Seeking help from within: I talk to myself all the time. But far from making me crazy, I think it’s the thing that keeps me sane

Seeking help from within: I talk to myself all the time. But far from making me crazy, I think it’s the thing that keeps me sane – What’s on My Mind

Rachel Streit

THIS MORNING I WAS DRIVING to my chiropractor for an 8 a.m. appointment. I was a little late and worried that I would have trouble finding a parking space. I was angry at myself because I had wanted to get to this appointment early so I could then get to the office early and get a jump on all the work on my desk.

I saw a spot to park and darted over to it–nearly cutting off a delivery truck. I parked, quickly grabbed two quarters for the meter, and, as I was attempting to spring out of the car, jammed my thumb on the steering wheel, bending the nail back slightly. It hurt. Why does this always happen to me, I thought.

“It’s because you’re rushing too much. You’re trying to do too much at once,” I said out loud to myself. “Why don’t you give yourself a break?”

I’d had a good idea. Why didn’t I give myself a break? And with that simple suggestion, I felt much of the tension that had been building in my mind (and my neck and shoulders) ease. I took a deep breath. And I calmly walked to my chiropractor.

I often give myself good ideas. I also give myself pep talks. Tell myself not to take things personally. Remind myself to keep a good perspective on problems. I even tell myself jokes.

I know that might sound odd. But I’ve never set out to talk to myself. I think it’s just my way of stopping myself when I get too harried and need to regain balance.

Natural Health has long explored nontraditional ways of making yourself feel better, and these ways often involve listening to yourself and doing what feels right. This issue is no exception. One inspiring story features a woman who recovered from a hip ailment in part by expressing herself creatively (see “Create a Healthy You,” page 52). Another woman was able to overcome the emotional pain and trauma of a rape by adopting and raising two dogs (see “Rescued by My Dogs,” page 40).

I hope you enjoy these stories and that Natural Health is able to help you find your own unique way of achieving wellness.

Wishing you good health,

RACHEL STREIT

Editor in Chief

COPYRIGHT 2002 Weider Publications

COPYRIGHT 2002 Gale Group