot

flood stage from 1242 p.m. through 249

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

8.58 feet at 300 p.m. EDT. The Crum

Creek at Newtown Square was above its

6 foot flood stage from 906 a.m.

through 518 p.m. EDT on the 18th. It

crested at 8.38 feet at 215 p.m. EDT.

The Brandywine Creek at Chadds Ford was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 552

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 416 a.m.

EDT on the 19th. It crested at 9.86

feet at 1212 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Berks County

Countywide 0 0

PAZ060

0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from late in the evening on the

17th until around 10 a.m. EDT on the

18th in Berks County. Doppler Radar

storm total estimates ranged between

2.5 inches and 5 inches across most of

the county. This caused poor drainage

and creek flooding and also Schuylkill

River flooding.

The Schuylkill River at

Berne was above its 12 foot flood stage

from 918 a.m. EDT on the 18th through

1236 a.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested

at 15.05 feet at 345 p.m. EDT on the

18th. Farther downstream, the

Schuylkill River at Reading was above

foot flood stage from 146 p.m. EDT on

the 18th through 528 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 16.13 feet at 11

p.m. EDT on the 18th. The Manatawny

Creek at Spangville was above its 6

foot flood stage from 923 a.m. EDT

through 838 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

It crested at 7.5 feet at 330 p.m. EDT.

Storm totals included 4.18 inches in

Reading and 3.57 inches in Hamburg.

Carbon County

Countywide 0 0

PAZ054

0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from late in the evening on the

17th until around 10 a.m. EDT on the

18th. Storm totals average around 5

inches and caused poor drainage, creek

and river flooding throughout Carbon

County. Hardest hit were Palmerton

Borough and Penn Forest and Kidder

Townships. President George W. Bush

declared the county a disaster area.

Eighty-nine homes and four businesses

were damaged. Seven public buildings

and structures were damaged including

the Henning Road Bridge over Mud Run

Creek.

In Palmerton Borough, the flooding

Aquashicola Creek flooded ten homes

into their first floor. The Aquashicola

Creek at Palmerton was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 937 a.m. EDT on the

18th through 104 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

It crested at 12.17 feet at 2 p.m. EDT

on the 18th. The Lehigh River at

Lehighton was above its 10 foot flood

stage from 940 a.m. EDT through 522

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

12.04 feet at 100 p.m. EDT. The

Pohopoco Creek at Parryville was above

its 5.5 foot flood stage from 1110 a.m.

EDT on the 19th through 1051 a.m. EDT

on the 21st. It crested at 5.71 feet at

1230 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Storm totals included 6.03 inches at

the Wilkes-Barre Scranton Airport in

Luzerne County and 4.55 inches in

Lehighton.

Chester County

Countywide 0 0

PAZ067

0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from during the first half of

the day on the 18th. Most storm totals

average between 2.5 and 4.0 inches and

caused widespread poor drainage and

creek flooding throughout Chester

County.

The French Creek at Phoenixville was

above its 8 foot flood stage from 1119

a.m. through 645 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

It crested at 9.51 feet at 230 p.m.

EDT. The Valley Creek at Valley Forge

was above its 7 foot flood stage from

938 a.m. EDT through 509 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. It crested at 8.63 feet at

330 p.m. EDT. The White Clay Creek at

Strickersville was above its 9.5 foot

flood stage from 327 p.m. EDT through

451 p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

9.72 feet at 415 p.m. EDT. The East

Branch of the Brandywine Creek at

Downingtown was above its 7 foot flood

stage from 1137 a.m. EDT through 713

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

10.11 feet at 4 p.m. EDT. Flood stage

is 7 feet. The West Branch of the

Brandywine Creek at Honey Brook was

above its 7 foot flood stage from 1222

p.m. EDT through 538 p.m. EDT on the

18th. It crested at 8.01 feet at 245

p.m. EDT. The main stem of the

Brandywine Creek at Chadds Ford was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 552

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 416 a.m.

EDT on the 19th. It crested at 9.86

feet at 1212 a.m. EDT on the 19th. The

Schuylkill River at Pottstown

(Montgomery County) was above its 13

foot flood stage from 714 p.m. EDT on

the 18th through 1218 p.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 14.59 feet at 530

a.m. EDT.

Storm totals included 3.93 inches in

Exton, 3.40 inches in West Chester,

2.82 inches in Honey Brook and 2.78

inches in East Nantmeal Township.

PAZ071

0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

in the upstream areas in the Schuylkill

River Basin. Runoff from the heavy rain

led to flooding along the Schuylkill

River within the city from the evening

of the 18th into the early morning of

the 19th. The Schuylkill River in

Philadelphia was above its 11 foot

flood stage from 736 p.m. EDT on the

18th through 311 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

It crested at 11.33 feet at 1030 p.m.

EDT on the 18th. The heavy runoff along

the Schuylkill river also caused the

Wissahickon Creek at its mouth (where

it merges with the Schuylkill River) to

briefly (5 minutes) rise above its 5

foot flood stage and crested at 5.09

feet at 330 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

PAZ070-070>071-071

0 0 0

The combination of runoff from the

heavy rain that fell upstream in the

Delaware River and the incoming high

tide produced minor tidal flooding

along the Delaware River and tidal

parts of its tributaries during the

late afternoon high tide on both the

19th and 20th. The highest tides

occurred during the afternoon of the

19th. The Delaware River at Pier 12 in

Philadelphia reached a height of 8.96

feet above mean lower low water at 518

p.m. EDT on the 19th. Minor tidal

flooding begins at 8.2 feet above mean

lower low water.

Chester County

Countywide 0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 3 and 8 inches with the

highest amounts toward the Delaware

County border. Widespread poor

drainage, stream and creek flooding

occurred. Many roads were flooded and

closed and numerous water rescues were

performed. Shelters were opened because

of flooding along the East Branch of

the Brandywine Creek in Downingtown.

The East Branch of the Brandywine Creek

at Downingtown was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 636 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 744 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 12.83 feet at 1101 p.m.

EDT on the 28th. The West Branch of the

Brandywine Creek at Honey Brook was

above its 7 foot flood stage from 1211

a.m. EDT through 327 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 7.21 feet at 130

a.m. EDT. The main stem of the

Brandywine Creek at Chadds Ford was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 619

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 535 p.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 13.62

feet at 243 a.m. EDT on the 29th. The

French Creek at Phoenixville was above

its 8 foot flood stage from 815 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 328 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 9.11 feet at

1115 p.m. EDT on the 28th. The Red Clay

Creek at Kenneth Square was above its

7.5 foot flood stage from 608 p.m. EDT

on the 28th through 210 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 9.65 feet at 815

p.m. EDT on the 28th. The White Clay

Creek at Strickersville was above its

9.5 foot flood stage from 552 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 356 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 14.07 feet at

1115 p.m. EDT on the 28th. The Valley

Creek at Valley Forge was above its 7

foot flood stage from 635 p.m. EDT on

the 28th through 504 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 10.91 feet at 10

a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 9.00 inches in

Avondale, 8.97 inches in West Chester,

8.00 inches in Uwchlan Township, 6.63

inches in Strickersville, 6.50 inches

in Downingtown, 5.30 inches in Valley

Forge, 4.57 inches in Modena, 3.76

inches in Glenmoore and 2.47 inches in

Honey Brook.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Delaware County

Countywide 0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 3 and 8 inches with the

highest amounts toward the Chester

County border. Widespread poor

drainage, stream and creek flooding

occurred. Many roads were flooded and

closed and numerous water rescues were

performed. Evacuations occurred along

the Darby Creek in Darby Borough,

Marple Township and Upper Darby

Township. Darby Creek flooding also

affected Clifton Heights and

Collingdale. Flooding was also reported

along the Hermesprota Creek in Sharon

Hill.

The Chester Creek at Chester was above

its 8 foot flood stage from 646 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 830 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 16.33 feet at

215 a.m. EDT on the 29th. Crum Creek at

Newtown Square was above its 6 foot

flood stage from 618 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 345 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 11.14 feet at 930 p.m.

EDT on the 28th. The Brandywine Creek

at Chadds Ford was above its 9 foot

flood stage from 619 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 535 p.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 13.62 feet at 243 a.m.

EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 7.84 inches in

Chadds Ford and 5.49 inches in Upper

Providence. A SKYWARN Spotter reported

7 inches of rain in Havertown before

his rain gage overflowed.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Chester County

West Chester 0 0

A series of severe thunderstorms

knocked down several large tree limbs

and wires in the southeastern part of

Chester County.

Montgomery County

Countywide 0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 3 and 8 inches with

the highest amounts toward

Philadelphia. Widespread poor drainage

and creek flooding occurred, especially

in the lower part of the county. Many

roads were flooded and closed and

numerous water rescues were performed.

Boats were used to rescue stranded

motorists.

The East Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Schwenksville was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 731 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 759 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Along the main stem of the Perkiomen

Creek, at Graterford, the creek was

above its 11 foot flood stage from 1013

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 738 a.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 12.5

feet at 4 a.m. EDT on the 29th. Gaged

sites of the Pennypack and Wissahickon

Creeks within Philadelphia all flooded.

Storm totals included 8.22 inches in

Blue Bell, 7.90 inches in Ambler, 6.70

inches in Norristown, 6.28 inches in

Wynnewood, 6.15 inches in King of

Prussia, 6.11 inches in Hatboro, 4.75

inches in Pottstown, 4.29 inches in

Eagleville, 4.26 inches in Willow

Grove, 3.26 inches in Green Lane and

3.04 inches in Palm.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Bucks County

Countywide 0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 3 and 8 inches with

the highest amounts toward

Philadelphia. Widespread poor drainage

and creek flooding occurred, especially

in the lower part of the county. Many

roads were flooded and closed and

numerous water rescues were performed.

The East Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Dublin was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 729 p.m. EDT through 1105

p.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested at

6.49 feet at 848 p.m. EDT. The Little

Neshaminy Creek at Neshaminy was above

its 8 foot flood stage from 650 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 236 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 9.91 feet at 11

p.m. EDT on the 28th. The main stem of

the Neshaminy Creek at Langhorne was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 829

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 313 p.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 15.21

feet at 630 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 6.50 inches in

Neshaminy Falls, 6.08 inches in

Morrisville, 5.88 inches in Furlong,

5.63 inches in Levittown, 5.06 inches

in Doylestown, 4.38 inches in

Sellersville, 4.22 inches in Fricks and

3.48 inches in Springtown.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Delaware County

Radnor 0 0

A severe thunderstorm pulled down

several trees and wires in Radnor

Township.

Philadelphia County

Countywide 1 0 2M 0

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 4 and 8 inches with

the highest amounts in the northwest

part of Philadelphia. Widespread poor

drainage and creek flooding occurred

throughout the city. All roads near

creeks flooded. Many roads were flooded

and closed and numerous water rescues

were performed. The heaviest rain

coincided with the evening commute

home. A 26-year-old woman drowned when

she was swept off her feet while

waiting to board a SEPTA bus in the

East Falls section of the city. The

flood waters carried her downhill and

she became trapped her under a parked

pickup truck where in spite of the

efforts of six people, she drowned. The

heavy rain also caused several

abandoned buildings to collapse.

The Frankford Creek at Castor Avenue

was above its 7 foot flood stage from

536 p.m. EDT on the 28th through 216

a.m. EDT on the 29th. It crested at

13.91 feet at 730 p.m. EDT on the 28th.

The Wissahickon Creek at its mouth with

the Schuylkill River was above its 5

foot flood stage from 538 p.m. EDT on

the 28th through 1118 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 10.14 feet at 2

a.m. EDT on the 29th. The Pennypack

Creek at the Rhawn Street Bridge was

above its 7 foot flood stage from 624

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 839 a.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 12.63

feet at 3 a.m. EDT on the 29th. The

Schuylkill River at Philadelphia was

above its 11 foot flood stage from 1136

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 1013 a.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 11.86

feet at 4 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 9.12 inches in

Roxborough, 5.98 inches at the Fairmont

Dam, 5.77 inches at the Northeast

Philadelphia Airport and 3.63 inches at

the Philadelphia International Airport.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further. ?260U

Berks County

Leesport to 0 0

Birdsboro

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 2 and 5 inches with the

highest amounts toward the Chester

County border. Poor drainage, stream

and creek flooding occurred, mainly in

the southeast quarter of the county.

Many roads were flooded. The Manatawny

Creek at Spangville was briefly above

its 6 foot flood stage from 1235 a.m.

through 235 a.m. EDT on the 29th. It

crested at 6.06 feet at 130 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. Storm totals included 3.44

inches in Hamburg, 2.88 inches in

Bethel, 2.82 inches in Berne, 2.64

inches in Reading.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Lehigh County

Countywide 0 0

Northampton County

Countywide 0 0

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused bands of heavier

rain to fall across the Lehigh Valley

from the late morning through the

evening of the 28th in the Lehigh

Valley. Doppler Radar storm total

estimates averaged between 2 and 4

inches with the highest amounts toward

the Montgomery and Bucks County

borders. Widespread poor drainage and

scattered stream and creek flooding

occurred. Many roads were flooded and

some were closed. The flooding was not

nearly as severe as it was with the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan. In

Northampton County, roads were closed

in Forks Township, Palmer Township and

Wilson Borough.

Storm totals included 4.40 inches in

Orefield (Lehigh County), 3.90 inches

in Forks Township (Northampton County)

and 2.82 inches at the Lehigh Valley

International Airport.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

PAZ070>071

0 0 0

The combination of the runoff from the

heavy rain from the remnants of

Hurricane Jeanne and the spring tides

associated with the full moon caused

minor tidal flooding during the high

tide cycles on the Pennsylvania side of

the Delaware River and tidal sections

of its tributaries on the 30th. The

highest tides occurred with the high

tide during the early morning on the

30th. That high tide reached 8.57 feet

above mean lower low water at Pier 12

in Philadelphia. Minor tidal flooding

begins at 8.2 feet above mean lower low

water.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northeast

Bradford County

Countywide 0 0 20M

Heavy rain with amounts of 3 to 7

inches fell from the 16th to the 18th.

The rain was due to remnants from

hurricane Ivan. All creeks and streams

went out of their banks causing major

problems. Early on the 18th more than

half of the roads in the county were

closed, prompting a state of emergency

to be issued. River flooding also

occurred along the entire length of the

Susquehanna River. 50 homes, 5

businesses, and dozens of roads and

bridges were damaged. At least 20 water

rescues occurred.

Susquehanna County

Countywide 0 0 10M

Heavy rain with amounts of 4.5 to 7

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Most creeks and streams went out

of their banks. Over 300 homes were

affected by flooding with 132 having

minor damage, 21 having major damage,

and 4 being totally destroyed. 27

businesses were affected with 19 having

minor damage and 8 having major damage.

Dozens of roads and bridges were

damaged. About 750 people had to

evacuate their homes. Their was

flooding where there had never been any

before. One major bridge was destroyed.

Wyoming County

Countywide 0 0 15M

Heavy rain with amounts of 5 to 7

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. 500 homes and 30 businesses were

damaged. 50 water rescues were

reported. The hardest hit areas were

Tunkhannock, Eaton Township, Nicholson,

Exeter, Meshoppen, and Laceyville. In

Nicholson, the Shadow Brook did major

damage. The county declared a state of

emergency and closed all roads to the

public early Saturday morning. In

addition the Susquehanna River had

major flooding.

PAZ038

0 0 1M

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Waverly, NY and Sayre, PA rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet early

on the 18th, crested at 18.8 feet at

11:30 PM on the 18th, then slowly fell

to be below its flood stage late

morning on the 20th. Rainfall amounts

were 2 to 5 inches which started on the

16th and continued into the 18th. This

rain was from the remnants of hurricane

Ivan.

Luzerne County

Countywide 0 0 100M

Heavy rain with amounts of 4.0 to 6.5

inches caused major flash flooding.

Almost all of the streams and creeks

came out of their banks. In addition,

the Susquehanna River also caused major

flooding. Solomon’s Creek in Wilkes-

Barre Township was the first to flood.

This creek caused businesses to close

and people to evacuate. 4000 homes and

dozens of businesses were damaged.

Mercy Hospital had damage to its lower

levels. The hardest hit areas were

Shickshinny, Moconqua, Plains, and

Plymouth Township.

Wayne County

Countywide 0 0 15M

Heavy rain with amounts of 5 to 7

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Most creeks and streams went out

of their banks. In addition, the

Delaware and Lackawaxen Rivers had

major flooding. At least 1000 homes

were damaged, 10 of which were

completely destroyed. The county

Emergency Management Agency had damage

to their office in the basement of the

County Courthouse. Dozens of bridges

were closed with 2 bridges destroyed.

There were at least 50 roads that were

damaged and /or closed due to the

flooding.

Lackawanna County

Countywide 0 0 20M

Heavy rain with amounts of 4.5 to 7.5

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. All creeks and streams were out

of their banks. In addition, the

Lackawanna River had major flooding.

Almost 1000 homes and over 30

businesses were damaged. A 40 foot deep

sinkhole developed on Pittston Avenue.

PAZ043

0 0 1M

The Tunkhannock Creek at Tunkhannock

rose above its flood stage of 11 feet

early on the 18th, crested at 19.7 feet

at 3:30 PM on the 18th, then fell below

its flood stage around midnight on the

19th. This was the second highest crest

on record. Rainfall amounts were 4 to

7 inches which started on the 16th and

continued into the 18th. This rain was

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PAZ044

0 0 lM

The Lackawanna River at Old Forge rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet early

on the 18th, crested at 16.7 feet at

3:30 PM on the 18th, then fell below

its flood stage in the evening also on

the 18th. This was the third highest

crest on record. Rainfall amounts were

4 to 7 inches which started on the 16th

and continued into the 18th. This rain

was from the remnants of hurricane

Ivan.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northeast

PAZ072

0 0 500K

The Lackawaxen River at Hawley rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet the

morning of the 18th, crested at 14.5

feet at 5:15 PM on the 18th, then fell

below the flood stage early in the

morning on the 19th. Rainfall amounts

were 4 to 7 inches due to the remnants

of hurricane Ivan. The rain fell from

the 16th to the 18th. The crest was the

fifth highest recorded at Hawley.

PAZ048

0 0 500K

The Lackawaxen River at Hawley rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet the

morning of the 18th, crested at 14.5

feet at 5:15 PM on the 18th, then fell

below the flood stage early in the

morning on the 19th. Rainfall amounts

were 4 to 7 inches due to the remnants

of hurricane Ivan. The rain fell from

the 16th to the 18th. The crest was the

fifth highest recorded at Hawley.

PAZ038

0 0 1M

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Towanda rose above its flood

stage of 16 feet early on the 18th,

crested at 22.3 feet at 7:16 PM on the

18th, then slowly fell to be below its

flood stage early evening on the 19th.

Rainfall amounts were 2 to 5 inches

which started on the 16th and continued

into the 18th. This rain was from the

remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PAZ043

0 0 1M

The Susquehanna River at Meshoppen rose

above its flood stage of 27 feet early

on the 18th, crested at 35.3 feet at

6:15 PM on the 18th, then slowly fell

to be below its flood stage early in

the morning of the 20th. This was the

third highest crest on record. Rainfall

amounts were 4 to 7 inches which start-

ed on the 16th and continued into the

18th. This rain was from the remnants

of hurricane Ivan.

Pike County

Countywide 0 0 15M

Heavy rain with amounts of 3.5 to 6

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Most creeks and streams went out

of their banks. In addition, the Dela-

ware and Lackawaxen Rivers had major

flooding. About a dozen rescues were

performed. Over 100 roads were closed.

The entire borough of Newfoundland in

western Pike County was evacuated. 6

bridges were closed. 2 businesses were

closed.

PAZ040

0 0 1M

The Delaware River at Callicoon, NY

(near Abrahamsville, PA) rose above its

flood stage of 12 feet the morning of

the 18th, crested at 17.3 feet at 4:45

PM on the 18th, then fell below the

flood stage the morning of the 19th.

Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7 inches due

to the remnants of hurricane Ivan. The

rain fell from the 16th to the 18th.

This was the highest crest on record by

about a foot at the river gage at

Callicoon.

PAZ048

0 0 1M

The Delaware River at Barryville, NY

(near Shohola, PA) went above its flood

stage of 17 feet the morning of the

18th, crested at 24.1 feet at 3:15 PM

EST on the 18th, then fell back below

the flood stage late morning on the

19th. Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7

inches due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. The rain fell from the 16th to

the 18th. This was the second highest

crest on record at Barryville. The

highest crest was in 1955.

PAZ047

0 0 5M

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Wilkes-Barre rose above its

flood stage of 22 feet midday on the

18th, crested at 35.0 feet at 1:00 AM

on the 19th, then slowly fell to be

below its flood stage midday on the

20th. This was the third highest crest

on record. Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7

inches which started on the 16th and

continued into the 18th. This rain was

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PAZ048

0 0 1M

The Delaware River at Port Jervis, NY

(near Matamoras, PA) rose above its

flood stage of 18 feet during the

afternoon on the 18th, crested at 19.5

feet at 4:45 PM on the 18th, then fell

below its flood stage early in the

morning of the 19th. This was the fifth

highest crest on record. Rainfall

amounts were 4 to 7 inches which start-

ed on the 16th and continued into the

18th. This rain was from the remnants

of hurricane Ivan.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northeast

PAZ048

0 0 1M

The Delaware River at Montague, NJ

(near Milford, PA) rose above its flood

stage of 25 feet during the afternoon

on the 18th, crested at 28.4 feet at

10:15 PM on the 18th, then fell below

its flood stage the morning of the

19th. Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7

inches which started on the 16th and

continued into the 18th. This rain was

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northwest

PAZ003

0 0 250K

One to three inches of rain fell on

Crawford County during the afternoon

and evening hours. This rain was

associated with the remnants of Tropi-

cal Storm Frances. Runoff from the rain

caused lowland flooding to begin just

after sunset. This flooding gradually

worsened as the evening progressed. Re-

ports of street and basement flooding

were common.

Crawford County

Countywide 0 0 11.5M

Heavy rains associated with the rem-

nants of Tropical Storm Frances caused

extensive flooding in Crawford County.

Light rain associated with this storm

began falling early on September 8th.

Rainfall rates increased during the

evening hours as the low approached

Northwest Pennsylvania. Rainfall totals

through midnight on the 9th were as

high as 4 to 5 inches, especially in

southern Crawford County. The heavy

rain continued through early morning

hours and finally ended around daybreak

after another two to four inches of

rain had fallen. Storm total rainfall

amounts included: around 4.0 inches at

Conneaut Lake; 4.20 inches at Titus-

ville; 5.07 inches at the Meadville

Airport; 5.57 inches at Saegertown, 6.0

inches at Meadville; 7.8 inches at

Springboro and 10.0 inches at Cambridge

Springs. This rain caused rapid rises

in area streams and creeks. Evacuations

in the county began just after 11 p.m.

after Crooked Creek left it’s banks

near Adamsville and Hartstown. The

flooding worsened during the early

morning hours with many road washouts

and evacuations reported. Around 3

a.m., two dozen residents were evacua-

ted from homes along Conneaut Creek in

Conneautville with some of the people

rescued from second floor windows.

Around 30 homes (most along West Street

in this area were heavily damaged by

the flooding. Nearby, seven people had

to be rescued from their vehicle after

flood waters washed if off the road.

Church Run, Sugar Creek and Oil Creek

left their banks in the southeast

corner of the county damaging many

homes and washing out several roads.

Several people had to be rescued from

homes along Shenango Creek in South

Shenango Township around 4 a.m. In

Meadville, French Creek rapidly rose

during the early morning hours. Many

people had to be evacuated from homes

in the city’s Fifth Ward. North of

Meadville, flooding along Cussewago

Creek washed out a road causing a car

to leave the road. The driver was later

rescued. Evacuations and extensive

flood damage were also reported in the

Cambridge Springs, Linesville and

Springboro areas. Over 1,200 homes in

Crawford County were damaged by flood-

ing caused by Frances. At least several

dozen of these were either destroyed or

heavily damaged. Damage to roads in the

county topped $2 million. See the flood

description for September 9th through

the 11th for information on the subse-

quent flooding along French Creek in

Meadville.

PAZ001>002

0 0 500K

Two to four inches of rain fell on Erie

County on September 8th through the

early morning hours of the 9th. This

rain was associated with the remnants

of Tropical Storm Frances. Runoff from

the rain caused lowland flooding to

begin during the evening hours. This

flooding gradually worsened as the eve-

ning progressed. Reports of street and

basement flooding were common,

especially in the southern portion of

the county.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northwest

Erie County

Countywide 0 0 5.6M

Heavy rains associated with the rem-

nants of Tropical Storm Frances persis-

ted during the early morning hours of

September 9th. The rain eventually

ended around daybreak. Storm total

rainfall amounts from early on the 8th

through the 9th generally ranged from

3 to 6 inches in Erie County. Some

totals included: 3.5 inches at North

East; 3.59 inches at Erie International

Airport; 4.32 inches at Union City;

4.75 inches at Corry; 5.0 inches on the

east side of Eric; 5.4 inches at

Cranesville; 6.5 inches at Edinboro and

7.44 inches at Franklin Center. Runoff

from this rain caused extensive flash

flooding in Erie County during the

morning hours of the 9th. Evacuations

began in the Edinboro and McKean areas

around 2:30 a.m. The flooding in Edin-

boro was particularly severe. Water

overflowed a dam on Edinboro Lake in

the city. Hundreds of residents down-

stream of the dam, including students

at Edinboro University, were evacuated

because of the possibility of a dam

failure. Cottages just south of the dam

were reported to be completely sub-

merged. A bridge just south of the city

on State Route 99 was washed out. A

second bridge was destroyed north of

Edinboro in Washington Township. A

landslide wiped out around 500 feet of

State Route 5 in Fairview Township

between 3 and 4 a.m. Cars and buildings

along State Route 5 were damaged by the

debris. Elk Creek went into flood

around the same time in Fairview for-

cing several dozen people to be evacua-

ted along State Route 98. In Mill Creek

Township, residents were evacuated from

two mobile home parks that had flood

waters up to three feet deep. Signifi-

cant flooding was also reported in the

Albion and Corry areas. Four vehicles

were stranded in flood waters up to

four feet deep east of Erie along In-

terstate 90. A total of 20 roads were

either washed out or damaged in the

county. Hundreds of homes in the county

were damaged by the flooding. Several

of these were damaged enough to be

declared destroyed.

PAZ001>003

0 0 100K

The remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

moved northeast across the Upper Ohio

Valley on September 8th. Gusty norther-

ly winds behind this storm caused

damage in extreme northwestern

Pennsylvania. A peak gust of 47 mph was

measured at Eric International Airport.

Many trees were downed in both Erie and

Crawford Counties. A couple homes in

Erie County sustained minor wind

damage.

PAZ003

0 0 2M

Runoff from heavy rains associated with

the remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused French Creek in Meadville to

rise to it’s highest level in 45 years.

The creek climbed above the flood stage

of 14 feet around daybreak on September

9th. The river crested at 16.36 feet

around 10 a.m on the 10th. This level

was the highest non-ice affected crest

on record. The river finally went below

flood stage at midday on the 11th.

Damage along the creek was extensive.

Meadville’s Fifth Ward was especially

hard hit with hundreds of homes and

businesses damaged. The flooding was

particularly bad along Spring Street,

Lincoln Avenue and Columbia Street. All

but one road leading into Meadville had

to be closed because of the flooding.

Flood waters in some neighborhoods were

as much as 4 to 5 feet deep. Over 1,200

homes were damaged in Crawford County

from the flash flooding on 9th and the

flooding along French Creek the succes-

sive days. In Meadville alone, nine

mobile homes were destroyed with 34

houses and five businesses sustaining

major damage. See the Flash Flood event

description of September 9th for more

damage estimates.

