Globalisation and the labour market; trade, technology and less-skilled workers in Europe and the United States

Globalisation and the labour market; trade, technology and less-skilled workers in Europe and the United States

Globalisation and the labour market; trade, technology and less-skilled workers in Europe and the United States.

Ed. by Robert Anderton et al.

Routledge

2006

178 pages

$113.00

Hardcover

Routledge studies in the modern world economy; 56

HD5710

As globalization has advanced, the relative economic position of the unskilled worker in Europe and North America has declined. Anderton (European Central Bank and U. of Nottingham, UK), Brenton (International Trade Department, World Bank), and Whalley (economics at the UK’s U. of Warwick and Canada’s U. of Western Ontario) present eight papers investigating whether the primary cause for this phenomenon is increased trade with countries with abundant low-skill and low-wage labor or whether it lies in skill-biased technological change. The papers apply such methodologies as econometrics, general equilibrium, and case studies to the wage and employment experiences of less-skilled workers across a range of countries and industries. A final contribution discusses the policy responses that European and North American governments can make towards helping low-skill workers adjust to globalization.

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