Osteoarthritis; Prevention

Osteoarthritis; Prevention

While many osteoarthritis risk factors-being female, older and having a genetic predisposition-cannot be changed, you can work on several other risk factors to lower your risk of developing the condition:

* Obesity. Losing extra weight and exercising can help people with osteoarthritis. Most importantly, weight loss may reduce the risk of developing osteoarthritis of the knee in overweight or obese people.

* On-the-job injuries. Taking precautions to avoid repetitive joint use and resulting joint injury in the occupational setting can help prevent osteoarthritis.

* Sports injuries. Using recommended prevention strategies (warm-ups, strengthening exercises and appropriate equipment) helps to avoid joint injuries and damage to ligaments and cartilage, all of which can increase the risk of osteoarthritis.

In studies of older women, scientists found a lower risk of osteoarthritis in those who had used oral estrogens for postmenopausal hormone therapy. The researchers suspect that low estrogen levels could increase risk for the disease. Further studies are needed to answer this question.

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Editorial Staff of the National Women’s Health Resource Center 2002/02/01 2005/03/16 There are more than 100 different kinds of arthritis, which literally means joint inflammation. About 70 million Americans are afflicted, and more than half of those have osteoarthritis, by far the most common form, especially among older people. Arthroscopy,Bone spurs,Bouchard’s nodes,Heberden’s nodes,Hyaluronic acid,joint inflammation,Osteoarthritis,Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

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