PAZ001>003

0 0 575K

For the second time in a week, exten-

sive urban and lowland flooding was

reported across Erie and Crawford

Counties. The remnants of Ivan moved

across the Ohio Valley on September

17th. A stationary front extending

northeast from the low caused heavy

rains to develop and fall on most of

northwestern Pennsylvania from late on

September 16th through the daylight

hours of the 17th. Rainfall totals for

the storm in Crawford County included:

1.36 inches at Cambridge Springs; 1.77

inches at the Meadville Airport and

2.00 inches at Union City. In Erie

County rain totals were: 1.30 inches at

Edinboro; 1.44 inches at Erie Interna-

tional Airport and 2.1 inches at

Cranesville. Runoff from this rain

caused many streams and creeks to leave

their banks flooding many low lying

areas. Many roads had to be closed be-

cause of the flooding. At Meadville,

French Creek rose rapidly but crested

below the flood stage of 14 feet.

Hundreds of homes in both Erie and

Crawford Counties sustained damage from

lowland or basement flooding.

PENNSYLVANIA, West

PAZ020

0 0 4M

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Frances began early on the 8th and end-

ed by dawn on the 9th. By 540 PM EDT on

8th, many roads were closed by flooding

countywide, including Center and Chip-

pewa Townships. By 1030 PM on 8th, many

roads flooded, especially in Darlington

and Hopewell from Connoquenessing

Creek. At this time, the Hopewell shop-

ping plaza began to flood. By 9 AM EDT

on 9th, in Bridgewater, 80 boats broke

lose from their dock. Later, nearly 250

boats were seen piled up against a

bridge. At time unknown, there were mud

slides on Rte 18 in Potter Twp, and Rte

68 near Shippingport. By the end of the

storm, 300 homes were damaged across

the county; 35 roads were flooded, and

39 towns were flooded. Total rain: 4″

in Beaver. (FRANCES)

PENNSYLVANIA, West

PAZ029

0 0 25K

By 750 PM EDT, 30 basements were flood-

ed countywide, some to a depth of 2

feet. In Hanover Twp, North Kings Creek

Rd was washed out in part (time

unknown). Both Hickory and Eight-four

reported 2.6 inches of rain. (FRANCES)

PAZ021

0 0 40K

By 7 PM EDT on 8th, Wexford Run flooded

in Ross Twp; Babcock Blvd flooded in

McCandless Twp; creeks were flooding

Shaler Twp; Streets Run Rd was flooded

in Baldwin. By 948 PM, people were

being evacuated in Bell Acres because

of flooding after 6 inches of rain. By

1146 PM EDT on 8th, parts of Sewickley

were being evacuated. About 1 AM EDT on

9th, in Etna, Pine Creek began to flood

and 50 people were evacuated. Many

basements flooded. Other 24-hr rain-

falls: 4.5″ Westview; 4.2″ Moon Twp;

3.6″ Pittsburgh Airport (record 1 day

rainfall). Most small stream flooding

ended by 8 AM EDT on the 9th, but the

Allegheny River at Acmetonia (C W Bill

Young Dam) rose to the flood stage of

17 ft for a few minutes around 6 AM EDT

on the 10th. The remnants of Frances

passed over the Pittsburgh airport at

230 AM EDT on the 9th. (FRANCES)

PAZ014

0 0 50K

Basement flooding began at 718 PM EDT

on 8th. At 827 PM, Dinnerbell Rd flood-

ed in Saxonburg. By 10 PM, evacuations

began west of Butler. By 8 AM on 9th,

roads were still closed near Butler;

and people were evacuated in Evans City

and Harmony. There was flooding in

Jackson Twp and 3 other townships. Con-

noquenessing Creek flooded Zelienople

(time unknown). In total, 30 roads were

closed by flood. Total rain: 3.2″ in

Sarver. (FRANCES)

PAZ032

0 0 15K

Basements flooded in Redstone and

Uniontown. Chalkhill reported 2.4

inches of rain. (FRANCES)

PAZ008

0 0 50K

By 718 PM EDT on 8th, basements were

flooded in Cranberry. By 922 PM, Mercer

and Addams Roads flooded in Polk;

Cherry Tree Rd and Rte 417 flooded near

Franklin; and Rte 8 north of Oil City

was flooded. By 8 AM on the 9th, French

Creek and Sugar Creek were still out of

their banks northwest of Franklin; and

50 basements had been flooded through-

out the county. Total rain: 3.2″ in

Polk. (FRANCES)

PAZ007

0 0 200K

At 730 PM EDT on 8th, State Rte 258 was

closed by flood near Mercer. As of 9 AM

on 9th, widespread flooding continued.

At Jamestown, 12 families were evacuat-

ed as a precaution because of a dam

(time unknown); the dam did not fail.

Total rain: 4 inches in Mercer. There

was a record flood on the Shenango

River at Transfer, which crested at

10.65 ft at 11 AM EDT on 9th (previous

record 10.47). (FRANCES)

PAZ013

0 0 40K

By 859 PM EDT on 8th, several roads

were closed by flood near New Castle,

including Rtes 18 and 108. By 1145 PM,

numerous roads were flooded countywide;

and 30 people evacuated in North Beaver

Twp. By 9 AM EDT on 9th, flooding was

still widespread. In all, basements

flooded, 30 roads were flooded; 100

people evacuated, including 3 trailer

parks; one road washed away. There was

a record flood on Slippery Rock Creek

at Wurtemburg, which crested at 9.48 ft

at 11 PM EDT on 9th (previous record

8.09). (FRANCES)

PAZ015

0 0 25K

At 132 AM EDT on 9th, Rte 208 flooded

near Shippenville; Huey Rd flooded 4

miles south of Sligo; and Rte 58 flood-

ed 6 miles west of Sligo. Some roads

were still flooded as of 8 AM EDT on

9th. Clarion River at Cooksburg (north-

east corner of Clarion Co) rose to

flood stage (13 ft) at 4 PM EDT on 9th;

crested at 13.4 at 6 PM on 9th; and

fell below flood stage 11 PM EDT on

9th. (FRANCES)

PAZ022

0 0 Flood

Allegheny River at Mosgrove rose to

flood stage (19 feet) briefly from 1145

PM EDT to 1159 PM EDT on the 9th.

(FRANCES)

PENNSYLVANIA, West

PAZ029

0 0 5.1M

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Ivan started during the night of the

16th, and continued into the evening of

the 17th. At 115 PM EDT on 17th, roads

flooded in Canonsburg and Washington.

At 206 PM, there was widespread stream

flooding in Burgettstown, McDonald, and

Midway. At 217 PM, Houston flooded. 315

PM, Rtes 50 and 980 were flooded in

Avella and Cecil. 5 PM, mud slides in

Peters Twp, which had 4″ of rain. By 8

PM, Washington 5″ of rain. Total of 961

structures damaged or destroyed. Towns

hard hit: Avella, Burgettstown, Cecil,

Independence, Peters, Washington. Many

roads closed by mud slides or flooded.

Trailer park in Canton washed away.

Some trailer park residents were trap-

ped atop their mobile homes until dark,

asking for help by signaling SOS with

their flashlights. Other mobile homes

destroyed. Houses lifted off founda-

tions; railroad track beds gone;

several roads washed out, including Rte

19 near Houston; grocery store destroy-

ed. 11 boats, docked in Millsboro,

damaged. Total rain: 5.9″ in Canons-

burg. (IVAN)

PAZ021

1 92 26M

At 124 PM EDT on 17th, road flooding

was reported 2 miles west of Pitts-

burgh. At 2 PM, Wexford flooded. At 218

PM, roads flooded in Oakdale. By 315

PM, Springdale Boro flooded; and Wex-

ford had 4.5″ of rain. . By 450 PM on

17th, in Tarentum, Mill St and Davidson

St were flooded; people evacuated. By 5

PM EDT on 17th, a state of emergency

was declared in 62 of the 130 municipa-

lities of Allegheny Co. South Park 6″

of rain 530 PM EDT 17th. At 6 PM, eva-

cuations in Tarentum. Widespread

flooding stranded thousands. A total of

9494 homes, 1060 businesses, 4 schools,

9 fire depts, 50 public buildings

damaged or destroyed. 140 boats broke

away and ran away down several rivers.

Some towns flooded, include: Bridge-

ville, Carnegie (by Chartiers Creek,

starting 415 PM), Etna, Millvale,

Sharpsburg, Shaler (by Little Pine

Creek), South Fayette, Tarentum, West

Deer. In Carnegie, 22 people were trap-

ped on a bridge as flood waters rose

and surrounded them. They tied them-

selves together and waited for rescue.

These roads partly washed out: Oakdale

Rd, Brocktown Rd, Boyds Run Rd, Dor-

rington Rd, Millers Run Rd, Noblestown

Rd. Total rain: 6.6 inches Franklin

Park, 6.4 Moon Twp. Pittsburgh Interna-

tional Airport set a new record for 1-

day rainfall of 5.95 inches. This broke

the old record (3.6″) set during

FRANCES on Sept 9. The Allegheny River

flooded, from Freeport to Sharpsburg,

from 11 PM EDT on 17th, until 5 AM EDT

on 19th. Here are city, flood stage,

crest, time: Freeport (flood stage 23

ft), 24.1 10 AM 18th; natrona (21 ft),

24.2 11 AM 18th; Acmetonia (17), 19.8 1

PM 18th; Sharpsburg (21), 22.1 4 PM EDT

18th. The Ohio River flooded, from

Pittsburgh to Dashields, from 10 PM on

17th, until 830 AM EDT on 19th. Pitts-

burgh (flood stage 25 ft), crested 31.0

at 4 PM EDT on 18th; Dashields (25 ft),

crested 29.9 at 8 PM on 18th. On the

Youghiogheny River, Sutersville rose

above flood stage (20 ft) 1 PM on 18th,

crested 20.7 at 430 PM, and fell below

flood stage at 730 PM EDT on 18th. The

remnants of Ivan made its closest

approach to Pittsburgh at 7 PM EDT on

the 17th. (IVAN)

M350U

PAZ007

0 0 66K

At 2 PM EDT on 17th, Rte 18 was closed

by flood north of Greenville. Some

flooding continued beyond 8 PM EDT on

17th. (IVAN)

PAZ013

0 0 265K

At 236 PM EDT on 17th, numerous roads

were flooded in Pulaski and Shenango

townships. By 845 PM, Ellwood City had

3.5 inches of rain. As of 6 PM on 18th,

many roads were still flooded, and

there were a few mud slides, including

one on Vanguard Rd in Perry Twp. Part

of Mohawk School Rd washed out. (IVAN)

PAZ014

0 0 3.1M

At 245 PM EDT on 17th, flooding began

in Sarver. At 315 PM, Butler reported

3″ of rain. At 445 PM, flooding occur-

red in Butler. State of emergency

declared 5 PM EDT 17th. By 6 PM, 4.3″

of rain in Penn Twp. Harmony and Jack-

son townships hardest hit. Part of

Monroe Rd in Buffalo Twp washed out.

Total of 588 structures damaged or

destroyed. Record flooding along Conno-

quenessing Creek. Zelienople crested at

18.17 ft (previous record 16.66) Total

rain: 6.1″ at Butler Jr High School,

5.4″ in Sarvar. (IVAN)

PAZ030

0 0 5M

By 3 PM EDT on 17th, 911 started

receiving flood calls. By 353 PM,

streams overflowed and flooded Vander-

grift. 417 PM, Greensburg Rd closed by

flood in New Kensington. 5 PM, Irwin

had 2.5″ of rain. 534 PM, roads flooded

1 mile southwest of Apollo. 548 PM, 1

house evacuated near a previously

damaged dam in Allegheny Twp; and New

Kensington 6″ of rain. 606 PM, Freeport

Rd flooded 1 mile south of Tarentum;

people being evacuated. Roads closed,

included Rte 30, 381, 982. Total of 819

homes and businesses, and 75 public

structures damaged or destroyed.

Ligonier sewage treatment plant

damaged. Many basements were flooded by

Youghiogheny River when Sutersville

rose above flood stage (20 ft) at 1 PM

EDT on 18th, crested 20.7 at 430 PM

PENNSYLVANIA, West

18th, and fell below flood stage 730 PM

18th. On the Conemaugh River, Seward

rose above flood stage (12 ft) at 11 AM

18th, crested 12.1 at I1 AM, and fell

below flood stage 1 PM EDT 18th. Total

rain: 6.3″ in Monesson, 6.1 Delmont, 6

inches New Kensington. (IVAN)

PAZ020

0 0 4M

At 325 PM EDT on 17th, Rte 30, and all

roads in Industry closed by flooding.

Much damage along Rte 68 corridor in

western part of county. Bridgewater and

Glasgow flooded. Total of 625 struc-

tures damaged or destroyed, including

43 businesses, mainly in Hopewell Twp.

Hundreds of runaway boats were lost,

but 93 were recovered. Several marinas

were ripped from the shore and broke up

as they slammed into bridges, with

numerous boats still attached. Roads

partly washed out: Rtes 65, 288, 588,

Hoenig Rd, Hartzell School Rd, Shady

Rest Rd, Franklin Rd, Green Garden Rd.

On the Ohio River, Montgomery Dam rose

to flood stage (33 ft) at 4 AM EDT on

18th, crested 41.0 at 10 PM 18th, and

fell below flood stage 2 PM EDT on

19th. Total rain: 4 inches in Monaca.

(IVAN)

PAZ022

0 1 4M

By 4 PM EDT on 17th, a courthouse was

threatened by a mud slide in Kittan-

ning; and numerous roads were flooded

countywide, including Rte 66 between

Ford City and Leechburg. By 11 PM,

Bradys Bend had 5.7 inches of rain; and

Red Bank Creek, on the border of Arm-

strong and Clarion counties, continued

to flood. St Charles on the Red Bank

Creek crested around 17.9 ft around

dawn (flood stage 17). On the Clarion

River, Cooksburg rose above flood stage

(13 ft) at 2 AM EDT on 18th, crested

16.5 at 8 AM on 18th, and fell below

flood stage 8 PM EDT 18th. The Allegheny

River rose above flood stage 4 AM EDT

18th, and fell below flood stage by 9

PM EDT on 19th. Here are city, flood

stage, crest, and time: Rimer (19 ft),

19.5 at 10 AM 18th; Mosgrove (19), 20.4

at 10 AM 18th; Kittanning (21), 22.2 at

9 AM EDT 18th; Freeport (23), 24.1 at

10 AM EDT on 18th. Crooked Creek at

Idaho had a record crest of 19.33 ft at

8 AM on 18th (previous record 18.6).

Buffalo Creek at Freeport had a record

crest of 15.28 at 8 PM on 17th (pre-

vious record 13.6). Total of 56 struc-

tures damaged or destroyed, including 3

businesses and 1 church. (IVAN)

PAZ008

0 0 15K

At 4 PM EDT on 17th, Moon Run Rd flood-

ed in Oil City. 656 PM, 3.1 inches of

rain 5 miles east of Oil City. (IVAN)

PAZ015

0 0 2M

At 410 PM EDT on 17th, Rte 66 closed by

flood in Shippenville. New Bethlehem,

Hawthorn, East Brady, and Sligo also

flooded. At 646 PM on 17th, there was a

mud slide on the south side of New

Bethlehem. Rte 58 also flooded. On the

Clarion River, Cooksburg rose above

flood stage (13 ft) 2 AM EDT on 18th,

crested 16.5 at 8 AM 18th, and fell be-

low flood stage 8 PM EDT on 18th. Total

of 117 homes and businesses, and 155

public roads, damaged or destroyed.

Total rain: 3.5 inches in East Brady.

(IVAN)

PAZ031

0 0 6.1M

It started 5 PM EDT 17th, when Grays-

ville flooded, according to newspaper

accounts. By 740 PM on 17th, there was

widespread road and stream flooding

countywide, including all roads in and

out of Greensburg; Rte 21 in Franklin

Twp; and Rte 18 in Centre Twp. Total of

157 homes and 46 businesses damaged or

destroyed. Total rain: about 5 inches.

(IVAN)

PAZ016

0 0 478K

At 538 PM EDT on 17th, roads flooded,

in Warsaw Twp, 7 miles north of Brook-

ville after 3.3 inches of rain. By 6

PM, there was widespread road and

stream flooding. At least 5 people were

rescued from their vehicles. By 8 PM,

Rockdale had 4″ of rain. By 9 PM,

Punxsutawney had 4.5 inches. Mahoning

Creek at Punxsutawney crested at 32.3

ft (flood stage 32) around 1 PM EDT on

18th. (IVAN)

PAZ023

0 0 1.5m

At 630 PM EDT on 17th, Curry Run over-

flowed and closed Rte 422 near Shelocta

(newspaper). By 720 PM, there was wide-

spread road and stream flooding. Flood

waters swept away 8 empty campers at a

camp ground between Shelocta and Elder-

ton. 845 PM, numerous roads closed by

flood. At one house in Centre Twp,

basement wall caved in. Rte 954 near

Beyer was washed out. Rte 4018 near

Smicksburg closed when Mahoning Dam

overflowed. Indiana had 3.5 inches of

rain. By 1050 PM, Clymer flooded and

people were evacuated. 150 people had

to be evacuated countywide. Shelocta

hit hard. Total of 339 structures

damaged or destroyed, 40 of them were

businesses. (IVAN)

PENNSYLVANIA, West

PAZ009

0 0 50K

At 9 PM EDT on 17th, roads and a bridge

covered by water near Tionesta. On the

Clarion River, Cooksburg rose above

flood stage (13 fl) at 2 AM EDT on

18th, crested 16.5 at 8 AM 18th, and

fell below flood stage at 8 PM EDT on

18th. (IVAN)

PUERTO RICO

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Mayaguez 0 0

Heavy rain and pea sized hail were

reported at Barrio Miradero.

Western Interior

Adjuntas 1 0 15K

A near severe thunderstorm drifted over

Adjuntas during the afternoon causing

heavy rainfall which caused the loss of

a life as river Yayales, a small tribu-

tary of river Guilarte, surged out of

its banks and flowed across the inter-

sections of roads 131 and 135. A 59

year old woman drove a car into the

moving waters, attempted to escape her

car and was drowned.

F59VE

PRZ003-007-007-007

0 0 8K

Coastal flooding was reported at

Playita Cortada in the municipality of

Santa Isabel. Three families were relo-

cated to higher ground.

PRZ003

0 0 10K

Coastal flooding occurred along the

coastal sector of Salinas, as the high

surf generated by Hurricane Ivan when

it was over 300 miles south of Puerto

Rico, washed ashore, rocks and debris,

which blocked the traffic along coastal

highway 109, at barrio Las Ochenta,

leading from Salinas to Guayama. The

road remained closed for a period of 12

hours.

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Hormigueros 0 0

Several areas were reported flooded in

the municipality of Hormigueros, road

319, the San Jose Lavandero community,

road 114 at Valle Hermoso Sur. Around 4

inches of rain fell in Hormigueros

during the afternoon. Landslides were

reported at Parelas San Romulado Norte,

Camino Oscar Barbosa, road 345.

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Mayaguez 0 0

Flooding was reported in Mayaguez, Del

Carmen Street at Barrio Santurce,

Barrio Rio Hondo, Wilson Street at

Parcelas Castillo, Badiz and Nenadich

Streets. Landslides were reported at

Camino Rosa, road 348, and the bridge

at Puente de Camino Juan Lebron

was affected by the rains.

PRZ003

0 0 2K

Coastal flooding was reported in Barrio

Guardarraya along Highway 3 in the

municipality of Patillas.

PRZ001>013

4 1 68M 101.5M

Tropical Storm Jeanne and its asso-

ciated weather affected Puerto Rico,

Vieques and Culebra from Sep. 14-17. On

its wake it left considerable damages

to the electric power grid, the water

supply system, highways and roads,

bridges, schools, individual house-

holds, businesses and commerce due to

extensive flooding, landslides and mud-

slides. Jeanne forced 3,629 people

living in flood zones to seek refuge in

shelters. Jeanne caused eight deaths in

Puerto Rico, four direct and four in-

direct. One death direct death was in

the municipality of Yabucoa, where the

winds tore the roof and ceiling of a

house to which a hammock was attached,

flunging a person from the hammock and

smashing her into the wall of an adja-

cent structure. Another,and the only

one flood related fatality was reported

in the municipality of Moca, where a

person was reportedly drowned in a tri-

butary stream of River Culebrinas. Two

other persons died and one was injured

after a tree damaged by winds fell on

an automobile in a rural road of Yauco

the Saturday after the storm. Two other

persons died due to carbon monoxide

poisoning from generators running in

closed spaces without proper ventila-

tion. The island road system was widely

impacted as 302 roads had to be closed

due to fallen trees, landslide and mud-

slides or debris. Damages to the

electrical grid were estimated at 60

million, and to the water system at 8

million. Tropical Storm Jeanne made

landfall as a strong tropical storm

over southeast Puerto Rico around noon

time on Sep. 15. Official winds reports

from the International airport in Caro-

lina were of sustained winds of 49 mph

with a gust to 71 mph. An unofficial

report from a spotter in Salinas indi-

cated sustained winds of 63 mph with

gust to 71 mph at 1140 am AST. Another

unofficial report of a wind gust to 68

mph was recorded at Palmas del Mar,

Humacao, and the Arecibo Observatory,

which recorded a wind gust of 70 mph at

an elevation of 1,200 feet on Sep 15.

The agricultural impact was signifi-

cant, the hardest hit areas were the

south and east. Damages were estimated

at 101.5 million, 55 million were

attributed to the banana an plantainx

sectors. More than 15,500 acres of

plantain and banana farm lands were

affected. Hardest hit crops were

coffee, plantain, banana and wheat. The

hydrological impact of Jeanne were

widespread and diverse with major

stream and river flooding. The island

of Vieques recorded 23.75 inches of

rain over three days, and 14.75 inches

in a 24 hour period which corresponded

to more than a 100 year return period.

Other municipalities in Puerto rico

received from 11 to 18 inches over the

three day period ending on Sep. 17 at

800 am AST. The highest return

frequency over inland Puerto Rico was

at Aibonito, where the 24 hour rainfall

of 15 inches corresponded to more than

a 100 year event. F47PH, M37 VE, M41

VE, M450U

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Anasco 0 0

River Rio Grande de Anasco was reported

out of its banks.

San Juan And

Vicinity

San Juan 0 0

Funnel cloud reported between Roosevelt

and Pinciro Avenues.

San Juan And

Vicinity

Carolina 0 0

Urban flooding was reported at Parque

Escorial. Standing water knee high in

some places and as high as some car

doors in spots.

Ponce And Vicinity

Ponce 0 0

Heavy rains, pea size hail and strong

gusty winds were reported at Barrio

Punta Diamante in the municipality of

Ponce. Winds gusts were estimated

between 40 and 50 mph.

RHODE ISLAND

NONE REPORTED.

SOUTH CAROLINA,

Calhoun County

7 NE St Matthews to 0 0 0 0

7.5 NE St Matthews

NWS survey along with dept. of high-

ways, found trees down across US601

from a small tornado.

Calhoun County

2 SE Ft Motte 0 0 0 0

Hwy Dept. reported trees down on SC

419.

Richland County

1.5 SE Gadsden to 0 3 100K 0

1 NW Gadsden

NWS survey found 3 mobile destroyed,

several others damaged along with a

couple of businesses. Three people were

injured. Numerous trees and powerlines

down.

Richland County

Ft Jackson 0 0 300K 0

Ft. Jackson reported 22 homes with

light to moderate damage from an F1

tornado.

Richland County

1 SE Columbia to 0 0 0

.5 SE Columbia

An F0 took down some trees on Bluff and

Blackberry roads.

Barnwell County

Barnwell 0 0 0

An F0 took down some trees and power-

lines and damaged some signs in Barn-

well.

SOUTH CAROLINA, Central

Aiken County

5 SE Monetta to 0 0 0 0

4.5 SE Monetta

An F0 tornado took down some trees on

hwys 39 and 391.

Sumter County

3 SW Sumter to 0 3 1.7M

2 W Sumter

Emergency manager reported 55 homes

damaged, 9 destroyed, and 3 injuries.

Calhoun County

Countywide 0 0

Sheriff reported some secondary roads

beginning to flood with some closures.

Richland County

1 SE Columbia 0 0

Sheriff reported heavy rains and

flooding of roads in southeast Columbia

and outskirts with some closures.

Lee County

3 S Manville to 0 0

4 SW Manville

A strong F1 tornado took down huge

trees and powerlines, and also did

moderate damage to several homes and a

cotton gin mill.

Lee County

2 SW Bishopville to 0 0 0

2 WSW Bishopville

Storm Chaser reported an F0 did minor

damage to a mobile home and took down

some trees and powerlines.

Kershaw County

5 ESE Camden to 0 0

5 E Camden

Intermittent touchdown of an F0 took

down trees and powerlines in and around

Antioch with minor damage to some

mobile homes.

Kershaw County

2 SE Cassatt to 0 0

3 NW Cassatt

An F1 tornado did moderate damage to

several homes and mobile homes. A

turkey farm also had light damage.

Calhoun County

6 SW St Matthews to 0 0 0

5.5 SW St Matthews

Dept of highways reported an F0 took

down some trees and powerlines on Sc

453.

Clarendon County

2 SW Paxville to 0 0 0 0

2.5 WSW Paxville

Survey found an F0 path a half mile

long which took down trees.

Sumter County

Shaw Afb to 0 0 0

2.5 N Shaw Afb

Shaw AFB reported many homes with light

damage and a few with moderate damage

as an Fl touched down between the run-

ways and moved across the base. Many

trees and powerlines were also down.

Lancaster County

Rich Hill Xrds to 0 0 0

2 NW Rich Hill Xrds

A strong F1 did moderate to severe

damage to buildings on a turkey farm.

Several mobile along the path.

Kershaw County

2 NE Camden to 0 1

7 N Camden

An F3 tornado demolished several mobile

homes and severely damaged cinder block

horse stables at a horse farm. A large

horse trailer was lifted up and placed

on top of the stable. Several out-

buildings were destroyed and numerous

trees and powerlines were down.

Chesterfield County

7 SSE Cheraw to 0 0 0

1 NNW Cheraw

An F1 intermittently touched down and

did minor damage to several homes,

businesses, and an elementary school..

Numerous trees and powerlines were

down.

SOUTH CAROLINA, Central

Orangeburg County

5 SE Cope to 0 0 0 0

4.5 SE Cope

An F0 took down some trees along Cannon

Bridge road.

Chesterfield County

13 ESE Patrick to 0 0 0 0

13 E Patrick

An F0 took down trees along hwy 52

north of Society Hill as the tornado

dissipated.

Fairfield County

Jenkinsville to 0 0

6 W Winnsboro

An F0 intermittently touched down and

took down trees from Jenkinsville to

the Greenbrier Community.

Bamberg County

1 E Ehrhardt to 0 0 0

1.5 NE Ehrhardt

Emergency manager reported trees and

powerlines down along path.

SCZ016-030>031

0 0 0

Emergency manager reported a tree on a

home 5SSE of Chesterfield and shingles

of a home.

Chesterfield County

8 E Me Bee to 0 5 0

9 NE Me Bee

An F2 destroyed 2 mobile homes and did

moderate to severe damage to several

others. Numerous trees and powerlines

were down.

Newberry County

Macedonia 0 0 0 0

Highway Dept. reported several trees

down.

Aiken County

Aiken Muni Arpt 0 0 0 0

Pilot at Aiken airport sighted a funnel

cloud moving north.

Aiken County

4 N Aiken to 0 0 0 0

10 N Aiken

Sheriff and Emergency manager reported

trees down along the path of an FO

tornado that down from 1-20 just south

of US 1 to 3 miles South of Ridge

Spring on SC511 which is Pitts Branch

road.

Saluda County

5 NNE Saluda to 0 1

10 N Saluda

Storm survey found numerous trees and

powerlines down, light to moderate

damage destroyed, 2 trees on cars, and

light to moderate roof damage to

several framed homes.

Fairfield County

3 NE Winnsboro 0 0 0 0

Highway dept. reported several trees

down on SC200 northeast of town.

Clarendon County

3 W Alcolu to 0 4 0

Alcolu

An F1 tornado destroyed 2 mobile homes

and damaged several others. Light to

moderate and its busses. Severe damage

occurred to large open air outbuildings

at a mill across the street from the

school.

