CDC Antimicrobial Resistance Campaign – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CDC Antimicrobial Resistance Campaign – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Brief Article

Brian Torrey

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has initiated a campaign aimed at physicians to prevent antimicrobial resistance in health care settings. Information about the CDC campaign is available online at www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/healthcare.

The campaign, “Prevent Antimicrobial Resistance,” is built on the following four key strategies for preventing antimicrobial resistance in health care settings: (1) preventing infection, (2) diagnosing and treating infection effectively, (3) using antimicrobials wisely, and (4) preventing transmission of drug-resistant pathogens.

Within these strategies are 12 specific action steps derived from evidenced-based guidelines and recommendations already developed by the CDC and other organizations that physicians can use to prevent antimicrobial resistance in hospitalized adults. The action steps are (1) give influenza vaccine to at-risk patients; (2) remove catheters when no longer essential; (3) target the pathogen with appropriate therapy; (4) consult infectious disease experts for patients with serious infections; (5) engage in local antimicrobial control efforts; (6) know your antibiogram; (7) treat infection, not contamination; (8) treat infection, not colonization; (9) know when to say “no” to vanco(mycin); (10) stop antimicrobial treatment when infection is treated or unlikely; (11) isolate the pathogen; and (12) break the chain of contagion.

The CDC will announce in the future similar action steps for physicians who care for dialysis patients, emergency department patients, obstetric patients, critical care patients, patients in long-term care facilities, and children.

Antimicrobial resistant infections in health care settings are a major threat to patient safety. Each year, an estimated 2 million hospitalized patients acquire infections that result in more than 90,000 deaths. More than one half of these infections are caused by bacteria that are resistant to at least one of the antimicrobials commonly used to treat those infections, according to the CDC.

COPYRIGHT 2002 American Academy of Family Physicians

COPYRIGHT 2002 Gale Group