Energy Inefficiencies Force Data Centers to Re-Evaluate Existing Power Infrastructure

Energy Inefficiencies Force Data Centers to Re-Evaluate Existing Power Infrastructure

PALO ALTO, Calif. — The Energy & Power Systems group at Frost & Sullivan is pleased to announce its 2008 Quarterly Analyst Briefing Presentation on the North American power supplies and battery market to be held on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 at 12:00 p.m. PDT.

Improving power solution offerings at facility, rack and server levels address pressures to resolve energy inefficiency issues. Dynamic, heterogeneous environments where power requirements vary significantly according to site size, server configuration, and physical layout characterize the data center sector. Frost & Sullivan classifies the data center space into small, medium, and large based on the number of racks and servers. In-depth end-user surveys identify common traits among these end users. Common traits include end-user preferences for power layout, power requirements per rack, row and facility.

Frost & Sullivan recognizes the dynamic nature for data centers and will produce an update of this multi-client study. Previous research looked at UPS systems and precision air cooling. Current research, however, digs deeper into how end users resolve energy inefficiency problems. End-users look at the entire power infrastructure including software used to monitor, measure, and control power consumption.

This briefing will benefit power equipment manufacturers, server OEMs, utilities that propose power solutions to solve energy inefficiencies and improve data center operations. Highlights include discussion of a typical data center power infrastructure, UPS power trends by data center size, research methodology, and insight on the upcoming data center project.

“Over the past three years, the power supplies and battery market has been on alarm about risk associated with maxing out data center capacity due to bandwidth expansions, and blade servers impact on thermal loads. As a result, the industry has seen a wealth of both hardware and software products that promise better management and control of power. The question remains, what are customers likely to accept and why,” observes Frost & Sullivan Senior Consultant Farah Saeed.

To participate, please e-mail Johanna Haynes, Corporate Communications, at johanna.haynes@frost.com with the following information: your full name, title, company name, company telephone number, company e-mail address, city, state and country. Upon receipt of the above information, a registration link will be e-mailed to you. You may also register to receive a recorded version of the briefing at anytime by submitting the aforementioned contact details.

Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, partners with clients to accelerate their growth. The company’s Team Research, Growth Consulting and Growth Team Membership empower clients to create a growth focused culture that generates, evaluates and implements effective growth strategies. Frost & Sullivan employs over 45 years of experience in partnering with Global 1000 companies, emerging businesses and the investment community from more than 30 offices on six continents. For more information about Frost & Sullivan’s Growth Partnerships, visit http://www.frost.com.

COPYRIGHT 2008 Business Wire

COPYRIGHT 2008 Gale, Cengage Learning