Aiken County

9 NE Aiken to 0 0 0

11 NNE Aiken

An F0 did moderate damage to a barn,

camper, and roof of a home.

Lee County

Bishopville to 0 0 0

Lucknow

An F0 touched down in Bishopville then

again in the Lucknow area. Trees and

powerlines were down with minor damage

to a couple of homes.

Chesterfield County

4 S Chesterfield to 0 0 0

1 S Chesterfield

An F0 took down trees, severely damage

some wood framed outbuildings and did

minor damage to a couple of mobile

homes.

Saluda County

7 N Ridge Spg 0 0 0 0

Sheriff reported a funnel north of

Ridge Springs.

Saluda County

Countywide 0 0 0 0

Highway dept. reported scattered trees

down around the county.

Saluda County

8 NW Saluda to 0 0 0 0

9 NNW Saluda

An F0 touched down along Old Chappells

road taking down trees.

Newberry County

Chappells 0 0 0 0

Sheriff reported a funnel cloud over

Chappells.

Newberry County

8 ENE Newberry to 0 0 0

10 ENE Newberry

Roof torn off home with 4 other homes

damaged. Several outbuildings

destroyed. Damage was on SC34, US 176,

and BIg Pine road.

Lexington County

10 WNW Lexington to 0 0 0 0

11 WNW Lexington

An F0 touchd down on Devils Backbone

road in taking down trees which just

missed several homes.

Newberry County

.5 N Jalapa to 0 0 0

3 NNW Jalapa

An F0 touched down on Jalapa road and

Indian Creek road taking down trees and

doing minor damage to a couple of

mobile homes.

Orangeburg County

Springfield to 0 0 0 0

Norway

Sheriff reported trees down in the

western part of the county.

Lexington County

Gilbert to 0 0 0

Lexington

Sheriff reported trees down in the

Gilbert area and in Heritage Hills

subdivision of Lexington.

Richland County

Countywide 0 0 0

Sheriff reported scattered trees down

around the county.

Fairfield County

3 NNW Ridgeway to 1 13 0

5 NNW Ridgeway

An F2 tornado destroyed 5 mobile homes,

did moderate to severe damage to 2

framed homes and injurred 13 people.

One 57 year old male died. Two vehicles

were moved 20 to 30 yards. M51MH

SOUTH CAROLINA, North

Coastal

Darlington County

2 SW Darlington to 0 0 75K

1 SW Darlington

A tornado snapped trees, some of which

fell onto several homes and damaged

roofs.

Darlington County

1 S Society Hill to 0 0 10K

1 SE Society Hill

Tornado snapped several trees, and

caused damage to a roof of a home.

Marlboro County

4 SSE Clio to 0 0 250K

Clio

Tornado snapped or uprooted numerous

trees and damaged several homes.

Marlboro County

1 SW Me Coll 0 0 60K

Tornado demolished a stapped down

mobile home.

Darlington County

7 NNE Darlington 0 0 8K

Tornado snapped several trees and

damaged a mobile home.

Florence County

4 NE Florence to 0 0 2K

4 N Florence

Tornado damaged a billboard and several

trees next to a Petro truck stop. The

tornado continued into Darlington

county.

Darlington County

7 ESE Darlington to 0 0

7 E Darlington

Tornado snapped numerous trees.

Dillon County

6 E Dillon to 0 0 100K

5 NE Dillon

A tornado flattened and old barn and

part of the roof of a shed was torn

off. A few trees were snapped … one

damaging a roof of a home.

Marlboro County

4 SW Bennettsville to 0 0 15K

5 W Bennettsville

A tornado damaged a steel conveyor belt

track at a sand and gravel mine.

Several trees were snapped, and the

roof of a front porch of a church was

lifted off.

Florence County

Florence 0 0

Public reported a funnel cloud near

Ebenezer Road.

Darlington County

Hartsville 0 0

A funnel cloud was reported near Old

Camden Rd.

Georgetown County

1 N Murrells Inlet 1 0

Strong rip currents caused by the

swells from Hurricane Jeanne resulted

in a drowning. Five other people had to

be rescued by lifeguards.

??1W

Florence County

2 E Lake City to 0 0 20K

2 NE Lake City

A tornado destoyed a barn and snapped

trees. A house sustained minor damage.

Georgetown County

5 NW Carvers Bay to 0 0 30K

7 NW Carvers Bay

A tornado snapped telephone poles,

uprooted trees, and moved a mobile home

off its foundation. The tornado also

destroyed several sheds and outhouses.

Marion County

3 NE Peedee to 0 0 25K

4 N Peedee

A tornado damaged two homes, and downed

trees, powerlines, and sheds.

Dillon County

2 E Oak Grove 0 0

A tornado downed trees along Interstate

95.

Marlboro County

Blenheim 0 0

A tornado touched down in a parking lot

with no damage.

Florence County

Florence 0 0

Florence 911 reported widespread

flooding of roadways. Some of the

streets reported flooding include:

Church St., Baroody St., Coit St.,

Sumter St., Evans St., Chase St.,

Alexander St., and the Cheves area.

Darlington County

Darlington 0 0

911 reported flooding on the roadways.

SOUTH CAROLINA, Northwest

Greenville County

Mauldin 0 0

A number of streets, especially Butler

Rd., were partially closed because of

high water produced by a thunderstorm

which dropped 2 inches of rainfall very

quickly.

York County

8 N Rock Hill to 0 0 5K

9 N Rock Hill

This tornado touched down on the

norheast side of Tega Cay and tracked

almost due north into North Carolina.

Damage was mainly limited to trees, but

a few of these fell on homes and

automobiles.

SCZ001>003

0 0 15K

High winds associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Frances produced some

damage to trees and power lines across

the South Carolina mountains.

SCZ003-006

0 0 15K

An extended period of moderate to heavy

rainfall associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Frances resulted in

gradual rises and eventual flooding

along Gilder and Brushy Creeks, the

Enoree River, and other streams on

Greenville’s east side. Overnight, the

flooding expanded to include most of

the remainder of the county.

SCZ001-004

0 0 1.3M

Widespread flooding of creeks and

streams developed across the county by

early evening. Numerous roads were

covered with water or washed out, and

the sewer systems of several

communities were damaged.

Anderson County

2 NE Sandy Spgs to 0 0 2K

2 N Sandy Spgs

This tornado touched down just

northeast of Sandy Springs, then moved

northwest, uprooting several trees

along its path. An aluminum cattle

shelter was also destroyed.

Abbeville County

Abbeville 0 0 6K

Pickens County

Countywide 0 0

Greenville County

West Central Portion 0 0 8K

Anderson County

Anderson to 0 0

Belton

After an extended period of moderate to

heavy rainfall, a tropical rain band

produced intense rainfall rates that

led to rapid rises along some creeks

and small streams across portions of

the Upstate during the mid-to-late

evening. Streams affected by flash

flooding included Blue Hill Creek in

Abbeville and Broadway Creek between

Anderson and Belton. Some evacuations

occurred in Berea late in the evening,

as the Reedy River rose above flood

stage from Berea to downtown

Greenville. A few roads were damaged

across the area.

Chester County

10 SE Chester 0 0 100K

This brief tornado blew down several

trees and damaged or destroyed 2 small

trailers shortly after touching down.

It then moved north and lifted a

portion of the roof from a

well-constructed home. The garage wall

was blown inward about I foot at this

same location. A carport next to the

home was also detroyed. Several trees

were blown down and a small trailer

destroyed at a hunting club before the

tornado lifted.

Cherokee County

East Portion 0 0 23K

Union County

Union 0 0 250K

After an extended period of moderate to

occasionally heavy rainfall,

intensifying rain rates led to rapid

rises and flash flooding along some

small creeks and streams in eastern

portions of the Upstate. Several roads

were covered with water in areas from

Gaffney to Blacksburg due to flooding

of Cherokee Creek and other small

streams. However, flooding was most

severe near the city of Union, where

there was extensive damage to roads and

bridges, including 2 bridges that were

washed away. Several homes were also

damaged.

SCZ002-005

0 0 1.3M 5M

SCZ010

0 0

After the flash flooding that developed

earlier in the evening waned, general

flooding continued across the county

through the overnight hours, as

numerous additional streams rose

gradually to flood.

SCZ007>008

0 0 40K

General flooding became widespread

across portions of the Upstate late in

the evening, as numerous streams rose

gradually to flood. A mobile home park

near Gaffney required evacuation

overnight. The Pacolet River flooded in

northern portions of Spartanburg

County, especially areas around

Landrum. Several roads and bridges were

damaged.

Union County

6 E Union to 0 0 50K

7 NE Union

This tornado touched down east of the

city of Union, then tracked north/

northwest, blowing down and uprooting

numerous trees, and rolling one mobile

home. Other structural damage was

limited to shingles and gutters.

Chester County

Chester 0 0

York County

Rock Hill to 0 0

Ft Mill

An intense tropical rain band moved

north across portions of the eastern

piedmont during the early morning

hours, causing small creeks and streams

to rise quickly to flood.

SCZ009-014

0 0

After the intense rainfall rates ended,

continued moderate to occasionally

heavy rainfall allowed general flooding

to persist into the mid-morning.

SCZ005>006

0 0 100K

After flooding due to the heavy

rainfall on the 7th abated, the Saluda

River crested a seond time on the

morning of the 9th, as the heavy

rainfall that fell well upstream worked

its way through the system.

Laurens County

13 SE Laurens 0 0

This brief, weak tornado blew down a

few trees.

SCZ001>002-

004>005-010

0 0 100K

High winds developed across the

mountains and a portion of the

foothills during the evening as the

remants of Hurricane Ivan moved just

west of the area. Numerous trees were

blown down, many of which fell on

vehicles and structures. The hardest

hit areas were generally in areas from

the mountains south to highway 11.

Anderson County

4 SSE Townville 0 0

This brief tornado produced mainly tree

damage in the Double Springs community.

Oconee County

13 SE Walhalla to 0 0 2K

8 SE Walhalla

This weak tornado blew down numerous

trees and power lines along its 5-mile

track.

Anderson County

3 W Iva 0 0

This tornado touched down very briefly

in an open field.

Oconee County

Westminster to 0 0 75K

4 NNW Westminster

This tornado blew down numerous trees

and power lines along its track, some

of which fell on homes. A mobile home

was destroyed when it was blown into an

embankment.

SCZ001>002-004>005

0 0 116K

Moderate to heavy rainfall associated

with the remnants of Hurricane Ivan

resulted in flooding along a few creeks

during mid-evening across the northwest

part of the Upstate. The flooding

gradually became widespread and more

severe during the overnight hours,

especially in Oconee County, as the

Tugaloo River flooded, trapping a

number of famalies, some of which

required rescue via helicopter. A

number of bridges and roads were washed

out or otherwise damaged by flood

water.

SCZ003-006>007

0 0 15K

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

continued to cause strong enough winds

to blow down a number of trees and

power lines across portions of the

mountains and foothills. A few fell on

structures and vehicles, and there were

scattered power outages. The damage was

more widespread across the western

Upstate.

Spartanburg County

Campobello 0 0 1M

Lightning struck an industrial plant,

igniting a fire which destroyed about

2/3 of the facility.

SCZ007

0 0

After an evening of heavy rainfall,

several small streams flooded just

after midnight. Several bridges were

covered with water. Most areas affected

were in the northwest quarter of the

county, including Campobello, Inman,

and Lyman. The Pacolet River also

flooded in spots.

Chester County

6 WSW Great Falls 0 0 25K

Two tractor trailers flipped over on

I-77 when the drivers lost control due

to strong winds.

Abbeville County

Abbeville to 0 0 26K

Calhoun Falls

Greenwood County

Greenwood 0 0

Intense rainfall rates associated with

the remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

resulted in rapid rises and flash

flooding along some small creeks and

streams across the southern part of the

Upstate. Some of the worst flooding

occurred around Abbeville, where

several bridges were covered by

flooding streams. Severe urban flooding

developed in the city of Greenwood, as

the bypass at Burton Plaza was covered

with water, and a small stream flooded

a portion of Laurel St. Several other

roads were closed around the city,

including Scotts and Airport Roads. In

addition, a portion of highway 72

became covered with water near Calhoun

Falls. Several roads and bridges were

damaged by flood water.

Anderson County

5 S Anderson to 0 0 50K

Honea Path

Oconee County

South Portion 0 0 20K

As an intense tropical ran band moved

across the western Upstate, some flash

flooding developed. Part of highway 81S

was closed in Anderson County when a

construction site was flooded in the

northbound lane. Widespread flash

flooding also occurred around Iva,

where all low spots filled quickly with

deep water. At Honea Path, an apartment

building was evacuated after flooding

from a stopped up storm drain entered

the building. Some businesses incurred

minor flood damage in southern Oconee

County. Urban flooding also occurred in

Anderson.

Laurens County

Countywide 0 0 5K

As the intense tropical rain band

continued to sweep over the Upstate,

flash flooding developed across Laurens

County, where up to a foot-and-a-half

of water accumulated in low places on

Interstate 385 from Laurens to the

Greenville line. Interstate 26 was also

flooded between mile markers 52 and 55.

Flooding was also reported along

highway 221 S around Waterloo with a

foot of water covering the road in low

places. By late evening, flash flooding

became severe, as 5 to 6 inches of rain

had fallen in just a 3-hour period.

Water covered a number of bridges from

the Hickory Tavern and Green Pond

areas, east across Gray Court and

Fountain Inn to the Spartanburg line.

At Cooks Bridge, just the reflectors

along the top of the bridge were

visible. Evacuations of several homes

were required around Fountain Inn.

Flooding also developed in the Ware

Shoals area.

Greenville County

Fountain Inn to 0 0 20K

Simpsonville

Flooding developed quickly across

Greenville County during mid-evening.

Numerous automobiles were stranded in

water in the southern and eastern parts

of the county. Flash flooding occurred

around Fork Shoals, along highway 25

south of Greenville, and along Jones

Mill Rd east of Fountain Inn. Gilder

Creek flooded from Mauldin downstream

to the Enoree River. Water from the

flooded creek covered a bridge at E

Georgia Rd.

Spartanburg County

Central Portion 0 0 20K

Greenville County

Berea to 0 0

Greer

As the intense tropical rain band

associated with the remnants of Jeanne

continued to progress north and east

across the Upstate, flash flooding

followed. Numerous streams rose quickly

to flood, including Brushy Creek and

the Enoree River around Greer and

Taylors. Numerous people required

rescue from their automobiles in this

area. The Reedy River also flooded from

Berea to downtown Greenville. In

Spartanburg County, a bridge was washed

out on Apple Valley Rd in the Berry

Shoals area. Portions of South

Blackstock Rd and Reidville Rd were

flooded, as was highway 101 north of

Woodruff.

Cherokee County

2 S Gaffney 0 0 88K

This tornado destroyed a mobile home

and blew down numerous trees and power

lines.

Chester County

7 NE Chester 0 0

A few trees were blown down along

highway 72. There were also some power

outages in the area.

SCZ006>007-012

0 0

After an evening of flash flooding,

rises along creeks and streams

moderated, but general flooding

persisted through the overnight and

morning hours, as rainfall worked its

way downstream through the water

systems. The main flood problem was

along the Enoree River basin in eastern

Greenville and Spartanburg Counties, as

Gilder and Peters Creeks and other

tributaries remained in flood for many

hours. There was also considerable

urban and small stream flooding

throughout the city of Spartanburg.

SOUTH CAROLINA, South Coastal

Jasper County

13 SSW Hardeeville 0 0

A tornado crossed into Jasper County

from Chatham County Georgia. The

tornado tracked through a marshy area

and no significant damage occurred.

Charleston County

1 NW Adams Run 0 0

Thunderstorms winds knocked down

several trees.

Colleton County

4 NW Jacksonboro to 0 0

4.5 NW Jacksonboro

A tornado knocked down trees.

Jasper County

4 SE Hardeeville to 0 1

2 SE Hardeeville

A tornado knocked down limbs and trees,

one of which fell on a mobile home

causing 1 injury.

Colleton County

6 SE Walterboro 0 0

Thunderstorm winds knocked down several

trees.

Charleston County

3 WNW Hollywood 0 0

Thunderstorm winds knocked down several

trees.

Colleton County

3 W Canadys 0 0

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and large limbs.

Berkeley County

15 SW Cross 0 0

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

Dorchester County

2 NE Ridgeville 0 0

Thunderstorm winds knocked down several

trees.

Jasper County

5 NE Hardeeville to 0 0

5.5 NE Hardeeville

A tornado knocked down trees.

Dorchester County

8 SE Harleyville to 0 0

7.5 SE Harleyville

A small tornado knocked down trees and

large limbs.

Allendale County

2 NW Allendale to 0 0

4 NW Allendale

A tornado knocked down and snapped off

numerous trees.

Allendale County

4 NW Seigling to 0 0

5 NW Seigling

A tornado snapped and downed several

trees.

Jasper County

2 E Gillisonville to 0 0

2 NNW Gillisonville

A tornado knocked down trees. Many

trees were snapped off and thrown in

different directions.

Berkeley County

6 W Goose Creek 0 0

Thunderstorms winds knocked down trees.

Charleston County

North Charleston 0 0

Two trees were blown along the 52

Connector.

Berkeley County

Goose Creek 0 0

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

Allendale County

5 NW Seigling 0 0

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and large limbs.

Hampton County

5 NE Brunson to 0 0

5 N Brunson

A tornado knocked down trees in the

county before crossing into Allendale

county.

Allendale County

4 E Fairfax to 0 0

4 ESE Sycamore

A weak F1 tornado crossed from Hampton

county into Allendale county. The

tornado uprooted and snapped off trees

along its path.

Allendale County

10 S Martin to 0 0

9.5 S Martin

A tornado snapped and bent trees in

various directions.

Allendale County

4 NE Millett to 0 0

4 N Millett

A tornado snapped trees and bent others

in various directions.

Hurricane Frances made land fall over

the Florida Panhandle and continued to

track in a generally northward

direction into Georgia, before turning

more to the northeast. This track

placed the Charleston County Warning

Area in the favorable right side of the

remnants of Frances which produced

numerous tornadoes and areas of

straight line wind damage over

southeast Georgia and south coastal

South Carolina. Several Georgia

counties also experienced flash

flooding as there were isolated

rainfall amounts of 5 to 8 inches over

a 24 to 36 hour period. This was on top

of already saturated ground from heavy

rains during the month of August. The

South Carolina counties experienced

more nuisance type flooding as the

rainfall amounts were not as high as

what occurred in southeast Georgia.

Beaufort County

Hilton Head Is 0 0

A picket fenced was knocked down. Part

of the fence went through the door of a

house. The roof of a house was

partially lifted and then set back

down. This caused some interior damage

to the home.

Allendale County

13 S Martin 0 0

Several trees and large limbs were

knocked down by thunderstorm winds.

Hampton County

4 NE Early Branch to 0 0

4 NNE Early Branch

A weak tornado knocked down several

trees.

Berkeley County

1 W Pineville to 0 0

1 NW Pineville

A weak tornado damaged 2 mobile homes

and a shed. One mobile home had the

entire roof torn off and the second had

skirting torn off. Numerous trees and

limbs were knocked down.

Charleston County

Charleston to 0 0

Isle Of Palms

Heavy rainfall caused flooded roads in

Charleston, Mt. Pleasant, and the Isle

of Palms.

Colleton County

Countywide 0 0

Thunderstorm winds knocked down

numerous trees across the county. One

tree fell on a house and another fell

on a vehicle.

Dorchester County

St George 0 0

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

in several locations across the

northern part of the county.

SCZ043-047>050

0 0

The center of Tropical Storm Jeanne

tracked across inland Georgia but the

strongest winds at the time were along

the coast. Maximum wind gusts were 41

mph at both the Charleston downtown

observation and the Charleston airport.

The C-Man station at Folly Beach had a

maximum wind gust of 38 mph.

Non-tornadie wind damage was limited to

a few trees falling on cars.

SOUTH DAKOTA, Central and North

Stanley County

10 W Mission Ridge 0 0

Roberts County

11 S Rosholt to 0 0

9 SSW Rosholt

The storm entered South Dakota from

Traverse county, Minnesota where it

produced a tornado. The storm produced

a second tornado as it crossed Lake

Traverse into South Dakota. This

tornado was stronger and destroyed a

house, a mobile home, and a travel

trailer. Another house and travel

trailer were damaged and a shed was

also ripped apart. The tornado also

killed three cattle.

SOUTH DAKOTA, Southeast

Davison County

7 SE Mt Vernon 0 0

Davison County

5 N Mitchell 0 0

Sanborn County

3 SE Artesian 0 0

Miner County

1 W Fedora 0 0

Davison County

Mitchell 0 0 2K

Lightning struck and damaged a brick

chimney, and burned out a transformer

at an amusement center.

Hanson County

9 SW Alexandria 0 0

Clay County

5 E Wakonda 0 0

Turner County

2 N Centerville 0 0

Lincoln County

5 NW Beresford 0 0

Minnehaha County

Sioux Falls 0 0

Minnehaha County

Sioux Falls 0 0

Minnehaha County

Sioux Falls 0 0

Minnehaha County

3 N Brandon 0 0

Aurora County

10 NE Plankinton 0 0

Davison County

7 NW Mt Vernon 0 0

Sanborn County

1 S Letcher 0 0

Davison County

3 N Loomis 0 0

SOUTH DAKOTA, West

Pennington County

Keystone 0 0 0 0

Pennington County

4 SW Rapid City 0 0 0 0

Pennington County

7 SW Rapid City 0 0 0 0

Custer County

1 W Hermosa 0 0 0 0

Ziebach County

21 NE Cherry Creek 0 0 0 0

Fall River County

2 N Provo 0 0 0 0

Small tornado was on the ground for

about 1 minute. No damage.

Custer County

22 W Custer 0 0 0 0

Custer County

8 ESE Custer 0 0 0 0

Fall River County

12 W Hot Spgs 0 0 0 0

A 71 mph thunderstorm wind gust was

recorded at Red Canyon RAWS.

Location Character of Storm

NORTH DAKOTA, Central and West

Mountrail County

7 N Palermo Hail (1.50)

Ward County

5 N Kenmare Hail (0.75)

Ward County

1 N Kenmare Hail (1.00)

NORTH DAKOTA, East

Cavalier County

5 W Hannah Hail (0.88)

Benson County

5 NE Warwick Hail (0.75)

Ramsey County

2 S Doyon Hail (0.75)

Nelson County

7 WSW Lakota Hail (0.75)

Eddy County

10 S Hamar Hail (0.75)

Nelson County

1 S Tolna Hail (0.88)

Nelson County

3 S Whitman Hail (0.75)

Walsh County

6 W Fordville Hail (0.75)

OHIO, East

OHZ068

Flood

Rain from remnants of Hurricane

Frances began late on the 7th. It

ended the morning of the 9th, but

flooding continued. At 155 PM EDT,

the West Fork of Duck Creek flooded

near Caldwell. Carlisle reported 4

inches of rain. At 415 PM, Mt Ephraim

had 5″ of rain. By 528 PM, houses

were being evacuated in East Union;

all state roads were closed across

county. 200 people were evacuated

in Belle Valley and Caldwell. By 9

AM on 9th, many roads remain closed.

Total rain: Mt Ephraim 6.2 inches;

Hiramsburg 5.8″. (FRANCES)

OHZ058

Flood

Rain from remnants of Hurricane

Frances began late on the 7th. It

ended the morning of the 9th, but

flooding continued for days. By 330

PM EDT, flooding was county-wide. By

615 PM EDT, just south of Cambridge,

I-70 was closed by flooding; so were

routes 265 and 513. Many roads

remained flooded 4 PM on the 10th. By

8 PM EDT on 11th, flooding was

primarily confined to the northern

and central parts of Guernsey County.

Most small stream flooding ended by 2

am EDT on the 12th, but flooding on

Wills Creek in Cambridge continued.

Wills Creek rose to flood stage

(15 ft) at 9 PM EDT on the 8th;

crested 24.9 at 5 AM EDT 10th; and

fell below flood stage 11 PM EDT on

the 14th. The crest fell short of the

record (26.9 ft). Total rain: 6.6″ at

Salt Fork Sewage Plant. (FRANCES)

OHZ059

Flood

At 340 PM EDT on the 8th, Neffs was

flooded by Big McMahon and Little

McMahon Creeks. At 4 PM, flooding

began in Colerain; school busses

stranded. At 445 PM, Pine Creek

flooded Shadyside. 549 PM, Rte 147

flooded at Bailey Mills; Rte 40

flooded Bannock. 6 PM, Lafferty

flooded. 609 PM, Rte 149 flooded

Glencoe. 650 PM, CR 2 flooded

Yorkville. 655 PM, Bethesda flooded.

720 PM, Lansing evacuations. 816 PM,

road washed away in Dilles Bottom.

854 PM, 100 homes flooded in

Wolfhurst. 914 PM, cars and buildings

under water in Maynard. 938 PM, near

Bailey Mills, car drove into flood, 2

occupants rescued. 948 PM, near

Powhatan Point, 2 woman were clinging

to a tree; rescued at 1 AM EDT on 9th.

10 PM EDT 8th, foundation of 1 house

washed away in Glencoe; Deep Run Rd

bridge washed out in Yorkville. 1026

PM, Barton evacuations. 1055 PM,

Neffs evacuations as 25 homes

flooded. 1230 AM on 9th, CR 10

collapsed near Crabapple, after

police car had passed. Countywide,

350 homes evacuated and 14 roads

flooded during the night of the 8th.

Total rain: 5.2″ in Uniontown and

4.7″ St Clairsville. (FRANCES)

OHZ057

Flood

At 4 PM EDT on 8th, roads began to

flood south of Zanesville; and 5

inches of rain fell at

Chandlersville. At 430 PM, Brush

Creek flooded near Duncan Falls. At

630 PM, Roseville was in a state of

emergency after 7 inches of rain. At

7 PM, New Concord reported severe

and widespread flooding after 7.5

inches of rain (in 24 hr).

Chandlersville and Roseville totaled

6″ of rain. (FRANCES)

OHZ039

Flood

By 445 PM EDT on 8th, Horse Shoe Bend

Rd flooded east of Newcomerstown; a

9-year old girl was swept off the

road by flood waters as she walked

home from school. By 5 PM, Blizzard

Rd flooded in Uhrichsville. Before

flooding ended, basements flooded

in Uhrichsville and a few homes were

evacuated in Dennison. Rte 258 closed

by mud slide. 14 structures suffered

major damage; 19 had minor. Other

roads flooded: 10, 43, 151, 331, 800.

Most small stream flooding ended by

12 PM EDT on the 9th, but flooding on

Stillwater Creek at Uhrichsville

continued. Stillwater Creek rose to

flood stage (5 ft) at 4 AM EDT on

9th; crested 10.3 at 7 AM EDT 10th;

and fell below flood stage 7 AM EDT

on the 13th. Total rain: 6.2″ at

Gilmore; 4.8 Newcomerstown. There was

a record flood on Huff Creek at

Mineral City, which crested at 5.82

ft at 530 AM EDT on 9th (previous

record 4.35). (FRANCES) F90U

OHIO, East

OHZ069

Flood

At 6 PM EDT on 8th, Sunfish Creek

flooded houses in Cameron. Many roads

were under water, including those in

Sardis. By 750 PM, SR 78 was closed

by flooding near Lewisville. At 827

PM, SR 26 closed near Graysville, and

Sunfish Creek overflowed in Cameron.

Before it ended, routes 260 and 379

flooded. There were basements

flooded and people evacuated from

homes in Cameron and Clarington.

Total rain: 4.8″ in Antioch. (FRANCES)

OHZ049

Flood

By 615 PM, streams were out of their

banks countywide. Basement of

Hopedale School flooded. Routes 22,

49, 151, 250, 331 closed by flooding

(times unknown). 4 to 6″ of rain by 9

PM on the 8th. By 830 AM EDT on the

9th, Jewett was closed off because

of flooding. Total rain: New Athens

4.9″; Deersville 4.6. (FRANCES)

OHZ050

Flood

By 630 PM EDT on 8th, flooding was

reported countywide. 40 roads were

closed by flooding, including SR 150.

