1984 guide to Department of Education programs

1984 guide to Department of Education programs

This annual Guide gives, in compact form, information necessary to begin the process of applying for funding under individual federal education programs. Additional copies of this issue, containing the Guide, are available for $2.50 each from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. Block grants

The Education Consolidation and Improvement Act of 1981 gives state and local education agencies authority in administering federal funds for education programs. Chapter 1 of the Act, which superseded Title 1 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, extends to states and local education agencies prime responsibility for conducting the nation’s largest federal education program, providing financial assistance to meet the special education needs of disadvantaged children.

Chapter 2 consolidated 42 other elementary and secondary education activities into block grants for three broad purposes: basic skills improvement, improvement of support services, and special projects. State education agencies administer Chapter 2. Programs transferred to block grants are not included in this Guide, except for those listed under “Compensatory Education Programs” and “State and Local Education Programs.” How to find a particular program

In the alphabetical index at the end of this Guide, programs are listed by both popular name and by descriptive words. The number after each index entry is the number that appears before each program title in this Guide.

All funded programs have been assigned a number (shown in parentheses after each program title) by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. These OMB numbers will lead the reader to a more detailed description of each program in OMB’s current Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (see glossary). How to apply for funding

While most funds allocated by Congress are distributed and adminstered directly by the federal government, some programs call for both state and federal administration. Under several programs, states administer the distribtuion of federal grants under federal guidelines. In these state grant programs, individuals and organizations must apply directly to state agencies, as indicated in the column headed “Who May Apply.” Under other programs, federal funds are distributed through grants or contracts directly to individuals, schools, school districts, libraries, museums, and organizations.

Announcements of all competitions for federal grants are published in the Federal Register; requests for proposals (RFP’s) for all contracts appear in Commerce Business Daily (See glossary).

Information on applying for federal grants or contracts can be obtained by writing or calling the administering office listed under the column headed “Contact.” Written inquiries should be addressed to (name of administering office), U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC 20202, unless another address is given. Telephone numbers for all contact offices are in area code 202 unless otherwise indicated. Participation of private school students

An asterisk (*) before a program description indicates that the program requires that eligible private lementary and secondary schools and teachers be provided wit services comparable to those afforded public schools. Under these programs, the public agency generally is required to consult with appropriate representatives of private school students. To determine the precise requirements for serving these students, refer to the particular program regulations. In certain cases, further reference to the Education Department General Administrative Regulations will be necessary.

Some of the programs also authorize the implementation of a bypass (see glossary) to provide services to eligible private school students and teachers. These programs are indicated by a dagger ([dagger]) alongside the program description.

For more information on the opportunities available for private school students, contact the Office of Private Education, 202/472-9610. Closing dates

Closing dates–or deadlines–for submitting applications appear after the program descriptions in the first column. These dates are roughly the same for each year a program is in operation. It is advisable to verify the accuracy of all closing dates (which are subject to change) by checking either the Federal Register or the Commerce Business Daily, or by contacting the administering office. Bypass. When a public education agency fails to provide services authorized by federal law, the Secretary of Education may withhold funds from that agency and may contract with a third party to provide such services directly. This procedure is referred to as “bypassing” the public education agency. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance. Published by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and updated with loose-leaf additions, this catalog (CFDA) describes all federal programs that distribute funds to states, organizations, and individuals. The program numbers in parentheses after each program title in this Guide correspond to OMB numbers in the CFDA. For more details about any funded program listed in this Guide, use its OMB number to locate it in the CFDA. The CFDA is available in most major libraries or by subscription from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. Current price is $32 annually, which includes periodic updated materials. Checks should be payable to Superintendent of Documents; Visa and Master Card orders accepted. Closing Date: The date an application must be received by the Education Department ot be considered for an award within a particular funding cycle. All announcements of grants competitions or requests for proposals sfor contracts specify closing dates. These dates are roughly the same for each year a program is in operation. Commerce Business Daily. A publication issued every weekday by the U.S. Department of Commerce, listing all federal procurement invitations, including the Education Department’s requests for proposals for contracts. This publication is available in major libraries or by subscription from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. Current price is $160 annually, by first class mail, or $81 annually by regular mail. (Six-month subscriptions available at $88 by first class mail, $45 by regular mail.) Checks should be payable to Superintendent of Documents; Visa and Master Card orders accepted. Contact. An award of money to carry out a specific task for a government agency, as described in a request for proposal (RFP) published in the Commerce Business Daily. Contracts are awarded to bidders submitting proposals that best meet the requirements of the announced work, within a competitive budget range. Currently unfunded programs. Once Congress has authorized legislation, funds must be appropriated in order for the legislation to be carried out. However, appropriations are not always forthcoming immediately following the passage of legislation, and previously authorized or funded programs are sometimes dropped from annual appropriation acts. (Some programs authorized by Congress are never funded.) In this Guide, when an authorized program is currently unfunded, that fact will be indicated by the words “currently unfunded” in parentheses after the program description. Federal Register. A publication issued every weekday by the U.S. General Services Administration, listing all federal agency regulations and legal notices, including details of all federal grants competitions. Available in most major libraries and by subscription from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. Current price is $300 annually by regular mail, $150 for six months by regular mail. (Double these amounts for first class mail.) Checks should be payable to Superintendent of Documents; Visa and Master Card orders accepted. Grants. In direct grant or discretionary programs, awards are granted directly to those whose applications best meet the criteria for the work, as set out in the regulations of the federal agency published in the Federal Register. State formula grants, or entitlement grants, are made to the states in accordance with a formula based on the numbers of children or students to be served, or on the amounts of federal or state money available. In state-administered grants, the state itself is the grantee and may award grants to subgrantees on either a discretionary or formula basis. Local education agency. An agency that exercises control over the public schools in a specific area within a state or territory (usually called a school district). Postsecondary school. Any public or private education institution of higher education beyond the secondary level, including two- and four-year colleges, technical schools, and universities. State education agency. An agency that oversees all public education within a state or territory, usually called a state department of education.

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