Tradition and change in legal English; verbal constructions in prescriptive texts, 2d rev.ed

Tradition and change in legal English; verbal constructions in prescriptive texts, 2d rev.ed

Tradition and change in legal English; verbal constructions in prescriptive texts, 2d rev.ed.

Williams, Christopher.

Peter Lang Publishing Inc

2007

216 pages

$46.95

Paperback

Linguistic insights; v.20

K213

Williams (English, Faculty of Law, Foggia U. and English, Faculty of Political Science, U. of Bari) examines a range of legal texts from around the English-speaking world, analyzing modal auxiliaries such as “shall,” “may” and “must.” He examines the linguistic and pragmatic functions of prescriptive legal texts, their verbal constructions, mood, passive v. active voice. In addition, he examines the use of indicative tenses such as the present simple and non-finite constructions such as the “-ing” form and “-ed” participles. He shows how certain parts of the world are responding to the Plain Language Movement in legal circles, while others remained entrenched in traditional language, reviewing texts from the UK, Ireland, the European Union, the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

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