Role of Jewish artists in shaping American Art is focus of centennial exhibition

Role of Jewish artists in shaping American Art is focus of centennial exhibition

As one of its special exhibitions during its centennial year, The Jewish Museum is currently presenting “My America: Art from The Jewish Museum Collection, 1900-1955.”

The exhibition focuses on the years of 1900-1955, a period of great social and artistic activity, and includes more than 70 works–painting, sculpture, photographs and works on paper–by 46 artists such as Theresa Bernstein, Ilse Bing, Albert Bloch, Adolph Gottlieb, Jacques Lipchitz, Morris Louis, Robert Motherwell, Elie Nadelman, Arnold Newman, Larry Rivers, Ben Shahn, Aaron, Siskind, Raphael Soyer, Alfred Stiglitz, Max Weber and Weegee.

For much of the first half of the 20th century, Jewish artists became involved with social and intellectual change. Many used the aesthetic innovations of modernism to break away from their specific cultural and religious backgrounds or to embrace their religious traditions. Some made art that confronted established ideas of American society, art, culture and history.

The exhibit is divided into five thematic sections: Becoming American; Striving for Social Justice; Picturing Ourselves; Reacting to Tragedy; and Moving Towards Abstraction.

SHOW FACTS

My America: Art from The Jewish Museum Collection, 1900-1955

Through July 25

The Jewish Museum

Address: 1109 Fifth Ave. New York, NY

Phone: (212) 423-3200

Web site: www.thejewishmuseum.org

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