More than skin-deep: a healthy glow is important to well-being. It’s no surprise that the state of your skin can more or break your mood. Here are some tips that will help you keep it alive – Natural Health Guide

More than skin-deep: a healthy glow is important to well-being. It’s no surprise that the state of your skin can more or break your mood. Here are some tips that will help you keep it alive – Natural Health Guide – Brief Article

One look in the mirror says it all: Winter can do bad things to your skin. Forget the gray pallor from too much time indoors. For people who live in the Frost Belt, the real damage can come from elsewhere. Cold weather can dry out your skin in two ways: directly, because cold air generally has low humidity, and indirectly, from central-heating systems. And if you spend time outdoors, you can expose your face to the ultraviolet radiation that is reflected off the snow.

During the winter months, too much washing can actually be harmful: It strips away protective oils and draws out moisture. And exfoliation can leave new skin exposed to harsh winter winds. The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) recommends reassessing your skin-care routine during cold weather to ensure that you aren’t robbing your skin of moisture. The AAD encourages washing with mild soap in lukewarm water and trapping moisture by applying moisturizer while the skin is still wet. Come spring, your skin will need rejuvenation. This is a good time to return to regular cleaning and gentle exfoliation. Once the warm weather brings back humidity, your skin can draw moisture from the air and a normal routine can be re-established.

Another simple way to keep your skin healthy is by working up a sweat. According to Elson Haas, M.D., of the Preventive Medical Center of Marin in California, sweating is the natural way to eliminate unwanted chemicals that build up under the skin. But because we often reduce physical activity during the winter months, these chemicals accumulate. Starting an exercise regime or making regular visits to a sauna may flush out harmful chemicals.

Haas also recommends applying honey and creams containing aloe vera to the skin. Honey can draw impurities from the skin and possesses powerful antibacterial properties. Aloe vera is a natural healer. And dietary supplements that contain vitamin A and beta-carotene can help prevent acne and other skin problems.

If you take care of your skin this season, you will see a payoff all year round.

COPYRIGHT 2002 Sussex Publishers, Inc.

COPYRIGHT 2002 Gale Group