Survey Shows More Patients with Diabetes Should Take Aspirin

Survey Shows More Patients with Diabetes Should Take Aspirin

Matthew Neff

(American Diabetes Association) Results of a survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) showed that fewer than one in five Americans with diabetes are following the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) recommendation of taking a daily dose (81 to 325 mg) of enteric-coated aspirin to help reduce the incidence of diabetes-related cardiovascular disease. The CDC survey indicated that 98 percent of American adults with diabetes had evidence of cardiovascular disease or at least one risk factor for cardiovascular disease and were therefore eligible for aspirin therapy provided they have no contraindications, such as aspirin allergy, bleeding tendency, gastrointestinal bleeding or clinically active liver disease. The survey used a representative sample of 1,503 U.S. adults aged 20 or older with self-reported diabetes who participated in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988 to 1994 (NHANES III). Regular aspirin use was defined as 15 to 30 times in the past month. Thirty-two percent of those with cardiovascular disease and 12 percent of those with cardiovascular disease risk factors were regular aspirin users. Regular aspirin use was higher among non-Hispanic Caucasians, people with cardiovascular disease and among people 40 years of age or older. The ADA recommends aspirin therapy for primary prevention among those with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including family history of cardiovascular disease, smoking, hypertension, obesity and lipid abnormalities (such as high cholesterol levels), and as secondary prevention in those with a history of heart attack, stroke, claudication or angina.–DEBORAH B. ROLKA, ET AL., Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

COPYRIGHT 1999 American Academy of Family Physicians

COPYRIGHT 2000 Gale Group