Link between agricultural pesticides and incidence of prostate cancer – News and Notes

Link between agricultural pesticides and incidence of prostate cancer – News and Notes – Brief Article

The Agricultural Health Study (AHS), a long-term study of pesticide applicators and their spouses, has discovered exposure to certain agricultural pesticides may be associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer among pesticide applicators. The study is being conducted by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and the Environmental Protection Agency and includes 55,332 subjects from North Carolina and Iowa who were followed for around 4.3 years. The study concluded that methyl bromide, a fumigant gas used nationally to protect crops from pests in the soil and to fumigate grain bins and other agricultural storage areas, was linked to the risk of prostate cancer in the entire group. Exposure to six other pesticides was associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer only among men with a family history of the disease. Current cases will continue to be followed and new trends will be looked for as the study continues.

More information on the AHS is available at their homepage: http://www.aghealth.org. More information of findings of AHS is available at http://cancer.gov /newscenter/pressreleases/Agricultural Health Study.

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