Towns that flooded include: Adena

(evacuations), Connorsville,

Dillonvale (evac), Glen Robbins

(bridge washed out), trondale (evac),

Rayland, Smithfield (power substation

flooded), Toronto (evac), Wolf Run

(woman rescued from flooded car).

Total rain: 3.8″ in Amsterdam and

Hammondsville. There was a record

flood on Yellow Creek at

Hammondsville, which crested at

12.98 ft at 11 AM on 9th (previous

record 12.17). (FRANCES)

OHZ041

Flood

By 615 PM EDT, roads were flooded

countywide. By 730 PM, Mill Creek

began to flood the Lisbon area; and

West Point reported 6″ of rain. By

915 PM on 8th, Rte 30 from Hanoverton

to Kensington was closed by flood;

and SR 154 near Elkton is covered by

3 ft of water. Total rain: West Point

8 inches; Union 4.3; Salem 4.1.

(FRANCES)

OHZ040

Flood

By 615 PM EDT, SR 524 flooded 8 miles

northeast of Carrollton. By 827 PM,

Antigua Rd was flooded about 1 mile

west of Carrollton, at the

intersection of routes 9 and 171

(rescue needed). Several roads

remained closed the morning of the

9th. By 8 AM EDT on 10th, Conotton

Creek near Sherrodsville was still

rising and causing major flooding;

while in the north, Sandy Creek

continued to flood near Minerva. 30

mobile homes were flooded in Malvern

area. In summary, 12 roads were

closed by flooding; some were

damaged. 251 homes damaged or

destroyed. Minerva sewage treatment

plant damaged. Total rain: 3.8″ in

Augusta. (FRANCES)

OHZ048

Flood

By 645 PM EDT on 8th, SR 751 flooded

near Orange; and CR 16 flooded

between Coshocton and Lafayette.

Total rain: 4.1 inches at Wills Creek

Dam. (FRANCES)

OHZ059

Flood

At 11 AM EDT on 17th, CR 4 flooded

near Neffs. By noon, roads were

flooded in Bridgeport and St

Clairsville. As of 9 AM on 18th, a

few roads were still flooded but

water was receding. A total of 521

structures damaged or destroyed.

State Rte 7 was closed by multiple

mud slides. 200 ft of Rte 40 washed

away between Lansing and Brookside;

48-inch water main destroyed under

road; thousands lose water service.

Five businesses had major damage

along Rte 40, including $1 million

damage to Giant Eagle food store.

House destroyed by mud slide on Rte

250. Duffy and Powhatan Point also

flooded. Eight roads damaged by mud

slides and floods. These routes were

closed at one time: 7, 9, 145, 147,

148, 149, 250, 379, 647, 800. One

woman died (age unknown) There was a

record flood on Wheeling Creek at

Blaine, which crested at 9.86 ft

(previous record 8.21) Total rain:

6.1″ in Colerain, 5.7″ Morristown.

(Just across the river, Wheeling

storm total 9.5″) Most small stream

flooded ended by 9 AM EDT on 18th,

but flooding on the Ohio River

continued: Pike Island and Wheeling

were above flood stage from 12 AM on

18th, til 5 AM 20th. Pike Island

(flood stage 37 ft) crested 46.3 at

5 AM 19th. Wheeling (flood stage 36

ft) crested 45.3 at 5 AM 19th.

Moundsville and Powhatan Point,

(both flood stages 37 ft) were above

flood from 1 AM on 18th, til 9 AM

20th. Moundsville crested 47.0 ft at

8 AM 19th; Powhatan Point crested

45.6 at 9 AM on 19th. (All times

here EDT) (IVAN) F35VE

OHZ068

Flood

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Ivan began the night of the 16th and

ended just before midnight on the

17th. At 1114 AM EDT on 17th, road

flooding began in Sarahsville. By

1230 PM, major flooding occurred

from Caldwell northward. By 315 PM,

Rtes 265 and 513 were flooded west of

Batesville after 5 inches of rain. As

of 9 AM on 18th, State Rtes 147, 333,

and 564 were still closed, but water

was receding. 81 structures damaged

or destroyed. Total rain: 6″

Hiramsburg and Sharon. (IVAN)

OHZ058

Flood

By Noon EDT on 17th, many roads were

flooded, especially in southeastern

part of county. By 3 PM, people were

being evacuated because of flooding

in Quaker City. At 9 AM on 18th, 15

to 20 roads remained closed because

of flooding, including Rte 22 near

Winterset. At late as 4 PM on 19th,

Wills Creek, and streams feeding

into it, continued to cause flooding.

30 structures damaged or destroyed.

Wills Creek at Cambridge rose to

flood stage (15 ft) at 2 AM EDT on

18th; crested at 22.9 at 6 AM on

19th; and fell below flood stage 8

AM EDT on 22nd. Total rain: 4″ in

Cambridge; 3.4″ Salt Fork. (IVAN)

OHZ069

Flood

At 1230 PM EDT, many roads flooded

near Woodsfield. As of 3 PM EDT,

numerous streams continued to flood

roads. Clarington also flooded.

State routes 7 and 78 were closed by

multiple mud slides. 17 structures

damaged or destroyed. Most small

stream flooding had ended by early

on the 18th, but flooding on the Ohio

River continued: at Hannibal, the

Ohio River rose above flood stage

(35 ft) at 4 AM EDT on 18th, crested

at 41.1 ft at 9 AM EDT on 19th, and

fell below flood stage at 10 AM EDT

on 20th. Total rain: 6.6 inches at

Woodsfield. (IVAN)

OHZ057

Flood

At 1 PM EDT on 17th, many roads were

flooded near Duncan Falls. 116

structures damaged or destroyed.

Total rain: 6.2″ at Gratiot. (IVAN)

OHZ050

Flood

At 215 PM EDT on 17th, there were

multiple mud slides on Route 7 from

Steubenville to Brilliant from heavy

rain and flooding. By 333 PM, there

was widespread flooding throughout

Jefferson Co. As of 9 AM on 18th,

many roads remained closed by

flooding and mud slides, including

Rtc 7. As of 4 PM on 19th,

Brilliant, Mingo Jet, and other

towns remained flooded. In total,

255 structures were damaged or

destroyed. These roads were closed

by flooding or mud slides at one

time: State Routes 146 through 152;

county roads 1 through 43. There was

flooding in Empire, Stratton, and

Toronto. Sewage treatment plant in

Steubenville has damaged. On the

Ohio River, New Cumberland WV was

above flood stage from 3 AM EDT on

18th, til 8 PM on 19th; it crested at

44.5 ft at 930 PM EDT on 18th (flood

stage 36). Wellsburg WV was above

flood stage from 3 AM on 18th, til 2

AM EDT on 20th; it crested at 45.1 ft

at 445 AM on 19th (flood stage 36).

Total rain: 4.2″ at Bloomingdale.

(IVAN)

OHZ048

Flood

At 325 PM EDT on 17th, State Rte 83

by closed by flooding near Wills

Creek in southeastern Coshocton Co.

Rtes 93 and 541 were also closed.

(IVAN)

OHZ049

Flood

At 345 PM EDT on 17th, Rtes 22 and

250 were closed by flooding near

Cadiz. By 9 AM on 18th, Scio was

still under water. Rte 151 between

Scio and Bowerstown closed by flood.

137 structures damaged or destroyed.

State Routes 519, 646, and 799 also

closed by flood. Total rain: 5.1

inches in New Athens. (IVAN)

OHZ041

Flood

At 4 PM EDT on 17th, mud slides and

floods closed numerous roads near

East Liverpool. 508 PM, Will Creek

flooded Rte 518 near Summitville.

119 structures damaged or destroyed.

Total rain: 7 inches in southeastern

part of county. (IVAN)

OHIO, North

OHZ033

Flood

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused widespread urban and lowland

flooding in Mahoning County. Between

two and three inches of rain fell on

much of the county by late evening.

Dozens of roads in the county had to

be closed because of flooding.

Hundreds of homes in the county

experienced basement or nuisance

flooding. Flood waters in some areas

were reported to be as much as two

feet deep.

Trumbull County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused extensive flooding in Trumbull

County. The worst flooding was

reported in the eastern and central

sections of the of the county where

up to four inches of rainfall had

fallen by late evening on September

8th. The rains continued into the

9th with another two to four inches

reported in some areas before the

rain finally ended around daybreak.

Rainfall totals from the event

included: 3.36 inches at Mosquito

Creek State Park; 3.60 inches at

Newton Falls; 3.85 inches in

Leavittsburg; 4.45 inches at the

Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport

in Vienna Township and 9.40 inches

at Brookfield. The Cortland area was

especially hard hit by flooding.

Between 20 and 30 families had to be

evacuated from their homes around

2:30 a.m. after flood waters from

Walnut Run rose to nearly four feet

in depth in their neighborhood. A

total of 118 homes were damaged by

flooding in Cortland. Several roads

and culverts were also washed out in

the area. Flood waters along

Tournament Trail and Old Oak Drive

exceeded the 100 year flood plain.

Brookfield Township was also hard hit

as several small streams went into

flood washing out a couple roads and

forcing the closure of several more.

To the south, Little Yankee Creek and

Mud Run Creek went into flood in

Hubbard damaging many homes and

businesses along Main Street. Many

other roads were washed out or

damaged elsewhere in the county. A

total of 309 homes were directly

damaged by flash flooding in Trumbull

County. Hundreds of additional homes

and businesses experienced basement

or nuisance flooding.

Stark County

Southeast Portion Flash Flood

For the second time in less than

two weeks, heavy rains caused

significant flooding in the

southeastern corner of Stark County.

Rain associated with the remnants of

Tropical Storm Frances began early

on September 8th and increased in

intensity during the evening hours.

The rain continued into the early

morning hours of the 9th and finally

ended an hour or two before daybreak.

Storm total rainfall amounts

included: 2.08 inches at North

Lawrence, 2.32 inches at Genoa and

3.08 inches at Alliance. Similar to

the August 28th flash flood event,

heavy rains over Columbia County

contributed to the severity of the

flooding. Up to 9 inches of rain was

reported over the headwaters of

Sandy Creek in Columbia County. The

creek rapidly rose during the late

evening hours of the 8th and early

morning of the 9th. Over 60 homes

and business were heavily damaged

in Minerva after the creek left it’s

banks. A couple dozen people had to

be rescued or evacuated from their

homes. The water treatment plant in

Minerva sustained over $100,000 in

damages. Many roads in the southeast

corner of the county were washed out

or had to be closed because of

flooding. Dozens of additional homes

sustained damage from basement or

nuisance flooding.

Mahoning County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused flooding over portions of

Mahoning County. Most of the flooding

occurred in the eastern half of the

county where rainfall totals were the

greatest. The rain began early on the

8th and increased in intensity during

the evening hours. The heavy rain

continued into the 9th and finally

ended just before daybreak. Rainfall

totals from the event included: 3.56

inches at Sebring; 3.88 inches at

Youngstown; 5.5 inches at Poland; 7.0

inches at Canfield and 9.25 inches

near Poland. The Poland area was

especially hard hit by flooding. A

branch of Yellow Creek left it’s

banks and flooded much of the

Cobbler’s Run Subdivision along

Dobbins Road. Several families had to

be evacuated and at least two homes

were destroyed when their basement

walls collapsed. A library in Poland

was also damaged. Extensive street

nuisance flooding was reported in

both Beaver and Springfield

Townships and also in Campbell and

Boardman. Flood waters on some roads

were reported to be as much as three

feet deep. Occupants of three

vehicles had to be rescued from their

stranded cars. Two roads were washed

out in the southeastern corner of the

county. Hundreds of homes in Mahoning

County were damaged, mainly by

basement and nuisance flooding.

Ashtabula County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rains associated with the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused flooding over portions of

Ashtabula County. Rain began early

on September 8th and increased in

intensity during the evening hours.

The heavy rain continued into the

9th and finally ended just before

daybreak. Rainfall totals from the

event included: 2.08 inches at

Ashtabula; 2.42 inches at Geneva;

2.88 inches at Jefferson; 3.00 inches

at New Lyme; 3.68 inches at Conneaut

and 4.66 inches at Pierpont.

Significant flooding occurred along

Conneaut Creek in the northeastern

corner of the county. Very heavy

rain fell over the headwaters of the

creek in Pennsylvania and caused a

rapid rise in creek levels beginning

around midnight. By 12:24 a.m., a

campground along Creek Road in

Kingsville Township was under as

much as five feet of water. 17

campers at the campground barely

escaped the rapidly rising waters

and had to be rescued by boat.

Several roads near the creek were

washed out by the floodwaters. Many

other roads, including State Route

7 had to be closed because of

flooding. Over a dozen vehicles were

damaged at an automobile dealership

by flood waters up to four feet deep.

Hundreds of homes and businesses

were damaged by flooding. Several of

these sustained significant damage.

OHZ012>014-

022>023-032>033

Strong Wind

The remnants of Tropical Storm

Frances moved northeast across the

upper Ohio Valley on September 8th.

Gusty northerly winds behind this

storm caused considerable damage in

northeastern Ohio. Hundreds of

trees were downed in Ashtabula,

Trumbull,

Mahoning, Portage, Lake, Geauga and

Stark Counties. Trumbull County was

especially hard hit with at least five

homes damaged in the Cortland area by

fallen trees. Roads were blocked by

trees in both Niles and Liberty

Township. In Stark County, a tree hit a

moving car around 4:30 p.m. The driver

sustained only minor injuries, but the

car was heavily damaged. In Mahoning

County, a fallen tree destroyed a

garage in Milton Township. A pier at an

Eastlake marina (Lake County) was

destroyed by high winds and waves.

0HZ033

Flood

Runoff from heavy rains produced by the

remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused the Mahoning River to go into

flood. At Youngstown, the river went

above the flood stage of 10 feet during

the late evening hours of September

8th. The river crested at 14.35 feet

during the evening of the 9th and fell

below flood stage during the evening of

the 10th. Extensive flooding occurred

in low areas along the river. Several

roads were damaged in Mill Creek Park.

Buildings along the river in Youngstown

also sustained some damage. Many roads

along the river had to be closed

because of the flooding.

0HZ032

Flood

Heavy rains from the remnants of

Tropical Storm Frances caused

Nimishillen Creek to go into flood

during the early morning hours of

September 9th. The creek at North

Industry crested at 8.98 feet during

the early afternoon hours and fell back

below the flood stage of 8.0 feet by

early evening. Many homes and

businesses along the creek experienced

flooding. Damage to most of these

buildings was minor, but a few did

sustain significant damage. Several

roads along the creek had to be briefly

closed.

0HZ023

Flood

Runoff from rains from the remnants of

Tropical Storm Frances caused

widespread lowland and nuisance

flooding across Trumbull County. The

Mahoning River at Leavittsburg went

above the flood stage of 10 feet during

the afternoon hours of the 9th. The

river crested at 10.91 feet at 11 p.m.

and fell back below flood stage around

9 a.m. on the 10th. Homes along the

river experienced minor flooding

problems. Several roads in the county

remained closed through the 10th.

0HZ023-033

Flood

For the second time in a week,

extensive urban and lowland flooding

was reported across Trumbull and

Mahoning Counties. The remnants of Ivan

moved across the Ohio Valley on

September 17th. A stationary front

extending northeast from the low caused

heavy rains to develop and fall on most

of northeastern Ohio from late on

September 16th through the 17th.

Rainfall totals for the storm in

Trumbull County included: 2.00 inches

at Mespotamia; 2.87 inches at Newton

Falls and 3.64 inches at Brookfield. In

Mahoning County totals included: 2.80

inches at Canfield; 3.66 inches at East

Lewistown and 3.90 inches at Craig

Beach. Runoff from this rain caused

many rivers and streams to leave their

banks flooding many low lying areas.

Several roads had to be closed because

of the flooding. At Youngstown, the

Mahoning River went above the 10 foot

flood stage during the afternoon hours

of the 17th. The river crested at 14.26

feet at 9 p.m. and fell out of flood

late in the morning of September 19th.

At Leavittsburg, the Mahoning River

went above the 10 foot flood stage

during the evening of the 17th and

crested at 11.62 feet just before

daybreak on the 18th. The river went

out of flood early on September 19th.

Hundreds of homes in both Mahoning and

Trumbull Counties sustained damages

from either lowland or basement

flooding.

0HZ011-020>021-

031-038

Flood

The remnants of Ivan moved across the

Ohio Valley on September 17th. A

stationary front extending northeast

from the low caused heavy rains to

develop and fall on most of

northeastern Ohio from late on

September 16th through the 17th.

Rainfall totals for the storm included:

1.76 inches at Millersburg (Holmes

County); 1.84 inches at Wooster (Wayne

County); 2.50 inches at Cuyahoga

Heights (Cuyahoga County); 2.91 inches

at Macedonia (Summit County) and 3.84

inches at Wadsworth (Medina County).

Runoff from this rain caused several

streams and creeks to leave their banks

flooding many low lying areas. A few

roads had to be closed because of

flooding. Hundreds of homes sustained

minor damage from either basement or

lowland flooding.

OHIO, Northwest

Allen County

Spencerville Flash Flood

Several county and state roads reported

closed due to flash flooding. A foot of

water reported flowing over roads.

Van Wert County

Elgin Flash Flood

County and State roads closed due to

flash flooding. At least a foot of

flowing water over roads in southeast

Van Wert county.

OHIO, Southeast

Jackson County

3 W Jackson to Funnel Cloud

6 W Jackson

Slow moving showers produced a rope

like funnel cloud west of the city.

0HZ066>067-

075>076-083>087

Flood

The low pressure remains of Hurricane

Frances caused about a 30 hour rain

event, from the afternoon of the 7th,

into the evening hours of the 8th.

A stalled frontal boundary helped

trigger heavier convection on the

northern, or leading edge, of the rain

shield during the late afternoon and

evening of the 7th. This initial

convection caused the heavier storm

totals to be over Morgan and Perry

Counties, compared to points further

south.

Storm totals of 4 to 7 inches were

common, with isolated amounts both

above and below those totals. Some

specific preliminary totals include New

Lexington with 7.5 inches,

McConnelsville 6.6 inches, McArthur 6.3

inches, Salem Center 5.7 inches, Athens

5.5 inches, Gallipolis 5.1 inches,

Carpenter 5.0 inches, South Point 4.7

inches, Newport and Nelsonville 4.6

inches, and finally Marietta 3.8

inches.

The Scalia Lab on the Ohio University

campus in Athens reported a storm total

of 5.3 inches. Other rain totals from

spotters included 5.9 inches at

Pageville of Meigs County, 5.7 inches

from Darwin of Meigs County and

Guysville of Athens County. Tuppers

Plain of Meigs County measured 5.4

inches. A few automated gauges totaled

5.1 inches at Coolville, 4.9 inches at

Kitts Hill, and 4.8 inches at

Amesville.

Since the ground was dry prior to this

event, most flooding was to roads and

low lying areas. In Athens County,

Sunday Creek surrounded buildings in

Trimble and blocked streets. Some

residents evacuated their homes as a

precaution. Flooding remained minor.

The gauge at Glouster crested at 16.4

feet on the 9th, well below the 19 foot

crest observed back in May, 2004.

However, flooding was more severe in

Perry, Morgan, and Washington Counties,

affecting some homes. In Perry County,

around 50 homes had major damage, with

3 homes destroyed. Duck Creek flooded

in Washington County, including around

Elba and Lower Salem. In Washington

County, one house was destroyed, while

7 homes had major damage. In Morgan

County, 8 homes had major damage.

The Muskingum River crested at 11.7

feet early on the 9th at McConnelsville

in Morgan County. Flood stage is 11

feet. The Shade river near Chester of

Meigs County rose from 4.7 feet around

0500E on the 8th, to 21.5 feet around

1830E on the 9th. Bankfull is around 17

feet.

This event set the stage for a more

widespread flood across southeast Ohio,

to follow later in the month.

0HZ066>067-

075>076-084>087

Flood

Light rain spread north into southeast

Ohio during the afternoon and evening

hours of the 16th. The heavier rain

from the remnants of Hurricane Ivan

developed over Lawrence County before

dawn on Friday the 17th, reaching the

Athens and Marietta vicinity by 0900E

on the 17th. By 1700E the heavy rain

was pulling east and northeast, out of

southeast Ohio. A rain event of 24 to

30 hours dumped 4 to 6.5 inches of

rain. Some specific preliminary totals

included Beverly 6.4 inches, McArthur 6

inches, McConnelsville 5.5 inches,

Athens and Waterloo 5.1 inches,

Marietta and Newport 4.8 inches,

Gallipolis 4.3 inches, and Nelsonville

4 inches. Rains were not as heavy over

central and northern portions of Perry

County. New Lexington measured 2.4

inches. Spotters reported 6.2 inches

from Guysville, 6.1 inches at Toppers

Plains, and 5.5 inches in Pageville.

Since the ground was still recovering

from the effects of Hurricane Frances 8

days earlier, streams crested higher in

many instances. The small stream

flooding developed during the late

morning and early afternoon period of

the 17th. Serious small stream flooding

occurred on such streams as Sunday

Creek, Duck Creek, Racoon Creek, Little

Racoon Creek, and Symmes Creek. On the

2 year old gauge at Bolins Mills on

Racoon Creek, the crest was 17 feet,

its highest. At Millfield on Sunday

Creek, a crest of 24.5 feet established

a new record. However, the upper

reaches of Sunday Creek in Perry and

northern Athens County were higher in

May of 2004, than this event. For

example, the gauge at Glouster crested

at 17.6 feet compared to 19 feet in

May. Symmes Creek near Aid crested at

23.3 feet.

The smaller rivers, such as the Little

Muskingum and Shade, saw serious

flooding. The Little Muskingum River

at Bloomfield crested at 31.1 feet,

surpassing the 30.7 feet crest in 1998.

The Rinard covered bridge, originally

built in 1874, was shoved into the

river. During a restoration project in

the early 1990s, gaps between the

wooden boards were taken out. Local

residents think, without those gaps,

the water pressure was greater,

knocking the bridge off its supports.

In this vicinity, general stores in

Bloomfield and Wingett Run were flooded

with 5 feet of water. The Shade River

crested at 30 feet near Chester. The

1997 crest was at 31.4 feet.

The Hocking River at Athens crested

slightly over its 20 foot flood stage

at 20.8 feet. The crest occurred before

dawn on the 18th at Athens.

The axis of heaviest rain ran up the

main stem of the Ohio River toward

Wheeling and Pittsburgh. Storm totals

of 6 to 8 inches were seen there. This

rain was almost direct local runoff

into the upper Ohio River. As a result,

a strong rise of 1 to 2 feet per hour

was observed on the Ohio River during

the Friday evening, the 17th. For

example, between 1600E and 2100E, the

Ohio River rose 9 feet at Willow Island

Lock and Dam, and around 10 feet on the

Marietta 2SW gauge. The 24 hour rise at

Marietta was 22 feet in 24 hours, the

greatest 24 hour rise there on record.

On the 18th and 19th, as most small

streams were receding, moderate to

major flooding occurred on the Ohio

River from New Matamoras and Willow

Island on down through Marietta,

Belpre, Racine and Pomeroy. It was the

highest stage since March 1964. The

crest then dampened to minor flooding

below the mouth of the Kanawha River.

Some specific crests included Willow

Island 44.8 feet, Marietta 2SW 42.4

feet, Belleville 45.8 feet, Racine 50.2

feet, Pomeroy 51.2 feet, and R C Bryd

Lock and Dam 51 feet. The crest was 2

to 4 feet deep inside hundreds of

Marietta businesses, plus on the order

of 40 businesses in Meigs County

including the town of Pomeroy.

In Washington County, the Red Cross

surveyed 159 homes with major damage,

with 60 homes destroyed. Two trailer

parks were hit hard by flooding around

Marietta. On the order of 400 to 500

businesses in the county were affected.

State damage assessments had 56 homes

with major damage in Athens County. In

Meigs County, 16 homes had major damage

and 1 house was destroyed. In Gallia

County, 6 homes had major damage with

1 home destroyed. In Lawrence County, 8

homes had major damage and 3 were

destroyed. In Vinton County, 5 homes

had major damage and 2 homes were

destroyed.

The FEMA disaster 1556 included this

flood event.

OHIO, Southwest

0HZ065-074

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Frances

brought heavy rains to portions of

central Ohio. Areas southeast of

Columbus received three to four inches

of rain, causing some minor flooding

problems. Numerous roads were flooded

across Fairfield and Hocking counties,

with a few roads closed near Lancaster.

Several creeks rose out of their banks

across Hocking County.

Scioto County

Countywide Flash Flood

Twenty roads were closed due to high

water across the county. Basements were

flooded in several homes, and one

evacuation took place.

0HZ074

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan brought

persistent heavy rains to southern and

central Ohio. Three to five inches of

rain fell across Hocking County,

causing flooding on several roads in

the eastern part of the county. A

number of the roads were closed because

of the flooding.

Pike County

Beaver Flash Flood

Several roads were flooded and closed.

OKLAHOMA, Eastern

NONE REPORTED.

OKLAHOMA, Extreme Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

OKLAHOMA, Panhandle

Cimarron County

3 SSE Boise City Thunderstorm Wind (G70)

A thunderstorm became severe over the

western Oklahoma panhandle during the

evening hours producing a brief high

wind gust at the Boise City Oklahoma

MesoNet. No damage or injuries were

reported.

OKLAHOMA, Western, Central and Southeast

Payne County

2 S Cushing Lightning

Lightning struck a crude oil storage

tank causing a fire. The 80,000 barrel

capacity tank only had 8700 barrels of

crude in the tank at the time.

OREGON, Central and East

Grant County

l N Granite Hail (0.75)

Union County

La Grande Lightning

Lightning from a thunderstorm hit a

home, which tripped circuit breakers,

knocked out some outlets, and left a

burn mark on the house.

Wallowa County

5 S Imnaha Hail (0.75)

Wallowa County

20 ESE Enterprise Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

High winds from a thunderstorm knocked

down large trees near the confluence of

north/south forks of the Imnaha River.

Wallowa County

20 ESE Enterprise Hail (0.75)

ORZ047

High Wind (G52)

A peak wind gust of 60 MPH was measured

at the John Day Airport.

OREGON, Northwest

NONE REPORTED.

OREGON, Southeast

NONE REPORTED.

OREGON, Southwest

ORZ021>022-024-026

Wildfire

See below.

A Red Flag Warning was issued for

Oregon fire weather zones 618/691/620

for expected strong winds and poor

recoveries, effective at the above

listed time interval. The winds did

blow, but recoveries were much better

than expected, so the warning did not

verify.

ORZ029>031

See below.

Frost/Freeze

A Freeze Warning was issued for the

above listed zones, effective at the

above listed times. Reported low

temperatures in the area ranged from 20

to 28 degrees, so the warning verified

well.

PACIFIC

NOT RECEIVED.

PENNSYLVANIA, Central

Fulton County

12.5 W Mc Connellsbur Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Trees and wires were knocked down by

thunderstorm winds near Crystal Spring.

PAZ004>005-

011>012-017>019-

024>026-034>035-

037-041-045>046

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Frances moved

northeast across central Pennsylvania

from late Thursday afternoon on

September 8th, into the early morning

hours of Friday, September 9th,

producing widespread heavy rainfall,

and subsequent minor to moderate

flooding. Rainfall amounts of 3 to 5

inches within a 12 to 18 hour period

led to numerous road closures and

widespread basement flooding across

central Pennsylvania, particularly in

Blair and Huntingdon Counties. In Blair

County, a railroad bridge in

Hollidaysburg Borough was damaged by

flood waters, while approximately 200

persons were evacuated due to flooded

homes. In Huntingdon County, Juniata

College evacuated 23 persons from a

dormitory due to flooding, while in

Logan Township, 35 calves were swept

away by flood waters from a farm.

