Collateral damage; the psychological consequences of America’s war on terrorism

Collateral damage; the psychological consequences of America’s war on terrorism

Collateral damage; the psychological consequences of America’s war on terrorism.

Ed. by Paul R. Kimmel and Chris E. Stout.

Praeger

2006

222 pages

$49.95

Hardcover

Contemporary psychology

HV6432

Kimmel, chair of the American Psychological Association’s Task Force on the Psychological Effects of Efforts to Prevent Terrorism, together with his fellow psychiatrist Stout (U. of Illinois), present research conducted by the Task Force on the psychological effects of efforts to prevent terrorism and on programs that provide alternatives to terrorism. Contributors discuss the importance of overhauling the diplomatic approach to terrorism; the ways that the US reaction to 9/11 set conditions conducive to hate crimes; the social psychology of punishing antiwar dissent; relationships between threat, ideology, and political behavior; psychological effects of media coverage of the Iraq war; the impact of US activities in Afghanistan and Iraq on terrorist motivation; public mental health; and other aspects of the “War on Terror” that can explored through psychological investigation.

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