A new drug for rheumatoid arthritis?

A new drug for rheumatoid arthritis?

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) causes pain and disability in people whose immune systems mistakenly cause their bodies’ T cells to create inflammation. Current treatments range from anti-inflammatory drugs for mild cases to immune system suppressors like corticosteroids for more severe cases. Obviously, a suppressed immune system makes a person more susceptible to other diseases. An experimental drug called dnaJP1, developed by Salvatore Albani, MD, PhD, of the University of California, San Diego, has been found to be an ingenious and effective alternative in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. The drug, taken orally, makes T cells more accepting of the triggers that cause inflammation, helping to control one function of the immune system without restraining it as a whole. Dr. Albani presented his current findings at the Frontiers of Clinical Investigation Symposium in September.

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