Somerset County

Central City Flash Flood

Thunderstorms produced torrential rain

across Somerset County, leading to

Flash Flooding in Central City. US

Route 30 was closed in several places

due to flooding and debris over the

roadway. Several secondary roads were

also closed in the vicinity of Central

City and Meyersdale.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Little Juniata River at Spruce Creek.

The creek rose above flood stage of 8.0

feet at 01:00 EST on the 9th, crested

at 12.94 feet at 5:45 EST on the 9th,

then fell back below flood stage at

14:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ025

Flood

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Frankstown Branch of the Juniata River

at Williamsburg. The river rose above

flood stage of 12.0 feet at 1:00 EST on

the 9th, crested at 16.91 feet at 10:00

EST on the 9th, then fell back below

flood stage at 22:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Juniata River at Huntingdon. The river

rose above flood stage of 12.0 feet at

7:15 EST on the 9th, crested at 13.45

feet at 11:45 EST on the 9th, then fell

back below flood stage at 20:15 EST on

the 9th.

PAZ045

Flood

Heavy rain caused flooding along the

Bald Eagle Creek at Beech Creek

Station. The creek rose above flood

stage of 11.0 feet at 09:00 EST on the

9th, crested at 12.68 feet at 14:45 EST

on the 9th, then fell back below flood

stage at 22:30 EST on the 9th.

PAZ034

Flood

Heavy rain caused flooding of Raystown

Branch of the Juniata River at Saxton.

The river rose above flood stage of

17.0 feet at 11:00 EST on the 9th,

crested at 17.15 feet at 12:30 EST on

the 9th, then fell back below flood

stage at 14:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ010

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Clarion River at

Johnsonburg to rise above its flood

stage of 7 feet at 11:00 EST on the

9th, crest at 7.23 feet on the 9th

shortly after 11:00 EST and fell below

flood stage at 14:00 EST on the 9th.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused flooding of the

Aughwick Creek at Shirleysburg. The

river rose above flood stage of 10 feet

at 11:30 EST on the 9th, crested at

10.79 feet at 16:45 EST on the 9th and

then fell back below flood stage at

19:45 EST on the 9th.

PAZ046

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Montgomery to

exceed its flood stage of 17 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 08:00

EST on the 10th, crested at 18.6 feet

at 11:00 on the 10th and fell below

flood stage at 00:00 EST on the 11th.

Warren County

Sheffield Flash Flood

Heavy rain caused rapid rises along

Tionesta Creek in southeast Warren

County. Several homes were quickly

surrounded by flood waters during the

mid afternoon hours. The flooding

prevented several school students from

returning home, since their homes were

inaccessible due to flood waters. Flood

waters quickly receded during the early

evening hours.

PAZ004>006-

010>012-017>019-

024>028-033>037-

041>042-045>046-

049>053-056>059-

063>66

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan moved

north along the Appalachians during

Friday, September 17th, and interacted

with an approaching cold front, leading

to a large swath of excessive rainfall

across central Pennsylvania as the

system weakened to a tropical

depression. The rain began during

Friday morning, and then became very

heavy from Friday afternoon into Friday

evening. Rainfall amounts of 3 to 6

inches were common, with some localized

amounts exceeding 8 inches within a 12

hour period. The heavy rainfall finally

tapered off from west to east across

central Pennsylvania late Friday night.

As a result of this excessive rainfall,

and antecedent heavy rainfall from the

remnants of Hurricane Frances one week

earlier, widespread flooding occurred

throughout central Pennsylvania from

Friday evening through early Monday,

September 20th. Many smaller creeks and

streams overflowed their banks by

Friday evening, while many larger

tributaries of the Susquehanna River

experienced moderate to major flooding

from Saturday into Sunday. In fact,

flood levels at many locations reached

into the top 5 of all flood events,

with many river forecast points

cresting above levels reached in the

January 1996 flood. Overall, 32 of 47

river forecast points exceeded flood

stage in central Pennsylvania, with 2

points setting all-time record high

water marks, as Bald Eagle Creek at

Beech Creek Station reached 15.96 feet,

and the Frankstown Branch of the

Juniata River reached 19.46 feet.

The widespread flooding closed hundreds

of roads and bridges across central

Pennsylvania, causing a significant

adverse impact on commerce and

transportation for several days. In

particular, Route 322 through the

“narrows” section of Juniata and

Mifflin Counties was closed, in

addition to numerous smaller roadways.

The high water also caused the

weakening of several flood control

structures in Cambria, Huntingdon, and

Montour Counties, leading to

evacuations. In addition, two deaths

were attributed to the flooding. One

death occurred in Greenfield Township

in Blair County, where a 2.5 year old

boy was swept away from waters of

Popular Run Creek, as the family was

cleaning up storm damage and the child

wandered off to the creek and was swept

away. The death occurred between 12:30

PM and 1:00 PM EST on Saturday

September 18th. The second death

occurred in Mifflin County to a 59 year

old male, who was found within receding

waters. Preliminary monetary estimates

of flood damage from the remnants of

Ivan across the state were over 50

million dollars.

M2IW, M59IW

Fulton County

17 SW Mc Connellsbur Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Fulton

County Pennsylvania from the storms of

September 17 2004. The tornado occurred

3.5 miles east of McKees Gap along

route 731 (McKees Gap Road). Wind

speeds were estimated to be around 75

mph.

The tornado touched about one quarter

mile south of McKees Gap Road downing

several trees, damaging the roof of a

house, damaging part of a barn and

leveling a tractor barn. The tornado

also flattened tall grass and corn. The

tornado traveled toward the

north-northwest for about half a mile.

It toppled and uprooted trees as it

crossed McKees Gap Road before lifting

up. The width of the tornado was about

30 to 40 yards and damage could be

followed for about half a mile.

The tornado touched down at

approximately 530 pm EDT and was on the

ground for about 1 to 2 minutes. The

tornado was a weak F1 tornado on the

Fujita scale. There were no injuries or

deaths.

PAZ037

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Tioga River at

Mansfield to exceed its flood stage of

9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 17:30 EST on the 17th, crested

at 14.21 feet at 04:30 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 12:45 EST

on the 18th.

Franklin County

2 SW Greencastle Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Franklin

County.

The tornado occurred near the town of

Greencastle and was rated an F1 on the

Fujita scale. Wind speeds were

estimated to be near 80 mph. The

tornado first hit the ground about 2

miles to the southwest of Greencastle

and moved to the north-northwest for

about 2 miles. The width of the storm

was approximately 30 yards. The tornado

touched down at approximately 714 pm

EDT and lifted at approximately 718 pm

EDT. The tornado caused many trees to

fall and damaged several structures.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Franklin County

3 SW St Thomas Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Franklin

County.

The tornado occurred near the town of

Saint Thomas and was rated an F1 on the

Fujita scale. Top wind speeds were

estimated at about 85 mph. The path was

2.5 miles long and began 3 miles

south-southwest of Saint Thomas. The

width of this tornado was 30 yards. The

tornado touched down approximately at

728 pm EDT and lifted at 732 pm EDT.

This tornado caused many trees to fall

and damaged several structures.

PAZ018>019-

024>028-033>036

Strong Wind

Strong winds associated with the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan, combined

with excessively wet soil resulted in

the downing of hundreds of trees across

portions of south central Pennsylvania

during Friday evening on September

17th. Although the system weakened to a

tropical depression upon reaching

Pennsylvania, with estimated winds

between 35 and 45 mph, the extremely

wet soil from recent heavy rainfall, in

addition to water-loaded foliage likely

led to this blow-down phenomenon. Areas

that were particularly hit hard

included exposed eastern slopes within

the ridges of central Pennsylvania, and

also in valley locations near the foot

of these ridges. Such areas included

the east facing ridges within Blue Knob

State Park, with an estimated 800 acres

affected, mainly between 1800 and 2000

EST, the eastern slopes within Rothrock

State Forest, and the valley at Tussey

Mountain. Fallen trees resulted in some

structural damage in Huntingdon County

where a camper was destroyed at Camp

Blue Diamond, and a hunting cottage was

damaged about 13 miles south of Camp

Blue Diamond. Most of the trees that

fell were aligned from northeast to

southwest, indicative of the strong

sustained straight line winds that

occurred during this event.

Franklin County

9 E Chambersburg Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed that a tornado

occurred in Caledonia State Park in

easternmost Franklin County

Pennsylvania.

The tornado began less than a mile

south of the park and then moved

northward across Route 30 and through

the park, toppling numerous trees in

its path. The tornado was about one and

one-half miles in length with a width

of 50 to 100 yards and a top wind speed

estimated around 85 mph. The tornado

was rated as an Fl on the Fujita scale.

The tornado touched down about 818 pm

EDT and lasted a couple of minutes.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Bedford County

3 NW Everett Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Bedford

County.

The tornado occurred north of the town

of Everett and was rated an Fl on the

Fujita scale. Wind speeds were

estimated to be around 80 mph. The

tornado first touched down 3 miles

northwest of the town of Everett on

Lower Snake Spring Road. The tornado

traveled north along Snake Spring Road

for three and one half miles before

lifting up. The width of the tornado

was 50 to 100 yards.

The tornado touched down at

approximately 830 pm EDT and lifted at

approximately 835 pm EDT. The tornado

caused many trees to fall, and damaged

one house and several farm buildings.

Extensive damage was done to corn crops

on six different farms.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Bedford County

2.5 NE Bedford Tornado (F1)

A survey of the area near Imlertown and

Yount revealed a tornado struck the

region around 840 pm EDT.

The damage and snapped trees near Yount

suggest a weak F1 tornado on the Fujita

scale. The tornado touched down south

of Yount along Station Road. The

tornado moved northwest causing

sporadic damage along Younts Road and

Briar Valley Road. The main damage was

snapped and uprooted trees suggesting

winds of 70 to 75 mph. On Briars Valley

Road, the tornado lifted off a barn

roof. It also uprooted and snapped

trees as it moved up the hill from the

farm. The tornado had about a two and

one quarter mile long path that was

about 50 yards wide.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Cumberland County

Oakville Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in

Cumberland County.

The tornado occurred near the town of

Oakville and was rated an F1 on the

Fujita scale. Wind speeds were

estimated to be near 90 mph. The

tornado first touched down 1 mile south

of Oakville, and moved north for about

2 miles before lifting up. The width of

the tornado was about 50 yards.

The tornado touched down at

approximately 855 pm EDT and lifted at

approximately 858 pm EDT. The tornado

caused many trees to fall, and damaged

several farm houses and farm buildings.

There were no injuries or deaths.

Juniata County

3 NW Mifflintown Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Juniata

County.

A tornado touched down near the town of

Denholm and was likely influenced by

the steep terrain of the area. The

damage, in the form of downed trees,

could be easily seen from Route 333.

About 100 trees were knocked down with

this tornado. The path was

approximately 1 mile long and about 75

yards wide. The tornado occurred around

905 pm EDT and lifted at 907 pm EDT.

This tornado was rated F1 on the Fujita

scale with winds approaching 85 mph.

There were no known injuries or deaths.

Juniata County

3 N Mifflintown Tornado (F1)

A survey team from the National Weather

Service confirmed a tornado in Juniata

County.

A tornado touched down near the town of

Arch Rock. It downed trees which were

visible along Township Road 527. The

length of the tornado was approximately

4.5 miles and the width was about 100

yards. In addition to the tornado,

downburst winds were also observed in a

much wider swath. Damage was mainly

confined to trees being knocked down,

however several structures had minor

damage and several corn fields were

flattened. The tornado touched down at

approximately 910 pm EDT and lasted

until approximately 913 pm EDT. The

tornado was rated Fl on the Fujita

scale with winds estimated at 85 mph.

There were no known injuries or deaths.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Little Juniata

River at Spruce Creek to exceed its

flood stage of 8 feet. The river rose

above flood stage at 20:15 EST on the

17th, crested at 15.46 feet at 04:45

EST on the 18th, and fell below flood

stage at 20:45 EST on the 18th.

PAZ037

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Tioga River at

Tioga Junction to exceed its flood

stage of 15 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 20:15 EST on the 17th,

crested at 15.33 at 21:30 EST on the

17th, and fell below flood stage at

22:15 EST on the 17th.

PAZ045

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Bald Eagle Creek

at Beech Creek Station to exceed its

flood stage of 11 feet. The river rose

above flood stage at 20:45 EST on the

17th, crested at 15.96 feet at 11:45

EST on the 18th, and fell below flood

stage at 11:45 EST on the 19th.

PAZ025

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Frankstown Branch

of the Juniata River at Williamsburg to

exceed its flood stage of 12 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 20:45

EST on the 17th, crested at 19.46

(record) at 10:45 EST on the 18th, and

fell below flood stage at 05:15 EST on

the 19th.

Perry County

9.5 SW Newport Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds blew the roof off a

barn on Little Germany Road near Route

274 in Little Germany.

Cambria County

11 E Carrolltown Flash Flood

Heavy rain caused Dysart Sportsmans

Club Dam to overtop during the evening

of September 17. Water overtopped the

breast of the dam by one and one half

feet, causing the evacuation of about

10 residents downstream of the dam. One

home was flooded, along with several

others reporting water in their

basements. Portions of the built-up

embankments of the retaining pond

collapsed into Clearfield Creek. In

addition, Cherry Tree Reservoir was

thought to be in danger of failing, and

evacuations also took place. This

structure did, however, not fail.

Perry County

New Germantown Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

along Bryner Road in the Tuscarora

State Forest near New Germantown and

Route 274.

PAZ010

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Clarion River at

Ridgway to exceed its flood stage of 16

feet. The river exceeded flood stage at

22:00 EST on the 17th, crested at 16.89

feet at 00:00 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 05:00 EST on the

18th.

PAZ050

Flood

Heavy rain caused Penns Creek at Penns

Creek to exceed its flood stage of 8

feet. The river rose above flood stage

at 22:30 EST on the 17th, crested at

12.19 feet at 11:30 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:15 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Aughwick Creek at

Shirleysburg to exceed its flood stage

of 10 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 00:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 18.5 feet at 12:15 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 10:15 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ046

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Loyalsock Creek

at Loyalsockville to exceed its flood

stage of 12 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 00:15 EST on the 18th,

crested at 15.24 feet at 10:30 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

16:00 EST on the 18th.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Huntingdon to exceed its flood stage of

12 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 00:30 EST on the 18th, crested

at 17.78 feet at 10:15 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 05:00 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ011

Flood

Heavy rain caused Sinnemahoning Creek

at Sinnemahoning to exceed its flood

stage of 17 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 00:30 EST on the 18th,

crested at 17.78 feet at 03:00 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

08:30 EST on the 18th.

PAZ034

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Raystown Branch

of the Susquehanna River at Saxton to

exceed its flood stage of 17 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 02:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 20.02 feet

at 11:30 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 20:15 EST on the

18th.

PAZ010

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Clarion River at

Johnsonburg to exceed its flood stage

of 7 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 02:15 EST on the 18th, crested

at 7.43 feet at 03:00 EST on the 18th

and fell below flood stage at 07:00 EST

on the 18th.

PAZ045

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Renovo to

exceed its flood stage of 16 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 02:15

EST on the 18th, crested at 21.14 feet

at 10:16 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 20:30 EST on the

18th.

PAZ056

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Sherman Creek at

Shermans Dale to exceed its flood stage

of 9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 02:45 EST on the 18th, crested

at 16.31 feet at 10:30 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 01:00 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ057

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Hershey to exceed its flood stage of 7

feet. The river rose above flood stage

at 03:00 EST on the 18th, crested at

14.27 feet at 09:30 on the 19th, and

fell below flood stage at 05:00 EST on

the 20th.

Lancaster County

Bainbridge Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and wires in Bainbridge.

PAZ059

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Harper Tavern to exceed its flood stage

of 9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 04:15 EST on the 18th, crested

at 17.35 feet at 01:00 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 19:15 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ063

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Yellow Breeches

Creek at Camp Hill to exceed its flood

stage of 7 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 04:30 EST on the 18th,

crested at 8.67 feet at 16:15 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

15:15 EST on the 19th.

PAZ046

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Montgomery to

exceed its flood stage of 17 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 05:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.8 feet

at 01:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 19:00 EST on the

20th.

PAZ026

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Mapleton Depot to exceed its flood

stage of 20 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 06:00 EST on the 18th,

crested at 23.76 feet at 14:15 EST on

the 18th, and fell below flood stage at

00:45 EST on the 19th.

PAZ045

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Lock Haven to

exceed its flood stage of 21 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 06:15

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.13 feet

at 16:00 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 11:00 EST on the

19th.

PENNSYLVANIA, Central

PAZ046

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Williamsport

to exceed its flood stage of 20 feet.

The river rose above flood stage at

07:15 EST on the 18th, crested at 27.82

feet at 22:45 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 23:30 EST on the

19th.

PAZ033

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Youghiogheny

River at Confluence to exceed its flood

stage of 12 feet. The river rose to

flood stage at 08:00 EST on the 18th,

and fell below flood stage at 09:00 EST

on the 18th.

PAZ052

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Milton to rise

above its flood stage of 19 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 08:45

EST on the 18th, crested at 27.94 feet

at 06:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 11:30 EST on the

20th.

PAZ046

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Muncy to

exceed its flood stage of 20 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 09:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.8 feet

at 01:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 17:00 EST on the

20th.

PAZ049

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Lewisburg to

exceed its flood stage of 18 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 09:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 26.01 feet

at 09:00 EST on the 19th, and fell

below flood stage at 14:16 EST on the

20th.

PAZ057

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Middletown to exceed its flood stage of

11 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 09:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 19.5 feet at 07:00 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 01:00 EST

on the 20th.

PAZ027

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Lewistown to exceed its flood stage of

23 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 09:30 EST on the 18th, crested

at 31.68 feet at 01:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:30 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ052

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Watsontown to

exceed its flood stage of 23 feet. The

river rose above flood stage at 11:00

EST on the 18th, crested at 28.8 feet

at 01:00 on the 19th, and fell below

flood stage at 11:00 EST on the 20th.

PAZ046

Flood

Heavy rain caused the West Branch of

the Susquehanna River at Jersey Shore

to exceed its flood stage of 26 feet.

The river rose above flood stage at

12:00 EST on the 18th, crested at 30.74

feet at 21:00 EST on the 18th, and fell

below flood stage at 13:00 EST on the

19th.

PAZ063

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Conodoguinet

Creek at Hogestown to exceed its flood

stage of 8 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 14:00 EST on the 18th,

crested at 11.35 feet at 17:45 EST on

the 19th, and fell below flood stage

at 10:30 EST on the 20th.

PAZ053

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Bloomsburg to exceed its flood stage

of 19 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 16:15 EST on the 18th, crested

at 27.12 EST at 09:45 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 18:45 EST

on the 20th.

PAZ052

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Sunbury to exceed its flood stage of

24 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 17:30 EST on the 18th, crested

at 30.44 feet at 13:30 EST on the 19th

and fell below flood stage at 18:30 EST

on the 20th.

PAZ057

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Harrisburg to exceed its flood stage

of 17 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 19:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 24.4 feet at 19:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 03:30 EST

on the 21st.

PAZ051

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Danville to exceed its flood stage

of 20 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 19:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 26.22 feet at 15:30 on the 19th, and

fell below flood stage at 20:30 EST on

the 20th.

PAZ066

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Susquehanna River

at Marietta to exceed its flood stage

of 49 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 20:00 EST on the 18th, crested

at 55.67 feet at 16:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 10:30 EST

on the 21st.

PAZ056

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Juniata River at

Newport to exceed its flood stage of 22

feet. The river rose above flood stage

at 22:30 EST on the 18th, crested at

23.58 feet at 06:30 EST on the 19th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:00 EST

on the 19th.

PAZ045

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Bald Eagle Creek

at Beech Creek Station to exceed its

flood stage of 11 feet. The creek rose

above flood stage at 02:30 EST on the

28th, crested at 11.6 feet at 07:00 EST

on the 28th and fell back below flood

stage just after 07:00 EST

on the 28th.

PAZ035>036-

056>059-063>066

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne moved

northeast along the east slopes of the

Appalachians during Tuesday, September

28th, eventually moving off the mid

Atlantic Coast by early Tuesday

evening. However, a large plume of

tropical moisture to the northwest of

the system produced widespread heavy

rainfall across south central

Pennsylvania during Tuesday, with

rainfall amounts of 2 to 4 inches. This

rainfall, combined with excessively wet

soil and swollen rivers from the

remnants of 2 antecedent tropical

systems, produced mainly minor flooding

across portions of south central

Pennsylvania, with several road

closures and some basement flooding

report.

PAZ059

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Harper Tavern to exceed its flood stage

of 9 feet. The river rose above flood

stage at 21:00 EST on the 28th, crested

at 10.09 feet at 05:00 EST on the 29th,

and fell below flood stage at 13:15 EST

on the 29th.

PAZ063

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Yellow Breeches

Creek at Camp Hill to exceed its flood

stage of 7 feet. The creek rose above

flood stage at 21:45 EST on the 28th,

crested at 7.52 feet at 01:15 EST on

the 29th and fell below flood stage at

05:30 EST on the 29th.

PAZ063

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Conodoguinet

Creek at Hogestown to exceed its flood

stage of 8 feet. The river rose above

flood stage at 04:30 EST on the 29th,

crested 8.73 feet at 00:00 EST on the

30th and fell below flood stage at

11:30 EST on the 30th.

PAZ057

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Hershey to exceed its flood stage of 7

feet. The creek rose above flood stage

at 10:45 EST on the 29th, crested at

7.01 feet at 11:30 EST on the 29th,

and fell below flood stage at 16:00 EST

on the 29th.

PAZ057

Flood

Heavy rain caused the Swatara Creek at

Middletown to reach flood stage of 11

feet. The creek rose to flood stage at

12:00 EST on the 29th, crested at 11.00

feet at 12:00 EST on the 29th and fell

below flood stage at 13:00 EST on the

29th.

PAZ063

Flood

Heavy rain and local runoff caused the

Yellow Breeches Creek at Camp Hill to

exceed its flood stage of 7 feet again.

The creek rose above flood stage at

16:55 EST on the 29th, crested at 7.56

feet at 22:15 EST on the 29th, and fell

below flood stage at 02:45 on the 30th.

PENNSYLVANIA, East

Northampton County

Central Portion Flash Flood

Heavy rain associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Frances caused poor

drainage flooding and flooding of some

of the streams in Northampton County.

Most of the flooding affected the

central part of the county the most. A

number of stranded vehicles were

reported in Nazareth, Bath and Belfast.

Tatamy Road was closed near the

Nazareth Middle School in Upper

Nazareth Township. Doppler Radar storm

total estimates reached three inches in

the county. Storm totals included 3.37

inches in Forks Township and 1.59

inches at the Lehigh Valley

International Airport.

Berks County

4 W Birdsboro Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A severe thunderstorm knocked down

numerous trees and snapped several

poles in the Green Hills area of

Robeson Township. Sporadic tree wind

damage extended for about one mile.

Monroe County

Countywide Flash Flood

PAZ055

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from the late evening of the

17th through the first half of the day

on the 18th in Monroe County. Doppler

Radar storm total estimates averaged

between 3 and 6 inches throughout the

county. The torrential rain caused

widespread poor drainage, creek and

river flooding. It was the worst

flooding along the Delaware River since

1955. Every stream in the county

flooded. About 160 homes and businesses

were damaged. Extensive damage also

occurred in the Delaware Water Gap

National Recreational Area. President

George W. Bush declared the county a

disaster area. Damage was estimated at

between fifteen and seventeen million

dollars.

The Delaware River at Tocks Island was

above its 21 foot flood stage from 438

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 232 a.m.

EDT on the 20th. It crested at 30.32

feet at 845 a.m. EDT.

The Brodhead Creek at Analomink was

above its 8 foot flood stage from 826

a.m. through Noon EDT on the 18th. It

crested at 8.53 feet at 10 a.m. EDT.

The Pohopoco Creek at Kresgeville was

above its 8.5 foot flood stage from 643

a.m. EDT through 951 p.m. EDT on the

18th. It crested at 8.99 feet at 230

p.m. EDT. The Brodhead Creek at

Minisink Hills was above its 10 foot

flood stage from 927 a.m. EDT on the

18th through 1235 a.m. EDT on the 20th.

It crested at 18.27 feet at 815 a.m.

EDT on the 19th. The Bush Kill Creek at

Shoemakers was above its 6 foot flood

stage from 732 a.m. EDT on the 18th

through 6 a.m. EDT on the 19th. It

crested at 7.27 feet at 230 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. The Lehigh River at

Stoddartsville was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 622 a.m. EDT on the

the 18th through 221 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 11.59 feet at 1215

p.m. EDT on the 18th. The Tobyhanna

Creek at Blakeslee was above its 10

foot flood stage from 348 a.m. EDT on

the 18th through 450 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 12.71 feet at 1245

p.m. EDT on the 18th.

Storm totals included 6.02 inches at

Pocono Summit.

Lehigh County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall during the first half of the

day on the 18th in Lehigh County. Storm

totals average around 5 inches and

caused widespread poor drainage,

creek and river flooding throughout the

county. Hardest hit were the city of

Allentown, Lower Macungie and Macungie

Townships. It was estimated that

85 homes, 31 businesses and five public

buildings and structures were damaged.

The preliminary damage estimate was

five million dollars.

The Lehigh River at Walnutport

(Northampton County) was above its 8

foot flood stage from 904 a.m. EDT on

the 18th through 102 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 12.32 feet at 245

p.m. EDT on the 18th. Farther

downstream the Lehigh River in

Bethlehem was above its 16 foot flood

stage from 212 p.m. EDT through 1156

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

18.79 feet at 700 p.m. EDT. The Little

Lehigh Creek within Little Lehigh Park

was above its 6 foot flood stage from

721 a.m. EDT on the 18th through

Midnight EDT on the 19th. It crested at

10.49 feet at 345 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

Farther downstream, the Little Lehigh

Creek at 10th Street within Allentown

was above its 8 foot flood stage from

1040 a.m. EDT through 951 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. It crested at 10.05 feet at

615 p.m. EDT. The Monocacy Creek at

Bethlehem was above its 4.5 foot flood

stage from 540 a.m. EDT on the 18th

through 752 a.m. EDT on the 19th. It

crested at 9.67 feet at 2 p.m. EDT on

the 18th.

Storm totals included 8.90 inches in

Orefield, 7.25 inches in Bethlehem,

5.32 inches in Coopersburg and 4.82

inches at the Lehigh Valley

International Airport.

Northampton County

Countywide Flash Flood

PAZ062

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall during the first half of the

day on the 18th in Northampton County.

Storm totals average around 5 inches

and caused widespread poor drainage,

creek and river flooding throughout the

county. Runoff from the heavy rain also

caused the worst flooding along the

Delaware River since 1955. Nearly every

township in the county reported flood

damage. President George W. Bush

declared the county a disaster area.

About 865 homes, businesses and

structures were damaged including

several roads and bridges.

The Delaware River washed a home from

Harmony Township (Warren County)

downstream, the home crashed into the

Easton-Phillipsburg free bridge. The

impact sheared the roof from the home

and the remainder floated under the

bridge.

The Lehigh River at Walnutport

(Northampton County) was above its 8

foot flood stage from 904 a.m. EDT on

the 18th through 102 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 12.32 feet at 245

p.m. EDT on the 18th. Farther

downstream the Lehigh River in

Bethlehem was above its 16 foot flood

stage from 212 p.m. EDT through 1156

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

18.79 feet at 700 p.m. EDT. Farther

downstream, the Lehigh River at Glendon

was above its 19 foot flood stage from

1118 a.m. EDT on the 18th through 620

a.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested at

19.82 feet at 415 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

The Monocacy Creek at Bethlehem was

above its 4.5 foot flood stage from

540 a.m. EDT on the 18th through 752

a.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested at

9.67 feet at 2 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

Along the Delaware River at Belvidere,

the river was above its 22 foot flood

stage from 1101 p.m. EDT on the 18th

through 842 p.m. EDT on the 19th. It

crested at 24.83 feet at 915 a.m. EDT

on the 19th. Farther downstream, the

Delaware River at the Easton-

Phillipsburg Bridge was above its 22

foot flood stage from 331 p.m. EDT on

the 18th through 1126 a.m. EDT on the

20th. It crested at 33.45 feet at 8

a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Storm totals included 7.25 inches in

Bethlehem, 6.88 inches in Forks

Township and 4.70 inches in Easton.

