Dying of the lite: the rise and fall of L.A.’s lo-cal plate – Inventory – Tiny Naylor’s at Sunset and La Brea, Hollywood

Dying of the lite: the rise and fall of L.A.’s lo-cal plate – Inventory – Tiny Naylor’s at Sunset and La Brea, Hollywood – Brief Article

Chris Nichols

SLIMLINER, STREAMLINER, SLENDERIZER … the classic “lo-cal” plate is as endangered as the L.A. coffee shops that serve it. Fifty years ago a hamburger patty, mound of cottage cheese, and canned peach half came to symbolize a light lunch for ladies, one of the earliest examples appearing on the menu at Tiny Naylor’s at Sunset and La Brea. “It started as a special,” says Tiny’s son, Biff, “but the women loved it and we kept it on.”

Fried halibut, ham, even a cheese omelette with bacon have worn the lo-cal crown. But nutrition disclosure laws and the ever-sophisticated tastes of the leg-warmer era drove the plate into seclusion. By the late ’80s it had been excised from most coffee shop menus. “If the world wanted canned peaches,” says Norms marketing director Jerry O’Connell, “I’d give it to them.”

Coffee shop owners “were heart smart and interested in doing the right thing,” says Jennifer Naylor, Tiny’s granddaughter and executive chef at Granita in Malibu. Every summer Jennifer sells “the heck out of” her own version of the lo-cal platter, with heirloom tomatoes, buffalo mozzarella, and sliced prosciutto. “In general, all my food is lo-cal,” she says. “It has to be for my Malibu clientele. If I served peaches out of a can, they might wonder.”

COPYRIGHT 2002 Los Angeles Magazine, Inc.

COPYRIGHT 2002 Gale Group