Radiometric Characterization Performed At Nist Improves Accuracy Of The Marine Optical Spectrograph

Radiometric Characterization Performed At Nist Improves Accuracy Of The Marine Optical Spectrograph – Brief Article

The Marine Optical Buoy (MOBY) project is a part NASA’s Earth Observing System Program, and supports the validation of satellite ocean color imagery data that are used for understanding the global carbon cycle. The Marine Optical Spectrographic (MOS) system is used in MOBY to derive water-leaving radiance.

For the first time, a rigorous study of the radiometric properties of the MOS was performed using NIST’ s Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Calibrations with Uniform Sources (SIRCUS) facility, which uses broadly tunable lasers and integrating spheres to calibrate and characterize a wide variety of detector-based instrumentation. Using the measurements from SIRCUS, physicists at NIST assessed the effect of stray light on MOS measurements of water-leaving radiance. A stray-light-correction algorithm was developed and applied to a subset of MOS data sets, greatly reducing the uncertainty in these measurements. This work will have immediate impact on the ocean-color remote-sensing community.

COPYRIGHT 2001 National Institute of Standards and Technology

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