Private tuition increases 5 percent

Private tuition increases 5 percent – four-year independent colleges and universities

WASHINGTON – Tuition rates increased by 5 percent at four-year independent colleges and universities according to a report released by the College Board in September.

While that is the same rate change as last year and marks the tenth straight year that the rate of increase has held steady or declined, it is still well over the rate of inflation, which was calculated at 2 percent.

According to the College Board, the 1997-98 unweighted average tuition and fees for four-year independent institutions was $11,721 compared with $11,173 the previous year. For two-year independent colleges, tuition and fees rose from $6,823 to $7,100, an increase of 4 percent between 1996-97 and 1997-98.

“The rising cost of educating students for work and life in the twenty-first century is making it increasingly difficult for colleges and universities to hold the line on tuition. But as we see from the College Board report, this is clearly being done,” said David L. Warren, president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU).

A recently released NAICU survey also found that 91 percent of respondents are increasing the amount of institutional aid in their operating budgets earmarked for low- and middle-income students, and 97 percent are increasing their institutional fundraising efforts to provide more scholarships for needy students.

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