Introduction: employment projections – Brief Article

Introduction: employment projections – Brief Article – Statistical Data Included

The Bureau classifies jobs by occupation and by industry. The occupational totals presented in the charts represent the sum of jobs in all industries in which that occupation occurs. For example, occupational employment of automotive mechanics is the sum of mechanics working for automotive dealers and in automotive repair shops, auto supply stores, gas stations, and other industries. The industry totals show the sum of jobs in all occupations in each industry For example, industry employment for automotive repair shops is the sum of automotive mechanics, automotive body repairers, bookkeeping clerks, managers, and workers in other occupations employed there.

Employment totals shown in this section include those for wage-and-salary workers and for self-employed workers. Occupational data also include both groups of workers, but industry data include wage-and-salary workers only.

Employment growth or decline is measured two ways: numeric and percent change. Numeric change is the actual number of jobs gained or lost over the projections decade. Percent change is the rate of employment growth or decline during the decade.

For example, between 2000 and 2010, employment of childcare workers is expected to change from 1,192,578 to 1,319,338–an increase of nearly 127,000 jobs. Employment of speech-language pathologists is expected to grow from 87,931 to 122,398–an increase of more than 34,000 jobs.

In numeric terms, as the upper chart shows, this means that four times as many new jobs are projected for childcare workers as for speech-language pathologists between 2000 and 2010.

Percent change tells a different story. As the lower chart shows, employment of speech-language pathologists is expected to grow nearly four times as fast as that of childcare workers.

Employment growth in selected occupations, projected 2000-10

(Thousands)

Childcare workers 127

Speech-language pathologists 34

Employment growth in selected occupations, projected 2000-10

(Percent)

Childcare workers 11

Speech-language pathologists 39

Employment is projected to continue growing, reaching 168 million by 2010.

Employment, 1990,

2000, and projected 2010

(Millions)

1990 124

2000 146

Projected 2010 168

Employment growth is expected to be slightly more between 2000 and 2010 than it was during the previous 10 years.

Employment growth,

1990-2000 and projected

2000-10

(Millions)

1990-2000 21

Projected 2000-10 22

Employment growth between 2000 and 2010 is expected to be about 2 percentage points shower than it was from 1990 to 2000.

Employment growth,

1990-2000 and projected

2000-10

(Percent)

1990-2000 17

Projected 2000-10 15

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