Montgomery County

Northwest Portion Flash Flood

PAZ068

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacted with an approaching cold

front and dropped very heavy rain

across Montgomery County, especially

in the northwestern half of the county.

The heaviest rain fell between 3 a.m.

EDT and Noon EDT on the 18th. There was

widespread poor drainage flooding as

well as flooding of many of the streams

in the northwest part of the county.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 1.5 and 5.0 inches.

Runoff from the heavy rain within the

county and also upstream led to

flooding along the Schuylkill River.

The West Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Hillegass was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 1018 a.m. EDT through 231

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

5.76 feet at Noon EDT. The East Branch

of the Perkiomen Creek at Schwenksville

was above its 7 foot flood stage from

657 a.m. EDT through 1017 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. It crested at 10.35 feet at

830 a.m. EDT on the 18th. The main stem

of the Perkiomen Creek at East

Greenville was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 742 a.m. through 529 p.m.

EDT on the 18th. It crested at 7.07

feet at 10 a.m. EDT. Farther

downstream, the Perkiomen Creek at

Graterford was above its 11 foot flood

stage from 942 a.m. EDT through 1043

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

14.8 feet at 330 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

The Manatawny Creek at Pottstown was

above its 6 foot flood stage from 1103

a.m. EDT through 10 p.m. EDT on the

18th. It crested at 7.41 feet at 7 p.m.

EDT. The Schuylkill River at Pottstown

was above its 13 foot flood stage from

714 p.m. EDT on the 18th through 1218

p.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested at

14.59 feet at 530 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Storm totals included 4.50 inches in

Pottstown, 4.00 inches in Hatfield and

Green Lane, 3.78 inches in Palm and

3.12 inches at the Pottstown Airport.

Bucks County

Northwest Portion Flash Flood

PAZ069

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy in

the upper part of Bucks County during

the first half of the day on the 18th.

Very heavy rain also fell in the upper

and middle sections of the Delaware

River Valley. The runoff from both

produced widespread poor drainage and

creek flooding in the upper part of

Bucks County and the worst flooding

along the Delaware River since 1955.

President George W. Bush declared Bucks

County a disaster area. Municipalities

and roadways along the Delaware River

and the Lehigh County were hardest hit

and they included Quakertown,

Springfield, Durham, Nockamixon,

Bridgeton, Tinicum, Solebury, Upper

Makefeld, Yardley and Lower Makefield.

Around 500 homes and 29 businesses were

damaged. Damage was estimated at 25

million dollars.

The Delaware River at Riegelsville was

above its 22 foot flood stage from 522

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 1025 a.m.

EDT on the 20th. It crested at 30.95

feet at 1115 a.m. EDT on the 19th. The

Delaware River at Frenchtown (Hunterdon

County) was above its 16 foot flood

stage from 6 p.m. EDT on the 18th

through 927 a.m. EDT on the 20th. It

crested at 20.7 feet at 1 p.m. EDT on

the 19th. The Delaware River at

Stockton (Hunterdon County) was above

its 18 foot flood stage from Midnight

EDT on the 19th through 836 a.m. EDT on

the 20th. It crested at 22.5 feet at 3

p.m. EDT on the 19th. The Delaware

River at Washington’s Crossing was

above its 20 foot flood stage from 416

p.m. EDT through 828 p.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 20.12 feet at 5

p.m. EDT. The Delaware River at Trenton

(Mercer County) was above its 20 foot

flood stage from 148 a.m. EDT on the

19th through 1245 p.m. EDT on the 20th.

It crested at 23.39 feet at 731 p.m.

EDT on the 19th. Flood stage is also

20 feet.

The East Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Dublin was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 1242 a.m. EDT through 249

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

6.08 feet at 130 p.m. EDT.

Specific storm totals included 5.97

inches in Springtown, 3.70 inches in

Sellersville, 3.27 inches in Perkasie

and 3.06 inches in Fricks.

Delaware County

Countywide Flash Flood

PAZ070

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacted with an approaching cold

front and dropped very heavy rain

across Delaware County in the morning

and into the early afternoon on the

18th. Heavier rain fell upstream in

Chester County and the runoff affected

the Brandywine Creek. Doppler Radar

storm estimates ranged between 1 and 4

inches with the heaviest amounts along

the Chester County border. Chester

Creek at Chester was above its 5 foot

flood stage from 1242 p.m. through 249

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

8.58 feet at 300 p.m. EDT. The Crum

Creek at Newtown Square was above its

6 foot flood stage from 906 a.m.

through 518 p.m. EDT on the 18th. It

crested at 8.38 feet at 215 p.m. EDT.

The Brandywine Creek at Chadds Ford was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 552

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 416 a.m.

EDT on the 19th. It crested at 9.86

feet at 1212 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Berks County

Countywide Flash Flood

PAZ060

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from late in the evening on the

17th until around 10 a.m. EDT on the

18th in Berks County. Doppler Radar

storm total estimates ranged between

2.5 inches and 5 inches across most of

the county. This caused poor drainage

and creek flooding and also Schuylkill

River flooding.

The Schuylkill River at

Berne was above its 12 foot flood stage

from 918 a.m. EDT on the 18th through

1236 a.m. EDT on the 19th. It crested

at 15.05 feet at 345 p.m. EDT on the

18th. Farther downstream, the

Schuylkill River at Reading was above

foot flood stage from 146 p.m. EDT on

the 18th through 528 a.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 16.13 feet at 11

p.m. EDT on the 18th. The Manatawny

Creek at Spangville was above its 6

foot flood stage from 923 a.m. EDT

through 838 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

It crested at 7.5 feet at 330 p.m. EDT.

Storm totals included 4.18 inches in

Reading and 3.57 inches in Hamburg.

Carbon County

Countywide Flash Flood

PAZ054

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from late in the evening on the

17th until around 10 a.m. EDT on the

18th. Storm totals average around 5

inches and caused poor drainage, creek

and river flooding throughout Carbon

County. Hardest hit were Palmerton

Borough and Penn Forest and Kidder

Townships. President George W. Bush

declared the county a disaster area.

Eighty-nine homes and four businesses

were damaged. Seven public buildings

and structures were damaged including

the Henning Road Bridge over Mud Run

Creek.

In Palmerton Borough, the flooding

Aquashicola Creek flooded ten homes

into their first floor. The Aquashicola

Creek at Palmerton was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 937 a.m. EDT on the

18th through 104 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

It crested at 12.17 feet at 2 p.m. EDT

on the 18th. The Lehigh River at

Lehighton was above its 10 foot flood

stage from 940 a.m. EDT through 522

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

12.04 feet at 100 p.m. EDT. The

Pohopoco Creek at Parryville was above

its 5.5 foot flood stage from 1110 a.m.

EDT on the 19th through 1051 a.m. EDT

on the 21st. It crested at 5.71 feet at

1230 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

Storm totals included 6.03 inches at

the Wilkes-Barre Scranton Airport in

Luzerne County and 4.55 inches in

Lehighton.

Chester County

Countywide Flash Flood

PAZ067

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

to fall from during the first half of

the day on the 18th. Most storm totals

average between 2.5 and 4.0 inches and

caused widespread poor drainage and

creek flooding throughout Chester

County.

The French Creek at Phoenixville was

above its 8 foot flood stage from 1119

a.m. through 645 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

It crested at 9.51 feet at 230 p.m.

EDT. The Valley Creek at Valley Forge

was above its 7 foot flood stage from

938 a.m. EDT through 509 p.m. EDT on

the 18th. It crested at 8.63 feet at

330 p.m. EDT. The White Clay Creek at

Strickersville was above its 9.5 foot

flood stage from 327 p.m. EDT through

451 p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

9.72 feet at 415 p.m. EDT. The East

Branch of the Brandywine Creek at

Downingtown was above its 7 foot flood

stage from 1137 a.m. EDT through 713

p.m. EDT on the 18th. It crested at

10.11 feet at 4 p.m. EDT. Flood stage

is 7 feet. The West Branch of the

Brandywine Creek at Honey Brook was

above its 7 foot flood stage from 1222

p.m. EDT through 538 p.m. EDT on the

18th. It crested at 8.01 feet at 245

p.m. EDT. The main stem of the

Brandywine Creek at Chadds Ford was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 552

p.m. EDT on the 18th through 416 a.m.

EDT on the 19th. It crested at 9.86

feet at 1212 a.m. EDT on the 19th. The

Schuylkill River at Pottstown

(Montgomery County) was above its 13

foot flood stage from 714 p.m. EDT on

the 18th through 1218 p.m. EDT on the

19th. It crested at 14.59 feet at 530

a.m. EDT.

Storm totals included 3.93 inches in

Exton, 3.40 inches in West Chester,

2.82 inches in Honey Brook and 2.78

inches in East Nantmeal Township.

PAZ071

Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

interacting with a slowly moving cold

front caused widespread very heavy rain

in the upstream areas in the Schuylkill

River Basin. Runoff from the heavy rain

led to flooding along the Schuylkill

River within the city from the evening

of the 18th into the early morning of

the 19th. The Schuylkill River in

Philadelphia was above its 11 foot

flood stage from 736 p.m. EDT on the

18th through 311 a.m. EDT on the 19th.

It crested at 11.33 feet at 1030 p.m.

EDT on the 18th. The heavy runoff along

the Schuylkill river also caused the

Wissahickon Creek at its mouth (where

it merges with the Schuylkill River) to

briefly (5 minutes) rise above its 5

foot flood stage and crested at 5.09

feet at 330 p.m. EDT on the 18th.

PAZ070-070>071-071

Astronomical High Tide

The combination of runoff from the

heavy rain that fell upstream in the

Delaware River and the incoming high

tide produced minor tidal flooding

along the Delaware River and tidal

parts of its tributaries during the

late afternoon high tide on both the

19th and 20th. The highest tides

occurred during the afternoon of the

19th. The Delaware River at Pier 12 in

Philadelphia reached a height of 8.96

feet above mean lower low water at 518

p.m. EDT on the 19th. Minor tidal

flooding begins at 8.2 feet above mean

lower low water.

Chester County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 3 and 8 inches with the

highest amounts toward the Delaware

County border. Widespread poor

drainage, stream and creek flooding

occurred. Many roads were flooded and

closed and numerous water rescues were

performed. Shelters were opened because

of flooding along the East Branch of

the Brandywine Creek in Downingtown.

The East Branch of the Brandywine Creek

at Downingtown was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 636 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 744 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 12.83 feet at 1101 p.m.

EDT on the 28th. The West Branch of the

Brandywine Creek at Honey Brook was

above its 7 foot flood stage from 1211

a.m. EDT through 327 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 7.21 feet at 130

a.m. EDT. The main stem of the

Brandywine Creek at Chadds Ford was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 619

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 535 p.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 13.62

feet at 243 a.m. EDT on the 29th. The

French Creek at Phoenixville was above

its 8 foot flood stage from 815 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 328 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 9.11 feet at

1115 p.m. EDT on the 28th. The Red Clay

Creek at Kenneth Square was above its

7.5 foot flood stage from 608 p.m. EDT

on the 28th through 210 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 9.65 feet at 815

p.m. EDT on the 28th. The White Clay

Creek at Strickersville was above its

9.5 foot flood stage from 552 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 356 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 14.07 feet at

1115 p.m. EDT on the 28th. The Valley

Creek at Valley Forge was above its 7

foot flood stage from 635 p.m. EDT on

the 28th through 504 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 10.91 feet at 10

a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 9.00 inches in

Avondale, 8.97 inches in West Chester,

8.00 inches in Uwchlan Township, 6.63

inches in Strickersville, 6.50 inches

in Downingtown, 5.30 inches in Valley

Forge, 4.57 inches in Modena, 3.76

inches in Glenmoore and 2.47 inches in

Honey Brook.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Delaware County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 3 and 8 inches with the

highest amounts toward the Chester

County border. Widespread poor

drainage, stream and creek flooding

occurred. Many roads were flooded and

closed and numerous water rescues were

performed. Evacuations occurred along

the Darby Creek in Darby Borough,

Marple Township and Upper Darby

Township. Darby Creek flooding also

affected Clifton Heights and

Collingdale. Flooding was also reported

along the Hermesprota Creek in Sharon

Hill.

The Chester Creek at Chester was above

its 8 foot flood stage from 646 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 830 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 16.33 feet at

215 a.m. EDT on the 29th. Crum Creek at

Newtown Square was above its 6 foot

flood stage from 618 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 345 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 11.14 feet at 930 p.m.

EDT on the 28th. The Brandywine Creek

at Chadds Ford was above its 9 foot

flood stage from 619 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 535 p.m. EDT on the 29th.

It crested at 13.62 feet at 243 a.m.

EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 7.84 inches in

Chadds Ford and 5.49 inches in Upper

Providence. A SKYWARN Spotter reported

7 inches of rain in Havertown before

his rain gage overflowed.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Chester County

West Chester Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

A series of severe thunderstorms

knocked down several large tree limbs

and wires in the southeastern part of

Chester County.

Montgomery County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 3 and 8 inches with

the highest amounts toward

Philadelphia. Widespread poor drainage

and creek flooding occurred, especially

in the lower part of the county. Many

roads were flooded and closed and

numerous water rescues were performed.

Boats were used to rescue stranded

motorists.

The East Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Schwenksville was above its 7 foot

flood stage from 731 p.m. EDT on the

28th through 759 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Along the main stem of the Perkiomen

Creek, at Graterford, the creek was

above its 11 foot flood stage from 1013

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 738 a.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 12.5

feet at 4 a.m. EDT on the 29th. Gaged

sites of the Pennypack and Wissahickon

Creeks within Philadelphia all flooded.

Storm totals included 8.22 inches in

Blue Bell, 7.90 inches in Ambler, 6.70

inches in Norristown, 6.28 inches in

Wynnewood, 6.15 inches in King of

Prussia, 6.11 inches in Hatboro, 4.75

inches in Pottstown, 4.29 inches in

Eagleville, 4.26 inches in Willow

Grove, 3.26 inches in Green Lane and

3.04 inches in Palm.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Bucks County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 3 and 8 inches with

the highest amounts toward

Philadelphia. Widespread poor drainage

and creek flooding occurred, especially

in the lower part of the county. Many

roads were flooded and closed and

numerous water rescues were performed.

The East Branch of the Perkiomen Creek

at Dublin was above its 5 foot flood

stage from 729 p.m. EDT through 1105

p.m. EDT on the 28th. It crested at

6.49 feet at 848 p.m. EDT. The Little

Neshaminy Creek at Neshaminy was above

its 8 foot flood stage from 650 p.m.

EDT on the 28th through 236 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. It crested at 9.91 feet at 11

p.m. EDT on the 28th. The main stem of

the Neshaminy Creek at Langhorne was

above its 9 foot flood stage from 829

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 313 p.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 15.21

feet at 630 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 6.50 inches in

Neshaminy Falls, 6.08 inches in

Morrisville, 5.88 inches in Furlong,

5.63 inches in Levittown, 5.06 inches

in Doylestown, 4.38 inches in

Sellersville, 4.22 inches in Fricks and

3.48 inches in Springtown.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Delaware County

Radnor Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

A severe thunderstorm pulled down

several trees and wires in Radnor

Township.

Philadelphia County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

averaged between 4 and 8 inches with

the highest amounts in the northwest

part of Philadelphia. Widespread poor

drainage and creek flooding occurred

throughout the city. All roads near

creeks flooded. Many roads were flooded

and closed and numerous water rescues

were performed. The heaviest rain

coincided with the evening commute

home. A 26-year-old woman drowned when

she was swept off her feet while

waiting to board a SEPTA bus in the

East Falls section of the city. The

flood waters carried her downhill and

she became trapped her under a parked

pickup truck where in spite of the

efforts of six people, she drowned. The

heavy rain also caused several

abandoned buildings to collapse.

The Frankford Creek at Castor Avenue

was above its 7 foot flood stage from

536 p.m. EDT on the 28th through 216

a.m. EDT on the 29th. It crested at

13.91 feet at 730 p.m. EDT on the 28th.

The Wissahickon Creek at its mouth with

the Schuylkill River was above its 5

foot flood stage from 538 p.m. EDT on

the 28th through 1118 a.m. EDT on the

29th. It crested at 10.14 feet at 2

a.m. EDT on the 29th. The Pennypack

Creek at the Rhawn Street Bridge was

above its 7 foot flood stage from 624

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 839 a.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 12.63

feet at 3 a.m. EDT on the 29th. The

Schuylkill River at Philadelphia was

above its 11 foot flood stage from 1136

p.m. EDT on the 28th through 1013 a.m.

EDT on the 29th. It crested at 11.86

feet at 4 a.m. EDT on the 29th.

Storm totals included 9.12 inches in

Roxborough, 5.98 inches at the Fairmont

Dam, 5.77 inches at the Northeast

Philadelphia Airport and 3.63 inches at

the Philadelphia International Airport.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further. ?260U

Berks County

Leesport to Flash Flood

Birdsboro

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused torrential

downpours to occur during the late

afternoon and evening of the 28th.

Doppler Radar storm total estimates

ranged between 2 and 5 inches with the

highest amounts toward the Chester

County border. Poor drainage, stream

and creek flooding occurred, mainly in

the southeast quarter of the county.

Many roads were flooded. The Manatawny

Creek at Spangville was briefly above

its 6 foot flood stage from 1235 a.m.

through 235 a.m. EDT on the 29th. It

crested at 6.06 feet at 130 a.m. EDT on

the 29th. Storm totals included 3.44

inches in Hamburg, 2.88 inches in

Bethel, 2.82 inches in Berne, 2.64

inches in Reading.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

Lehigh County

Countywide Flash Flood

Northampton County

Countywide Flash Flood

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

interacting with two frontal boundaries

in the region caused bands of heavier

rain to fall across the Lehigh Valley

from the late morning through the

evening of the 28th in the Lehigh

Valley. Doppler Radar storm total

estimates averaged between 2 and 4

inches with the highest amounts toward

the Montgomery and Bucks County

borders. Widespread poor drainage and

scattered stream and creek flooding

occurred. Many roads were flooded and

some were closed. The flooding was not

nearly as severe as it was with the

remnants of Hurricane Ivan. In

Northampton County, roads were closed

in Forks Township, Palmer Township and

Wilson Borough.

Storm totals included 4.40 inches in

Orefield (Lehigh County), 3.90 inches

in Forks Township (Northampton County)

and 2.82 inches at the Lehigh Valley

International Airport.

The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

tracked across Georgia and North

Carolina and then northeast across the

central Delmarva Peninsula and extreme

southern New Jersey. A frontal boundary

that passed through the region of the

26th stalled offshore and came back as

a warm front on the 28th. This front

stalled close to the Interstate 95

corridor. The remnants of Jeanne

tracked along this frontal boundary. At

the same time a cold front approaching

from the Saint Lawrence Valley on the

morning of the 28th helped wring the

tropical moisture over the area even

further.

PAZ070>071

Astronomical High Tide

The combination of the runoff from the

heavy rain from the remnants of

Hurricane Jeanne and the spring tides

associated with the full moon caused

minor tidal flooding during the high

tide cycles on the Pennsylvania side of

the Delaware River and tidal sections

of its tributaries on the 30th. The

highest tides occurred with the high

tide during the early morning on the

30th. That high tide reached 8.57 feet

above mean lower low water at Pier 12

in Philadelphia. Minor tidal flooding

begins at 8.2 feet above mean lower low

water.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northeast

Bradford County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 3 to 7

inches fell from the 16th to the 18th.

The rain was due to remnants from

hurricane Ivan. All creeks and streams

went out of their banks causing major

problems. Early on the 18th more than

half of the roads in the county were

closed, prompting a state of emergency

to be issued. River flooding also

occurred along the entire length of the

Susquehanna River. 50 homes, 5

businesses, and dozens of roads and

bridges were damaged. At least 20 water

rescues occurred.

Susquehanna County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 4.5 to 7

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Most creeks and streams went out

of their banks. Over 300 homes were

affected by flooding with 132 having

minor damage, 21 having major damage,

and 4 being totally destroyed. 27

businesses were affected with 19 having

minor damage and 8 having major damage.

Dozens of roads and bridges were

damaged. About 750 people had to

evacuate their homes. Their was

flooding where there had never been any

before. One major bridge was destroyed.

Wyoming County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 5 to 7

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. 500 homes and 30 businesses were

damaged. 50 water rescues were

reported. The hardest hit areas were

Tunkhannock, Eaton Township, Nicholson,

Exeter, Meshoppen, and Laceyville. In

Nicholson, the Shadow Brook did major

damage. The county declared a state of

emergency and closed all roads to the

public early Saturday morning. In

addition the Susquehanna River had

major flooding.

PAZ038

Flood

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Waverly, NY and Sayre, PA rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet early

on the 18th, crested at 18.8 feet at

11:30 PM on the 18th, then slowly fell

to be below its flood stage late

morning on the 20th. Rainfall amounts

were 2 to 5 inches which started on the

16th and continued into the 18th. This

rain was from the remnants of hurricane

Ivan.

Luzerne County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 4.0 to 6.5

inches caused major flash flooding.

Almost all of the streams and creeks

came out of their banks. In addition,

the Susquehanna River also caused major

flooding. Solomon’s Creek in Wilkes-

Barre Township was the first to flood.

This creek caused businesses to close

and people to evacuate. 4000 homes and

dozens of businesses were damaged.

Mercy Hospital had damage to its lower

levels. The hardest hit areas were

Shickshinny, Moconqua, Plains, and

Plymouth Township.

Wayne County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 5 to 7

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Most creeks and streams went out

of their banks. In addition, the

Delaware and Lackawaxen Rivers had

major flooding. At least 1000 homes

were damaged, 10 of which were

completely destroyed. The county

Emergency Management Agency had damage

to their office in the basement of the

County Courthouse. Dozens of bridges

were closed with 2 bridges destroyed.

There were at least 50 roads that were

damaged and /or closed due to the

flooding.

Lackawanna County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 4.5 to 7.5

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. All creeks and streams were out

of their banks. In addition, the

Lackawanna River had major flooding.

Almost 1000 homes and over 30

businesses were damaged. A 40 foot deep

sinkhole developed on Pittston Avenue.

PAZ043

Flood

The Tunkhannock Creek at Tunkhannock

rose above its flood stage of 11 feet

early on the 18th, crested at 19.7 feet

at 3:30 PM on the 18th, then fell below

its flood stage around midnight on the

19th. This was the second highest crest

on record. Rainfall amounts were 4 to

7 inches which started on the 16th and

continued into the 18th. This rain was

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PAZ044

Flood

The Lackawanna River at Old Forge rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet early

on the 18th, crested at 16.7 feet at

3:30 PM on the 18th, then fell below

its flood stage in the evening also on

the 18th. This was the third highest

crest on record. Rainfall amounts were

4 to 7 inches which started on the 16th

and continued into the 18th. This rain

was from the remnants of hurricane

Ivan.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northeast

PAZ072

Flood

The Lackawaxen River at Hawley rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet the

morning of the 18th, crested at 14.5

feet at 5:15 PM on the 18th, then fell

below the flood stage early in the

morning on the 19th. Rainfall amounts

were 4 to 7 inches due to the remnants

of hurricane Ivan. The rain fell from

the 16th to the 18th. The crest was the

fifth highest recorded at Hawley.

PAZ048

Flood

The Lackawaxen River at Hawley rose

above its flood stage of 11 feet the

morning of the 18th, crested at 14.5

feet at 5:15 PM on the 18th, then fell

below the flood stage early in the

morning on the 19th. Rainfall amounts

were 4 to 7 inches due to the remnants

of hurricane Ivan. The rain fell from

the 16th to the 18th. The crest was the

fifth highest recorded at Hawley.

PAZ038

Flood

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Towanda rose above its flood

stage of 16 feet early on the 18th,

crested at 22.3 feet at 7:16 PM on the

18th, then slowly fell to be below its

flood stage early evening on the 19th.

Rainfall amounts were 2 to 5 inches

which started on the 16th and continued

into the 18th. This rain was from the

remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PAZ043

Flood

The Susquehanna River at Meshoppen rose

above its flood stage of 27 feet early

on the 18th, crested at 35.3 feet at

6:15 PM on the 18th, then slowly fell

to be below its flood stage early in

the morning of the 20th. This was the

third highest crest on record. Rainfall

amounts were 4 to 7 inches which start-

ed on the 16th and continued into the

18th. This rain was from the remnants

of hurricane Ivan.

Pike County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rain with amounts of 3.5 to 6

inches caused flash flooding. The rain

which fell from the 16th to the 18th

was due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. Most creeks and streams went out

of their banks. In addition, the Dela-

ware and Lackawaxen Rivers had major

flooding. About a dozen rescues were

performed. Over 100 roads were closed.

The entire borough of Newfoundland in

western Pike County was evacuated. 6

bridges were closed. 2 businesses were

closed.

PAZ040

Flood

The Delaware River at Callicoon, NY

(near Abrahamsville, PA) rose above its

flood stage of 12 feet the morning of

the 18th, crested at 17.3 feet at 4:45

PM on the 18th, then fell below the

flood stage the morning of the 19th.

Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7 inches due

to the remnants of hurricane Ivan. The

rain fell from the 16th to the 18th.

This was the highest crest on record by

about a foot at the river gage at

Callicoon.

PAZ048

Flood

The Delaware River at Barryville, NY

(near Shohola, PA) went above its flood

stage of 17 feet the morning of the

18th, crested at 24.1 feet at 3:15 PM

EST on the 18th, then fell back below

the flood stage late morning on the

19th. Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7

inches due to the remnants of hurricane

Ivan. The rain fell from the 16th to

the 18th. This was the second highest

crest on record at Barryville. The

highest crest was in 1955.

PAZ047

Flood

The north branch of the Susquehanna

River at Wilkes-Barre rose above its

flood stage of 22 feet midday on the

18th, crested at 35.0 feet at 1:00 AM

on the 19th, then slowly fell to be

below its flood stage midday on the

20th. This was the third highest crest

on record. Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7

inches which started on the 16th and

continued into the 18th. This rain was

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PAZ048

Flood

The Delaware River at Port Jervis, NY

(near Matamoras, PA) rose above its

flood stage of 18 feet during the

afternoon on the 18th, crested at 19.5

feet at 4:45 PM on the 18th, then fell

below its flood stage early in the

morning of the 19th. This was the fifth

highest crest on record. Rainfall

amounts were 4 to 7 inches which start-

ed on the 16th and continued into the

18th. This rain was from the remnants

of hurricane Ivan.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northeast

PAZ048

Flood

The Delaware River at Montague, NJ

(near Milford, PA) rose above its flood

stage of 25 feet during the afternoon

on the 18th, crested at 28.4 feet at

10:15 PM on the 18th, then fell below

its flood stage the morning of the

19th. Rainfall amounts were 4 to 7

inches which started on the 16th and

continued into the 18th. This rain was

from the remnants of hurricane Ivan.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northwest

PAZ003

Flood

One to three inches of rain fell on

Crawford County during the afternoon

and evening hours. This rain was

associated with the remnants of Tropi-

cal Storm Frances. Runoff from the rain

caused lowland flooding to begin just

after sunset. This flooding gradually

worsened as the evening progressed. Re-

ports of street and basement flooding

were common.

Crawford County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rains associated with the rem-

nants of Tropical Storm Frances caused

extensive flooding in Crawford County.

Light rain associated with this storm

began falling early on September 8th.

