Detecting hypnotically altered states of consciousness

Detecting hypnotically altered states of consciousness

Wickramsekera, Ian II

Naish, P. (2005). Detecting hypnotically altered states of consciousness. Contemporary Hypnosis, 22(1), 24-30. “The non-veridical experiences associated with hypnosis, which are clearly at variance with reality, are a clue that the hypnotized person has ceased to test the validity of experiences,” Naish says (p. 24). He notes that brain mapping studies have implicated the anterior cingulate gyrus as a key region in hypnotic misperceptions-a region that when damaged can cause patients to have difficulty distinguishing real from imaginary experiences. He believes that these observations support the claim that hypnosis entails an abandonment of reality testing, and he argues that an altered state of consciousness is an inevitable consequence of ceasing to test reality. He suggests possible ways of researching this altered state. Address for reprints: Peter L. N. Naish, Dept. of Psychology, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA, United Kingdom. E-mail: P.Naish@open.ac.uk

Copyright American Society of Clinical Hypnosis Jul 2005

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