Fahrenheit 9/11

Fahrenheit 9/11

Chris Chang

FILM COMMENT’s May/June cover proclaimed it “Movie of the Year.” So why didn’t it fare as well in the year-end wrap-up? Because it’s actually two films. The first existed in a time of sensed opportunity fired by desperate need. Watching it before Nov. 3 the message was clear: no one in their right mind, given access to the ever-tightening noose of factoids Mr. Moore assembled and then unleashed in a thundering squall of damnation, will be able to accept the consequences of a second term for a president who has cornered the market on duplicity. Well, we should have remembered: never say “no one.” After the “Halloween election,” Moore’s movie became something else entirely. If you live in the land of the blue, you are strongly advised to avoid it now. Nonetheless, considered alongside likeminded endeavors by Jon Stewart, Al Franken, and other denizens of the learned barb, it is indicative of a zeitgeist trend: comedy is the new tregedy.

COPYRIGHT 2005 Film Society of Lincoln Center

COPYRIGHT 2005 Gale Group