Rainfall rates increased during the

evening hours as the low approached

Northwest Pennsylvania. Rainfall totals

through midnight on the 9th were as

high as 4 to 5 inches, especially in

southern Crawford County. The heavy

rain continued through early morning

hours and finally ended around daybreak

after another two to four inches of

rain had fallen. Storm total rainfall

amounts included: around 4.0 inches at

Conneaut Lake; 4.20 inches at Titus-

ville; 5.07 inches at the Meadville

Airport; 5.57 inches at Saegertown, 6.0

inches at Meadville; 7.8 inches at

Springboro and 10.0 inches at Cambridge

Springs. This rain caused rapid rises

in area streams and creeks. Evacuations

in the county began just after 11 p.m.

after Crooked Creek left it’s banks

near Adamsville and Hartstown. The

flooding worsened during the early

morning hours with many road washouts

and evacuations reported. Around 3

a.m., two dozen residents were evacua-

ted from homes along Conneaut Creek in

Conneautville with some of the people

rescued from second floor windows.

Around 30 homes (most along West Street

in this area were heavily damaged by

the flooding. Nearby, seven people had

to be rescued from their vehicle after

flood waters washed if off the road.

Church Run, Sugar Creek and Oil Creek

left their banks in the southeast

corner of the county damaging many

homes and washing out several roads.

Several people had to be rescued from

homes along Shenango Creek in South

Shenango Township around 4 a.m. In

Meadville, French Creek rapidly rose

during the early morning hours. Many

people had to be evacuated from homes

in the city’s Fifth Ward. North of

Meadville, flooding along Cussewago

Creek washed out a road causing a car

to leave the road. The driver was later

rescued. Evacuations and extensive

flood damage were also reported in the

Cambridge Springs, Linesville and

Springboro areas. Over 1,200 homes in

Crawford County were damaged by flood-

ing caused by Frances. At least several

dozen of these were either destroyed or

heavily damaged. Damage to roads in the

county topped $2 million. See the flood

description for September 9th through

the 11th for information on the subse-

quent flooding along French Creek in

Meadville.

PAZ001>002

Flood

Two to four inches of rain fell on Erie

County on September 8th through the

early morning hours of the 9th. This

rain was associated with the remnants

of Tropical Storm Frances. Runoff from

the rain caused lowland flooding to

begin during the evening hours. This

flooding gradually worsened as the eve-

ning progressed. Reports of street and

basement flooding were common,

especially in the southern portion of

the county.

PENNSYLVANIA, Northwest

Erie County

Countywide Flash Flood

Heavy rains associated with the rem-

nants of Tropical Storm Frances persis-

ted during the early morning hours of

September 9th. The rain eventually

ended around daybreak. Storm total

rainfall amounts from early on the 8th

through the 9th generally ranged from

3 to 6 inches in Erie County. Some

totals included: 3.5 inches at North

East; 3.59 inches at Erie International

Airport; 4.32 inches at Union City;

4.75 inches at Corry; 5.0 inches on the

east side of Eric; 5.4 inches at

Cranesville; 6.5 inches at Edinboro and

7.44 inches at Franklin Center. Runoff

from this rain caused extensive flash

flooding in Erie County during the

morning hours of the 9th. Evacuations

began in the Edinboro and McKean areas

around 2:30 a.m. The flooding in Edin-

boro was particularly severe. Water

overflowed a dam on Edinboro Lake in

the city. Hundreds of residents down-

stream of the dam, including students

at Edinboro University, were evacuated

because of the possibility of a dam

failure. Cottages just south of the dam

were reported to be completely sub-

merged. A bridge just south of the city

on State Route 99 was washed out. A

second bridge was destroyed north of

Edinboro in Washington Township. A

landslide wiped out around 500 feet of

State Route 5 in Fairview Township

between 3 and 4 a.m. Cars and buildings

along State Route 5 were damaged by the

debris. Elk Creek went into flood

around the same time in Fairview for-

cing several dozen people to be evacua-

ted along State Route 98. In Mill Creek

Township, residents were evacuated from

two mobile home parks that had flood

waters up to three feet deep. Signifi-

cant flooding was also reported in the

Albion and Corry areas. Four vehicles

were stranded in flood waters up to

four feet deep east of Erie along In-

terstate 90. A total of 20 roads were

either washed out or damaged in the

county. Hundreds of homes in the county

were damaged by the flooding. Several

of these were damaged enough to be

declared destroyed.

PAZ001>003

Strong Wind

The remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

moved northeast across the Upper Ohio

Valley on September 8th. Gusty norther-

ly winds behind this storm caused

damage in extreme northwestern

Pennsylvania. A peak gust of 47 mph was

measured at Eric International Airport.

Many trees were downed in both Erie and

Crawford Counties. A couple homes in

Erie County sustained minor wind

damage.

PAZ003

Flood

Runoff from heavy rains associated with

the remnants of Tropical Storm Frances

caused French Creek in Meadville to

rise to it’s highest level in 45 years.

The creek climbed above the flood stage

of 14 feet around daybreak on September

9th. The river crested at 16.36 feet

around 10 a.m on the 10th. This level

was the highest non-ice affected crest

on record. The river finally went below

flood stage at midday on the 11th.

Damage along the creek was extensive.

Meadville’s Fifth Ward was especially

hard hit with hundreds of homes and

businesses damaged. The flooding was

particularly bad along Spring Street,

Lincoln Avenue and Columbia Street. All

but one road leading into Meadville had

to be closed because of the flooding.

Flood waters in some neighborhoods were

as much as 4 to 5 feet deep. Over 1,200

homes were damaged in Crawford County

from the flash flooding on 9th and the

flooding along French Creek the succes-

sive days. In Meadville alone, nine

mobile homes were destroyed with 34

houses and five businesses sustaining

major damage. See the Flash Flood event

description of September 9th for more

damage estimates.

PAZ001>003

Flood

For the second time in a week, exten-

sive urban and lowland flooding was

reported across Erie and Crawford

Counties. The remnants of Ivan moved

across the Ohio Valley on September

17th. A stationary front extending

northeast from the low caused heavy

rains to develop and fall on most of

northwestern Pennsylvania from late on

September 16th through the daylight

hours of the 17th. Rainfall totals for

the storm in Crawford County included:

1.36 inches at Cambridge Springs; 1.77

inches at the Meadville Airport and

2.00 inches at Union City. In Erie

County rain totals were: 1.30 inches at

Edinboro; 1.44 inches at Erie Interna-

tional Airport and 2.1 inches at

Cranesville. Runoff from this rain

caused many streams and creeks to leave

their banks flooding many low lying

areas. Many roads had to be closed be-

cause of the flooding. At Meadville,

French Creek rose rapidly but crested

below the flood stage of 14 feet.

Hundreds of homes in both Erie and

Crawford Counties sustained damage from

lowland or basement flooding.

PENNSYLVANIA, West

PAZ020

Flood

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Frances began early on the 8th and end-

ed by dawn on the 9th. By 540 PM EDT on

8th, many roads were closed by flooding

countywide, including Center and Chip-

pewa Townships. By 1030 PM on 8th, many

roads flooded, especially in Darlington

and Hopewell from Connoquenessing

Creek. At this time, the Hopewell shop-

ping plaza began to flood. By 9 AM EDT

on 9th, in Bridgewater, 80 boats broke

lose from their dock. Later, nearly 250

boats were seen piled up against a

bridge. At time unknown, there were mud

slides on Rte 18 in Potter Twp, and Rte

68 near Shippingport. By the end of the

storm, 300 homes were damaged across

the county; 35 roads were flooded, and

39 towns were flooded. Total rain: 4″

in Beaver. (FRANCES)

PENNSYLVANIA, West

PAZ029

Flood

By 750 PM EDT, 30 basements were flood-

ed countywide, some to a depth of 2

feet. In Hanover Twp, North Kings Creek

Rd was washed out in part (time

unknown). Both Hickory and Eight-four

reported 2.6 inches of rain. (FRANCES)

PAZ021

Flood

By 7 PM EDT on 8th, Wexford Run flooded

in Ross Twp; Babcock Blvd flooded in

McCandless Twp; creeks were flooding

Shaler Twp; Streets Run Rd was flooded

in Baldwin. By 948 PM, people were

being evacuated in Bell Acres because

of flooding after 6 inches of rain. By

1146 PM EDT on 8th, parts of Sewickley

were being evacuated. About 1 AM EDT on

9th, in Etna, Pine Creek began to flood

and 50 people were evacuated. Many

basements flooded. Other 24-hr rain-

falls: 4.5″ Westview; 4.2″ Moon Twp;

3.6″ Pittsburgh Airport (record 1 day

rainfall). Most small stream flooding

ended by 8 AM EDT on the 9th, but the

Allegheny River at Acmetonia (C W Bill

Young Dam) rose to the flood stage of

17 ft for a few minutes around 6 AM EDT

on the 10th. The remnants of Frances

passed over the Pittsburgh airport at

230 AM EDT on the 9th. (FRANCES)

PAZ014

Flood

Basement flooding began at 718 PM EDT

on 8th. At 827 PM, Dinnerbell Rd flood-

ed in Saxonburg. By 10 PM, evacuations

began west of Butler. By 8 AM on 9th,

roads were still closed near Butler;

and people were evacuated in Evans City

and Harmony. There was flooding in

Jackson Twp and 3 other townships. Con-

noquenessing Creek flooded Zelienople

(time unknown). In total, 30 roads were

closed by flood. Total rain: 3.2″ in

Sarver. (FRANCES)

PAZ032

Flood

Basements flooded in Redstone and

Uniontown. Chalkhill reported 2.4

inches of rain. (FRANCES)

PAZ008

Flood

By 718 PM EDT on 8th, basements were

flooded in Cranberry. By 922 PM, Mercer

and Addams Roads flooded in Polk;

Cherry Tree Rd and Rte 417 flooded near

Franklin; and Rte 8 north of Oil City

was flooded. By 8 AM on the 9th, French

Creek and Sugar Creek were still out of

their banks northwest of Franklin; and

50 basements had been flooded through-

out the county. Total rain: 3.2″ in

Polk. (FRANCES)

PAZ007

Flood

At 730 PM EDT on 8th, State Rte 258 was

closed by flood near Mercer. As of 9 AM

on 9th, widespread flooding continued.

At Jamestown, 12 families were evacuat-

ed as a precaution because of a dam

(time unknown); the dam did not fail.

Total rain: 4 inches in Mercer. There

was a record flood on the Shenango

River at Transfer, which crested at

10.65 ft at 11 AM EDT on 9th (previous

record 10.47). (FRANCES)

PAZ013

Flood

By 859 PM EDT on 8th, several roads

were closed by flood near New Castle,

including Rtes 18 and 108. By 1145 PM,

numerous roads were flooded countywide;

and 30 people evacuated in North Beaver

Twp. By 9 AM EDT on 9th, flooding was

still widespread. In all, basements

flooded, 30 roads were flooded; 100

people evacuated, including 3 trailer

parks; one road washed away. There was

a record flood on Slippery Rock Creek

at Wurtemburg, which crested at 9.48 ft

at 11 PM EDT on 9th (previous record

8.09). (FRANCES)

PAZ015

Flood

At 132 AM EDT on 9th, Rte 208 flooded

near Shippenville; Huey Rd flooded 4

miles south of Sligo; and Rte 58 flood-

ed 6 miles west of Sligo. Some roads

were still flooded as of 8 AM EDT on

9th. Clarion River at Cooksburg (north-

east corner of Clarion Co) rose to

flood stage (13 ft) at 4 PM EDT on 9th;

crested at 13.4 at 6 PM on 9th; and

fell below flood stage 11 PM EDT on

9th. (FRANCES)

PAZ022

Flood

Allegheny River at Mosgrove rose to

flood stage (19 feet) briefly from 1145

PM EDT to 1159 PM EDT on the 9th.

(FRANCES)

PENNSYLVANIA, West

PAZ029

Flood

Rain from the remnants of Hurricane

Ivan started during the night of the

16th, and continued into the evening of

the 17th. At 115 PM EDT on 17th, roads

flooded in Canonsburg and Washington.

At 206 PM, there was widespread stream

flooding in Burgettstown, McDonald, and

Midway. At 217 PM, Houston flooded. 315

PM, Rtes 50 and 980 were flooded in

Avella and Cecil. 5 PM, mud slides in

Peters Twp, which had 4″ of rain. By 8

PM, Washington 5″ of rain. Total of 961

structures damaged or destroyed. Towns

hard hit: Avella, Burgettstown, Cecil,

Independence, Peters, Washington. Many

roads closed by mud slides or flooded.

Trailer park in Canton washed away.

Some trailer park residents were trap-

ped atop their mobile homes until dark,

asking for help by signaling SOS with

their flashlights. Other mobile homes

destroyed. Houses lifted off founda-

tions; railroad track beds gone;

several roads washed out, including Rte

19 near Houston; grocery store destroy-

ed. 11 boats, docked in Millsboro,

damaged. Total rain: 5.9″ in Canons-

burg. (IVAN)

PAZ021

Flood

At 124 PM EDT on 17th, road flooding

was reported 2 miles west of Pitts-

burgh. At 2 PM, Wexford flooded. At 218

PM, roads flooded in Oakdale. By 315

PM, Springdale Boro flooded; and Wex-

ford had 4.5″ of rain. . By 450 PM on

17th, in Tarentum, Mill St and Davidson

St were flooded; people evacuated. By 5

PM EDT on 17th, a state of emergency

was declared in 62 of the 130 municipa-

lities of Allegheny Co. South Park 6″

of rain 530 PM EDT 17th. At 6 PM, eva-

cuations in Tarentum. Widespread

flooding stranded thousands. A total of

9494 homes, 1060 businesses, 4 schools,

9 fire depts, 50 public buildings

damaged or destroyed. 140 boats broke

away and ran away down several rivers.

Some towns flooded, include: Bridge-

ville, Carnegie (by Chartiers Creek,

starting 415 PM), Etna, Millvale,

Sharpsburg, Shaler (by Little Pine

Creek), South Fayette, Tarentum, West

Deer. In Carnegie, 22 people were trap-

ped on a bridge as flood waters rose

and surrounded them. They tied them-

selves together and waited for rescue.

These roads partly washed out: Oakdale

Rd, Brocktown Rd, Boyds Run Rd, Dor-

rington Rd, Millers Run Rd, Noblestown

Rd. Total rain: 6.6 inches Franklin

Park, 6.4 Moon Twp. Pittsburgh Interna-

tional Airport set a new record for 1-

day rainfall of 5.95 inches. This broke

the old record (3.6″) set during

FRANCES on Sept 9. The Allegheny River

flooded, from Freeport to Sharpsburg,

from 11 PM EDT on 17th, until 5 AM EDT

on 19th. Here are city, flood stage,

crest, time: Freeport (flood stage 23

ft), 24.1 10 AM 18th; natrona (21 ft),

24.2 11 AM 18th; Acmetonia (17), 19.8 1

PM 18th; Sharpsburg (21), 22.1 4 PM EDT

18th. The Ohio River flooded, from

Pittsburgh to Dashields, from 10 PM on

17th, until 830 AM EDT on 19th. Pitts-

burgh (flood stage 25 ft), crested 31.0

at 4 PM EDT on 18th; Dashields (25 ft),

crested 29.9 at 8 PM on 18th. On the

Youghiogheny River, Sutersville rose

above flood stage (20 ft) 1 PM on 18th,

crested 20.7 at 430 PM, and fell below

flood stage at 730 PM EDT on 18th. The

remnants of Ivan made its closest

approach to Pittsburgh at 7 PM EDT on

the 17th. (IVAN)

M350U

PAZ007

Flood

At 2 PM EDT on 17th, Rte 18 was closed

by flood north of Greenville. Some

flooding continued beyond 8 PM EDT on

17th. (IVAN)

PAZ013

Flood

At 236 PM EDT on 17th, numerous roads

were flooded in Pulaski and Shenango

townships. By 845 PM, Ellwood City had

3.5 inches of rain. As of 6 PM on 18th,

many roads were still flooded, and

there were a few mud slides, including

one on Vanguard Rd in Perry Twp. Part

of Mohawk School Rd washed out. (IVAN)

PAZ014

Flood

At 245 PM EDT on 17th, flooding began

in Sarver. At 315 PM, Butler reported

3″ of rain. At 445 PM, flooding occur-

red in Butler. State of emergency

declared 5 PM EDT 17th. By 6 PM, 4.3″

of rain in Penn Twp. Harmony and Jack-

son townships hardest hit. Part of

Monroe Rd in Buffalo Twp washed out.

Total of 588 structures damaged or

destroyed. Record flooding along Conno-

quenessing Creek. Zelienople crested at

18.17 ft (previous record 16.66) Total

rain: 6.1″ at Butler Jr High School,

5.4″ in Sarvar. (IVAN)

PAZ030

Flood

By 3 PM EDT on 17th, 911 started

receiving flood calls. By 353 PM,

streams overflowed and flooded Vander-

grift. 417 PM, Greensburg Rd closed by

flood in New Kensington. 5 PM, Irwin

had 2.5″ of rain. 534 PM, roads flooded

1 mile southwest of Apollo. 548 PM, 1

house evacuated near a previously

damaged dam in Allegheny Twp; and New

Kensington 6″ of rain. 606 PM, Freeport

Rd flooded 1 mile south of Tarentum;

people being evacuated. Roads closed,

included Rte 30, 381, 982. Total of 819

homes and businesses, and 75 public

structures damaged or destroyed.

Ligonier sewage treatment plant

damaged. Many basements were flooded by

Youghiogheny River when Sutersville

rose above flood stage (20 ft) at 1 PM

EDT on 18th, crested 20.7 at 430 PM

PENNSYLVANIA, West

18th, and fell below flood stage 730 PM

18th. On the Conemaugh River, Seward

rose above flood stage (12 ft) at 11 AM

18th, crested 12.1 at I1 AM, and fell

below flood stage 1 PM EDT 18th. Total

rain: 6.3″ in Monesson, 6.1 Delmont, 6

inches New Kensington. (IVAN)

PAZ020

Flood

At 325 PM EDT on 17th, Rte 30, and all

roads in Industry closed by flooding.

Much damage along Rte 68 corridor in

western part of county. Bridgewater and

Glasgow flooded. Total of 625 struc-

tures damaged or destroyed, including

43 businesses, mainly in Hopewell Twp.

Hundreds of runaway boats were lost,

but 93 were recovered. Several marinas

were ripped from the shore and broke up

as they slammed into bridges, with

numerous boats still attached. Roads

partly washed out: Rtes 65, 288, 588,

Hoenig Rd, Hartzell School Rd, Shady

Rest Rd, Franklin Rd, Green Garden Rd.

On the Ohio River, Montgomery Dam rose

to flood stage (33 ft) at 4 AM EDT on

18th, crested 41.0 at 10 PM 18th, and

fell below flood stage 2 PM EDT on

19th. Total rain: 4 inches in Monaca.

(IVAN)

PAZ022

Flood

By 4 PM EDT on 17th, a courthouse was

threatened by a mud slide in Kittan-

ning; and numerous roads were flooded

countywide, including Rte 66 between

Ford City and Leechburg. By 11 PM,

Bradys Bend had 5.7 inches of rain; and

Red Bank Creek, on the border of Arm-

strong and Clarion counties, continued

to flood. St Charles on the Red Bank

Creek crested around 17.9 ft around

dawn (flood stage 17). On the Clarion

River, Cooksburg rose above flood stage

(13 ft) at 2 AM EDT on 18th, crested

16.5 at 8 AM on 18th, and fell below

flood stage 8 PM EDT 18th. The Allegheny

River rose above flood stage 4 AM EDT

18th, and fell below flood stage by 9

PM EDT on 19th. Here are city, flood

stage, crest, and time: Rimer (19 ft),

19.5 at 10 AM 18th; Mosgrove (19), 20.4

at 10 AM 18th; Kittanning (21), 22.2 at

9 AM EDT 18th; Freeport (23), 24.1 at

10 AM EDT on 18th. Crooked Creek at

Idaho had a record crest of 19.33 ft at

8 AM on 18th (previous record 18.6).

Buffalo Creek at Freeport had a record

crest of 15.28 at 8 PM on 17th (pre-

vious record 13.6). Total of 56 struc-

tures damaged or destroyed, including 3

businesses and 1 church. (IVAN)

PAZ008

Flood

At 4 PM EDT on 17th, Moon Run Rd flood-

ed in Oil City. 656 PM, 3.1 inches of

rain 5 miles east of Oil City. (IVAN)

PAZ015

Flood

At 410 PM EDT on 17th, Rte 66 closed by

flood in Shippenville. New Bethlehem,

Hawthorn, East Brady, and Sligo also

flooded. At 646 PM on 17th, there was a

mud slide on the south side of New

Bethlehem. Rte 58 also flooded. On the

Clarion River, Cooksburg rose above

flood stage (13 ft) 2 AM EDT on 18th,

crested 16.5 at 8 AM 18th, and fell be-

low flood stage 8 PM EDT on 18th. Total

of 117 homes and businesses, and 155

public roads, damaged or destroyed.

Total rain: 3.5 inches in East Brady.

(IVAN)

PAZ031

Flood

It started 5 PM EDT 17th, when Grays-

ville flooded, according to newspaper

accounts. By 740 PM on 17th, there was

widespread road and stream flooding

countywide, including all roads in and

out of Greensburg; Rte 21 in Franklin

Twp; and Rte 18 in Centre Twp. Total of

157 homes and 46 businesses damaged or

destroyed. Total rain: about 5 inches.

(IVAN)

PAZ016

Flood

At 538 PM EDT on 17th, roads flooded,

in Warsaw Twp, 7 miles north of Brook-

ville after 3.3 inches of rain. By 6

PM, there was widespread road and

stream flooding. At least 5 people were

rescued from their vehicles. By 8 PM,

Rockdale had 4″ of rain. By 9 PM,

Punxsutawney had 4.5 inches. Mahoning

Creek at Punxsutawney crested at 32.3

ft (flood stage 32) around 1 PM EDT on

18th. (IVAN)

PAZ023

Flood

At 630 PM EDT on 17th, Curry Run over-

flowed and closed Rte 422 near Shelocta

(newspaper). By 720 PM, there was wide-

spread road and stream flooding. Flood

waters swept away 8 empty campers at a

camp ground between Shelocta and Elder-

ton. 845 PM, numerous roads closed by

flood. At one house in Centre Twp,

basement wall caved in. Rte 954 near

Beyer was washed out. Rte 4018 near

Smicksburg closed when Mahoning Dam

overflowed. Indiana had 3.5 inches of

rain. By 1050 PM, Clymer flooded and

people were evacuated. 150 people had

to be evacuated countywide. Shelocta

hit hard. Total of 339 structures

damaged or destroyed, 40 of them were

businesses. (IVAN)

PENNSYLVANIA, West

PAZ009

Flood

At 9 PM EDT on 17th, roads and a bridge

covered by water near Tionesta. On the

Clarion River, Cooksburg rose above

flood stage (13 fl) at 2 AM EDT on

18th, crested 16.5 at 8 AM 18th, and

fell below flood stage at 8 PM EDT on

18th. (IVAN)

PUERTO RICO

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Mayaguez Heavy Rain

Heavy rain and pea sized hail were

reported at Barrio Miradero.

Western Interior

Adjuntas Flash Flood

A near severe thunderstorm drifted over

Adjuntas during the afternoon causing

heavy rainfall which caused the loss of

a life as river Yayales, a small tribu-

tary of river Guilarte, surged out of

its banks and flowed across the inter-

sections of roads 131 and 135. A 59

year old woman drove a car into the

moving waters, attempted to escape her

car and was drowned.

F59VE

PRZO03-007-007-007

Heavy Surf/High Surf

Coastal flooding was reported at

Playita Cortada in the municipality of

Santa Isabel. Three families were relo-

cated to higher ground.

PRZO03

Heavy Surf/High Surf

Coastal flooding occurred along the

coastal sector of Salinas, as the high

surf generated by Hurricane Ivan when

it was over 300 miles south of Puerto

Rico, washed ashore, rocks and debris,

which blocked the traffic along coastal

highway 109, at barrio Las Ochenta,

leading from Salinas to Guayama. The

road remained closed for a period of 12

hours.

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Hormigueros Heavy Rain

Several areas were reported flooded in

the municipality of Hormigueros, road

319, the San Jose Lavandero community,

road 114 at Valle Hermoso Sur. Around 4

inches of rain fell in Hormigueros

during the afternoon. Landslides were

reported at Parelas San Romulado Norte,

Camino Oscar Barbosa, road 345.

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Mayaguez Heavy Rain

Flooding was reported in Mayaguez, Del

Carmen Street at Barrio Santurce,

Barrio Rio Hondo, Wilson Street at

Parcelas Castillo, Badiz and Nenadich

Streets. Landslides were reported at

Camino Rosa, road 348, and the bridge

at Puente de Camino Juan Lebron

was affected by the rains.

PRZO03

Heavy Surf/High Surf

Coastal flooding was reported in Barrio

Guardarraya along Highway 3 in the

municipality of Patillas.

PRZ001>013

Tropical Storm

Tropical Storm Jeanne and its asso-

ciated weather affected Puerto Rico,

Vieques and Culebra from Sep. 14-17. On

its wake it left considerable damages

to the electric power grid, the water

supply system, highways and roads,

bridges, schools, individual house-

holds, businesses and commerce due to

extensive flooding, landslides and mud-

slides. Jeanne forced 3,629 people

living in flood zones to seek refuge in

shelters. Jeanne caused eight deaths in

Puerto Rico, four direct and four in-

direct. One death direct death was in

the municipality of Yabucoa, where the

winds tore the roof and ceiling of a

house to which a hammock was attached,

flunging a person from the hammock and

smashing her into the wall of an adja-

cent structure. Another,and the only

one flood related fatality was reported

in the municipality of Moca, where a

person was reportedly drowned in a tri-

butary stream of River Culebrinas. Two

other persons died and one was injured

after a tree damaged by winds fell on

an automobile in a rural road of Yauco

the Saturday after the storm. Two other

persons died due to carbon monoxide

poisoning from generators running in

closed spaces without proper ventila-

tion. The island road system was widely

impacted as 302 roads had to be closed

due to fallen trees, landslide and mud-

slides or debris. Damages to the

electrical grid were estimated at 60

million, and to the water system at 8

million. Tropical Storm Jeanne made

landfall as a strong tropical storm

over southeast Puerto Rico around noon

time on Sep. 15. Official winds reports

from the International airport in Caro-

lina were of sustained winds of 49 mph

with a gust to 71 mph. An unofficial

report from a spotter in Salinas indi-

cated sustained winds of 63 mph with

gust to 71 mph at 1140 am AST. Another

unofficial report of a wind gust to 68

mph was recorded at Palmas del Mar,

Humacao, and the Arecibo Observatory,

which recorded a wind gust of 70 mph at

an elevation of 1,200 feet on Sep 15.

The agricultural impact was signifi-

cant, the hardest hit areas were the

south and east. Damages were estimated

at 101.5 million, 55 million were

attributed to the banana an plantainx

sectors. More than 15,500 acres of

plantain and banana farm lands were

affected. Hardest hit crops were

coffee, plantain, banana and wheat. The

hydrological impact of Jeanne were

widespread and diverse with major

stream and river flooding. The island

of Vieques recorded 23.75 inches of

rain over three days, and 14.75 inches

in a 24 hour period which corresponded

to more than a 100 year return period.

Other municipalities in Puerto rico

received from 11 to 18 inches over the

three day period ending on Sep. 17 at

800 am AST. The highest return

frequency over inland Puerto Rico was

at Aibonito, where the 24 hour rainfall

of 15 inches corresponded to more than

a 100 year event. F47PH, M37 VE, M41

VE, M450U

Mayaguez And

Vicinity

Anasco Flash Flood

River Rio Grande de Anasco was reported

out of its banks.

San Juan And

Vicinity

San Juan Funnel Cloud

Funnel cloud reported between Roosevelt

and Pinciro Avenues.

San Juan And

Vicinity

Carolina Heavy Rain

Urban flooding was reported at Parque

Escorial. Standing water knee high in

some places and as high as some car

doors in spots.

Ponce And Vicinity

Ponce Heavy Rain

Heavy rains, pea size hail and strong

gusty winds were reported at Barrio

Punta Diamante in the municipality of

Ponce. Winds gusts were estimated

between 40 and 50 mph.

RHODE ISLAND

NONE REPORTED.

