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Renascence

Graham Greene, Evelyn Waugh and Mexico

Graham Greene, Evelyn Waugh and Mexico Brennan, Michael G 1. “It is before you cross a frontier that you experience fear” (Graham Greene) IN 1951, the year in which The End of the Affair was published, Graham Greene also contributed a five-page introduction to John Gerard: The Autobiography of an Elizabethan, translated by Father Philip […]

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Renascence

THE REASONABLE USE OF THE UNREASONABLE

ANAGOGICAL VISION AND COMEDIC FORM IN FLANNERY O’CONNOR: THE REASONABLE USE OF THE UNREASONABLE Askin, Denise T FLANNERY O’Connor warns in Mystery and Manners that unless the scholar can “apprehend the form, he will never apprehend anything else about the work, except what is extrinsic to it as literature” (129). Her creative instincts drew her […]

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Renascence

The gift of narrative in Muriel Spark’s The Only Problem and The Comforters

“The latter end of job”: The gift of narrative in Muriel Spark’s The Only Problem and The Comforters Christensen, Bryce THE number of commentaries on the Old Testament Book of Job runs into the thousands-and with good reason. As a work of great power and scope, this ancient Hebrew poem raises the profoundest questions about […]

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Renascence

Margaret Edson’s play and John Donne’s poetry

Wit, pride and the resurrection: Margaret Edson’s play and John Donne’s poetry Sykes, John D Jr FOR reasons internal and external to Margaret Edson’s play Wit, it is easy to miss the serious dialogue with John Donne’s poetry to be found in it. Internally, the last utterance we hear from the dying scholar on the […]

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Renascence

problematic relation between reason and emotion in Hamlet, The

problematic relation between reason and emotion in Hamlet, The Levy, Eric HAMLET opens on a state of incipient alarum, with martial vigilance on the battlemented “platform” (act 1, scene 2, line 252) of Elsinore and conspicuous “post-haste and rummage in the land” (1.1.110).1 For the sentries, this apprehension is heightened by the entrances of the […]

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Renascence

Shakespeare’s conception of moral order in Macbeth

Shakespeare’s conception of moral order in Macbeth Tufts, Carol Strongin SHAKESPEARE’S CONCEPTION OF MORAL ORDER IN MACBETH FOR all the debate over the character of Macbeth-Is he truly a tragic figure, or little more than a criminal, a butcher?-and the nature and function of the witches-Are they agents of the Devil, of Fate, or the […]

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Renascence

JANE EYRE AND THE TRADITION OF SELF ASSERTION; OR, BRONTË’S SOCIALIZATION OF SCHILLER’S “PLAY AESTHETIC”

JANE EYRE AND THE TRADITION OF SELF ASSERTION; OR, BRONTË’S SOCIALIZATION OF SCHILLER’S “PLAY AESTHETIC” Weele, Michael Vander WE all know there are times to get angry and times to restrain anger, times to pursue love and times to resist it, times to question, perhaps even contradict, our doctor, and times to trust her recommended […]

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Renascence

BIBLICAL FOUNDATION OF JAMES BALDWIN’S “SONNY’S BLUES”, THE

BIBLICAL FOUNDATION OF JAMES BALDWIN’S “SONNY’S BLUES”, THE Tackach, James SONNY’S Blues” is James Baldwin’s most anthologized and most critically discussed short story. Most critical analyses of “Sonny’s Blues” have centered on the story’s unnamed narrator’s identity issues (Bieganowski, Reid, Murray) and Baldwin’s use of blues / jazz music within the story (Jones, Sherard, Byerman, […]

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Renascence

Beowulf, the Old Testament, and the regula fidei

Beowulf, the Old Testament, and the regula fidei Cain, Christopher M NINETEENTH-CENTURY criticism of Beowulf generally focused upon the task of pointing out the Germanic components of the work’s a priori designation as an “essentially heathen poem” (Blackburn 1). In the first decades of this century, Frederick Klaeber argued against this view and proposed that […]

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Renascence

C.S. Lewis and the scholarship of imagination in E. Nesbit and Rider Haggard

C.S. Lewis and the scholarship of imagination in E. Nesbit and Rider Haggard Nicholson, Mervyn To explore the scholarship of imagination as C. S. Lewis practiced it, it is useful to begin with two poetic and striking passages. The first is from Lewis’ great book The Voyage of the Dawn Treader Caspian, the Narnian, expresses […]