Gender Is a Predictor of Increased Mortality in Myocardial Infarction

Gender Is a Predictor of Increased Mortality in Myocardial Infarction

John H. Haley

(American College of Cardiology) Results of a study of 856 consecutive patients who had myocardial infarctions between 1988 and 1997 show that women are at increased risk of morbidity and mortality following acute myocardial infarction, compared with men. The study included 531 men and 325 women. Following admission to a coronary care unit, 14.5 percent of the women and 7.2 percent of the men died. Overall, the women had higher rates of hypertension (58.2 percent versus 35.8 percent) and diabetes mellitus (21.2 percent versus 13.0 percent) but lower prevalence of smoking (21.2 percent versus 33.2 percent) and family history of coronary artery disease (14.8 percent versus 20.3 percent). Women were less likely to present with Killip Class I (72.3 percent versus 82.7 percent). In particular, women 75 years of age or younger had much higher mortality rates than men of the same age. The risk of increased mortality was independent of other risk factors. The investigators believe that gender is an important and independent predictor of mortality associated with acute myocardial infarction in patients under age 75 years.-John H. Haley, m.d., et al., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

COPYRIGHT 1999 American Academy of Family Physicians

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