SOUTH CAROLINA,

Calhoun County

7 NE St Matthews to Tornado (F0)

7.5 NE St Matthews

NWS survey along with dept. of high-

ways, found trees down across US601

from a small tornado.

Calhoun County

2 SE Ft Motte Thunderstorm Wind (G55)

Hwy Dept. reported trees down on SC

419.

Richland County

1.5 SE Gadsden to Tornado (F2)

1 NW Gadsden

NWS survey found 3 mobile destroyed,

several others damaged along with a

couple of businesses. Three people were

injured. Numerous trees and powerlines

down.

Richland County

Ft Jackson Tornado (F1)

Ft. Jackson reported 22 homes with

light to moderate damage from an F1

tornado.

Richland County

1 SE Columbia to Tornado (F0)

.5 SE Columbia

An F0 took down some trees on Bluff and

Blackberry roads.

Barnwell County

Barnwell Tornado (F0)

An F0 took down some trees and power-

lines and damaged some signs in Barn-

well.

SOUTH CAROLINA, Central

Aiken County

5 SE Monetta to Tornado (F0)

4.5 SE Monetta

An F0 tornado took down some trees on

hwys 39 and 391.

Sumter County

3 SW Sumter to Tornado (F2)

2 W Sumter

Emergency manager reported 55 homes

damaged, 9 destroyed, and 3 injuries.

Calhoun County

Countywide Flash Flood

Sheriff reported some secondary roads

beginning to flood with some closures.

Richland County

1 SE Columbia Flash Flood

Sheriff reported heavy rains and

flooding of roads in southeast Columbia

and outskirts with some closures.

Lee County

3 S Manville to Tornado (F1)

4 SW Manville

A strong F1 tornado took down huge

trees and powerlines, and also did

moderate damage to several homes and a

cotton gin mill.

Lee County

2 SW Bishopville to Tornado (F0)

2 WSW Bishopville

Storm Chaser reported an F0 did minor

damage to a mobile home and took down

some trees and powerlines.

Kershaw County

5 ESE Camden to Tornado (F0)

5 E Camden

Intermittent touchdown of an F0 took

down trees and powerlines in and around

Antioch with minor damage to some

mobile homes.

Kershaw County

2 SE Cassatt to Tornado (F1)

3 NW Cassatt

An F1 tornado did moderate damage to

several homes and mobile homes. A

turkey farm also had light damage.

Calhoun County

6 SW St Matthews to Tornado (F0)

5.5 SW St Matthews

Dept of highways reported an F0 took

down some trees and powerlines on Sc

453.

Clarendon County

2 SW Paxville to Tornado (F0)

2.5 WSW Paxville

Survey found an F0 path a half mile

long which took down trees.

Sumter County

Shaw Afb to Tornado (F1)

2.5 N Shaw Afb

Shaw AFB reported many homes with light

damage and a few with moderate damage

as an Fl touched down between the run-

ways and moved across the base. Many

trees and powerlines were also down.

Lancaster County

Rich Hill Xrds to Tornado (F1)

2 NW Rich Hill Xrds

A strong F1 did moderate to severe

damage to buildings on a turkey farm.

Several mobile along the path.

Kershaw County

2 NE Camden to Tornado (F3)

7 N Camden

An F3 tornado demolished several mobile

homes and severely damaged cinder block

horse stables at a horse farm. A large

horse trailer was lifted up and placed

on top of the stable. Several out-

buildings were destroyed and numerous

trees and powerlines were down.

Chesterfield County

7 SSE Cheraw to Tornado (F1)

1 NNW Cheraw

An F1 intermittently touched down and

did minor damage to several homes,

businesses, and an elementary school..

Numerous trees and powerlines were

down.

SOUTH CAROLINA, Central

Orangeburg County

5 SE Cope to Tornado (F0)

4.5 SE Cope

An F0 took down some trees along Cannon

Bridge road.

Chesterfield County

13 ESE Patrick to Tornado (F0)

13 E Patrick

An F0 took down trees along hwy 52

north of Society Hill as the tornado

dissipated.

Fairfield County

Jenkinsville to Tornado (F0)

6 W Winnsboro

An F0 intermittently touched down and

took down trees from Jenkinsville to

the Greenbrier Community.

Bamberg County

1 E Ehrhardt to Tornado (F0)

1.5 NE Ehrhardt

Emergency manager reported trees and

powerlines down along path.

SCZ016-030>031

Tropical Storm

Emergency manager reported a tree on a

home 5SSE of Chesterfield and shingles

of a home.

Chesterfield County

8 E Me Bee to Tornado (F2)

9 NE Me Bee

An F2 destroyed 2 mobile homes and did

moderate to severe damage to several

others. Numerous trees and powerlines

were down.

Newberry County

Macedonia Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Highway Dept. reported several trees

down.

Aiken County

Aiken Muni Arpt Funnel Cloud

Pilot at Aiken airport sighted a funnel

cloud moving north.

Aiken County

4 N Aiken to Tornado (F0)

10 N Aiken

Sheriff and Emergency manager reported

trees down along the path of an F0

tornado that down from 1-20 just south

of US 1 to 3 miles South of Ridge

Spring on SC511 which is Pitts Branch

road.

Saluda County

5 NNE Saluda to Tornado (F1)

10 N Saluda

Storm survey found numerous trees and

powerlines down, light to moderate

damage destroyed, 2 trees on cars, and

light to moderate roof damage to

several framed homes.

Fairfield County

3 NE Winnsboro Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Highway dept. reported several trees

down on SC200 northeast of town.

Clarendon County

3 W Alcolu to Tornado (F1)

Alcolu

An F1 tornado destroyed 2 mobile homes

and damaged several others. Light to

moderate and its busses. Severe damage

occurred to large open air outbuildings

at a mill across the street from the

school.

Aiken County

9 NE Aiken to Tornado (F0)

11 NNE Aiken

An F0 did moderate damage to a barn,

camper, and roof of a home.

Lee County

Bishopville to Tornado (F0)

Lucknow

An F0 touched down in Bishopville then

again in the Lucknow area. Trees and

powerlines were down with minor damage

to a couple of homes.

Chesterfield County

4 S Chesterfield to Tornado (F0)

1 S Chesterfield

An F0 took down trees, severely damage

some wood framed outbuildings and did

minor damage to a couple of mobile

homes.

Saluda County

7 N Ridge Spg Funnel Cloud

Sheriff reported a funnel north of

Ridge Springs.

Saluda County

Countywide Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Highway dept. reported scattered trees

down around the county.

Saluda County

8 NW Saluda to Tornado (F0)

9 NNW Saluda

An F0 touched down along Old Chappells

road taking down trees.

Newberry County

Chappells Funnel Cloud

Sheriff reported a funnel cloud over

Chappells.

Newberry County

8 ENE Newberry to Tornado (F1)

10 ENE Newberry

Roof torn off home with 4 other homes

damaged. Several outbuildings

destroyed. Damage was on SC34, US 176,

and BIg Pine road.

Lexington County

10 WNW Lexington to Tornado (F0)

11 WNW Lexington

An F0 touchd down on Devils Backbone

road in taking down trees which just

missed several homes.

Newberry County

.5 N Jalapa to Tornado (F0)

3 NNW Jalapa

An F0 touched down on Jalapa road and

Indian Creek road taking down trees and

doing minor damage to a couple of

mobile homes.

Orangeburg County

Springfield to Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Norway

Sheriff reported trees down in the

western part of the county.

Lexington County

Gilbert to Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Lexington

Sheriff reported trees down in the

Gilbert area and in Heritage Hills

subdivision of Lexington.

Richland County

Countywide Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Sheriff reported scattered trees down

around the county.

Fairfield County

3 NNW Ridgeway to Tornado (F2)

5 NNW Ridgeway

An F2 tornado destroyed 5 mobile homes,

did moderate to severe damage to 2

framed homes and injurred 13 people.

One 57 year old male died. Two vehicles

were moved 20 to 30 yards. M51MH

SOUTH CAROLINA, North

Coastal

Darlington County

2 SW Darlington to Tornado (F0)

1 SW Darlington

A tornado snapped trees, some of which

fell onto several homes and damaged

roofs.

Darlington County

1 S Society Hill to Tornado (F0)

1 SE Society Hill

Tornado snapped several trees, and

caused damage to a roof of a home.

Marlboro County

4 SSE Clio to Tornado (F1)

Clio

Tornado snapped or uprooted numerous

trees and damaged several homes.

Marlboro County

1 SW Me Coll Tornado (F1)

Tornado demolished a stapped down

mobile home.

Darlington County

7 NNE Darlington Tornado (F1)

Tornado snapped several trees and

damaged a mobile home.

Florence County

4 NE Florence to Tornado (F0)

4 N Florence

Tornado damaged a billboard and several

trees next to a Petro truck stop. The

tornado continued into Darlington

county.

Darlington County

7 ESE Darlington to Tornado (F0)

7 E Darlington

Tornado snapped numerous trees.

Dillon County

6 E Dillon to Tornado (F0)

5 NE Dillon

A tornado flattened and old barn and

part of the roof of a shed was torn

off. A few trees were snapped … one

damaging a roof of a home.

Marlboro County

4 SW Bennettsville to Tornado (F0)

5 W Bennettsville

A tornado damaged a steel conveyor belt

track at a sand and gravel mine.

Several trees were snapped, and the

roof of a front porch of a church was

lifted off.

Florence County

Florence Funnel Cloud

Public reported a funnel cloud near

Ebenezer Road.

Darlington County

Hartsville Funnel Cloud

A funnel cloud was reported near Old

Camden Rd.

Georgetown County

1 N Murrells Inlet Rip Current

Strong rip currents caused by the

swells from Hurricane Jeanne resulted

in a drowning. Five other people had to

be rescued by lifeguards.

??1W

Florence County

2 E Lake City to Tornado (F1)

2 NE Lake City

A tornado destoyed a barn and snapped

trees. A house sustained minor damage.

Georgetown County

5 NW Carvers Bay to Tornado (F1)

7 NW Carvers Bay

A tornado snapped telephone poles,

uprooted trees, and moved a mobile home

off its foundation. The tornado also

destroyed several sheds and outhouses.

Marion County

3 NE Peedee to Tornado (F1)

4 N Peedee

A tornado damaged two homes, and downed

trees, powerlines, and sheds.

Dillon County

2 E Oak Grove Tornado (F0)

A tornado downed trees along Interstate

95.

Marlboro County

Blenheim Tornado (F0)

A tornado touched down in a parking lot

with no damage.

Florence County

Florence Heavy Rain

Florence 911 reported widespread

flooding of roadways. Some of the

streets reported flooding include:

Church St., Baroody St., Coit St.,

Sumter St., Evans St., Chase St.,

Alexander St., and the Cheves area.

Darlington County

Darlington Heavy Rain

911 reported flooding on the roadways.

SOUTH CAROLINA, Northwest

Greenville County

Mauldin Heavy Rain

A number of streets, especially Butler

Rd., were partially closed because of

high water produced by a thunderstorm

which dropped 2 inches of rainfall very

quickly.

York County

8 N Rock Hill to Tornado (F1)

9 N Rock Hill

This tornado touched down on the

norheast side of Tega Cay and tracked

almost due north into North Carolina.

Damage was mainly limited to trees, but

a few of these fell on homes and

automobiles.

SCZ001>003

High Wind (G50)

High winds associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Frances produced some

damage to trees and power lines across

the South Carolina mountains.

SCZ003-006

Flood

An extended period of moderate to heavy

rainfall associated with the remnants

of Hurricane Frances resulted in

gradual rises and eventual flooding

along Gilder and Brushy Creeks, the

Enoree River, and other streams on

Greenville’s east side. Overnight, the

flooding expanded to include most of

the remainder of the county.

SCZ001-004

Flood

Widespread flooding of creeks and

streams developed across the county by

early evening. Numerous roads were

covered with water or washed out, and

the sewer systems of several

communities were damaged.

Anderson County

2 NE Sandy Spgs to Tornado (F0)

2 N Sandy Spgs

This tornado touched down just

northeast of Sandy Springs, then moved

northwest, uprooting several trees

along its path. An aluminum cattle

shelter was also destroyed.

Abbeville County

Abbeville Flash Flood

Pickens County

Countywide Flash Flood

Greenville County

West Central Portion Flash Flood

Anderson County

Anderson to Flash Flood

Belton

After an extended period of moderate to

heavy rainfall, a tropical rain band

produced intense rainfall rates that

led to rapid rises along some creeks

and small streams across portions of

the Upstate during the mid-to-late

evening. Streams affected by flash

flooding included Blue Hill Creek in

Abbeville and Broadway Creek between

Anderson and Belton. Some evacuations

occurred in Berea late in the evening,

as the Reedy River rose above flood

stage from Berea to downtown

Greenville. A few roads were damaged

across the area.

Chester County

10 SE Chester Tornado (F1)

This brief tornado blew down several

trees and damaged or destroyed 2 small

trailers shortly after touching down.

It then moved north and lifted a

portion of the roof from a

well-constructed home. The garage wall

was blown inward about I foot at this

same location. A carport next to the

home was also detroyed. Several trees

were blown down and a small trailer

destroyed at a hunting club before the

tornado lifted.

Cherokee County

East Portion Flash Flood

Union County

Union Flash Flood

After an extended period of moderate to

occasionally heavy rainfall,

intensifying rain rates led to rapid

rises and flash flooding along some

small creeks and streams in eastern

portions of the Upstate. Several roads

were covered with water in areas from

Gaffney to Blacksburg due to flooding

of Cherokee Creek and other small

streams. However, flooding was most

severe near the city of Union, where

there was extensive damage to roads and

bridges, including 2 bridges that were

washed away. Several homes were also

damaged.

SCZ002-005

Flood

SCZ010

Flood

After the flash flooding that developed

earlier in the evening waned, general

flooding continued across the county

through the overnight hours, as

numerous additional streams rose

gradually to flood.

SCZ007>008

Flood

General flooding became widespread

across portions of the Upstate late in

the evening, as numerous streams rose

gradually to flood. A mobile home park

near Gaffney required evacuation

overnight. The Pacolet River flooded in

northern portions of Spartanburg

County, especially areas around

Landrum. Several roads and bridges were

damaged.

Union County

6 E Union to Tornado (F1)

7 NE Union

This tornado touched down east of the

city of Union, then tracked north/

northwest, blowing down and uprooting

numerous trees, and rolling one mobile

home. Other structural damage was

limited to shingles and gutters.

Chester County

Chester Flash Flood

York County

Rock Hill to Flash Flood

Ft Mill

An intense tropical rain band moved

north across portions of the eastern

piedmont during the early morning

hours, causing small creeks and streams

to rise quickly to flood.

SCZ009-014

Flood

After the intense rainfall rates ended,

continued moderate to occasionally

heavy rainfall allowed general flooding

to persist into the mid-morning.

SCZ005>006

Flood

After flooding due to the heavy

rainfall on the 7th abated, the Saluda

River crested a seond time on the

morning of the 9th, as the heavy

rainfall that fell well upstream worked

its way through the system.

Laurens County

13 SE Laurens Tornado (F0)

This brief, weak tornado blew down a

few trees.

SCZ001>002-

004>005-010

High Wind (G55)

High winds developed across the

mountains and a portion of the

foothills during the evening as the

remants of Hurricane Ivan moved just

west of the area. Numerous trees were

blown down, many of which fell on

vehicles and structures. The hardest

hit areas were generally in areas from

the mountains south to highway 11.

Anderson County

4 SSE Townville Tornado (F0)

This brief tornado produced mainly tree

damage in the Double Springs community.

Oconee County

13 SE Walhalla to Tornado (F0)

8 SE Walhalla

This weak tornado blew down numerous

trees and power lines along its 5-mile

track.

Anderson County

3 W Iva Tornado (F0)

This tornado touched down very briefly

in an open field.

Oconee County

Westminster to Tornado (F1)

4 NNW Westminster

This tornado blew down numerous trees

and power lines along its track, some

of which fell on homes. A mobile home

was destroyed when it was blown into an

embankment.

SCZ001>002-004>005

Flood

Moderate to heavy rainfall associated

with the remnants of Hurricane Ivan

resulted in flooding along a few creeks

during mid-evening across the northwest

part of the Upstate. The flooding

gradually became widespread and more

severe during the overnight hours,

especially in Oconee County, as the

Tugaloo River flooded, trapping a

number of famalies, some of which

required rescue via helicopter. A

number of bridges and roads were washed

out or otherwise damaged by flood

water.

SCZ003-006>007

High Wind (G50)

The remnants of Hurricane Ivan

continued to cause strong enough winds

to blow down a number of trees and

power lines across portions of the

mountains and foothills. A few fell on

structures and vehicles, and there were

scattered power outages. The damage was

more widespread across the western

Upstate.

Spartanburg County

Campobello Lightning

Lightning struck an industrial plant,

igniting a fire which destroyed about

2/3 of the facility.

SCZ007

Flood

After an evening of heavy rainfall,

several small streams flooded just

after midnight. Several bridges were

covered with water. Most areas affected

were in the northwest quarter of the

county, including Campobello, Inman,

and Lyman. The Pacolet River also

flooded in spots.

Chester County

6 WSW Great Falls Thunderstorm Wind (G65)

Two tractor trailers flipped over on

I-77 when the drivers lost control due

to strong winds.

Abbeville County

Abbeville to Flash Flood

Calhoun Falls

Greenwood County

Greenwood Flash Flood

Intense rainfall rates associated with

the remnants of Hurricane Jeanne

resulted in rapid rises and flash

flooding along some small creeks and

streams across the southern part of the

Upstate. Some of the worst flooding

occurred around Abbeville, where

several bridges were covered by

flooding streams. Severe urban flooding

developed in the city of Greenwood, as

the bypass at Burton Plaza was covered

with water, and a small stream flooded

a portion of Laurel St. Several other

roads were closed around the city,

including Scotts and Airport Roads. In

addition, a portion of highway 72

became covered with water near Calhoun

Falls. Several roads and bridges were

damaged by flood water.

Anderson County

5 S Anderson to Flash Flood

Honea Path

Oconee County

South Portion Flash Flood

As an intense tropical ran band moved

across the western Upstate, some flash

flooding developed. Part of highway 81S

was closed in Anderson County when a

construction site was flooded in the

northbound lane. Widespread flash

flooding also occurred around Iva,

where all low spots filled quickly with

deep water. At Honea Path, an apartment

building was evacuated after flooding

from a stopped up storm drain entered

the building. Some businesses incurred

minor flood damage in southern Oconee

County. Urban flooding also occurred in

Anderson.

Laurens County

Countywide Flash Flood

As the intense tropical rain band

continued to sweep over the Upstate,

flash flooding developed across Laurens

County, where up to a foot-and-a-half

of water accumulated in low places on

Interstate 385 from Laurens to the

Greenville line. Interstate 26 was also

flooded between mile markers 52 and 55.

Flooding was also reported along

highway 221 S around Waterloo with a

foot of water covering the road in low

places. By late evening, flash flooding

became severe, as 5 to 6 inches of rain

had fallen in just a 3-hour period.

Water covered a number of bridges from

the Hickory Tavern and Green Pond

areas, east across Gray Court and

Fountain Inn to the Spartanburg line.

At Cooks Bridge, just the reflectors

along the top of the bridge were

visible. Evacuations of several homes

were required around Fountain Inn.

Flooding also developed in the Ware

Shoals area.

Greenville County

Fountain Inn to Flash Flood

Simpsonville

Flooding developed quickly across

Greenville County during mid-evening.

Numerous automobiles were stranded in

water in the southern and eastern parts

of the county. Flash flooding occurred

around Fork Shoals, along highway 25

south of Greenville, and along Jones

Mill Rd east of Fountain Inn. Gilder

Creek flooded from Mauldin downstream

to the Enoree River. Water from the

flooded creek covered a bridge at E

Georgia Rd.

Spartanburg County

Central Portion Flash Flood

Greenville County

Berea to Flash Flood

Greer

As the intense tropical rain band

associated with the remnants of Jeanne

continued to progress north and east

across the Upstate, flash flooding

followed. Numerous streams rose quickly

to flood, including Brushy Creek and

the Enoree River around Greer and

Taylors. Numerous people required

rescue from their automobiles in this

area. The Reedy River also flooded from

Berea to downtown Greenville. In

Spartanburg County, a bridge was washed

out on Apple Valley Rd in the Berry

Shoals area. Portions of South

Blackstock Rd and Reidville Rd were

flooded, as was highway 101 north of

Woodruff.

Cherokee County

2 S Gaffney Tornado (F1)

This tornado destroyed a mobile home

and blew down numerous trees and power

lines.

Chester County

7 NE Chester Thunderstorm Wind

A few trees were blown down along

highway 72. There were also some power

outages in the area.

SCZ006>007-012

Flood

After an evening of flash flooding,

rises along creeks and streams

moderated, but general flooding

persisted through the overnight and

morning hours, as rainfall worked its

way downstream through the water

systems. The main flood problem was

along the Enoree River basin in eastern

Greenville and Spartanburg Counties, as

Gilder and Peters Creeks and other

tributaries remained in flood for many

hours. There was also considerable

urban and small stream flooding

throughout the city of Spartanburg.

SOUTH CAROLINA, South Coastal

Jasper County

13 SSW Hardeeville Tornado (F0)

A tornado crossed into Jasper County

from Chatham County Georgia. The

tornado tracked through a marshy area

and no significant damage occurred.

Charleston County

1 NW Adams Run Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorms winds knocked down

several trees.

Colleton County

4 NW Jacksonboro to Tornado (F0)

4.5 NW Jacksonboro

A tornado knocked down trees.

Jasper County

4 SE Hardeeville to Tornado (F1)

2 SE Hardeeville

A tornado knocked down limbs and trees,

one of which fell on a mobile home

causing 1 injury.

Colleton County

6 SE Walterboro Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down several

trees.

Charleston County

3 WNW Hollywood Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down several

trees.

Colleton County

3 W Canadys Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and large limbs.

Berkeley County

15 SW Cross Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

Dorchester County

2 NE Ridgeville Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down several

trees.

Jasper County

5 NE Hardeeville to Tornado (F0)

5.5 NE Hardeeville

A tornado knocked down trees.

Dorchester County

8 SE Harleyville to Tornado (F0)

7.5 SE Harleyville

A small tornado knocked down trees and

large limbs.

Allendale County

2 NW Allendale to Tornado (F0)

4 NW Allendale

A tornado knocked down and snapped off

numerous trees.

Allendale County

4 NW Seigling to Tornado (F0)

5 NW Seigling

A tornado snapped and downed several

trees.

Jasper County

2 E Gillisonville to Tornado (F1)

2 NNW Gillisonville

A tornado knocked down trees. Many

trees were snapped off and thrown in

different directions.

Berkeley County

6 W Goose Creek Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorms winds knocked down trees.

Charleston County

North Charleston Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Two trees were blown along the 52

Connector.

Berkeley County

Goose Creek Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees.

Allendale County

5 NW Seigling Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

and large limbs.

Hampton County

5 NE Brunson to Tornado (F0)

5 N Brunson

A tornado knocked down trees in the

county before crossing into Allendale

county.

Allendale County

4 E Fairfax to Tornado (F1)

4 ESE Sycamore

A weak F1 tornado crossed from Hampton

county into Allendale county. The

tornado uprooted and snapped off trees

along its path.

Allendale County

10 S Martin to Tornado (F0)

9.5 S Martin

A tornado snapped and bent trees in

various directions.

Allendale County

4 NE Millett to Tornado (F0)

4 N Millett

A tornado snapped trees and bent others

in various directions.

Hurricane Frances made land fall over

the Florida Panhandle and continued to

track in a generally northward

direction into Georgia, before turning

more to the northeast. This track

placed the Charleston County Warning

Area in the favorable right side of the

remnants of Frances which produced

numerous tornadoes and areas of

straight line wind damage over

southeast Georgia and south coastal

South Carolina. Several Georgia

counties also experienced flash

flooding as there were isolated

rainfall amounts of 5 to 8 inches over

a 24 to 36 hour period. This was on top

of already saturated ground from heavy

rains during the month of August. The

South Carolina counties experienced

more nuisance type flooding as the

rainfall amounts were not as high as

what occurred in southeast Georgia.

Beaufort County

Hilton Head Is Tornado (F1)

A picket fenced was knocked down. Part

of the fence went through the door of a

house. The roof of a house was

partially lifted and then set back

down. This caused some interior damage

to the home.

Allendale County

13 S Martin Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Several trees and large limbs were

knocked down by thunderstorm winds.

Hampton County

4 NE Early Branch to Tornado (F0)

4 NNE Early Branch

A weak tornado knocked down several

trees.

Berkeley County

1 W Pineville to Tornado (F0)

1 NW Pineville

A weak tornado damaged 2 mobile homes

and a shed. One mobile home had the

entire roof torn off and the second had

skirting torn off. Numerous trees and

limbs were knocked down.

Charleston County

Charleston to Flash Flood

Isle Of Palms

Heavy rainfall caused flooded roads in

Charleston, Mt. Pleasant, and the Isle

of Palms.

Colleton County

Countywide Thunderstorm Wind (G60)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down

numerous trees across the county. One

tree fell on a house and another fell

on a vehicle.

Dorchester County

St George Thunderstorm Wind (G50)

Thunderstorm winds knocked down trees

in several locations across the

northern part of the county.

SCZ043-047>050

Tropical Storm

The center of Tropical Storm Jeanne

tracked across inland Georgia but the

strongest winds at the time were along

the coast. Maximum wind gusts were 41

mph at both the Charleston downtown

observation and the Charleston airport.

The C-Man station at Folly Beach had a

maximum wind gust of 38 mph.

Non-tornadie wind damage was limited to

a few trees falling on cars.

SOUTH DAKOTA, Central and North

Stanley County

10 W Mission Ridge Hail (2.00)

Roberts County

11 S Rosholt to Tornado (F2)

9 SSW Rosholt

The storm entered South Dakota from

Traverse county, Minnesota where it

produced a tornado. The storm produced

a second tornado as it crossed Lake

Traverse into South Dakota. This

tornado was stronger and destroyed a

house, a mobile home, and a travel

trailer. Another house and travel

trailer were damaged and a shed was

also ripped apart. The tornado also

killed three cattle.

SOUTH DAKOTA, Southeast

Davison County

7 SE Mt Vernon Hail (1.00)

Davison County

5 N Mitchell Hail (0.75)

Sanborn County

3 SE Artesian Hail (1.00)

Miner County

1 W Fedora Hail (0.75)

Davison County

Mitchell Lightning

Lightning struck and damaged a brick

chimney, and burned out a transformer

at an amusement center.

Hanson County

9 SW Alexandria Hail (0.75)

Clay County

5 E Wakonda Hail (1.50)

Turner County

2 N Centerville Hail (1.00)

Lincoln County

5 NW Beresford Hail (1.50)

Minnehaha County

Sioux Falls Hail (1.00)

Minnehaha County

Sioux Falls Hail (0.75)

Minnehaha County

Sioux Falls Hail (0.88)

Minnehaha County

3 N Brandon Hail (0.88)

Aurora County

10 NE Plankinton Hail (0.75)

Davison County

7 NW Mt Vernon Hail (0.88)

Sanborn County

1 S Letcher Hail (0.75)

Davison County

3 N Loomis Hail (0.88)

SOUTH DAKOTA, West

Pennington County

Keystone Hail (1.25)

Pennington County

4 SW Rapid City Hail (0.75)

Pennington County

7 SW Rapid City Hail (0.75)

Custer County

1 W Hermosa Hail (1.00)

Ziebach County

21 NE Cherry Creek Hail (0.75)

Fall River County

2 N Provo Tornado (F0)

Small tornado was on the ground for

about 1 minute. No damage.

Custer County

22 W Custer Thunderstorm Wind (G65)

Custer County

8 ESE Custer Thunderstorm Wind (G52)

Fall River County

12 W Hot Spgs Thunderstorm Wind (G62)

A 71 mph thunderstorm wind gust was

recorded at Red Canyon RAWS.

COPYRIGHT 2004 World Meteorological Organization

COPYRIGHT 2005 Gale Group