CDC update on AIDS

CDC update on AIDS

Carrie Morantz

Since the implementation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the United States, the number of persons diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the number of deaths among persons with AIDS have declined substantially. As a result, the number of persons living with AIDS has increased. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a report describing changes in AIDS incidence and prevalence, and deaths among persons with AIDS. The report, “Update: AIDS–United States, 2000” is available at www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ mm5127a2.htm.

Data indicate that the decline in new AIDS diagnoses is slowing and that the number of deaths among people with AIDS continues to decline. These findings indicate that AIDS is still a burden on the U.S. health care system and that access to medical and preventive services must be improved.

From 1996 to 2000, the incidence of AIDS declined in the West; declined and then leveled in the South, Midwest, and U.S. territories; and declined and then increased in the Northeast. During the same period, AIDS incidence declined sharply and then slowed among whites and declined more slowly and then leveled among blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and Pacific Islanders. From 1998 to 2000, incidence increased among American Indians and Alaska natives.

AIDS incidence declined sharply and then slowed among homosexual men and intravenous-drug users. Among people exposed through heterosexual contact, incidence declined slowly from 1996 to 1998, then increased.

In 1996 and 1997, the estimated number of deaths among people with AIDS declined 42 percent; from 1998 to 2000, declines were smaller (5 percent during 1998 and 1999 and 10 percent during 1999 and 2000). From 1996 to 2000, the number of deaths declined in the Northeast, West, and Midwest; from 1996 to 1999, deaths declined in the South and in U.S. territories, then leveled during 1999 and 2000. The number of deaths declined in all racial and ethnic groups and among homosexual men and intravenous-drug users.

COPYRIGHT 2002 American Academy of Family Physicians

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