Built-in beds – Custom Touches

Built-in beds – Custom Touches

Shelley D. Hutchins

A built-in bed takes optimum advantage of a frequently used piece of furniture by incorporating efficient features like drawers, TV cabinets, lighting, and bookshelves. Such a multi-tasking design fulfills diverse homeowner needs yet also offers inviting refuge. Phil Regan, principal at Mark Hutker Associates Architects in Vineyard Haven, Mass., lauds built-in beds as both space-saving and house-warming devices. “The scale is so comfortable and cozy that everyone immediately feels right at home.”

Norwegian Wood

These exquisitely carved twin beds traveled across the ocean they now overlook in their current home on a coastal Maine island. The entire log cabin was built in Norway for a U.S. ambassador who wanted to bring a bit of his experience back home. The colorful and ornate built-in sleeping nook brightens the room’s expanse of unfinished wood. Everything is connected–the platform flows into the beds’ footboards, side rails merge into a shared nightstand, and corner posts climb the walls to hold the gently curved canopy. Knowing where the beds were to ultimately rest, Norwegian carpenters carved waves of blue-green painted wood crested with yellow foam flourishes. Photographer: Brian Vanden Brink.

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Top Bunks

Six double-decker bunkbeds line the wall in this vacation home that manages to sleep 20 people in three big bedrooms. Designer/builder Steve Cappellucci’s model for the stacked compartments was a Pullman sleeper car. Each cubby has its own light and a set of operable drapes in case one of the occupants wants to sleep in. Even though the Almont, Colo., home is a timber frame mountain lodge, the owners wanted an elegant French country theme. Cappellucci translated their request into scalloped detailing on the pine trim and a pale blue wash on the ceiling that extends into the interior of the bunks. “Built-in beds usually work best in kids’ rooms or vacation houses,” explains Cappellucci. “They’re handy, and they add a friendly ambiance.” Builder/designer: Spring Creek Timber Construction, Almont, Colo; Photographer: Brad Simmons.

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Studio Sleeper

Tucked under the eaves of this Tenants Harbor, Maine, residence, a built-in daybed primarily serves as a sunny spot for reading or resting. The 16-by-16-foot room where it’s located is the owner’s studio–full of natural light from a windowed cupola and mostly devoid of furniture except for the built-in. When guests stay at the lakeside home, they sleep comfortably on the 3-by-6-foot bed with its water views. A track just above holds a curtain that can be drawn for privacy. Bookshelves are tucked away in a recessed alcove while drawers below hold bedding and art supplies. “I brought the home’s simplicity into the studio through the trim, which is very understated but upsized,” says architect John Silverio. Builder: Frank MacGrogan, Thomaston, Maine; Architect: John Silverio, Architect, Lincolnville, Maine; Photographer: Brian Vanden Brink.

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Write Style

“The property was deemed unbuildable,” explains architect Phil Regan, “but after an arduous process the owners were finally allowed to build a 1,500-square-foot cottage that couldn’t exceed 20 feet in height.” In order to fit everything his clients wanted into the Martha’s Vineyard, Mass., vacation home, Regan forced double duty on every square inch of space. One of many built-ins, this bed is situated on the second-story landing just outside the master bedroom. Regan says the location was selected because the wife is a writer and works primarily in the secluded bedroom. “The concept is that if she were busy writing and didn’t want to be interrupted, the husband could sleep on this daybed just outside the bedroom and steps from the master bath,” says Regan. Builder: Serpa Construction, Edgartown, Mass.; Architect: Mark Hutker & Associates Architects, Vineyard Haven, Mass. Photographer: Brian Vanden Brink.

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Flip Side

When Maine boat builder Alex Kayner designed and built a home on land (albeit overlooking the water) it made sense that he would want to build something that integrates the clever techniques used in boat design. In his music room/ study/guest room, Kayner created a long bench that flips forward to reveal a strapped-in, full-size mattress. The transforming built-in is made from the same natural pine that lines most of the house. Matching pine boxes on either end serve as end tables while concealing the nautical hardware used to operate the bed. Builder/designer: Alex Kayner, Bar Harbor, Maine; Photographer: Brian Vanden Brink.

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Restful Retreat

The restoration of an 1800s Federal-style home in Cooperstown, N.Y., included an improved plan for this diminutive 9-by-10-foot guest bedroom. Before designer Allen Ransome came along, the bedroom was bursting at the seams with furniture. “I took this streamlined idea from a room I had seen years ago in a Swiss mountain cottage,” says Ransome. The bed is taller than normal to accommodate extra storage underneath while cabinet doors at the foot open to reveal a TV and VCR. Twin reading lamps provide soft lighting while the dropped soffit makes the space feel like a snug hideaway. Taking cues from the home’s historic roots, Ransome speced beadboard in natural pine on the interior of the cubby. The same beadboard is painted with all official Colonial green on the exterior surround. Ransome even had a special duvet cover made that exactly fits the queen-size mattress. Builder/designer: Ransome Van Syoc, New York City; Photographer: Brad Simmons.

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COPYRIGHT 2003 Hanley-Wood, Inc.

COPYRIGHT 2003 Gale Group